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News of Otsego County

Search Results for: november 2017

slideshow from november 2017 election night
Otsego County Board Meetings
HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 23, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 23, 2012

125 Years Ago
Yesterday afternoon, a passerby the residence of W.D. Bissell on Main Street, would at a glance have noted that something unusual was going on. The front porch of Mr. Bissell’s residence was fairly covered with baskets and large, carefully wrapped packages, and every few moments a wagon would be driven briskly up, one or more of the packages placed in it, and away it would dash again at a lively speed. Investigation revealed that the women of Oneonta – members of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, and others – were engaged in the most commendable work of supplying worthy families of the town with Thanksgiving dinners. It had somehow leaked out that it was their intention to do this, and soon they were fairly deluged with contributions from many quarters. One generous person sent six dollars in cash, another sent chickens, another turkeys, another groceries, and so on, until it became apparent that there was to be enough to supply the demand, and the work of arranging and sending out was begun in earnest. Every package or basket was supplied with vegetables in profusion and either a chicken or turkey or fine roast.
November 1887

100 Years Ago
From the indications of last night indoor baseball in the city will be a great success during the winter months. The gallery was crowded with fans who kept up a constant cheering for their favorites, and as the ninth inning closed with victory for Company G when Finley walloped the ball with a mighty stroke for the winning run, bedlam broke loose with the score 23-22. An analysis of the two teams would show that the high school team is the better fielding organization, while their heavier opponents are better with the stick. The high school has in Downing by far the best pitcher displayed, though Company G may develop a man who will prove as good. Downing pitched the entire nine innings and only walked four men. For Company G, Orr passed one, Bond gave a free ticket to four, and Westcott issued ten free passes to the initial sack.
November 1912

60 Years Ago
A total of 140 children received their initial triple vaccine shots for protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough, at the first city clinic of this season held at the health center in the Oneonta high school. In charge of the clinic was Dr. Reade S. Sisson. He was aided by Mrs. Gertrude Cornell, Mrs. Ruth Rabeler, Mrs. James Nesbitt, Mrs. Carrie Lockwood, Mrs. Gilbert Driggs, and Miss Grace Miller.
Pvt. Henry L. Hulbert of 12 Walling Blvd. has arrived at Fort Dix, N.J. and has been assigned to the 9th Infantry Division for eight weeks of basic training. Private Hulbert is the son of Burton Hulbert. Before entering the service he attended Oneonta high school, St. Lawrence University and Columbia Law School.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
Today is National Kettle Day, marking the beginning of The Salvation Army’s Christmas Appeal to give a happy Christmas to needy families. Kettles will be located in front of Bresee’s in downtown Oneonta, FBC in the west end, at Jamesway, and possibly the Pyramid Mall in the East End. Bell ringers will be out Wednesday through Saturday, December 23. The Rotary Club will be manning a kettle at Bresee’s on Saturday, December 9 and the Kiwanis Club will man it on Saturday, December 16. The Christmas letter appeal will be sent out in Oneonta on December 1. One hundred and twenty dolls have been purchased by the Army for distribution to needy children at Christmas. These dolls are dressed by local individuals and groups in the community. Canned goods are donated through the school system. That project was kicked off by Bugbee School at its annual Thanksgiving Program this past Tuesday. Canned goods will be picked up at the schools on Wednesday, December 13. The canned goods are included in food baskets made up for distribution before Christmas.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Administrators at A.O. Fox Memorial Hospital this week will begin studying suggestions dealing with a projected $2 million deficit in the hospital’s 1983 budget. Earlier this month, hospital officials announced that they may be forced to cut 50 employees from the facility’s staff to cope with the shortfall. However, they were quick to add that, whenever possible, the cuts would be made through attrition, and by not filling vacancies. The hospital currently employs about 650 people. The budget problem stems from a state decision, made in October, to place a ceiling on Medicare and Medicaid cost increases. Under the new limits hospitals would be allowed to increase medical costs covered by the two programs by 16 percent above 1981 prices for the years 1983 and 1984. Payments from Medicare and Medicaid make up roughly 70 percent of the hospital’s annual budget.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
SHARE (Self-Help & Resource Exchange) is a food cooperative that allows anyone regardless of income, to buy $35 worth of food for $14 and two hours of community service each month. SHARE, started in 1983 by an American businessman, is now found in 22 states. SHARE arrived in Otsego County about six months ago. This past Saturday, a whopping 29,205 pounds of food was handed out to area families according to Marie Lusins, coordinator of SHARE-Otsego. The food varies every month but always includes meat, fruit, vegetables and a staple such as potatoes or pasta, Lusins said.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
The meal for the Otsego County Senior Meals Program for Monday, November 25, will be: German sausage, sauerkraut and mustard; German potato salad; carrots; orange juice; hot dog roll, tapioca pudding. For Tuesday, November 26: Sliced turkey with gravy; bread stuffing; winter squash; tomato juice; rye bread; pumpkin pie. For Wednesday, November 27: Roast beef with gravy; mashed potatoes; red cabbage; pumpernickel bread; white cake with whipped topping. Thursday, November 28: Closed for Thanksgiving Day. Friday, November 29: Spaghetti and meatballs with sauce; Parmesan cheese; salad; warm garlic bread; chocolate chip cookie. Reservations must be made one day in advance.
November 2002

