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News of Otsego County

Education

Student news: June 17, 2021

Student news

Elmira College celebrated the graduation of 192 students during its 163rd Commencement on Sunday, June 6, on Carnegie Lawn at the College. The exercises included 169 undergraduate and 23 graduate students, including: Evan Mendoza of New Berlin, who received a bachelor of arts; Mason Weir of Oneonta, who received a bachelor of science.

Ashley Harrington of New Berlin was named to The University of Alabama President’s List for spring semester 2021.

A total of 11,813 students enrolled during the spring 2021 term at The University of Alabama made the Dean’s List with academic records of 3.5 or above (on a 4.0 scale), or the President’s List with academic records of 4.0 (all A’s).

More than 100 Rochester Institute of Technology students, including Virginia Aswad of Cooperstown, were named as outstanding undergraduate scholars for the 2020-2021 year.

SUNY Canton recognizes students who earned a 3.75 or greater GPA during the spring 2021 semester, including: Danielle J. Conway, Gilbertsville, finance; Brittany George of Mount Upton, criminal investigation; Jordan B. Nelson, Richfield Springs, early childhood care and management; Sarah Roselli Ortiz, Sidney, health care management; and Kerrin T. O’Shaughnessy, Worcester, early childhood.

Tristan Montgomery of Oneonta has been named to the Spring 2021 Dean’s List at Buffalo State College. Montgomery is majoring in Communication Studies.

In general, students who have completed at least 12 credit hours and who have attained a term GPA of 3.5 or higher qualify for the Buffalo State Dean’s List.

Emily Burr of Coopers-town was recognized for an Academic Award at the Cazenovia College 196th Commencement Ceremony.

The College of Saint Rose celebrates the following students who earned Dean’s List honors for the Spring 2021 semester: Alexa Hurlburt, Otego, childhood education/special education; Katelyn Kwiatkowski, East Worcester, early childhood and childhood education; Meghan Saggese, Laurens, business administration.

Cooperstown and Around & The City of the Hills: June 17, 2021

Cooperstown and Around & City of the Hills

Juneteenth to be celebrated Saturday in Oneonta

Juneteenth, a celebration of the emancipation of African-Americans during the Civil War, will be celebrated at 3 p.m., Saturday, June 19, in Neahwa Park in Oneonta.
There will be music, food and art.
Oneonta Mayor Gary Herzig will speak at 5 p.m., before an introduction to Juneteenth from Jonathan Brown.


School merger passes first hurdle

According to officials at both schools, the Board of Educations at Worcester Central School and Schenevus Central School have both unanimously voted Tuesday, June 15, to approve a potential merger. The plan will now go to a non-binding community straw poll Sept. 22, followed by a binding resolution Dec. 3.

Clark Foundation announces scholarship awards

Clark Foundation announces
scholarship awards

STAFF REPORT • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

The Clark Foundation announced the scholarship recipients for 2021 in a Tuesday, June 15, media release.

The scholarships were awarded to 188 students, with a total of $742,600.

“The board and I are pleased to recognize the accomplishments of this distinguished group of graduating seniors by assisting them in their undergraduate studies,” Janes Forbes Clark said in the release. “Despite having to navigate and manage the impact of the COVID crisis, each of these exceptional young men and women have compiled excellent records at their schools.  As we welcome them to The Clark Foundation Scholarship Program, we wish each of them a most successful college experience.”

The following is a list of recipients by school:

Cherry Valley-Springfield

Marissa Ann Abbruzzese; Brady Matthew Benson; Zoe Elizabeth Climenhaga; Mia Frances Thompkins Horvath; Jaelyn Rose Jaquay; Allison Kate Lennebacker; Sarah Elise Lewis; Andrew Ward Oram; Dylan M. Smith.

