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News of Otsego County

Search Results for: ДИЗАЙН ЧЕЛОВЕКА "ДИЗАЙН ЧЕЛОВЕКА" «Дизайн Человека» Самый точный гороскоп на год. Гороскоп на 2021 для мужчин. Гороскоп на 2021 для женщин. Подписывайтесь - instagram - batmanapollo

Road To Fetterman Built On Teaching, Coaching, Scouting

PETE HENRICI HONORED

Road To Fetterman

Built On Teaching,

Coaching, Scouting

Fetterman honorees from more than a quarter-century gathered at the Monday, Oct. 21, luncheon in honor of this year’s winner, Pete Henrici. From left are Pat Hazzard, Bruce Andrews, Brenda Wedderspoon-Gray, Ed Hazzard, Sharky Nagelschmidt, Frank Miosek, Bob Snyder, Jerry Townsend, Jack Vineyard, Henrici, Ted Kantorowski, Dave Bliss, Ted Spencer, Brenda Jaeger, Mark Rathbun, Mike Perrino, Bud Lippitt and John Lambert. (Jennifer Hill/AllOTSEGO.com)

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – When Pete Henrici joined Cooperstown Central School as a student teacher back in the mid-1970s, he spent a week sitting in the back of Phyllis Jamieson’s Latin class.

Pete Henrici

He created a chart of each desk, so when he first taught the class the following week, he could address all the students by name.

That attention to detail, and consideration of the young people he guided, informed what followed: 38 years of teaching, 32 years coaching baseball and 29 in Scouting – even to Monday, Oct. 21, when he became the 25th recipient of the Clark Sports Center’s Patrick C. Fetterman Award for service to youth.

To hear him tell the story, it sounds like it was meant to be.

He came to Cooperstown in the summer of 1976 from New Jersey, and opened Baseball Nostalgia, which he still runs in the Doubleday Field parking lot (with business  partner Bruce Andrews, another Fetterman winner.)  He went back to Bergen County that Columbus Day Weekend, and returned the following year with more permanent residency in mind.

His wife Judi picked up a copy of The Freeman’s Journal and pointed out a help-wanted ad:  CCS was looking for an economics and Latin teacher to succeed Mrs. Jamieson, who was retiring in 1977.  “And I majored in both,” said Judi’s husband.

He’d been playing baseball since second grade.  When his dad took him to a Yankees-Tigers game in 1959, the Detroit team won, and won the young fan’s lifelong allegiance.

He played Little League, Pony League, high school and college ball, and in the semi-pros. His speed, he realized, prevented the outfielder from aspiring to the Majors; also, a torn Achilles tendon.  He explains his longevity: “I got on base a lot.”

Soon he was coaching JV, and was a natural successor when varsity coach Mark Rathbun, (another Fetterman honoree), moved on in 1983.

Thirty years before, high-school players would have learned more fundamentals early on from older players, the coach mused.  Henrici tried to fill that gap:  When batting, keep your weight on your back foot, he advised players. Never swing on the first pitch.

He moved on after a decade, when older son Mike, now the county’s Democratic election commissioner, went into T-Ball.  Dad was taken down a peg or two: “You don’t have the experience to coach T-Ball,” he was told.

So he underwent another apprenticeship, and ended up coaching T-Ball until second son Brian moved through the program.

By then, he had joined his boys in Scouting – the Webelos, Cubs and then Cooperstown’s Troop 1254, where he participated in four of the troop’s periodic Grand Canyon hikes, sometimes accompanied by Judi and daughter Erin.  (He’s planning to participate in 2021, too.)

First-time hikers are stunned by the Canyon’s vastness.  He takes them to the edge and points to ant-like dots at the bottom:  “That’ll be you in four days.”

He approaches the Canyon with the same attention to detail as his first Latin class: It’s desert, so the boys must have a drink every 15 minutes, and something to eat every half hour, (even though the heat suppresses their appetites.)

He spent the weekend before getting the Fetterman at Troop 1254’s camping site on private land in Westford, where he helped build a 24-foot lean-to a few years ago. First you teach safe use of knives, saws and axes, then fire safety – then the boys can light a campfire.

At Monday’s ceremony, emcee Jane Forbes Clark told him she liked his tie – appropriately, signed baseballs, from the Hall of Fame gift shop.

Looking around, there were a number of his former students and players in the audience:  Cooperstown Bat Co. owner Tim Haney (’87) and financial adviser Scott Curtis (’79) among them.

And among the waiters was a particular standout: Geoff Rudloff.  “He hit four doubles in one game,” said Henrici.  “No one else ever did that.”

 

 

 

McEVOY: After Long Republican Rule, Gives Democrats A Chance

McEVOY MEMO REVISITED

After Long Republican Rule,

Gives Democrats A Chance

By CHAD McEVOY • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Republicans have been in charge of our county for as long as anyone can remember. And for as long as anyone can remember, Otsego County, as beautiful and full of potential as it is, has not kept pace with its neighbors on many key indicators.

This means, in effect, that the Republican Party has overseen a protracted period of regional demographic and economic stagnation.

Chad McEvoy, author of the original McEvoy Memo, is Otsego County Democratic Committee director of communications. He lives in Westford.

In 2019, Otsego County has an opportunity to try something new.

We are all feeling a lot of partisan tension at the national level these days. It’s generating a kind of tribalism that threatens to permanently lock voters into established political identities, causing them to consistently vote by party and disregard a politician’s actual expertise and ideas.

This is not a healthy sign for a dynamic and responsive political system. What’s more, I fear that at the local level this could spell disaster for effective government.

In the free market of ideas, we need competitive political races with contestants who have to work hard to convince voters to vote for them. This is the only way that we will get competent citizens into elected roles to carry out policies and enact laws that respond to the current needs of our communities.

What we don’t need is for toxic politics to break our only mechanism of effecting change at the local level by preventing us from ever being able to impact, influence, or reject a local political structure that clearly needs a reboot from time to time.

We all love living here, but I don’t know many who would say they feel extremely well served by our county government. As it happens, the priorities and agenda of our somewhat disappointing local governance have been directed by Republican board members for decades.

Since the County Board was tied in 2017, we’ve seen important momentum on issues like the creation of a county-manager role, but we need so much more.

Under current leadership the board has been doing, at best, a passable job at managing our slow decline. On Nov. 5, voters can make a choice to bring fresh energy and new ideas to Otsego County.

So I am asking you to temporarily set aside your current political affiliation and consider whether you think Otsego County can do better than it has in the past. If you think we have room to grow, then vote to try something new.

For me, this year, that means voting for the Democratic candidates.

Despite what you may have heard, there is nothing radical about what they want to achieve if given the chance. They want to grow our economy, take care of our citizens, and steward the natural heritage of our region.

Like everyone else, they want competent and efficient government that gets more done with fewer resources, and they want to preserve and build upon the quality of life that binds us to our communities.

What’s even more impressive is that we’re looking at the opportunity to elect people with real skills when it comes to bringing in
grants and efficiently managing organizations.

How about this proposition? Otsego County Board terms are for two years. Why not give the Democrats a chance in 2019? If you don’t like the outcome, you can always vote them back out in 2021.

Why not at least try a different course for a couple of years and see if it gets better results? Personally, I predict it will help revitalize Otsego County and it could be the thing that finally positively changes the trajectory of our region.

But even if I am wrong, at the very least, a Democratic win in 2019 will make the Republican politicians have to work harder to represent you in the future – and that is to everyone’s benefit.

OH FEST IS A NO FEST IN NEAHWA SUNY Students Plan On-Campus Concert, Without Harwick He

OH FEST IS

A NO FEST

IN NEAHWA

SUNY Students Plan

On-Campus Concert,

Without Hartwick Help

Da Boogie Wit Da Hoodie drew a typical throng of SUNY and Hartwick students to Neahwa Park in 2018 for the usually controversial OH Fest concert. (AllOTSEGO.com photo)

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Rapper Sean Kingston’s UConn concert was cancelled last spring when rape allegations dating back to 2010 surface, as eventually was the OH Fest concert, too.

ONEONTA – After losing its permit to host rapper Sean Kingston in Neahwa Park last April, SUNY Oneonta’s Student Association has decided to move the often-controversial OH Fest back onto campus next spring.