BOUND VOLUMES: November 19, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

November 19, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Academy: The inhabitants of Cooperstown and its vicinity are respectively informed, that the second quarter of A. Parmele’s Academy, will commence on the Twenty-first of November, inst. The strictest attention will be paid to the accommodation of Young Ladies and Gentlemen who are desirous of instruction in the following branches of Science, viz: Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar; Geography; with the use of the Globe and Atlas; History; Rhetorick; Composition; the Elements of Chemistry; Astronomy; and Geometry; and the Latin and Greek languages.
Tuition: Reading, Writing and Orthography $2.50; the higher branches of English study $3; the Languages $4, per quarter. Abiel Parmele, Cooperstown, New York.

November 20 1820

HOMETOWN HISTORY: November 12, 2020

HOMETOWN HISTORY

November 12, 2020

150 Years Ago

Oneonta Local: The first snow of the season fell here on Sunday, October 29. There was a heavy thunder shower on Thursday morning last – the sign of a hard winter.
Conductor R. V. Humphrey is preparing to build a new house on his lot opposite James Cope’s on Elm Street. The cellar is already completed for a new house.
The person who borrowed or took a copy of French’s Gazetteer of New York City from this office will confer a special favor by returning it at once. We want to use it.
D. Morrell has bought 13 acres of land of Brewer & McDonald south of the creek road adjoining James Walling’s farm, at $100 per acre. It is well worth the money.
A new street has been opened from Main Street to the railroad near Mickel & Moore’s Foundry, and W. McCrum is erecting a new house thereon. He expects to erect another on the same street next spring.
H. Houghton has bought Perry Bennett’s lots on West Street – 11 acres at $850. The raspberry plantation on it will more than pay the interest and taxes on the place, but it will soon be wanted for building lots.

November 1870

HOMETOWN HISTORY: November 5, 2020

HOMETOWN HISTORY

November 5, 2020

150 Years Ago

Oneonta Local: Heavy white frost covers the ground these mornings.
Another new engine, the “Schoharie” came up the road on Monday last.
Jay McDonald has commenced the new home of  Albert Morris on Walnut Street which is to be pushed, until it is done.
C.H. Bundy of New Lisbon has erected and nearly finished a fine dwelling for Erastus Walling, on Oneonta Creek, It is by far the best house in the valley.

November 1870

BOUND VOLUMES, November 15, 2012

BOUND VOLUMES, November 15, 2012

200 YEARS AGO
Obituary – Died at Schlosser, in this state, on October 29th, Mr. Vine Griffin, late of this village, aged 21 years. Mr. Griffin belonged to the detachment of militia which was called into the service of the United States from this county. Impelled by devotion to his country, he voluntarily bid adieu to his friends and home, and dedicated himself to her service. His manly and social virtues, conciliated the friendship and esteem of his companions in arms; and his merit, activity, and faithful discharge of his duty as a soldier, early attracted the notice of his superiors, and were rewarded by promotion. Frankness, generosity, sincerity, benevolence, sensibility to the woes of others, and a sense of honor which rendered him incapable of a mean action – these were virtues which strongly marked his character, and endeared him to his associates. A numerous circle of friends condole with his afflicted relatives on this melancholy occasion.
November 14, 1812

