News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
Click for classifieds of Oneonta, Cooperstown, and all of Otsego County. Click for jobs in Oneonta, Cooperstown, and all of Otsego County. Click for dining, entertainment, and things to do in Oneonta, Cooperstown, and all of Otsego County. Click for real estate listings in Oneonta, Cooperstown, and all of OTsego County. click for cars, trucks, and other vehicles in oneonta, cooperstown, and all of otsego county. click for funeral homes, flower shops, and other businesses that specialize in= remembrance in oneonta, cooperstown, and all of otsego county. Click for more great ads from local businesses in Oneonta, Cooperstown, and all of Otsego County.

climate change

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAY 16
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAY 16

Hanford Mills Opening Day!!!

14-19eventspage

OPENING DAY – 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Kick of the 45th season the museum with guided tours of the water-powered sawmill, gristmill, woodworking workshop. Admission $9/adult. Hanford Mills Museum, 51 Co. Hwy. 12, East Meredith. Call 607-278-5744 or visit www.hanfordmills.org

BE INFORMED! – 6:30 – 8 p.m. Learn about food gardens, including what plants are best for our climate, when to start planting and how to care for your garden. Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. Call 607-282-4087 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/be-informed-lecture-series-food-gardens/

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
KUZMINSKI: More Gas? Only If Paired With Equal-Sized Renewable Project

Column by Adrian Kuzminski, May 5, 2018

More Gas? Only If Paired With
Equal-Sized Renewable Project

Adrian Kuzminski

When fracking was proposed in New York State a decade ago, the potential benefits were jobs, economic growth, lower energy prices, and energy security.
Opponents (like me) worried not only about local degradation of the environment but about the global consequences of methane seepage and emissions for the climate as a whole.
In most places outside of New York State, the frackers won the argument, and in fact much of what they claimed has come to pass.
Vast new reserves have been opened up by fracking, perhaps even more than anticipated. The United States has moved from deep energy dependence on often unfriendly foreign sources to a greater degree of energy self-sufficiency.
The US has become a net exporter of natural gas and is now able to leverage its new energy resources in foreign policy negotiations. Fracking has sparked renewed economic activity and a sense of energy security has been restored.
But the cost of these short-terms gains may yet overwhelm us. Professor Anthony Ingraffea from Cornell has a sobering new video on YouTube: “Shale Gas: The Technological Gamble That Should Not Have Been Taken.” Check it out; go to youtube.com and type “technological gamble” in the search line.
Ingraffea goes back six years and compares the climate change predictions made by a range of experts then with the latest data now available.
The new evidence shows those predictions to have been wide of the mark in the worst possible way. Global warming is happening much faster than predicted.

Cornell Professor Anthony Ingraffea’s conclusion in 2013 that natural gas contributes more to global warming than other fossil fuels changed the debate.

Ingraffea puts the blame for accelerating climate change squarely on the fracking revolution. As its critics have worried all along, the overall greenhouse emissions of fracked natural gas turn out to be as bad if not worse than any other fossil fuel.
Fracking has not been the “bridge fuel” the industry advocated. Ingraffea points out that fracking has extended the fossil fuel age, dramatically increased global warming, and, by providing continued low-priced gas and oil, frustrated the development of renewables.

This issue is playing out locally as well. There’s an energy crunch in Oneonta, with NYSEG interrupting gas service to some of their larger customers (SUNY, Fox, and some local businesses) because of limited supply.
In spite of the fracking boom in neighboring Pennsylvania, the infrastructure for delivering more gas in the Oneonta area right now doesn’t exist. The secondary pipeline serving the area isn’t big enough to meet demand.
The same arguments for the benefits of fracked gas used a decade ago are once again in circulation by those calling for more gas: It’ll bring jobs, stability, and economic growth.
Without a functioning economy we have social chaos, it’s true; but without environmental protections we have eco-catastrophe.
Transitioning to renewables remains the unavoidable answer in both cases. Renewables address the climate issue while providing economic relief with
jobs in the new industries we so desperately need. But it’s not happening fast enough.
That’s a political problem – one unfortunately not about to be solved.
The gas proponents now, as before, are focused on short-term benefits and seem oblivious to the bigger threat. Those who appreciate the long-term threat, on the other hand, have no immediate and practical solutions to the energy challenge.
Yes, of course, we must transition to renewables ASAP, but it’s not just a matter of effortlessly dropping one energy source and plugging in another.
There are serious technical problems (limits to electrical applications, intermittent power and inadequate electricity storage) and financial ones (funding the required large-scale infrastructure changes).
It’s time to recognize both the urgency of climate change as well as the need to buy some time to put in place technologies and financing that can transition us to renewables as quickly as possible.
It’s time to recognize both that the unintended consequences of gas may be worse than the problems it solves, and that those suffering from economic insecurity can’t afford to wait around indefinitely for promised but undelivered jobs in renewable energy.
What’s needed is restraint and prudence. Until we get to renewables, we’re clearly going to continue to overheat the planet to keep the economy going and avoid social breakdown.
How much more warming can we stand? It’s not clear, but major new pipelines and gas power plants are climate-denying projects that promise to take us over the edge.
In the meantime, we have growing local economic distress which might be relieved by delivering more gas to Oneonta by enlarging its existing pipeline.
Improving that pipeline and its capacity would clearly boost the local economy; a redone pipeline might also be more efficient.
But any expansion of gas consumption, even a small one like this, can no longer be justified unless correlated with a funded renewable energy project of at least the same scale.
Nothing less is acceptable any more.