“The SA wants to ensure that we put the students’ activity money to good use for the spring concert. We don’t want to take the risk of having a concert planned to have it fall through as it happened last spring,” said SA President Tim Nolan. “We are open to continuing the tradition. However, we need to do what’s best for the students.”

After 2010 rape allegations surfaced against Kingston, an ad hoc “Know Violence Committee” of students announced they would protest at the concert.  When SUNY officials could assure City Hall the event would be peaceful, Mayor Gary Herzig pulled the permit, and the SA forfeited its $45,000 fee.

Modern Era Committee Picks Honorees On Dec. 8

CLICK HERE FOR HoF 2020 PROSPECTS

Modern Era Committee

Picks Honorees On Dec. 8

COOPERSTOWN — Dwight Evans, Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Marvin Miller, Thurman Munson, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons and Lou Whitaker will be voted on for the Hall of Fame Class of 2020 when the 16-member Modern Baseball Era Committee meets next Sunday, Dec. 8.

The vote will occur Dec. 8 during the Baseball Winter Meetings in San Diego, and will be announced live on MLB Network at 8 p.m. that evening.

Those elected by 75 percent of the votes be inducted in Cooperstown on July 26, along with players chosen by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, who will be announced Jan. 21, again on the MLB Network.

Covid-19 Cancellations

Events Cancelled Or

Postponed by Covid-19

TOURNAMENT – Saturday, March 14. Have fun & support MCS at 3v3 March Madness Basketball Tournament. Cheer on the teams, see who wins. Milford Central School, 42 W. Main St., Milford. 607-286-7721 ext. 8408 or visit www.milfordeducationfoundation.org

FAMILY ART DAYS – 10 a.m. – Noon. Parents & children work together on fun, hands-on art projects to support community organizations. This month learn how to help care for the environment, enjoy fun hands-on craft project with Otsego Land Trust. Louis C. Jones Center, The Farmers’ Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1400 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

BOOK SALE – Noon – 5 p.m. Find your next read, support the library at used book sale. Canajoharie Library, 2 Erie Blvd., Canajoharie. 518-673-2314 or visit www.facebook.com/canajoharielibrary/ – POSTPONED

OPERA – Saturday, March 14. Performance of “Der Fliegende Hollander,” by Handel, streaming live from Metropolitan Opera House. Cost, $20/adult. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. 607-431-2080 or visit www.foothillspac.org

LOCAL HISTORY – 2 – 3:30 p.m. Join author/historian Marty Podskoch for power point presentation on new book ‘Adirondack Civilian Conservation Camps: History, Memories and Legacy.’ Will also speak about the camps in our local area during the Great Depression. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit www.facebook.com/hmloneonta/POSTPONED

SHAMROCK SWING – Saturday, March 14. 5th annual Mother & Son dance includes dinner, activities, prizes, more. Cost, $65/1 parent + 1 child. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. 607-431-2080 or visit www.foothillspac.orgPOSTPONED

POTLUCK & MOVIE – Saturday, March 14. Bring a dish to pass with friends. Drinks, dinnerware provided. Movie to follow. Fly Creek United Methodist Church, 852 Co. Hwy. 26, Fly Creek. 607-547-9946 or visit www.facebook.com/FlyCreekUMChurch

CABARET CONCERT – Saturday, March 14. Catskill Symphony Cabaret Concert featuring America’s Got Talent ‘Golden Buzzer’ Winner Mandy Harvey & Music Director Designee Maciej Żółtowski. Alumni Field House, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2670 or visit catskillsymphony.net

ST. BALDRICK’S FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER – Saturday, March 14. Volunteers have their head shaved to support research into childhood cancer. www.stbaldricks.org

MOVIE NIGHT – Saturday, March 14. Bring the whole family to enjoy a movie. Blankets, snacks, beverages, anything to get comfortable is welcome. This time showing ‘Playing with Fire’ (2019) in which straightlaced firefighters must deal with their toughest job yet, baby-sitting! Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. 607-547-2800 or visit www.facebook.com/clarksportscenter

SUGARING OFF SUNDAY – Every Sunday in March. Featured delicious pancake breakfast, then historic and contemporary demonstration of the science of making maple sugar. Farmer’s Museum, Cooperstown. www.farmersmuseum.org

SUNDAY SPEAKER – Sunday, March 15. Antoinette Kuzminski presents ‘Emerging Contaminants in Otsego Lake and the Susquehanna River’ She will review the toxicology from the study, implications of endocrine disrupters in water, & suggest corrective measures. Free, open to public. Ballroom, Cooperstown Village Library. 607-547-8344 or visit www.facebook.com/VillageLibraryOfCooperstown/

HEALTH – Monday, March 16. ‘Know The 10 Signs’ learn the facts & signs of Alzheimers disease with Ann Thayer, Alzheimer’s Association.. Cooperstown Senior Community Center, behind St. Mary’s Church, 31 Elm St., Cooperstown. coopseniorcenter@gmail.comPOSTPONED

PARENTS NIGHT – Monday, March 16. Parents are invited to Junior Ballroom Dance Class. Gym, Cooperstown Elementary School. 607-547-8181 or visit www.cooperstowncs.org

3D TINKERING – Tuesday, March 17. Create your own custom stamp with free design software and 3D printer, now with 2 nozzells instead of 1. For ages 8+. Free. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit www.facebook.com/hmloneonta/

COOPERSTOWN ROTARY CLUB – Tuesday, March 17. Lunch meeting at The Otesaga, Cooperstown. portal.clubrunner.ca/3556

CLUB ODYSSEY GRAND OPENING – Tuesday, March 17. Grand opening of Oneonta’s teen hangout. Club Odyssey, 80 Water St., Oneonta. 607-267-4435 or visit www.facebook.com/ClubOdysseyOneonta/POSTPONED

BINGO – Tuesday, March 17. Enjoy fun community bingo night to celebrate St. Patricks Day. Chance to win big screen TV. Free admission. Chestnut Park Rehabilitation & Nursing Center, 330 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-8500 or visit www.facebook.com/ChestnutParkRehabAndNursing/

ELECTION – Wednesday, March 18. Cast your vote in the village election. Make your voice heard. Cooperstown Fire Hall, 24 Chestnut St., Cooperstown. 607-547-2411 or visit www.cooperstownny.org – POSTPONED to April 28.

CLOTHING DRIVE – Wednesday, March 18. Bring clean, gently worn clothing items to donate to those in need in Oneonta community. All items including coats, shirts, pants, winter wear, shoes, socks, more for all ages are accepted. Professional attire will be donated to the Red Closet to aid SUNY Oneonta students. Dewar Arena, Alumni Field House, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2106 or visit oneontabulletin.wordpress.com/2020/03/04/student-athlete-advisory-council-athletics-organizing-clothing-drive/

SOUP TO GO – Wednesday, March 18. Stop by for free, homemade soup with neighbors. No age, socio-economic, or church membership requirement. Just because we’re neighbors. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-6552 or visit elmparkumconeonta.org

LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRAINING WORKSHOP – Wednesday, March 18th @ The Meadows Office Complex 140 Co. Hwy. 33, Cooperstown. www.facebook.com/Otsego-County-Planning-and-Solid-Waste-Department-974719492662975/

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT – Wednesday, March 18. Enjoy 3-course international themed dinner. Experience flavors from around the world. This week, try food form England. Cost, $20/person. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-547-9931 or visit www.otesaga.com/dining/seasonal-dining

ADIRONDACK MOUNTAIN CLUB – Wednesday, March 18. Join ADK for monthly meeting featuring potluck dinner followed at 7 by Sarah Coney presenting on the ecological impact of the Dams along the Susquehanna watershed on species like the American Eel, riverine pearly mussel, others. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-267-4586 or visit susqadk.org/node/2

BE INFORMED – Wednesday, March 18. ‘Coronavirus: Perspectives from the sciences’ presenting panel discussing Coronavirus with perspective from across the sciences. Includes Jill Fielhaber (Biology), Kelly Gallagher (Chemistry and Biochemistry), and Alanna Rudzik (Anthropology). Moderated by Sallie Han (Anthropology). Perna Lecture Hall, SUNY Oneonta.