175 YEARS AGO
Excerpts from a Proclamation by William Marcy, Governor of the State of New York – During the past season, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations has liberally dispensed his benefactions to the people of this State. Together with the full enjoyment of the rights of conscience, with public tranquility, and the increase and diffusion of knowledge, they continue to be blessed with civil institutions admirably calculated to secure, in the highest degree, their social happiness and the benefits of a free government. The dealings of Divine Providence with us, as individuals and as a political community, have been in other respects distinguished by unusual kindness and liberality. We have been mercifully exempted from those calamities which are frequently permitted to afflict nations; we have enjoyed an unusual degree of public health; and have been favored with a fruitful season and a plenteous harvest. I do therefore, in conformity to established usage, appoint Thursday, the 30th of November next, as a day of public Thanksgiving, and respectfully recommend its due observance as such to the good people of this state. W.L. Marcy.
November 13, 1837

150 YEARS AGO
There are few people in Washington who know of the great amount of business done here in the buying of Government horses. Away beyond the President’s House and south of the enclosure devoted to Washington’s equestrian statue known as the “Circle,” and adjoining the Observatory Grounds in the First Ward of the city, is an immense series of shops, yards and stables call the “Government Horse Corral.” At this place all the Army horses and mules are bought and inspected; sick and worn-out animals put in hospitals; wagons repaired and teams furnished the army and the commissaries that send supplies to it. There are over 8,000 men employed in these shops, and the cost of labor and material is nearly $40,000 a month. There have been as many as 19,000 horses and mules in the corrals at one time, and the daily average is 15,000.
November 14, 1862

125 YEARS AGO
The County of Otsego has a voting population of about 15,000. It is estimated that about 14,000 will be polled. The two parties are evenly balanced. When it is remembered that Otsego went Democratic in 1876 by 168, Republican in ’78 by 377, Democratic in ’79 by 62 on Governor and 100 Republican on Lieutenant-Governor, Democratic in 1880 by 28, Democratic in ’85 by 72, Republican in ’86 by 53, it will readily be conceded that the county is about as near a tie as well can be, and that neither party can claim a majority.
November 11, 1887

75 YEARS AGO
Members of the Cooperstown high school football team, fresh from their victory over the Oneonta high school eleven the preceding Saturday, were guests of honor at the regular luncheon of the Rotary Club at the Cooper Inn on Tuesday. They had the pleasure of hearing an address by Lieutenant Conrad F. Necrason of the United States Army Aviation Corps who related his experiences since he was graduated here in 1932. “Connie,” as the Lieutenant is known to everyone here, spent a year at Lafayette College and then entered West Point, where he starred on a couple of great Army elevens, graduated with honor and then entered the air corps. He has completed his training and is now home on leave before going to the Philippines where he has been stationed.
November 17, 1937

50 YEARS AGO
A capacity crowd was present at the joint meeting of the Woman’s Club of Cooperstown and the Criterion Club on Wednesday, November 7, at the Fenimore House. Bridal gowns of interest to all the ladies were displayed in a “Brides Through the Years” program. Gowns dating back to 1849 and as late as 1957 were featured. Mrs. William H. Sheffield, Jr. narrated. James Millen played organ music with appropriate old to new numbers for the gowns modeled. It was a marvel that the oldest gown, a 113-year-old embroidered silk, was still in perfect condition. The gown was originally worn by the grandmother of Mrs. George M. MacKenzie of Bowerstown.
November 14, 1962

25 YEARS AGO
A fire of undetermined origin destroyed The Market Place at 93 Main St. The blaze also did considerable smoke and water damage to The Cupboard located next door at 91 Main Street. The fire broke out at 11 p.m. Sunday evening. The first alarm was reported when Blake Hayes noticed smoke coming out of the front of the building. The business office of the Glimmerglass Opera lost its files and equipment. The building is owned by William Pepper.
November 18, 1987
10 YEARS AGO
First-year teacher Lindsay Hayes will direct the CCS student production of “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown,” based on the late Charles Schultz’s comic strip “Peanuts.” Hayes, who was hired in August, said she had always planned to be an elementary school teacher and direct a high school musical. “Those two things happened within two weeks of each other and I never expected that, so I’m dealing. It’s fun.”
November 15, 2002