Cooperstown

Fiona Tulip Bailey ; Josephine Alice Bertram; Alexander Cooper Bohler; Edward Vaughn Boulet; Jennifer Corinne Burch; Juliet E. Cunnington; Carly Angelia Erway; Mikael Blake Foutch-Carkee; Jason Anthony Furnari; Sam John Grigoli; Alexander Pomeroy Hage; Kendall John Haney; Alexander Gregory Hascup; Ellie Joanne Hotaling; Ray Michael Jastremski Hovis; Molly Ancilla Hughes; Phoebe L. Jones; Anna K. Lambert; Isaac N. Landry; Colette Ruth Leinhart; Edward Spencer Lewis; Faith Vivian Logue; Lucian Olearczyk Lytel; Lauren Ellen Martin; Julia Marie McCrea; Abigail Sarah Miller; Reilly Rose Mooney; Stuart A.I. Nelson; Emma Grace Panzarella; Marisa L. Phillips; Alexander N. Poulson; Ian Patrick Quinn; Mason Scott Raffo; Erin Elizabeth Rock; Stephanie Nicole Rudloff; Miguel Xekee Sagario; Nathaniel Cooper Savoie; Joseph Joshua Senchyshyn; Maya A. Stevens; Sydnie Alexandria Aijun Streek; Lindsey G. Trosset; Christopher Scott Ubner; Henry Davis Wager; William James Weldon; Caroline June Whitaker; Brayden Francis White; Addison Elizabeth Yastrzemski; Laurel K. Zaengle.

Edmeston

Sydney Marie Bateman; Isabel LeeAnne Brown; Madison Elizabeth Cole; Jacob Robert Cormier; Gregory Michael DeVries; Kennedy Rose Kapp; Logan Danielle Lund; Joshua Robert Lewis Martin; Madilynne Rae Smith.

Laurens

Kyle Zachery Davis; Lexis N. Davis; Faith Mei Gaglia; Jonah James Mathieson; Rylie James Nemitz; Kassidy Paige Qua; Emily Rose Stanley; Skyler Paige White.

Milford

Adrianna Domenica Greiner; Avery C. Leonard; Hailey Jade Maison; Mackenzie Mary O’Connor; Alexis Rae Stanford; Tia Brook Vagliardo; Benjamin E. Webster; Lawson Thomas Williams.

Richfield Springs

Cole J. Bobnick;  Sydney N. Burdick; Ronica Erica Clarke; Brooke Irene Connolly; Dylan John Dyn; Katherine Cheyenne Kodz; Samantha Rose O’Connor; Amy Lyne Seamon; Damon Joseph Thomson; Brady Charles Young.

Schenevus

Andrew Robert Hamilton; Kandence Ann Hoag; Cassandra L. Snyder; Nolan Nathan Sweeney; Claire Analiese Warner.

Owen D. Young 

Christian Andreev; Lynzee Danielle Bissell; Emma Nicole Sorensen.

Mount Markham  

Michael James Abbatiello; Aidan Ainslie; Jennah Barrtt; Marleigh Case; Logan D. Clark; Madison Veronica Deak; Mackenzie Maree Doyle; Lauren Elizabeth Entwistle; Alexis Sky Fitch; Kaitlyn Anne Fitch;  Sarah Marie Foster; Cassandra Catherine Gates; Hayleigh Lyn Gates; Chelsea Marie Hayes; Emily Mae Howard; Madelyn Landgren; Hayden Elisjah Larmon; Katie Taylor Livingston; Madison Jane Lockwood; Katherine Loomis; Kayla Marie Lottermann; Madison Jo Marsh; Matthew Carmen Maugeri; Emily Laura McClave; Jacob McKenzie; Morgan McGuire Merritt; Brianna Marie Morgan; Chelsea Wynn Osborn; Olivia Jade Ostrander; Joseph Robert Sanzo; Melanie Kathleen Sterling; Jordan Marie Treen; Chad Alan Tucker; Stepheny Anne Vriesema; Delia Kaydence Wilton.

Worcester

Lily Peyton Conroe; Michael Anthony Countryman; Isaiah Eric Haley; Casandra M. Haughn; Jenna Alexis Morell; Miriam Frances Odell;Maya Jane Powers; Delimar Marie Vega-Haley.