CLASSIC FLIX – Thursday, March 19. Showing ‘Smokey and the Bandit’ (1977). Tickets, $6/person. Walton Theater, 30 Gardiner Pl., Walton. 607-865-6688 or visit waltontheatre.org/classic-flicks/

PRODUCE MARKET – Thursday, March 19. Celebrate World Down Syndrome day with door prizes, festive decorations, contests, delicious fresh fruit & vegetables, and baked goods from the Pathfinder Bakery. Pathfinder Village Commons, 3 Chenango Rd., Edmeston. 607-965-8377 or visit pathfindervillage.org

DISCUSSION GROUP – Thursday, March 19. Read ‘Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement’ by Sally McMillen. Enjoy casual discussion about women’s past struggles, efforts to win the vote, local women’s contributions to Edmeston. Free, refreshments available. Registration preferred. Edmeston Free Library, 6 West St., Edmeston. 607-965-8208 or visit www.facebook.com/Edmestonfreelibrary/

SAFETY – Thursday, March 19. Week 2 of workshop ‘A Matter Of Balance’ with Becky Sears, Bassett. Registration required. Cooperstown Senior Community Center, behind St. Mary’s Church, 31 Elm St., Cooperstown. coopseniorcenter@gmail.com POSTPONED TO APRIL 23 (tentatively)

FRUIT DAY – Thursday, March 19. Celebrate the fruits of tropical cultures around the world. Features tastings, food-related activities, live music, more. Free, open to public. A.J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or visit www.facebook.com/AJReadSDC/

POETRY – Thursday, March 19. Spend an evening with poetry of Langston Hughes, poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance, as performed by David Mills. Alumni Little Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

WRITERS SALON – Thursday, March 19. Begin with Open Mic session followed by presentation by poet Tessa Yang. Community Arts Network of Oneonta, Wilber Mansion, 11 Ford Ave., Oneonta. 607-432-2070 or visit www.canoneonta.orgPOSTPONED

ONEONTA ROTARY CLUB – Thursday, March 19. Lunch meeting at The Quality, Oneonta. oneontarotary.org

SENIOR PLAY – March 19, 20, 21, 22. CCS Seniors present ‘Clue.’ Auditorium, Cooperstown High School. 607-547-8181 or visit www.cooperstowncs.org POSTPONED

CONFERENCE – Friday, March 20. Students from across the Northeast present their research in Political Science. Includes presentations on topics ranging from feminism, economics, sustainability to Locke’s Theory of Authority. Includes debate College Democrats V. Young Americans For Liberty on free college tuition. Followed by networking event. Morris Conference Center, SUNY Oneonta.

SQUARE DANCE – Friday, March 20. Join Doubleday Dancers Modern Western Square Dance Club for St. Patrick’s Day Dance. Bring the friends, enjoy fun music/dance. Cost, $5/person. Cooperstown Elementary School. 607-264-8128.

FILM – Friday, March 20, 21, & 22. Presenting “Frozen II.” Cost, $3/person. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

PLANETARIUM – Friday, March 20. Public is invited to enjoy presentation on outer space with new Digistar 6 digital planetarium system. Followed by star gazing at College Camp, weather permitting. Free, advance registration REQUIRED. A. J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or register at ScienceDiscovery.eventbrite.com

FLY CREEK PHILHARMONIC – Friday, March 20. The Fly Creek Philharmonic presents ‘What’s So Funny ‘Bout Peace, Love, & Understanding.’ Tickets available at Fly Creek General Store. Fly Creek Methodist Church, 852 Co. Rd. 26, Fly Creek.

TOURNAMENT – Saturday & Sunday, March 21 & 22. Enjoy 16th annual Pattrick C. Fetterman Basketball Tournament. Features boys & girls from 6th grade and below from the local area. Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. 607-547-2800 or visit www.facebook.com/clarksportscenter POSTPONED

WRITERS GROUP – Saturday, March 21. Join other writers to help improve your craft. Hosted by published author, Jennifer Donohue. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

COOKING CLINIC – Saturday, March 21. Explore the possibilities of the muffin tin multiple recipes, more to take home. Photograph what you made, start you recipe collection. Gilbertsville Baptist Church, Commercial St., Gilbertsville. 607-547-2536 ext. 225 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2020/03/21/4-h-muffin-tin-magic-cooking-clinic-otsego

CRAYON CARNIVAL – Saturday, March 21. Support Parent Teacher Association initiatives, programs for students at Crayon Carnival. Gym & Wrestling room, Cooperstown High School. 607-547-8181 or visit www.cooperstowncs.org

SNOWMEGANG – Saturday, March 21. Invitational Beer Festival featuring entertainment, drinks, souvenirs, live entertainment, more. Cost, $55/adult. Muller Plaza, Oneonta. 607-544-1800 or visit www.ommegang.com/event/snommegang-invitational-beer-festival/

SCOREBOARD DEDICATION – Saturday, March 21. Don Axtell Scoreboard dedication and Baseball field ribbon cutting. SUNY Oneonta. POSTPONED to Fall, 2020.

CONCERT – Saturday, March 21. Enjoy performance by ‘The Black Feathers’ featuring a meld of Americana, folk, more styles that sound both modern & ancient. Cost, $20/adult. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-547-1812 or visit cooperstownconcertseries.org/the-black-feathers-march-21-2020/

DREAM VACATIONS – Saturday, March 21. Meeting to learn about Cruises by Royal Carribean, North East Ports, & Group Cruising. Free, open to public. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-441-8223 or visit www.dreamvacations.com/travel/HomePage.html

WORKSHOP – Saturday, March 21. Stock your medicine cabinet with homemade remedies for everyday ailments made from natural ingredients. Learn to turn plants from the backyard to the spice rack to treatments for burns, bruises, more. Cost, $75/person. Registration required. Creamery Classroom, The Farmers’ Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org/stec_event/salves/

WRITERS GROUP – Saturday, March 21. Join other writers to help improve your craft. Hosted by published author, Jennifer Donohue. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

PERFORMANCE – Saturday, March 21. The Fly Creek Philharmonic presents ‘What’s So Funny ‘Bout Peace, Love, & Understanding.’ Tickets available at Fly Creek General Store. Fly Creek Methodist Church, 852 Co. Rd. 26, Fly Creek.

TREP$MARKETPLACE – Sunday, March 22. Support local student entrepreneurs. Includes door prize raffle, food. Richfield Springs Central School Elementary Gym, 93 W. Main St., Richfield Springs. 315-858-0610 or visit www.richfieldcsd.org

CAMPAIGN RECEPTION – Sunday, March 22. Reception for Jim Barber, candidate for New York State Senate. Visit www.facebook.com/JimBarberforSenate/

WEATHER – Monday, March 23. ‘Skywarn Training’ Learn to report weather info to National Weather Service, discuss our region’s severe weather. Cooperstown Senior Community Center, behind St. Mary’s Church, 31 Elm St., Cooperstown. coopseniorcenter@gmail.com

POP-UP SHOP – Monday, March 23. Find gold & silver jewelry for sale by Faith Tiemann of FC Jewelry Design. The Autumn Cafe, 244 Main St., Oneonta. 607-432-6845 or visit www.facebook.com/theautumncafe/

TEEN SCENE – Monday, March 23. Teens learn about, try out healthy coping mechanisms for stress from making stress balls to variety of exercises. Dinner provided, RSVP required by Friday before event. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-0001 or visit familyrn.org/event/march-teen-scene-healthy-coping-skills/ POSTPONED

DOCUMENTARY – Monday, March 23. Showing ‘Knock Down The House’ following journey of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Amy Vilela, Cori Bush, Paula Jean Swearengin to challenge congressional incumbents over America’s unsolved issues. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

FUN HIKE – 10 a.m. Enjoy relaxing hike on Greenway Trail along Susquehanna River. Call Maureen Dresser for meet location. Oneonta. 607-286-9821 or visit susqadk.org/node/4

FILM SOCIETY – Tuesday, March 24. Cooperstown film society presents ‘Bonnie & Clyde’ (1967). Cooperstown Village Library, 22 Main St., Cooperstown. Visit www.facebook.com/FilmSocCoop/