BOUND VOLUMES, November 22, 2012

BOUND VOLUMES, November 22, 2012

200 YEARS AGO
Advertisement – Ambrose L. Jordan and Samuel Birdsall, have formed a connection in the practice of law: Their office is one door south of Phinney’s Bookstore, in the village of Cooperstown, where commands relative to the profession will be executed with pleasure. Cooperstown, November 14, 1812. (Ed. Note: Ambrose L. Jordan was the father of Caroline Jordan, who, as a young girl, attended school in Cooperstown. Jordan left the village in 1819 for a law practice in the Hudson Valley, later serving as New York’s Attorney-General. In the early 1830s, Edward Clark became Jordan’s law partner and married his daughter Caroline. In the late 1840s, Edward Clark represented Isaac Singer in patent lawsuits over rights to the workings of sewing machines. By the mid-1850s Edward Clark and Isaac Singer had become business partners in the Singer Sewing Machine Co. In 1856, Caroline Jordan Clark persuaded her husband to purchase the farm then known as Apple Hill as a summer residence. Today, the property located on the east side of River Street is known as Fernleigh, the residence of Jane Forbes Clark, the Great-Great-Great Granddaughter of Ambrose Jordan, and Great-Great Granddaughter of Edward Clark and Caroline Jordan Clark.)
November 21, 1812

175 YEARS AGO
Smoking & Snuff – Tobacco belongs to the class of drugs called narcotics, and is possessed of the most noxious qualities. The excessive use of tobacco, in whatever shape it is taken, heats the blood, hurts digestion, wastes the fluids, and relaxes the nerves. Smoking is particularly injurious to lean, hectic, and hypochondriacal persons; it creates an unusual thirst, leading to the use of spirituous liquors; it increases indolence and confirms the lazy in the habits they have acquired; above all it is pernicious to the young, laying the foundation of future misery.
November 20, 1837

150 YEARS AGO
The double iron building erected by Mr. Geo. L. Bowne, formerly of Key West, is one of the most elegant structures of the kind in the state. The cast iron front is the work of Mr. James Bogardus of New York, who claims to be the original inventor of buildings of this kind. It is of the Corinthian style of architecture, beautiful in all its proportions. The plate glass for the front, in panes three and one-half by ten and one-half feet and cost about $700. The sides and end of the building are stone, very heavy. The stores are 22 x 70 feet, with a hall in the center of the building five feet wide. This leads to the Public Hall in the third story, which is 49 x 70 feet, 16 feet, 7 inches to the ceiling, and is calculated to accommodate about 700 people. The floor of this fine hall is double; it is well-ventilated; will be warmed from registers, and lit with gas from splendid chandeliers. The cost of this building, with the lots on which it is built, was about $13,000.
November 21, 1862

125 YEARS AGO
One of the finest country residences in this part of the state was that owned by Mr. William Constable, erected by him on the western shore of Otsego Lake at a cost of about $30,000. The Glimmerglen mansion was an object of attraction to summer tourists as they sailed by it. We regret to record the fact that it no longer exists. It was lighted by gas made on the premises from gasoline, and a leak occurred in the pipe in the cellar where there was a furnace, and an explosion was the result. This was about 1 p.m. on November 17. In a moment the cellar was filled with flames. Mr. Constable ordered the cellar door to be kept closed, while those in the house worked hard and rapidly to save such valuable pictures and furniture on the first floor as could be got out. Mr. J.K. Pierson ascended a ladder to the second story and succeeded in getting Mrs. Constable’s case containing very valuable diamond and other jewelry. The total loss is about $50,000.
November 25, 1887

100 YEARS AGO
Recently-elected Woodrow Wilson writes: “Democratic government has, the world over, had deep and far-reaching results. It has created a new conception of the functions of government. It is not merely that democratic government is based, as the old phrase used to go, on ‘the consent of the governed,’ but that it is based upon the participation in government of all classes and interests; and whenever this conception can be realized, whenever government is disentangled from its connection with special interests and made responsible to genuine public opinion, throughout the length and breadth of the great country, it at once gets new ideals and responds to new impulses. It then becomes an instrument of civilization and of humanity.”
November 20, 1912