Otsego Area Occupational Center

Gareth J. Austin; Louis Timothy Banks; Michaela Mea Bateman; Jasmine K. Bondies; Shayne Christian Chase; Mackenzie Angeline Conklin; Naomi Rebekah Cook; Molly Katherine Forbes; Ronin James Gould; Jourdyn Alexis Gray; Quinn E. Hansen; Megan S. Hughes; Justin Iannelli; Nila J. Jackson; Autumn Rae Jones;Riley Elizabeth Jubar; John Maximilian Kennedy; Tritny Elizabeth Knapp; Lillian Grace Lighthall; Maximilian Adam Madej; William Wyatt Moody; Emma Caroline Ough; Cole Gerald Platt; Abigail D. Pleuss; Hunter Van Poniros; Morgan Gabriella Rossignol; Sara Danyelle Sluiter; Chloe R. Thalheimer; Kaitlyn Marie Wellman.

Gilbertsville-Mount Upton

Gavin Bonczkowski; Apolonia Nina Drapaniotis; Maya Curtis Farwell; Emily D. Hammond; Olivia Grace Held; Kyle Jacob Meyers; Zan Eric Sansoucie; Theodore Charles Sharkey.

Morris

Baylie E. Boglioli; Daphne P. Fraser; Erin Nicole Herring; Emily Elizabeth Lincoln; Kate Frances Morano; Jacob Ronald Spoor; Matthew Carl Wendler.

 

 

 

 

As ‘Merger Mondays’ end, Tuesday decision looms for Schenevus, Worcester

As ‘Merger Mondays’ end,
Tuesday decision looms
for Schenevus, Worcester

By KEVIN LIMITI • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

The last of the Merger Mondays took place Monday, June 14, ahead of Tuesday’s board vote.

The superintendents of Worcester and Schenevus central schools acknowledged the growing pains of a merger, but also argued its perceived importance to a group of about 15 attendees.

Some of the guests included Assemblyman Brian Miller, and Jeff Bishop, communications director for state Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, who is an SCS graduate.

Miller expressed mostly neutrality for the upcoming vote and said he was there to “show support for whichever way the communities decide to go.”

Oberacker was unable to attend because he was at a parade in Unadilla, a cause of some criticism among those who attended, but Bishop said Oberacker was closely following the developments on the potential merger.

If the vote is approved, there will be a Sept. 22, straw poll followed by a Dec. 3, binding referendum.

If the merger is approved the combined Board of Education would increase from five to seven seats. There also will be state financial incentives for the merger, which BOE representatives say will be used to improve educational opportunities and provide funds to a reserve, while also maintaining the same staff only eliminating positions through attrition, which they say will save $690,000.

Class size will be 22 students or lower.

Much of the merger rationale is based on a study conducted prior to the pandemic, which referenced a declining enrollment for both schools, a problem which in a merged district would be resolved with access to more academics and athletics.

Any additional cost for transportation they say will be minimal.

Anything related to mascots, school colors and team names would be student driven, officials said.

“This is emotional for a lot of people. … We do realize that and recognize that, but we have to do what’s best for our kids and everything in the study shows its best for our kids,” Carlin said.

Miller diverted from his original stance of neutrality briefly to posit about the merger.

“It’s to benefit our children and make our area truly prosper. … Things are really getting tough,” Miller said, referencing state funding. “A merger is really the best thing we can do.”

Public forum for potential school merger between Schenevus and Worcester set for Monday, June 14

Public forum for
potential school merger
between Schenevus and Worcester
set for Monday, June 14

STAFF REPORT • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

An ongoing series of discussions surrounding the potential of a merger between Schenevus and Worcester central schools is culminating in a public forum that is to be held at 6 p.m., Monday, June 14, at Schenevus’s Draper School, according to a media release.

Discussions of a merger have been long underway in what is called “Merger Mondays,” a monthly meeting to discuss the possibility of the two schools merging.

A walking tour of SCS is also scheduled at 5 p.m., prior to the forum.

Student News: June 3, 2021

Student News

Molly Potter Pearlman, a 2011 Cooperstown Central School graduate and 2016 magna cum laude graduate of Brandeis University, received the juris doctor degree on May 14, from
City University of New York Law School.

The following students were named to the Nazareth College Spring 2021 Dean’s List: Deirdre Brett of Morris, who is studying public history; Annika DeVries of Burlington Flats, who is studying technical production; Jessica Klem of Richfield Springs, who is studying, history, inclusive education and public health; Morgan Stoecklin of Hartwick, who is studying clinical laboratory sciences. A student’s grade point average must be 3.5 or above. They must complete 12 credit hours to be included on the list.