Kuzminski, a retired Hartwick College philosophy professor and moderator of Sustainable Otsego, lives in Fly Creek.

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAY 3
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAY 3

Oneonta Student Art Show

14-19eventspage

ART SHOW – 5-6:30 p.m. Art exhibit featuring works by students of the Oneonta City School District opens at Fox Care Center, Oneonta. Info, www.oneontacsd.org

DEBATE – 7 p.m. The Candidates for the CCS Board of Education will debate each other and answer questions from the audience. Hosted by the League of Women Voters. Jr./Sr. Library, Cooperstown High School. Info, www.cooperstowncs.org/league-of-women-voters-to-hose-board-of-education-candidates-debate/

CLIMATE CHANGE LECTURE – 7 p.m. “US Energy Transition: The Plight of Fossil Fuels and the Rise of Renewables.” A talk by Village Trustee Lou Alstadt on the urgent need to confront climate change by adopting a national carbon tax and dividend policy. Templeton Hall, 63 Pioneer St., Cooperstown. Info, Adrian Kuzminski, moderator, Sustainable Otsego, adriankuzminski@gmail.com

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, APRIL 20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, APRIL 20

Otsego Folklore And History

14-19eventspage

LECTURE – 7:30 p.m. Bruce Buckley series presents Robert Baron speaking on “Contemporary Resonances of Mid Century Cooperstown Public Folklore and Public History.” The Fenimore Art Museum Auditorium, Cooperstown. Info, Amanda Berman bermal72@oneonta.edu

TEEN SCENE – 5:30-7:30 p.m. Teens meet to discuss events that are important to them. This months meeting will have a Paint & Dip in which teens will paint a pattern with a twist of their own. Led by artist Diane Stensland. Reservations required. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. Info, visit www.familyrn.org/news_events/event_calendar.html/event/2017/04/20/1492727400/teen-scene/153288 or contact Kristin Winn, info@familyrn.org or call (607)432-0001

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
1Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, NOV. 20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, NOV. 20

With Santa, Decorate

Downtown Cooperstown

14-19eventspage

To Learn How You Can Help Area Families This Holiday Season CLICK HERE.

SANTA’S COTTAGE –2 p.m. Decorating Party. Help Cooperstown Committee decorate Santa’s cottage and the village lampposts for the holidays. All decorations provided; please bring wirecutters, gloves, and ladders, if available. Meet in Pioneer Park. Free photo of your family in front of Santa’s Cottage as a thank you. To reserve a pole, email Meg Kiernan, megk@oecblue.com Meet in Pioneer Park, Cooperstown.

FILM SERIES –2 p.m. “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” (1952). Fenimore Auditorium, 5798 NY-80, Cooperstown fenimoreartmuseum.org/fenimore/films

CELEBRATE NATIVE AMERICAN MONTH – 1 p.m. Roger Longtoe Sheehan, Chief of the El Nu Abenaki tribe of Vermont, will tell traditional tales and display tools and crafts of Northeastern woodland cultures. Program is free and open to the public. Suny Oneonta College Camp Lodge, 119 Hoffman Rd., Oneonta. For more info call 436-3455 or CLICK HERE.

PROGRAM – 3 p.m. “The Very Greatest Victory: Recognizing Women’s Right to Vote in NY State” with Dr. Susan Goodler. Friends of the Village Library Lecture Series. Village Meeting room, Library, 22 Main St., Cooperstown. Info @ Sunday Programs page villagelibraryofcooperstown.org

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
As Climate Changes, Resilience Trumps Efficiency, Expert Says