50 YEARS AGO
The children of the village of Hartwick will have a new recreation area in the form of a playground in the center of the village on South Street, thanks to the generosity of the Oneonta Oil and Fuel Company, which made the village a gift of the property there. The Oneonta concern, which has owned the property since February 1945, deeded the property to the Hartwick Village. The Hartwick Union School building, built in 1878 at a cost of $1,300 will be razed to make way for the playground.
November 21, 1962

25 YEARS AGO
Bassett Hospital employees will be receiving a $500 bonus and salary grade increase as a result of careful planning and hard work. This is the first time in two years that revenues have exceeded expenses. All employees will be eligible for merit-based salary increases at the time of their annual performance review.
November 25, 1987

10 YEARS AGO
Otesaga Hotel general manager Frank Maloney will step down from the position he has held for the past 10 years on December 1st to begin duties as managing director until October 2003. The transition will allow the Maloney’s replacement, John Irvin, to become better acquainted with the hotel and the community.
November 22, 2002

BOUND VOLUMES: November 5, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

November 5, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Comments upon remarks made in response to an address by the Hon. Daniel Webster: “In the course of his remarks, Mr. W. stated, that since the commencement of the government, there had been paid into the Treasury through the Custom House, 350,000,000, while only $35,000,000 had been received from other sources, and that with much discontent. It was not the ship owner or ship builder merely, who had affected so much, but Commerce, by acting upon and enriching the Agriculture of the country, by calling into activity, all the capital, and exciting all the activity and enterprise of the country, had given to the whole people an ability to contribute to the revenue; and it had also afforded an easy and convenient mode for its collection.”

November 6, 1820

HOMETOWN HISTORY: November 19, 2020

HOMETOWN HISTORY

November 19, 2020

150 Years Ago

Oneonta Local: J.P. Van Woert is preparing to erect his house on Dietz Street. H.M. Brownson is the builder.
A.G. Shaw has sold his home to J.M. Watkins for $4,000. Mr. Wells, 0n Centre Street, intends to build a very superior house. S.M. Ballard has bought the house of Dr. Reynolds on Chestnut Street. J. Alger has purchased a lot of Isaac Peters, and intends erecting a house soon. McDonald & Brewer have the frame up for A. Morris’s new house on Walnut Street. John Dewar has bought a house of N.I. Ford, and moved it on a lot in the rear of T.J. Gildersleeve’s.
J.H. Ostrander’s new house, which is nearly completed, improved the corner above the creek on Dietz Street.
Stephen Bull’s fine house presents a very picturesque appearance. A portion of it can be seen so far up the road as J.W. Jenks’s. The Brewer Block is nearly completed. Six nice homes are thus offered for sale or to rent. Rents will not be less than $250 per year and at that price the owners will not realize more than ten percent on cost. If a few more houses could be built so as to rent for about $150 it would be a good thing. In a few years Oneonta will be the largest town in the county, and houses will be needed.

November 1870

BOUND VOLUMES: November 26, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

November 26, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Land for Sale Low: One Farm of 44 and three-quarter acres of excellent land lying in Richfield, Otsego County, on the Hamilton and Skaneateles Turnpike road leading from Richfield to Skaneateles, on which is a good framed house and barn, a fine young orchard which bears fruit sufficient for a family’s use. The fences are in good repair and 30 acres of which are under good improvement; and lies near the center of the Town. Also, one other Farm of 83 and five eighth acres of as good soil of land as any in the same section of the County, situated on the Third Great Western Turnpike from Albany to Buffalo, by way of Cherry Valley and Cazenovia, on which is a good house and barn, wood-house, cow-house, and other out buildings, to make it a delightful home for a good farmer.

November 27, 1820

BOUND VOLUMES: November 12, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

November 12, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

We are indebted to the politeness of Mr. Luca, the Deputy Marshal authorized to take the Census of this County, for the following statement of the population of this Village (Cooperstown): 371 Free White Males; 387 Free White Females; 1 Male Slave; 2 Female Slaves; 6 Free Colored Males; 16 Free Colored Females; Total population 783.
Female Fashion: The Weatherfield Grass Bonnet, which obtained a premium at the Hartford Fair, has been sent to New York, where it was examined by a great number of merchants and others who are well acquainted with and engaged in the sale of Leghorn Bonnets, who pronounced it equal if not superior to the finest imported Leghorns. It is said that the sale of Leghorn Bonnets in the City of New York alone amounts to not less than half a million of dollars.