TECHIE TUESDAY – Tuesday, March 24. Bring your laptop, cellphone, or i-pad to have tech experts help you with any problems. Franklin Free Library, 334 Main St., Franklin. 607-829-2941 or visit www.franklinfreelibrary.org

COOPERSTOWN ROTARY CLUB – Tuesday, March 24. Lunch meeting at The Otesaga, Cooperstown. portal.clubrunner.ca/3556

FOOD BANK – Wednesday, March 25. Experiencing food insecurity. Come out for mass food distribution by Regional Food Bank of Northeastern NY. All welcome, continues till food is gone. Northern Eagle Beverages, 41 Browne St., Oneonta. 607-267-2091 or visit www.unitedwaydo.org

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT – Wednesday, March 25. Enjoy 3-course international themed dinner. Experience flavors from around the world. This week, try food form Belgium. Cost, $20/person. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-547-9931 or visit www.otesaga.com/dining/seasonal-dining

DOCUMENTARY – Wednesday, March 25. Showing ‘Masters of Modern Design: The Art of the Japanese American Experience’ which explores the effect of WWII imprisonment had on the second generation Japanese-American artists who’s work had a massive impact on American culture. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

SAFETY – Thursday, March 26. Week 3 of workshop ‘A Matter Of Balance’ with Becky Sears, Bassett. Registration required. Cooperstown Senior Community Center, behind St. Mary’s Church, 31 Elm St., Cooperstown. coopseniorcenter@gmail.com

WOODSIDE HALL – Thursday, March 26. Presentation ‘Owls of New York State’ with local birding enthusiast Charlie Scheim. Learn NYS varieties, sounds, behaviors & unique abilities through picture, sound & video. Refreshments to follow. Free, open to public. Woodside Hall, 1 Main St., Cooperstown. 607-547-0600, Ext 101 or visit www.facebook.com/Woodside.Hall/

OPENING DAY – Thursday, March 26. Celebrate first day of baseball season with showings of live games from around Major League Baseball. Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown. 607-547-7200 or visit baseballhall.org/events/opening-day-2020?date=0

READING SERIES – Thursday, March 26. Reading by novelist Jamie Colbert, author of ‘Wild Things’ set in rural upstate New York. Craven Lounge, Morris Conference Center, SUNY Oneonta.

WORKSHOP – Thursday, March 26. Kids learn how to make music out of some cardboard, copper tape, and the power of coding. Registration required. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit www.facebook.com/hmloneonta/

ONEONTA ROTARY CLUB – Thursday, March 26. Lunch meeting at The Quality, Oneonta. oneontarotary.org

DISCUSSION GROUP – Thursday, March 26. Read ‘Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement’ by Sally McMillen. Enjoy casual discussion about women’s past struggles, efforts to win the vote, local women’s contributions to Edmeston. Free, refreshments available. Registration preferred. Edmeston Free Library, 6 West St., Edmeston. 607-965-8208 or visit www.facebook.com/Edmestonfreelibrary/

THEATER – March 26, 27, 28, & 29. Mask & Hammer Theater Club presents ‘I And You’ by Lauren Gunderson about a house bound girl and the boy who interrupts with waffle fries and a project due the next day which reveals the pairs hopes, dream, the bond that connects them. General Admission, $5/person. Hamblin Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

CANCER AWARENESS – Friday, March 27. Main Street turns blue for Colon Cancer Awareness Celebration featuring opening remarks by Dr. Charles Casale, Chief of Bassett Digestive Disease, then giveaways, refreshments, music, more. Free. Muller Plaza, Oneonta. 1-888-345-0225 or visit www.bassett.org/events/2020/03/main-street-goes-blue-get-screened-colon-cancer POSTPONED

CONCERT – Friday, March 27. Enjoy performance by the Lysander Piano Trio, known for innovative programming of masterworks alongside new works and hidden gems. First United Methodist Church, 66 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-433-7252 or visit oneontaconcertassociation.org

SPRING DINNER – Friday, March 27. Celebrate springs arrival wit delicious Roast Beef Dinner. Reservations required, takeout available. Dinner by donation. Middlefield Baptist Church, 121 Rezen Rd., Middlefield. 607-547-9093.

CANCER WALK – Friday, March 27.  Join Oneonta Fights Cancer Club for walk to support Oneonta Families affected by Cancer. Alumni Field House, SUNY Oneonta.

FILM – March 27, 28, & 29. Presenting “Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker.” Cost, $3/person. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

THEATER – Friday, March 27. Milford Central School Music Association presents ‘Shreck – The Musical.’ Tickets, $9/adult. Milford Central School Performing Arts Center, 42 W. Main St., Milford. 607-4353889 or visit www.web.milfordcentral.org

PSYCHIC FAIR – Saturday March 28. Fun event featuring psychics, healers, Reiki, angel readings, astrology, crystals, palm readings, more. Old School Gymnasium, 2 Genesee St., Cherry Valley. 607-264-3769 or visit www.facebook.com/ghostlady2013/ – POSTPONED to July 18.

PLANETARIUM – Saturday March 28. Public is invited to enjoy presentation on outer space with new Digistar 6 digital planetarium system. Free, advance registration REQUIRED. A. J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or register at ScienceDiscovery.eventbrite.com

PLAY READINGS – Saturday March 28. NEXT! Readings of New Works by Regional Playwrights. ‘KP’ by Peter Reich and Linda Crawford, about the struggles of the KP team on an army base during Vietnam as they deal with the war, race relations, & a draconian commanding officer. Free, donations accepted. The Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1453 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

THEATER – Saturday March 28. Milford Central School Music Association presents ‘Shreck – The Musical.’ Tickets, $9/adult. Milford Central School Performing Arts Center, 42 W. Main St., Milford. 607-4353889 or visit www.web.milfordcentral.org

HUNTER SAFETY – Saturday March 28. Learn how to stay safe while hunting in NY State. Required for first time hunter permits. Accepts hunters aged 11+. Registration on DEC website required. Oneonta Sportsmen’s Club, 251 Rod & Gun Club Rd., Oneonta. 607-433-0515 or visit www.facebook.com/OneontaSportsmensClub/

CRAFT SHOW – Saturday March 28. Celebrate spring and find unique items from 70+ vendors. Win door prizes, enter basket raffle, enjoy lunch at cyber cafe. FoxCare Center, 1 FoxCare Dr., Oneonta. 607-432-2000 or visit www.facebook.com/FoxCareCenter/

BALLET – Sunday, March 29. Direct from Moscow, showing of Bolshoi Ballet production of “Romeo & Juliet.” Cost, $20/adult. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. 607-431-2080 or visit foothillspac.org

THEATER – Sunday, March 29. Milford Central School Music Association presents ‘Shreck – The Musical.’ Tickets, $9/adult. Milford Central School Performing Arts Center, 42 W. Main St., Milford. 607-4353889 or visit www.web.milfordcentral.org

EPICUREAN FEAST – Sunday, March 29. Feast featuring extraordinary selection of delicious wines, hors d’ouvres, specialty dishes, & desserts. Held by Helios Care to honor Lola Rathbone for her exemplary service and commitment to hospice care, and the Otesaga hotel for their 20 years of partnership and support of the Epicurean experience. Included live music and a silent auction. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. helioscare.org

COMEDY –Monday, March 30. Laugh with Francisco Ramos who was a top ten finalist on ‘Last Comic Standing,’ and has other appearances in Showtime’s ‘Shameless,’ ‘Angie Tribeca,’ others. Waterfront Room, Hunt Union, SUNY Oneonta.

POP-UP SHOP –Monday, March 30. Find revamped clothes by textile artist Claudia J Koeppel, who uses cast off clothes & her custom print designs to create works of art. The Autumn Cafe, 244 Main St., Oneonta. 607-432-6845 or visit www.facebook.com/theautumncafe/

SAFETY – Monday, March 30. ‘Balance Your Daily Living’ about accessing adaptive devices/equipment, know when to replace them, work with what’s already around the house with Kari Mullin. Cooperstown Senior Community Center, behind St. Mary’s Church, 31 Elm St., Cooperstown. coopseniorcenter@gmail.com

COMEDY – Monday, March 30. Laugh with Francisco Ramos who was a top ten finalist on ‘Last Comic Standing,’ and has other appearances in Showtime’s ‘Shameless,’ ‘Angie Tribeca,’ others. Waterfront Room, Hunt Union, SUNY Oneonta.