As Climate Changes, Resilience

Trumps Efficiency, Expert Says

Dr. Laura Lengnick, author of "Resilient Agriculture: Cultivating Food Systems for a Changing Climate," keynotes today's annual "Celebration of Agriculture" at The Farmers' Museum's Louis Jones Center.  "Efficiency makes systems really easy to break," she said, using "just in time" distribution as an example:  Any breakdown along the supply chain disrupts the whole chain.  Farmers, she said, are can no longer depend on rainfall and temperatures and wind within general parameters.  Planners and academics studying future are concluding, "It's probably the regional scale that's the regional scale, not to the local scale," adding that New York State is on the cutting edge of such thinking and planning.  Today's program includes workshops throughout the day, all focus on climate change and farming.  (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Dr. Laura Lengnick, author of “Resilient Agriculture: Cultivating Food Systems for a Changing Climate,” keynotes today’s annual “Celebration of Agriculture” in The Farmers’ Museum’s Louis Jones Center. “Efficiency makes systems really easy to break,” she said, using “just in time” distribution as an example: Any breakdown along the supply chain disrupts the whole chain. Farmers, she said, can no longer depend on rainfall and temperatures and wind within general parameters. Planners and academics studying future are concluding, “It’s probably the regional scale that’s the resilience scale, not to the local scale,” adding that New York State is on the cutting edge of such thinking and planning. Today’s program includes workshops throughout the day, all focused on climate change and farming. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Happenin’ Otsego Saturday, Nov. 5
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY NOV. 5

Farmers Museum Conference

Examines Ag Climate Change

14-19eventspage

FOOD & FARMING CONFERENCE – 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. The Farmers’ Museum Conference on Food & Farming 2016: Climate Change & Its Impact on Farming in Central New York. Info, http://www.farmersmuseum.org/food-farm

LATINO COMMUNITY BAZAAR – 11 a.m.-4 p.m., at Cooperstown Baptist Church, Elm Street.  Everyone welcome. Offering arts, music, and activities presented by CCS Spanish classes to encourage familiarity with the Spanish language and Hispanic Culture. Everyone is encouraged to participate by bringing an item reflecting your families own immigration or migration story. Donations benefit the Children’s Home in Azacualpa, Honduras. Info, william.walker@oneonta.edu or (607)547-2586 or check out the FACEBOOK page.

CRAFT FAIR – 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Milford Central School Gym, 42 W. Main St., Milford. Info, web.milfordcentral.org

EXHIBITION – 10 a.m.-4 p.m.Final day for exhibits “Oneonta & Aviation History” and “183 Main Street: 150 Years of History.” Oneonta History Center, 183 Main St., Oneonta. Info: (607)432-0960 or http://www.oneontahistory.org/

GALA – 6:30 p.m. A.O. Fox Hospital 26th annual gala. 1920s soiree @ The Fox Speakeasy. Market style dining, open bar, benefit wine pull 6:30-8:30 p.m. Music by Blues Maneuver and The Honey Taps. Guests encouraged to dress the era. $150 per person. The Fox care Center, One Fox care Dr., Oneonta. Info, reservations: (607)431-5472, foxgala@aofmh.org or http://wzozfm.com/26th-fox-hospital-gala-features-1920s-soiree/

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2

Thinking about the Future

14-19eventspage

DINNER – 6:30 p.m. “The Future of Food: A Dinner & Conversation with the Local Youth Food Movement.” Cost: $40. Farmers Museum, 5775 NY-80, Cooperstown. Info, farmersmuseum.org/origins

 

MEETING – 4:30 p.m. SUNY Oneonta College Council meeting. Open to public. rm. 209, Physical Science Building, SUNY Oneonta, 108 Ravine pkwy. Oneonta. Info, http://www.oneonta.edu/general/collegecouncil.asp

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Program Helps NYS&W Reduce Emissions, Costs

Program Helps NYS&W

Reduce Emissions, Costs

By SAM ALDRIDGE • for www.AllOTSEGO.com

rail logoCOOPERSTOWN – The worldwide movement of climate change awareness has come home to the New York Susquehanna & Western Railroad.

The railway company, based in Cooperstown, has partnered with the state Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Department of Environmental Conversation (DEC) to install four anti-idling engines on their locomotives to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions.  The Utica-based Mohawk Adirondack and Northern is also participating.

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Cooperstown Board Lends Voice To Addressing Climate Change

 Cooperstown Board Lends Voice

To Addressing Climate Change

An early view of The Sleeping Lion, made famous in Cooper's novels, from Lake Front Park.
An early view of The Sleeping Lion, made famous in Cooper’s novels, from Lake Front Park.

COOPERSTOWN – The Village Board yesterday approved a resolution calling on officials up to the President of the United States to act to stem global warming, and to pledge Cooperstown’s help in any way it may be needed.

The vote was unanimous, although Trustee Bruce Maxson was absent.

Mayor Jeff Katz said the trustees hope that, with Glimmerglass being a symbol of nature’s purity, the village may be able to play a larger role than its size suggests in solving what is an international problem.

READ THE FULL TEXT OF THE TRUSTEES’ RESOLUTION

SHARE: News of Cooperstown, Oneonta, and Otsego County, NY.Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Share on Google+
Google+
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103