Cedarville student Ian Bolin of Edmeston, majoring in computer engineering, was named to the Dean’s Honor List for spring 2021. This recognition requires the student to obtain a 3.75 GPA or higher.
Cedarville University 125th commencement programs April 30 to May 1, included the following local graduates: Teagen Bolin of Edmeston, bachelor of arts in visual communication design and Ian Bolin of Edmeston, bachelor of science in computer engineering.

Clarkson University’s spring
2021 commencement in May, which also recognized the 280 August and December 2020 graduates, included graduates: Meg Stebbins of Richfield Springs,
who received a master of arts in teaching of English to speakers of other languages and Mohamed Alarabi of Mount Upton, who received a master of science in engineering management.

Education company seeks to fill camp void

Education company seeks to fill camp void

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

A local education company is planning to fill the gap in camps this summer.

ResourceME, an Otsego County company started by Cooperstown Central School special education teacher Stephanie Nelen, will offer summer camps this year.

“The thing about this company is we want to be a source to fill a need in Cooperstown for educational enrichment, not to compete with anything we already had,” Nelen said.

Nelen’s company had been working with Cooperstown Baptist Church during the height of the coronavirus pandemic to host learning pods and tutoring sessions.

The church had applied for COVID money to help with educations needs during the pandemic. However, when Pastor Joseph Purdue left for a church in Connecticut, Cooperstown Deputy Mayor Cindy Falk — who is a member of the church and had helped Purdue apply for the grant — reached out to Nelen for help.

Hartwick Graduation for ’20 and ’21 classes showcases importance of taking risks

Hartwick graduation
for ’20 and ’21 classes
showcases importance
of taking risks

By KEVIN LIMITI • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

ONEONTA – Hartwick College celebrated the graduating classes of 2020 and 2021 on Saturday, May 29, in a virtual commencement ceremony.

As the college acknowledged the unusual circumstances surrounding the graduation of the ’20 and ’21 classes, speakers highlighted some of the important lessons that the students would take with them in life.

Elizabeth Letendre speaks at the virtual graduation celebration.

Elizabeth LeTendre, a digital marketing entrepreneur who graduated Hartwick College in 1990, encouraged the graduating classes to step outside of their comfort zones in order to be successful.

“To be successful, you need to be comfortable with being uncomfortable,” LeTendre said. “Struggling is an important part of the growth experience … Fear is good. Don’t be afraid to take risks and don’t be afraid to fail.”

College President Margaret Drugovich rang the ceremonial bell at 11:30 a.m. to kick off the graduating ceremony followed shortly by a harmonizing rendition of the Star Spangled Banner by the Hartwick College Choir.

Matipa Mutoti, the 2020 student government president, was the first to acknowledge some of the circumstances the graduates had to deal with during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Graduation is a big achievement under any circumstance, but especially for us,” Mutoti said, listing off the need for students to adapt to social distancing, virtual classes and a volatile job market. “I believe this may have made us stronger. The fact that we are here today shows that we are able to face adversity. …

Matipa Mutoti, class of 2020 student government president, speaks at the virtual ceremony.

“Whatever our next steps may be, I believe that our experience at Hartwick College has provided us the tools to be the medicine that our world desperately needs right now.”

Lydia Marteney, the 2021 student government president, also acknowledged the difficulty that the COVID pandemic had placed upon the school while speaking from her home in Auburn.

Lydia Marteney, class of 2021 student government president, speaks at the virtual ceremony.

“Although this day might not look like how we had imagined it, today is a day to be proud of our many accomplishments and remember the glory days of our life as Hartwick students,” Marteney said. “For me, it’s strange and somewhat scary to think that we won’t all be up at Oyaron hill next year, but if we think back to the beginning and the many steps, both literal and otherwise, of our journey here at Hartwick we will realize that we are truly ready for the next step in our lives.”

David Long, chair of the Hartwick College board of trustees, also spoke during the graduation ceremony, talking about his own “abbey road” from England to Oneonta and the strangers who made him feel at home.