FUN HIKE – Tuesday, March 31. Enjoy relaxing hike through Wilber Park Oneonta. Call Currie & Ginny Marror meet location. 607-432-5434 or visit susqadk.org/node/4

GENEOLOGY – Tuesday, March 31. Learn to use the 4 county library system to research your family tree. Franklin Free Library, 334 Main St., Franklin. 607-829-2941 or visit www.franklinfreelibrary.org

CONCERT – Tuesday, March 31. CCS Choral Spectacular featuring grades 4-12. Auditorium, Cooperstown High School. 607-547-8181 or visit www.cooperstowncs.org

CCAL  – March Meeting and remaining 6 March classes. Center for Continuing Adult Learning hosts classes on topics ranging from art, history, literature, science, more. ccaloneonta.org

OPENING – Wednesday, April 1. Art Museum opens with exhibits ‘The World of Jan Brett,’ ‘Blue Gardens: Photographs by Gross and Daley,’ & ‘Prismatic Beauty: American People and American Art.’ The Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1400 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org/future-exhibitions/jan-brett – Tentative

ADAPTIVE SWIMMING – Wednesday, April 1.  EDD Adaptive sports presents adaptive swimming lessons for individuals with disabilities. Concludes with friendly races. Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. 607-547-2800 or visit www.facebook.com/clarksportscenter – POSTPONED
CRITERION CLUB – Wednesday, April 1. Birthday dinner for members is cancelled.

ADAPTIVE SWIMMING – Wednesday, April 1. EDD Adaptive sports presents adaptive swimming lessons for individuals with disabilities. Concludes with friendly races. Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. 607-547-2800 or visit www.facebook.com/clarksportscenter – POSTPONED

BOOK DISCUSSION – Wednesday, April 1. Join Palatine Literary Society to discuss ‘Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe’ by George Elliot. Bring a brown bag lunch, beverages provided. Canajoharie Library, 2 Erie Blvd., Canajoharie. 518-673-2314 or visit www.facebook.com/canajoharielibrary/ – POSTPONED

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT – Wednesday, April 1. Enjoy 3-course international themed dinner. Experience flavors from around the world. This week, try food form Philippines. Cost, $20/person. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-547-9931 or visit www.otesaga.com/dining/seasonal-dining

STAMP CLUB – Thursday, April 2. Bring stamp collections, get your questions answered, discuss with other stamp enthusiasts. Tillapaugh Home, 28 Pioneer St., Cooperstown. 607-547 5646 or e-mail kuchtill@gmail.com

NETWORKING MIXER – Thursday, April 2. Join Community Arts Network of Oneonta to mingle, make connections, more leading up to City of the Hills Festival. Cooperstown Beverage Exchange, 73 Main St., Cooperstown. 607-432-2070 or visit www.canoneonta.org/event/monthly-mixer-at-cbe/?instance_id=1176

HEALTHY LIVING – Friday, April 3. 3rd annual Living Healthier Expo on ‘Living Healthier Throughout Your Lifetime.’ Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. 607-431 2080 or visit www.facebook.com/foothillsoneonta/ – POSTPONED
COVID-19 – Friday, April 3. Communicable Disease Coordinator, Theresa Oellrich presents what you need to know about Corona Virus at Living Healthier Expor. Followed by question & answer session. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. 607-547-4230 or visit www.facebook.com/OtsegoCountyDepartmentofHealth/ – POSTPONED

FILM – Friday, April 3. Presenting “A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood.” Cost, $3/person. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

THEATER – Friday, April 3. 4-H Theater club presents spring production of ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.’ Tickets free, reservations required. Hartwick Community Center, 450 Co. Rt. 11, Hartwick. 607-547-2536 ext. 225 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2016/06/03/4-h-theater-club-spring-production – POSTPONED

FENIMORE MEMBERS RECEPTION – Friday, April 3. Spring members reception. Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

PLANETARIUM – Friday, April 3. Public is invited to enjoy presentation on outer space with new Digistar 6 digital planetarium system. Followed by star gazing at College Camp, weather permitting. Free, advance registration required. A. J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or register at ScienceDiscovery.eventbrite.com

TOLKEIN ESCAPE ROOM – Saturday, April 4. Travel back in time to prevent fantasy-hating bandits from erasing Tolkiens works from history. Solve puzzles to foil the plot. 6 people/1-hour timeslot. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit www.facebook.com/hmloneonta/

ARKELLEBRATION – Saturday, April 4. Celebrate opening of 2 exhibits ‘Garth Williams: Illustrator of the Century’ and ‘Winslow Homer: Illustrator’ featuring opportunities to chat with friendly docents on the artworks, storytime for kids featuring books by Garth Williams, a scavenger hunt, games from Little House on the Prairie, Basket Raffle to support the libraries acquisition of new books. Free admission. Arkell Museum, 2 Erie Blvd., Canajoharie. 518-673-2314 ext. 113 or visit www.arkellmuseum.org/events-calendar – POSTPONED

COMPETITION – Saturday, April 4. See who can lift the most, cheer on your favorites at this years Monster Bench Press competition. Cost, $35 to register for competition. Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. 607-547-2800 or visit www.facebook.com/clarksportscenter

WORKSHOP – Saturday, April 4. Make your own die-cut Spring Greeting Cards with Linda Shea. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit www.facebook.com/hmloneonta/

WRITERS GROUP – Saturday, April 4. Join other writers to help improve your craft. Hosted by published author, Jennifer Donohue. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

LEARTHERSTOCKING CREDIT UNION ANNUAL MEETING Saturday, April 4. Annual meeting of members of Leatherstocking Credit Union. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. www.lsrfcu.org – POSTPONED

THEATER – Saturday, April 4. 4-H Theater club presents spring production of ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.’ Tickets free, reservations required. Hartwick Community Center, 450 Co. Rt. 11, Hartwick. 607-547-2536 ext. 225 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2016/06/03/4-h-theater-club-spring-production – POSTPONED

COVID-19 – Saturday, April 4. Communicable Disease Coordinator, Theresa Oellrich presents what you need to know about Corona Virus at Living Healthier Expor. Followed by question & answer session. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. 607-547-4230 or visit www.facebook.com/OtsegoCountyDepartmentofHealth/ – POSTPONED

EXHIBIT RECEPTION – Saturday, April 4. Celebrate opening of exhibit “Celebrating the Life and Works of Sondra Freckleton” Oneonta artist whose works have been celebrated & displayed across the country. Brighthill Press & Literary Center, 94 Church St., Treadwell. 607-829-5055 or visit brighthillpress.org

OPENING RECEPTION – Saturday, April 4. Celebrate opening of Exhibit featuring works by local artists Lindsay France – ‘Abandoned History’ bringing out the beauty of decay, Gia Sabatani – paintings exploring the relationship between human’s and nature, Vernon Burnett – ‘Trails From The Emerald Ash Borer.’ Refreshments available. Free, open to public. Community Art Network of Oneonta, Wilber Mansion, 11 Ford Ave., Oneonta. 607-432-2070 or visit www.canoneonta.org

FILM – Saturday, April 4. Presenting “A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood.” Cost, $3/person. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

FILM – Sunday, April 5. Presenting “A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood.” Cost, $3/person. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

DOG OBEDIENCE – Sunday, April 5. Learn to train your pouch or refresh your (and their) skills. 2 sessions for beginning dog handlers (1 – 2:30) & experienced handlers (2:30 – 4). Crates required. Continues for 8 weeks in various locations. Free, advance registration required. New Lisbon Town Hall, 908 Co. Hwy. 16, Garrattsville. 607-267-2011 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2019/04/07/4-h-dog-obedience-workshop-otsego

THEATER – Sunday, April 5. Enjoy one-woman show by award winning playwright/performer Nancy Hasting about the incredible life of Jackie Cochran, a record-breaking WASP (Women’s Airforce Service Pilot) during WWII! Admission, $15/adult. Glimmerglobe Theater, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1400 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

TEA WITH ELSA – Sunday, April 5. Bring the kids for Afternoon Tea with Elsa & Anna. Dress up and enjoy tea, scones, table side visit from the sisters. Cost, $18/adult, $13/child. Reservations required. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-544-2524 or visit www.otesaga.com

SPRING CONCERT – Sunday, April 5. Performance featuring SUNY Oneonta World Percussion Ensemble and the World Chorus. Ballroom, Hunt Union, SUNY Oneonta.