November 13, 1820

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 22, 2013

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 22, 2013

125 Years Ago
At 2 p.m. Tuesday, the new First Presbyterian Church was filled with a devout congregation, the occasion being the dedication of the edifice. The building is built of brick and stone, in the English gothic style. The total seating capacity of the church is 900. Other divisions of the church are an infant classroom, a kitchen, library room, closets, and parlor. The windows are of stained glass, three being memorials.
November 1888
100 Years Ago
The national debts of the world now aggregate 42 billion dollars, having increased 20 percent in the last decade and doubled in the last 40 years. The interest and other annual charges amounted in 1912 to $1,732 million dollars, or an average of slightly more than four percent.
Joseph O’Brien, the one-armed baton and rifle juggler, who is spending a month at his home in this city before starting out on another engagement, has been secured by Manager George Roberts of the Oneonta Theatre to give his act here on the first three days of next week.
Manager Collar of the Five of Diamonds basketball team has arranged two games for the last of the month. On Wednesday night, November 25, the team will play the Morris high school team at Morris and on November 28 they will play the Cooperstown high school team at Cooperstown.
November 1913
80 Years Ago
Former New York State Governor Alfred E. Smith urged private citizens to unite in stamping out bootlegging after prohibition repeal by conforming strictly to state regulations for the purchase of liquor. “It behooves every patriotic citizen to secure his supplies after December 5 in a thoroughly legal manner. It is inherent in every good citizen to desire to be obedient to the law. The people now have the opportunity not only to be law-abiding, but the opportunity to help their country by increasing the taxation revenue so that the budget can be balanced. Realizing that the government needs more revenue and that he can do his part only by buying his supplies legally, no good citizen will patronize a bootlegger after repeal.”
November 1933
60 Years Ago
Milford firemen, taking a call at 1 p.m. went to the Portlandville house and found a neighbor named Bliss fighting the blaze alone with a garden hose. At 1:20 p.m., Milford called on Oneonta for help. The two departments halted the fire which began near the kitchen stove and crept through the partition into the attic and worked its way into the roof. Damage was estimated at $1,500. Mr. Meyers is employed in the Linn Coach and Truck Division plant in the West End.
November 1953

40 Years Ago
Specialists from Cornell University conducted an excellent seminar in Oneonta last week on natural disasters. The contention – natural disasters result in many different repercussions. For example, if Oneonta were flooded, we could expect fatalities, personal injuries, extensive property damage, power failures, disease epidemics and loss of water supply, to name a few outcomes. The question was asked: How would Oneonta cope?
November 1973
30 Years Ago
Thomas G. Currie, 37, of 18 Elm Street, Oneonta, was arrested Friday after a “very intensive and extensive” investigation and charged with threatening the life of President Ronald Reagan. The charge is a felony under federal law. Currie is alleged to have scrawled death threats against President Reagan in a book at the Huntington Memorial Library.
November 1983
10 Years Ago
Burger King’s corporate policy now allows women to breast-feed their babies in its restaurants. The change comes just a day before a threatened “nurse-in” in a Salt Lake City Burger King.
November 2003

BOUND VOLUMES, November 7, 2013

BOUND VOLUMES, November 7, 2013

200 YEARS AGO
Notice – On Sunday, the 14th inst. the Rev. Nathaniel Stacy, will deliver a discourse upon Universal Salvation, at the School House near the Cotton Factory, in Hartwick, at which place he will preach on the second Sunday of each month for the year to come (extraordinary cases excepted) November 6, 1813.
November 6, 1813

175 YEARS AGO
Ultimate dissolution of the solar system – The idea of the ultimate dissolution of the solar system, has usually been felt as painful and forcibly resisted by philosophers. When Newton saw no end to the deranging effect of the common planetary perturbations, he called for the special interference of the Almighty to avert the catastrophe; and great was the rejoicing when that recent analysis described a memorable power of conservation in our system’s constituent phenomena; but, after all, why should it be painful? Absolute permanence is visible nowhere around us; and the fact of change merely intimates that in the exhaustless womb of the future un-evolved wonders are in store. The phenomena referred to would simply point to the close of one mighty cycle in the history of the solar orb – the passing of arrangements which have fulfilled their objects that they might be transformed into new.
November 12, 1838