“Today you’re journey is uniquely yours, well underway and yet still to be created,” Long said. “You’ve already overcome some tough obstacles in life, demonstrating resiliency even at your young age.”

He spoke about the “unprecedented disruptions” of lives but how the graduates had to make their way through the college with “a unique determination.”

“You found your way,” Long said. “Well done.”

Presentations of awards were given to Madison Germuska and Kiara Biroo, who were awarded the Abraham Kellogg Oratorical Prize for 2020 and 2021 respectively.

Dr. Mary Allen, Professor of Biology, was awarded the Margaret B. Bunn Award for Outstanding Teaching. In addition, former state Sen. James L. Seward, who graduated Hartwick College in 1973, was awarded the President’s Award for Liberal Arts in Practice, and Richard Clapp, 1962 graduate, received the President’s Medal.

 

 

 

Views from around New York State: May 27, 2021

Views from around New York State

Schools should spend Federal money carefully

From: The Adirondack Daily Enterprise
It’s no surprise that all local school budgets were approved by voters Tuesday, May 18.

Between additional state aid approved by the state Legislature and federal pandemic aid, most of the proposed budgets came with either no tax increase or a nominal increase in local property taxes.

But local voters should make sure they are paying attention to how school districts are proposing to spend that federal pandemic aid. New York state received about $12.5 billion while school districts received a total of $9 billion in direct aid.

In our view, routine expenses should remain the domain of local and state taxpayers.

Care must be taken in planning what’s best for the needs of the individual district. Some districts may need major renovations to heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems to promote breathing easier for all who work and learn there. Others may require wholesale updating of their technology platforms to platforms to best prepare for effective online learning.

Care must be taken as well to ensure maximum input from the school district’s administrators, teaching staff, parents and students so that final spending decisions reflect a broad consensus of a district’s stakeholders.

Many schools will likely have a lot of money to spend helping students make up for lost time. That is essential, but the federal investment is enough to do a lot more than that. It’s enough to created targeted programs that help children achieve more than they would have if COVID-19 had never happened and schools had never been closed in the first place.

Taxpayers shouldn’t settle just for the old status quo. For this kind of money, they should demand a level of education higher than before.

Madison County native named new Morris superintendent

Madison County native named new Morris superintendent

STAFF REPORT • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Morris Central School appointed Shannon Babbie as the district’s next Superintendent of Schools at a Board of Education meeting Tuesday, May 18, according to a media release from the school.

Babbie will succeed Matthew Sheldon, who is finishing his 12th year of service at Morris.

Babbie will assume his new role on July 1.

“We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Babbie as our new Superintendent,” said Wendy Moore, Morris Board of Education president in the media release. “He brings a broad range of knowledge and expertise, and his
innovative and collaborative approach to education are just what we were looking for. Our students will surely benefit from his student centered philosophy. We are very fortunate to have him join our team.”

The myth of the good minority hurts everyone

The myth of the ‘good
minority’ hurts everyone

Editor’s Note: In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we asked some of the speakers at the recent rally against violence against people of Asian descent to submit their speeches as columns. This week’s submission came from SUNY Oneonta Professor of Anthropology Sallie Han.

Sallie Han, Professor, Anthropology at SUNY Oneonta. (Michael Forster Rothbart/SUNY Oneonta)

 

Thank you to the organizers for inviting me to take part in this gathering and to all of you here today for being present and taking a stand for truths and against lies and myths. Our commitment to truths brings us together, Asian and Black and White. Lies and myths manipulate and divide us.

Let me speak a little truth, or at least my truth, about what it means to be the American born daughter of Korean immigrants in this moment. Because I am also a professor of anthropology, I sincerely believe in the importance and necessity of learning and particularly of the study of humanity as a foundation for the understanding and unity that we need. Because I am standing here at this gathering today, I know that I am not alone in desperately wanting to find the ways toward righting the wrongs of the lies and myths.

I want to speak a little truth against one specific myth, which segregates people like me from the rest of American society by holding up Asians as a “model minority.” Some of us might already know this term—the model minority myth—and be familiar with the concept. Others of us might not have realized that this is the name given to set of assumptions that are likely familiar to a lot of Americans. All of us, I hope, can learn to question and criticize it. The model minority myth goes like this:

Of all the ethnic minority groups represented in the U.S. today, it is claimed that Asians are the highest achieving and most successful.