BOARD GAMES – Tuesday, April 7. Night of fun Board & Party games with Serenity Hobbies. Ages 16+ welcome. Huntington Memorial Library, 61 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

BIRD WALK – Tuesday, April 7. Enjoy walk through the woods with environmental educator Chris DeCesare & Otsego Land Trust Board Member, Joe Homburger to observe spring mating ritual of Woodcocks. Waterproof footwear & headlamp/flashlight recommended. Parslow Road Conservation Area, 127 Parslow Rd., Hartwick. 607-397-3815 or visit www.facebook.com/DelawareOtsegoAudubonSociety/

VISITING AUTHOR – Tuesday, April 7. Enjoy reading by Poet Brendan Walsh, Hartwick graduate, known for works published in American Literary Review, & ‘Buddha Vs. Bonobo’ (2017). Free, open to public. Eaton Lounge, Bresee Hall, Hartwick College, Oneonta. 607-431-4921 or visit www.hartwick.edu/news/mcauliff-walsh-10-to-present-work-at-hartwicks-visiting-writers-series/

WORD THURSDAY – Thursday, April 9. Presentation by novelist Fred Schneider, Cooperstown resident, whose works ’The Distance of Fathers,’ and ‘Last Stop, Ronkonkoma’ have earned critical acclaim. Bright Hills Press & Literary Center, 94 Church St., Treadwell. 607-829-5055 or visit www.facebook.com/brighthp/

FILM – April 10, 11, 12. Presenting “Birds of Prey: And The Fantabulous Emancipation Of One Harley Quinn.” Cost, $3/person. Red Dragon Theater, SUNY Oneonta.

EGG HUNT – Saturday, April 11. Annual Easter Egg Hunt on the lawn of Hyde Hall. Prizes, raffles, visits with the Easter Bunny. Free. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park, Cooperstown. 607-547-5098 or visit hydehall.org

WRITERS GROUP – Saturday, April 11. Join other writers to help improve your craft. Hosted by published author, Jennifer Donohue. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

EASTER BREAKFAST – Saturday, April 11. Enjoy delicious pancake breakfast with the Easter Bunny, send the kids on an Easter Egg Hunt, pose for photos, enjoy activities, more. Quality Inn, 5206 St. Hwy. 23, Oneonta. 607-432-2941 or visit www.facebook.com/DestinationOneonta/

FOOD FOR THOUGHT – Saturday, April 11. Bring the family for fun tour, story time, art activity celebrating works of childrens book author Jan Brett. Lunch included. Cost, $23/adult. Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1400 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

PLANETARIUM – Saturday, April 11. Public is invited to enjoy presentation on outer space with new Digistar 6 digital planetarium system. Free, advance registration REQUIRED. A. J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or register at ScienceDiscovery.eventbrite.com

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT – Wednesday, April 15. Enjoy 3-course international themed dinner. Experience flavors from around the world. This week, try food form Egypt. Cost, $20/person. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-547-9931 or visit www.otesaga.com/dining/seasonal-dining

WRITERS SALON – Thursday, April 16. Begin with Open Mic session followed by presentation by short story writer/local writers workshop facilitator Jennifer Donohue. Community Arts Network of Oneonta, Wilber Mansion, 11 Ford Ave., Oneonta. 607-432-2070 or visit www.canoneonta.org

PLANETARIUM – Friday, April 17. Public is invited to enjoy presentation on outer space with new Digistar 6 digital planetarium system. Followed by star gazing at College Camp, weather permitting. Free, advance registration required. A. J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or register at ScienceDiscovery.eventbrite.com

HISTORY – Saturday, April 18. Learn about the life of Aaron Burr after the fateful duel that ended the life of Alexander Hamilton. Join historian Douglas Ambrose for exploration of treason, exile, debt, & folly that followed Burr to his death in 1836. Auditorium, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1400 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

WORKSHOP – Saturday, April 18. Learn to techniques to cook on 1870s woodstove. Make hearty soup, home baked bread, top it off with a sweat treat. Cost, $85/non-member. Bump Tavern, The Farmers’ Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org/stec_event/woodstove/

BIRD WALK – Saturday, April 18. Join Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society to celebrate the Earth, enjoy walk in the woods to view local birds. Experience not required. Expect to return in time for Milford CS Earth Festival. Carpool leaves from parking lot, Milford Central School, 42 W. Main St., Milford. 607-397-3815 or visit www.facebook.com/DelawareOtsegoAudubonSociety/

WORKSHOP – Saturday, April 18. Introductory blacksmithing class for those interested beginning to learn the art. Learn to build a forge fire, heat metal, hammer control, more to craft a letter opener, fire poker, or key chain to take home. Cost, $100/non-member. Lunch included. Blacksmith Shop, The Farmers’ Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org/stec_event/woodstove/

POSTCARDS & EPHEMERA – Saturday, April 18. Show and sale featuring historical postcards, papers, more from Greater Oneonta Historical Society, others. Social Hall, Elm Park Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-0960 or visit www.oneontahistory.org – POSTPONED

CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT – Saturday, April 18. Come enjoy 2 sports tournaments, cornhole & youth 3-on-3 basketball, concessions, games, activities for the whole family. Support Opportunities for Otsego while having fun. Oneonta Boys & Girls Club, 70 River St. #2358, Oneonta. 607-433-8000 or visit www.facebook.com/ofoinc/ – POSTPONED

WRITERS GROUP – Saturday, April 18. Join other writers to help improve your craft. Hosted by published author, Jennifer Donohue. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

TRAIL HIKE – Wednesday, April 21. Take a ramble through the woods to visit F. Ambrose Clark’s ‘Irish Tower’ just outside Cooperstown with program director Jeff O’Handley, Susquehanna chapter of Adirondack Mountain Club. Features 3.5 mile walk through wooded landscapes, up/down hills, near wetlands. Release forms required. Meet on Beaver Meadow Rd., South of Co. Rd. 52. Cooperstown. 607-282-4087 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/the-hidden-tower/

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT – Wednesday, April 22. Enjoy 3-course international themed dinner. Experience flavors from around the world. This week, try food form Australia. Cost, $20/person. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. 607-547-9931 or visit www.otesaga.com/dining/seasonal-dining

WORD THURSDAY –Thursday, April 23. Presentation by poets Cicada Musselman (Walton) and Bill Stratton (Colchester, VT). Bright Hills Press & Literary Center, 94 Church St., Treadwell. 607-829-5055 or visit www.facebook.com/brighthp/

WRITERS GROUP – Saturday, April 25. Join other writers to help improve your craft. Hosted by published author, Jennifer Donohue. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/

PLANETARIUM – Saturday, April 25. Public is invited to enjoy presentation on outer space with new Digistar 6 digital planetarium system. Free, advance registration REQUIRED. A. J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or register at ScienceDiscovery.eventbrite.com

THEATER – April. Stuff of Dreams production of Maxwell Anderson’s ‘The Bad Seed’ is cancelled with possibility of performance this summer. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. www.facebook.com/GEStevensOneonta/

SPRING RUMMAGE SALE – May 15. Rescheduled for fall, 2020. Church of Christ Uniting, Richfield Springs. 315-858-1451 or visit rschurchofchristuniting.com

HALL OF FAME CLASSIC – May 22-24. Game bringing together previous inductees to the hall of fame for a game of baseball, the BASE race, and the classic clinic where children receive instruction from hall of famers. Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown. baseballhall.org

PLANT SALE – Saturday, May 23. Find plants raised, selected by Master Gardeners to do well in Otsego County. Features perennials, vegetables, annuals, herbs, more. Bring a soil sample from your garden for free PH testing. Cornell Cooperative Extension, 123 Lake St., Cooperstown. 607-547-2536 ext. 228 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2020/05/23/otsego-master-gardener-spring-plant-sale

PRIDEFEST – June 6. Replaced with virtual event. Celebrate Pride 2020 with pride parade through Main St. followed by family friendly festival featuring entertainment, vendors, food, kids activities, more. This years theme is ‘Colors of Pride.’ Neahwa Park, Oneonta. 607-386 1508 or visit www.facebook.com/otsegopride/

GARDEN & FLOWER SHOW – June 6 & 7 Enjoy state-wide flower show. Also includes floral parade, flower and garden presentations, vendors, entertainment, more. Sharon Springs. 518-860-5513 or visit  sharonspringschamber.com

FRIENDSHIP CRAFT FESTIVAL – June 13. Craft festival featuring Brooks BBQ, more. Returning Spring 2021. Church of Christ Uniting, Richfield Springs. 315-858-1451 or visit rschurchofchristuniting.com

BOOK COLLECTION – June 20. Friends of the Village Library Book Collection to support the Cooperstown Library.