150 YEARS AGO
Edward B. Crandal, Esq., for many years an active business man and politician in this county, died at his residence in Cooperstown on Friday last, in the 74th year of his age. Mr. C. came to this village in 1806 and was apprenticed to Mr. Phinney to learn the printing business. In 1817 he commenced the publication of the Watch Tower, and continued to print it until 1831. In 1824 he was appointed by the Legislature of the State one of the Electors of President and Vice President of the U.S. and in 1826 he was elected County Clerk, which office he held for three years. For many years he held the office of Justice of the Peace. In all those public positions, and in the social and domestic circles, Mr. Crandal was esteemed for his integrity and worth. He was buried with Masonic honors on Sunday last.
November 6, 1863

125 YEARS AGO
The result of the election in this county is a surprise to both parties. While a few well-informed Democrats hoped to carry it by a small majority for Cleveland, it was the expectation of most of them that it would go Republican by one to three hundred. No one looked for a Republican majority of over 800. The causes which have combined to produce this result are recognized by all. It is most largely due to the immense amount of money at the disposal of the Republicans, and the use made of it in controlling the floating vote. Of State and Congress district funds, they must have had from $25,000 to $30,000. The money put up in the interest of Mr. Wilber was largely used for the benefit of the whole Republican ticket. When paying from $10 to $25 for votes, this could easily be done. It was the amount such visitors were looking for, and caring little in turn what they did for it.
November 9, 1888

100 YEARS AGO
Local – Some mysterious individual seems to have a mania for traversing the streets at night, disturbing the inhabitants of the village by running up on the doorsteps and leaving handbills and tracts attacking the Roman Catholic Church in general and the pope in particular. If these reformers have anything important to say, we would suggest that they hire a hall, or come around in the daylight.
Linn Pope of Toddsville has been feasting on Calarab figs since Friday last, he having guessed the nearest to the number of figs in the basket in the Mulkins’ Store window for four weeks past. There were 3,657 figs in the basket and Mr. Pope guessed 3,600. Every customer who purchased a pound of Calarabs was entitled to a guess and the estimates ranged from 500 to 100,000.
November 5, 1913

75 YEARS AGO
The Cooperstown high school gridiron season ended Friday afternoon when the Redskins fell to a powerful Oneonta high school eleven, 21 to 13. The traditional game between the two schools was played before a throng of 2,500 at the new Webb Island field. Trailing throughout the contest, and after Oneonta scored its last touchdown with less than two minutes remaining, the Redskins scored two touchdowns, the first drive starting with an aerial heave from star back Walt Eggleston to Jim Callahan. Bob Dodge then took the handoff on a reverse, smashed off right tackle and took it to the Oneonta twelve before going out of bounds. Two plays later Eggleston scored when Dodge passed to Callahan who lateraled to Eggleston. Eggleston dropkicked the extra point. The Redskins then recovered an Oneonta fumble and scored on a 35-yard pass from Eggleston to Callahan who took it in from the five.
November 9, 1938

50 YEARS AGO
Paul S. Kerr, President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. announced the appointment of Ken Smith as Director of the National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum. He covered baseball for the Hartford Courant while attending Trinity College and later became office boy for the New York Evening Mail. Smith has been with the New York Mirror since 1931 and covered major league baseball for 38 years. He helped to count ballots in the first election for Hall of Fame members in 1936 and attended the dedication of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1939.
November 6, 1963

25 YEARS AGO
Jennie Bailey Elliott celebrated her 100th birthday at Woodside Hall October 21. Mrs. Elliott was born on October 21, 1888 in Massena, the daughter of Frank and Anna Miller Bailey. She graduated from Syracuse University in 1910, majoring in music. For many years, she taught lessons and played the church organ. She married Carl Elliott and lived in Massena until she was 94 before joining her daughter Jane Brayden in Cooperstown.
November 9, 1988

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 8, 2013

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 8, 2013

125 Years Ago
The Local News: The new iron bridge across the Susquehanna will reach Oneonta about December 1st and will be in position December 15th. During the fifteen days the bridge is being put up teams will be required to cross by the lower bridge. A ferry will convey foot passengers across the river.
A specimen of slag paving stone is on exhibition at Moody & Gold’s Store. The stone is now in use in portions of New York City and is said to excel all other pavements. It is durable, cheap, and is said to be the best sanitary pavement. Parties interested in paving Main Street are invited to call and see it.
The Salvation Army holds regular evening services at their hall in the Westcott Building. The meetings are well attended, the hall being crowded every night. There are seven members of the Army here. Three services are held on Sunday.
November 1888