We’re good at math! We become doctors or work in tech! We’re living the American dream! Our tiger moms put pressure on us, but we’re otherwise uniformly uncomplaining and non-problematic.

Some claim it’s due to traits in our genes. Others claim it’s due to “Asian” culture.

On surface, this myth seems like it might be a “positive” one, but I think all of us understand that true freedom comes from justice and equity and our recognition of unhappy truths and our rejection of even the happiest lies. Like every other stereotype, the model minority myth conceals a diversity of experiences. It distracts us from the histories and circumstances that make the American dream realistic or not for every one of us. I can assure you that Asians do not inherit a math gene and particularly as a cultural anthropologist, I can assure you that the values of learning and teaching are foundational to every human culture. The chances that I would have attended and graduated from college as well as earned a doctoral degree likely have less to do with my being Asian and more to do with the fact that both of my own parents, too, graduated from college and earned medical degrees.

Over time, I have come to understand that the model minority myth is not so much about lifting up Asian Americans, but more about putting down other Americans. The model minority myth barely conceals a condemnation. If Asians are the “model,” then what about the other “minorities”?

The model minority myth is one that in fact my parents and their closest Korean immigrant friends and their families and even myself at one time embraced and aspired to. The fact is it felt good not to be seen as “bad.” It was about as close to acceptance and being valued as it seemed possible for us to imagine.

The minority myth was alluring, I think, because the alternative was to be invisible. Indeed, invisibility is a strategy for being where we are made to feel we do not belong. Try not to draw attention.

Get along and get by quietly. Do not speak up to avoid being spoken about or worse, acted against.

For me, the myth of the model minority is that it makes us free to be visible. We are not. I am not free from the fear of harm to myself or to the people I love.

The model minority myth also extorts from me the high price of my silence. The awful, hard truth about the myth is it invites my complicity and participation in the institutionalized racism that threatens harm to me. It is a lie that divides Asian and Black and other racialized communities from each other and divides all of us as Americans from each other.

So, this is our moment. Let’s build a new model for a new majority acting in coalition. Here. Now. We can speak and listen to each others’ truths. Together.

Thank you.

SUNY Oneonta celebrates 2021 graduates

SUNY Oneonta celebrates 2021 graduates

By KEVIN LIMITI • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

 

Dennis Craig, acting president of SUNY Oneonta

ONEONTA — After a tumultuous year, SUNY Oneonta is celebrating the graduation of the class of 2021, on Saturday, May 15.

A virtual graduation highlighted student life, achievements and an acknowledgement of the particular difficulties faced during the past year due to COVID.

Today we acknowledge a major life achievement for not only the graduates but also their families and those they care about,” acting president Dennis Craig said during the ceremony. “If we learned anything over the past year it’s that our successes are only possible from the support of those we love and those that we have been inspired by.”

The ceremony opened with video showcasing student life and videos of congratulations from students and staff. The Leatherstockings District Pipe Band played bagpipes and drums and Zoe Johnson sung the national anthem.

Sen. Majority Leader Chuck Schumer also made remarks via video congratulating the class of 2021.

Appeals Court rejects lawsuit against Dietz Street development

Appeals Court rejects lawsuit against Dietz Street development

STAFF REPORT • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

The State of New York Appellate Division confirmed a previous ruling against a lawsuit brought by Johna Peachin that attempted to block construction of the lofts at Dietz Street in the City of Oneonta, Friday, May 7. 

The lawsuit claimed that the apartments would block views of the hills, reduce the capacity for parking at Peachin’s business, and require her to walk further for exercise at the YMCA.

The Dietz Street development will be completed by 2022.

Vaccine clinics at local schools

Vaccine clinics at local schools

STAFF REPORT • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

The Otsego County Department of Health announced Thursday, May 6, that it would be setting up vaccine clinics at several county schools.

Residents 16 and up will be eligible for vaccinations.

Participating schools include Cherry Valley-Springfield, Richfield Springs, Schenevus and Morris. The clinics will be open from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Go to www.otsegocounty.com/departments/d-m/health_department/covid-19_vaccination_clinics.php for more information.

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