CIVIL WAR WEEKEND – August 14-16. Experience civil war encampment complete with soldiers in authentic uniforms drilling/performing tactical maneuvers, performing period songs. Continues Saturday, Sunday. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Rd., Cooperstown. 607-547-5098 or visit hydehall.org

CONCERT –September 13. Members of world famous ‘Chatham Baroque’ return to perform 17th & 18th century music on instruments of the era. Cost, $30. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Rd., Cooperstown. 607-547-5098 or visit hydehall.org

DROP OFF – September. Households are invited to dispose of hazardous waste such as paint, pesticides, solvents, chemical cleaners, antifreeze, more. Contact Otsego County Solid Waste Department for list, restrictions. Unadilla Highway Building, 216 Co. Hwy. 3, Unadilla. 607-547-4225.

LIGHTING TOUR – September 12. Learn about early lighting, enjoy historic cocktails. For adults, 21+. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Rd., Cooperstown. 607-547-5098 Ext. 4 or visit hydehall.org

HARVEST FESTIVAL – September 19. 2-day fest featuring live performances, music, family activities to celebrate the seasons bounty. The Farmers’ Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org/stec_event/harvest/0/

HALLOWEEN BALL – October 31. Get out for Once In A Blue Moon Halloween costume ball. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Rd., Cooperstown. 607-547-5098 or visit hydehall.org

Past And Present Collide In Debate On Administrator

CLICK FOR ADMINISTRATOR JOB DESCRIPTION

Past And Present

Collide In Debate

On Administrator

Planning v. ‘Dealing With It’

Explored; Also, Redistricting

County Rep. Keith McCarty, front left, chides board Chairman David Bliss for questioning past boards’ decisions on MOSA.  “I’m not blaming them,” replied Bliss.  “They did the best thing they could at the time.  And that’s what we’re doing today:  acting on the best knowledge we have now.” (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – Three decades of striving ended today as the Otsego County Board of Representatives, 11-2-1, created the position of county executive.

In a half-hour of give and take, it was clear that, despite and lopsided vote, starkly contrasting outlooks remain.

“You talk about planning,” said county Rep. Keith McCarty, R-East Springfield, and longest-serving board member.  “You can’t plan when you’re going to get a flood.  You can’t plan when a bridge is going to go out.  You can’t plan when a road washes out – we’ve had two of them on the east side of Otsego Lake. You deal with it.”

Danny Lapin, D-Oneonta, who is finishing his first term, took on the rebuttal: “Our talents are hamstrung by a lack of coordination, a lack of planning, a lack of overall coordination.

Schenevus School Board: Tuitioning Out Could Save $1M

Schenevus School Board Says

Tuitioning Out Could Save $1M

By JAMES CUMMINGS • Special To AllOTSEGO.com

SCHENEVUS – Awaiting a merger study, the Schenevus Central School Board will meet tomorrow at 6:30 to vote on a resolution to begin conversations with Worcester about tuitioning-out students for the 2020-2021 school year.

“Tutioning-out is buying a service from another school district instead of supplying that service yourself,” said Schenevus Central School Superintendent Theresa Carlin.

Will Impeachment Vote Since Delgado’s Future?

Will Impeachment Vote

Since Delgado’s Future?

GOP: Freshman Voted Against Constituents;

Democrats: He Was Following His Conscience

By JIM KEVLIN • Special To www.AllOTSEGO.com

Antonio Delgado in Oneonta recently. (James Cummings/AllOTSEGO.con)

COOPERSTOWN – Impeachment is part of the issue.

The other part is: By voting for President Trump’s impeachment, is freshman Congressman Anthony Delgado, D-19, endangering his chances of reelection?

Yes, said Otsego County Republican Chairman Vince Casale: “He’s going against the majority of the will of his constituents, against how they voted in 2016.”

Regardless, Delgado had to do what he believes, said Otsego County Democratic Chairman Aimee Swan: “Regarding impeachment, we think that Congressman Delgado is doing a great job communicating his reasoning to the voters and we believe that he will continue to have the kind of broad support that got him elected.”

The U.S. House of Representatives was scheduled to vote Wednesday, Dec. 18 – this edition went to press the night before – on two articles of impeachment against Trump, and Delgado announced Sunday the 15th that he would vote for both articles.

His colleague to the north, U.S. Rep. Anthony Brindisi of Utica, D-22, reached the same conclusion, but it was a tougher one:  In 2018, He had very narrowly beaten the incumbent, Republican Claudia Tenney, 50.9 percent to 49.1 percent, and she’s challenging him in 2020.

Delgado has a little more breathing space: He beat incumbent Republican John Faso by a lesser margin, 50.4 percent, but Faso’s margin was winnowed to 46.2 percent by Green and Independent candidates also running in the 19th.

So far, Delgado is facing a Republican challenge from Maj. Gen. (ret.) Tony German of Oneonta, former commander of the state National Guard.  And perhaps a more formidable one: Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro, who ran for governor last year.  Casale said to expect news about formidable entries “after the first of the year.”

Hartwick College Poly-Sci Professor Laurel Elder agreed with Casale and Swan’s formulations, summing it up as follows: “We know it’s a very divided district; there’s no way he can please everybody.”

Harkening back to 2018, however, she recalled that several Democrats in the Congressional primary were significantly to the left of Delgado.  If he hadn’t stepped forward on impeachment, he might have provoked a primary next June.

“There’s energy in the wings of the party,” she observed.

Regardless, Delgado (and Brindisi) fall into a category that is generating a lot of interest: Democratic congressmen elected in 2018 to districts – some, like the 19th, are being called “purple districts” – that supported Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016.

Trump won the 19th by 6.8 percentile points, to Delgado’s 4.2.  (In Otsego County, Trump’s margin was greater, 51.85 percent to Clinton’s 40.72 percent, or 11.13 percentile points.  In 2018, Delgado won 48.97 percent of Otsego’s votes; Faso, 48.47 percent, or 0.5 percentile points.)

Since, statistically, members of Congress are most vulnerable when running for reelection after one term, a counter-sweep next November could put Congress back in Republicans hands just in time for the 2021 reapportionment that will follow the 2020 Census.

An indication of that significance: Both national newspapers, The New York Times and Wall Street Journal, had reporters shadowing Delgado the week leading up to his announced he’ll support impeachment.

The Journal’s Natalie Andrews reported Delgado being greeted by “vote no on impeachment cries” and a single “yes on impeachment” cry on arriving at a Town Hall meeting in Highland, Ulster County. She spoke to voters similarly split on the congressman, although they all seemed to like him.

Echoing what Aimee Swan said, The Times’ Emily Cochrane said voting for impeachment “had made it all the more important for Mr. Delgado and Democrats like him to find ways to show voters they are getting  things done in Congress, which is why he is crisscrossing his district through flurries, working on local issues and connecting with constituents.”

And why Speaker Nancy Pelosi scheduled Wednesday’s impeachment vote between votes on muscular legislation, one to fund the government, the other on the new NAFTA.

Delgado’s job could depend on it; and Pelosi’s.

Springbrook Envisions Upscale Apartments In Historic Ford Building

Springbrook Envisions

Upscale Apartments In

Historic Ford Building

Springbrook CEO Patricia Kennedy and COO Seth Haight survey the bright and airy space of the Ford Block. The windows also provide panoramic views of Muller Plaza and Main Street, Oneonta. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Springbrook’s Patricia
Kennedy and Seth Haight with the Ford Block keys.

ONEONTA – Springbrook CEO Patricia Kennedy, got the good news a few nights before Christmas.