100 Years Ago
A union temperance meeting at the First Presbyterian Church was addressed Sunday evening by Dr. F.D. Blakeslee of Binghamton. He said in brief, “A disaster like that of the Titanic is occurring every four days in our great country – the disaster of men going down to a drunkard’s grave – a disaster that is legalized. The remedy will have to come from the people – it will never come down from the head of the government unless the people demand it from the head. The slavery of the liquor traffic is infinitely stronger than African slavery and it is the purpose of the Anti-Saloon League to place men in the political stations of the country that will do this very thing. The saloon men say that they can sell more liquor if it is dry than they can if it is wet. But, why then do they fight so hard against the cause and against the advances made by the league?
November 1913

80 Years Ago
The people of the country will recognize that if government forces meddle in private industry it will be but an entering wedge. The outcome will be that the government, and perhaps the President himself (Franklin Delano
Roosevelt), will have more to say how a man’s business should be conducted than the man who fought his way valiantly through to success. No head of any industry big or little, winning a fair measure of success, has succeeded alone. He had carried with him pay rolls and assistance that meant success for others associated with him. This has provided homes, comfort and happiness for many others. While not approving the excessive salaries that have been paid beyond the capabilities of any man to be worth to any enterprise, yet attention is called to the fact that once we remove the incentive and stifle individual initiative, the employed will suffer far more than those who made the employment possible.
November 1933

60 Years Ago
The New York State Thruway Authority said today it had spent or obligated approximately 506 million dollars so far for construction for construction of the 427-mile cross-state expressway. Seventeen miles of the route remain to be contracted for, to which must be added the costs for construction of restaurants and gas stations, rights of way, and other items. A spokesman said the authority had not estimated how high additional costs would run. In addition to the 500 million dollar bond issue the authority has a loan of 80 million from the state, made before the bond issue was authorized. Those funds will be used to get construction rolling. The New York to Buffalo route is expected to be completed by the summer of 1955.
November 1953

30 Years Ago
Hartwick College has received a collection of letters, some written by the Rev. John Christopher Hartwick, a Lutheran minister who bequeathed his estate for the formation of a religious seminary near Cooperstown, which was the forerunner of the college now located on Oyaron Hill in Oneonta. The letters were given to Hartwick College by Yale University. “We’re extremely pleased that Yale officials have given them to us so that they can be part of the documentation of our history,” said Jane Des Grange, director of museums at Hartwick College. Hartwick, who was born in what is now East Germany, preached in the central New York area during the Revolutionary War era. When he died in 1796, he left his estate for the establishment of a Lutheran Seminary. The school became the first Lutheran Seminary in the United States. Mrs. Des Grange said the letters have been laminated.
November 1983

20 Years Ago
For Stan Sessions, phone calls are passé and letter writing is practically a lost art. When it comes to correspondence, he lets his computer do the talking. “No one is paying attention to memos and letters anymore,” says Sessions, a biology professor at Hartwick College in Oneonta. “They figure if it’s important enough, it’ll be on e-mail.” E-mail, or electronic mail, is becoming the dominant mode of communication at colleges, schools, and big business. It has the immediacy of a telephone call and the hard-copy capabilities of a letter and could be a way of life for the masses by the 21st century. Electronic mail began 15 years ago when the first bulletin board services (BBS) were created as local message centers for a handful of computer users. The number of BBS users in the U.S. has reached about 500,000 and some estimates expect that to climb to as many as 20 million by the year 2000.
November 1993

10 Years Ago
The Rev. Mitchell Spring, pastor of Spirit and Truth Christian Assembly, is lecturing at Hartwick College on “End Time Bible Prophecies.” Pastor Spring will appear in Room 202 of Miller Hall on Thursdays, November 6, 13 and 23 beginning at 7 p.m. The meetings are free and open to all.
Geshe Thupten Kunsang, who was in Oneonta for the Buddhism Semester at Hartwick College in 2000, is visiting the area. Kunsang will be available for appointments before November 19 and will return for teachings on the first stages of Lam Rim in late December.
November 2003

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