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Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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eEditions

STAMMEL: Voters, Thanks For Your Help

STAMMEL: Voters, Thanks For Your Help

To the Editor:

Thank you to everyone who supported me and our campaign this fall. These races are long and difficult and without the support of friends, families, and neighbors, they would be impossible. Thank you especially to former Rep. Rich Murphy, whose eagerness to offer me assistance and advice was instrumental.

Bound Volumes: November 12, 2015

BOUND VOLUMES

Compiled by TOM HEITZ with resources courtesy of the New York State Historical Association Library

200 YEARS AGO

TFJ November 13, 2015

175 YEARS AGO
Latter Day Saints – The Liverpool Chronicle contains the following: “The New York packet ship North America, Captain Lowbar, sailed on Tuesday with 19 cabin passengers and 200 in the steerage. The whole of the

Condescending, Arrogant Editorial Fails To Heal Tensions

Condescending, Arrogant Editorial Fails To Heal Tensions

To the Editor:

In last week’s editorial, “Republicans Romped. Now, What Are They Going to Do?,” much was made of the results of the recent election for the Otsego County Board of Representatives. It was pointed out that county Republicans did very well, putting the Republicans, with 4,600 weighted votes, well ahead of the Democrats, with 1,627 weighted votes, in the county’s system of weighted voting.

26 Layoffs Balance County ’16 Budget

26 Layoffs Balance
County ’16 Budget

7 Parttimers, 19 Fulltimers To Lose Jobs

COOPERSTOWN – The $9.2 million gap in Otsego County’s proposed 2016 budget is closed.
It took the layoffs of 19 full-time and 7 part-time county employees, slashing some services and raising property taxes by about $100,000 total, the maximum allowed under the state property tax cap.

The layoffs, agreed on Friday, Nov. 6, by the county board’s Budget Review Committee and county Treasurer Dan Crowell, followed six weeks of discussion.

‘Second Family’ Thanks Bill Streck

‘Second Family’ Thanks Bill Streck

$1.2 Million Clinic Named In Honor Of Former Bassett CEO

COOPERSTOWN – Bill Streck had every reason to be humbled by the opening of the Dr. William F. Streck Health Center at Pathfinder Village.

“I was talking to a friend about it, and he said, ‘Let me get this straight. Bassett starts a clinic in a farmhouse. Then you became president of Bassett. You retire. Dr. Vance Brown opens a clinic and they name it after you’?” he recalled during his remarks at the clinic’s opening reception Friday, Nov. 6.

Victory Goes To Bob O’Brien

Victory Goes To Bob O’Brien

HARTWICK – Bob O’Brien, the father of triplets, is used to surprises.

Still, when Hartwick’s surprise-rich election year ended Tuesday, Nov. 10, you can understand why the Hartwick town supervisor-elect declared, “Thank God it’s over.”

Robert O'Brien
Robert O’Brien

O’Brien learned that day that, 233 to 229, he had defeated two-term incumbent (and longtime Town Board member) David Butler after months of campaigning, legal challenges and political infighting to claim the top office in Otsego County’s fastest-growing town. A third candidate, Hartwick Town Board member Juli Sharratt, tallied 151.

O’Brien’s whole enterprise was a handful of votes away from disaster at every step.

It began over the summer, when O’Brien, the Hartwick hamlet fire chief for the past five years, won the endorsement from the Republican Town Committee over incumbent Butler.

That led to a Republican primary on Sept. 10, where he inched past Butler, 50 votes to 49, too close to call.

Cooperstown And Around: Nov 12

Cooperstown And Around

Flashing red lights were installed at Walnut and Delaware in recent days.
Flashing red lights were installed at Walnut and Delaware in recent days.

COOPERSTOWN – Concerns about cars running the stop sign at Cooperstown Elementary raised by crossing guard Stretch Redding have led to the installation this week of solar-powered flashing lights that will blink, blink 24-7.

Trustee Cindy Falk, Streets Committee chair, said this week she, Redding and Trustee Ellen Tillapaugh had independently observed similar lights at Center and Dietz in Oneonta, and though they might keep drivers alert at the student crosswalk in the village.

EXPERT ARRIVES: Consultant Kennedy Smith, former president of the National Main Street Center, was here Monday, Nov. 9, meeting with the Comprehensive Plan committee on ways to diversity retail in downtown Cooperstown.

AIDING FOOD BANK: The Scriven Foundation has again provided a holiday season grant to match donations to the Cooperstown Food Pantry for up to $5,000 during November and December. Donations may be sent to the food pantry, 25 Church St., Cooperstown NY 13326.