Her proposed Ford Block Revival – 22 apartments for executives and professionals above 186-212 Main St. – has been awarded a $1 million CFA grant through the Mohawk Valley Regional Economic Development Council.  The three-story building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

“It’s not just our Christmas present,” she said. “It’s our gift to the community.”

The Oneonta plan came about last year, as Springbrook completed Century Sunrise, a 120-apartment complex in the former Endicott-Johnson Shoe Factory that provided housing for people with developmental disabilities.

“We realized that this was our first step in working in housing development,” said Kennedy. “We believe we’re a good partner.”

Springbrook Envisions Upscale Apartments In Historic Ford Building

Reprinted From This Week’s

Hometown Oneonta, Freeman’s

Springbrook Envisions

Upscale Apartments In

Historic Ford Building

Springbrook CEO Patricia Kennedy and COO Seth Haight survey the bright and airy space of the Ford Block. The windows also provide panoramic views of Muller Plaza and Main Street, Oneonta. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Springbrook’s Patricia
Kennedy and Seth Haight with the Ford Block keys.

ONEONTA – Springbrook CEO Patricia Kennedy, got the good news a few nights before Christmas.

Her proposed Ford Block Revival – 22 apartments for executives and professionals above 186-212 Main St. – has been awarded a $1 million CFA grant through the Mohawk Valley Regional Economic Development Council.  The three-story building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

“It’s not just our Christmas present,” she said. “It’s our gift to the community.”

The Oneonta plan came about last year, as Springbrook completed Century Sunrise, a 120-apartment complex in the former Endicott-Johnson Shoe Factory that provided housing for people with developmental disabilities.

“We realized that this was our first step in working in housing development,” said Kennedy. “We believe we’re a good partner.”

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2020
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15

Showing ‘Yesterday: What If No One

Remembered The Beatles But You?’

14-19eventspage

FILM SOCIETY – 7 p.m. Cooperstown film society presents ‘Yesterday: What if no one remembered the Beatles but you?’ (2019) with long time rock tour manager John Draper welcoming all to the third season of Film Society. Cooperstown Village Library, 22 Main St., Cooperstown. Visit www.facebook.com/FilmSocCoop/

Worcester Decides: We Won’t Take In Schenevus Students

Worcester Decides:

We Won’t Take In

Schenevus Students

By JAMES CUMMINGS • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

WORCESTER – Less than a month after the Schenevus Central School Board voted to begin talks with Worcester about tuitioning-out, Worcester Central School turned down the proposal, citing legal issues.

“In the beginning, tuitioning for both sides looked good,” said Worcester superintendent Tim Gonzales. “But as we dug deeper and looked more into the legal side, that’s where it got muddy,” he said.

Assigned To Djibouti, Ruffles Trained Rangers, Dodged Elephant Herd

COUNTY TREASURER HOME

Assigned To Djibouti,

Ruffles Trained Rangers,

Dodged Elephant Herd

Ruffles’ most anxious moment during his East African deployment came when he was videotaping this herd of elephants, and they turned on him. See full video at www.allotsego.com

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

County Treasurer Allen Ruffles with wife Amy, daughter Mia, 11, and son Cooper, 6. The county treasurer arrived back in Cooperstown Sunday, Jan. 19, after a year’s deployment in East Africa. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

COOPERSTOWN – Only once did Allen Ruffles feel he was in any danger.

A sergeant in the 403rd Civil Affairs Battalion, Army Reserves, he was living in a small wooden house in Uganda, training local wildlife rangers in anti-poaching techniques.

One morning, Ruffles – Otsego County treasurer in civilian life – heard a rumble and looked out the window at a herd of a few dozen elephants.  Grabbing his cell phone, he slipped outside to capture a video.

He must have made a sudden noise or movement, because suddenly the video is flailing as Ruffles scrambles back into the house.

Eventually, the herd settled down and went sedately on its way.

Other than that, Ruffles’ 12-month assignment – he returned Sunday, Jan. 19, from Camp Lemmonier in Djibouti to his Beech Street home and wife Amy, daughter Mia, 11, and son Cooper, 6 – was uneventful.

Except everything was eventful, he related in an interview the following day: the people, the food, the weather, and his forays from his home base to conduct anti-poaching training in Tanganyika, Uganda, Burundi, “the second or first poorest nation in the world,” and a short stint in Ethiopia.

The house in Uganda was a luxury. Mostly, Ruffles and his team lived in tents.

“Everything’s so simple,” he said.   “There’s no electricity,” and when in the bush, Ruffles would have to charge up a generator to power his laptop so he could confer with the Otsego County. The latrine – a hole in the ground.

The wildlife rangers his unit was training “know their stuff.  They can tell you everything about the animals,” but mostly lacked education and basic skills.  For instance, they would fire off their rifles randomly, and part of the training was in basic marksmanship.

Ruffles poses with two of the wildlife rangers he was training in “land navigation.”

Ruffles’ tent mate was a medic, training the rangers in how to treat a wound or tie a tourniquet.

For his part, Ruffles focused on “land navigation.” For instance, if a path is winding back and forth, you can make better time by going forward in a straight line.

If you come upon a gang of armed poachers, don’t confront them head-on.  Sending out a flanking movement, and when they move toward the main unit, surprise them from the side.

Another area of instruction was what Ruffles characterized as “ethics” or “human rights.”  Stumbling upon poachers, the wildlife rangers’ first instinct was to shoot them dead. The goal was to give the rangers a sense of due process – that not every offense was a capital one.

Coming from a culture where fruits and vegetables are treated to last for days, even weeks, on grocery shelves, Ruffles experience the real thing for the first time.

Once, in Burundi’s Kibira Mountains, stopped at a home surrounded by fruit trees – mangoes, bananas, berries – and the owner put together a salad bowl for the visitors.  “It was like candy,” said Ruffles. “The fruit was so juicy.”

In Tanganika, the unit had a local cook, Grace, who would whip up a fresh chapatti for breakfast, or a salad – flavor-filled, like the fruit – with Pili Pili dressing, made with hot Habanero peppers.  “When Grace made salad, that was the whole meal,” he said.

Back at Camp Lemmonier, the food was like your typical college dining hall.

There was little to do at headquarters, so Allen played a lot of basketball and worked out. With that, and his assignments in the field, he left weighing 238 and returned a trim 205, some 33 pounds lighter.

More moderate on assignment, the heat and humidity back in Djibouti was something to watch for, with the mercury rising into the upper 120s.  When that happened, a “black flag” was flown, cautioned the soldier from any exertion.  “Just walking to where we worked, I was drenched with sweat,” he said.

Ruffles was interviewed amid a family giddy with delight on his first day back.  He, Amy and the kids went out to lunch on Monday the 20th, and then took off to Utica on a shopping trip that afternoon.

And absence did make the heart grow fonder.  “Cooperstown is an amazing place,” he said.  “I just wanted to get back to Cooperstown.”  CCS school board President Tim Hayes lives up Beech Street, and made sure Amy and the kids’ driveway was shoveled every time it snowed.

While Ruffles’ commitment to the Army Reserves continues until mid-2021, he’s fulfilled his overseas responsibilities.  (In the last few days, Ruffles predecessor, Dan Crowell, also a reservist, returned from Somalia, and has fulfilled his military commitment.)

Ruffles is taking a couple of weeks R&R, but expects to be back in the county treasurer’s office Monday, Feb. 3, to get acclimated before the county board’s February meeting on the 5th.

He’s already issued an invitation to the three new county board members who took office Jan. 2 – Rick Brockway, Jill Basile and Clark Oliver – to brief them on county finances.

“I met a lot of good people,” he concludes, “and it was a really good experience to see what we have here compared to what they have there.”

 

Clark Oliver, 22, Elected To Chair County Democrats

Clark Oliver, 22,

Elected To Chair

County Democrats

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Clark Oliver

ONEONTA – Clark Oliver, 22, who graduated from SUNY Oneonta only last December, was elected chairman of the Otsego County Democratic Committee at a Zoom meeting last evening.

Also serving as county board member from Oneonta’s District 11, he succeeds Amy Swan, who decided not to seek another term.

Oliver signs on with an action agenda, judging from a conversation a few moments ago:

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