Doug Zamelis In NYC: No Trash Upstate

Doug Zamelis Testifies In NYC: Don’t Send Trash Upstate

Doug Zamelis
Doug Zamelis

Attorney Doug Zamelis of Springfield Center is representing Waterloo Container Co. and Concerned Citizens of Seneca County in efforts to block New York City from transporting solid waste to Progressive Waste Solutions’ Seneca Meadows Landfill.

According to the Lansing Star newspaper, Zamelis, who has represented anti-windmill efforts in northern Otsego County, testified against the project Oct. 15 at a Department of Sanitation hearing in New York City.

“We testified today to put New York City and Mayor de Blasio

CCS: ‘Drowsy Chaperone’ On Sterling Stage

CCS Thespians Stage ‘Drowsy Chaperone’ On Sterling Stage

Students, from left, Alina Bischoff, Lindsay Brown and Vaughan Powers warm up in the “Drowsy Chaperone’s” finale.
Students, from left, Alina Bischoff, Lindsay Brown and Vaughan Powers warm up in the “Drowsy Chaperone’s” finale.

COOPERSTOWN – The CCS Thespians’ annual musical, “The Drowsy Chaperone,” will be performed Thursday-Sunday, Nov. 12-15, at the school’s Sterling Auditorium.

Evening shows at at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with a 2 p.m. matinee on Sunday.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for students and seniors, available 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the middle/high school’s main entrance, or at the door.

The play is a parody of American musical comedy of the 1920s.

4 Win ‘Beauty Of Nature’ Contest

4 Photographers Win $25 Prizes In ‘Beauty Of Nature’ Contest

COOPERSTOWN – Four photographs were chosen from 44 entries in the “Beauty in Nature” amateur photo contest Nov. 7-8, sponsored by the First Presbyterian Church’s Environmental Stewardship Team.

Ava’s “Milkweed Seedpod”
Ava’s “Milkweed Seedpod”

The winners in each age group received $25 prizes:

• Ava Calhoun, age 5-9, for “Milkweed Seedpod”

• Sofia Ingalls, age 10-15, for “Shale Stream”

• Kylen Smullens, age 16-21, for “The Notch, Stowe, Vermont”; and

• Nancy Morris, over 21, for “At the Pond”.

Editorial: Properly Implement City Charter

EDITORIAL

After 3 Years, It’s Time To

Properly Implement City Charter

Incoming Council member Melissa Nicosia’s fresh perspective cut through the accretions: Qualifications contained in the Oneonta City Charter matter. With her is fellow charter review member David W. Brenner.
Incoming Council member Melissa Nicosia’s fresh perspective cut through the accretions: Qualifications contained in the Oneonta City Charter matter. With her is fellow charter review member David W. Brenner.

Read the city charter: Meg Hungerford does not have the qualifications to be Oneonta city manager.

Efforts to put her in that position regardless damaged the last year of the Miller Administration, and continuing efforts to do so are preventing the implementation of a sensible city charter approved by 75 percent of the voters.

It’s past time for Mayor Gary Herzig to close the door on the Hungerford option and move on.

Instead, by forming an ad hoc committee to review the charter, and asking that the review be done before the end of the year so the current Common Council can fast-track any changes, the new

mayor risks poisoning his administration with many city voters before it’s even begun.

By all accounts, Hungerford is an excellent financial officer. But she lacks the training, experience and qualifications specified in the charter for the $120,000 position:
• One, she lives in East Meredith, 10 miles from Oneonta (and in another county, Delaware, not Otsego.)
• Two, she lacks the master’s degree in public administration or a related field. (Does the home to Hartwick and SUNY Oneonta really believe that doesn’t matter?)
• Three, she lacks the relevant professional experience.

There’s nothing the matter with not meeting the qualifications for Oneonta city manager. Many people don’t. Many brainy, happy and successful people don’t meet the qualifications for brain surgeon, or construction engineer, or ship captain; but they don’t seek do brain surgery, build skyscrapers or pilot a Viking cruise ship.

December 5, 2014 E-Edition

December 5, 2014 E-Edition

The Freeman’s Journal

Hometown Oneonta

All Otsego

November 28, 2014 E-Edition

November 28, 2014 E-Edition

The Freeman’s Journal

Hometown Oneonta

All Otsego

November 21, 2014 E-Edition

November 21, 2014 E-Edition

The Freeman’s Journal

Hometown Oneonta

All Otsego

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