News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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Search Results for: Christina Schermerhorn

IN MEMORIAM: Kathleen A. Bachand, 93; Cooperstown Realtor Margaret Savoie’s Mother

IN MEMORIAM:  Kathleen A. Bachand, 93;

Cooperstown Realtor Margaret Savoie’s Mother 

Kathleen Bachand
Kathleen
Bachand

COOPERSTOWN – Kathleen A. Bachand, 93, mother of Cooperstown realtor Margaret Savoie, passed away Sunday morning, July 27, 2014, at Otsego Manor.  Kathleen was a kind and loving woman with a great sense of humor, and with a deep and abiding love of her family and many friends.

She was born Dec. 18, 1920, in Hartford, Conn., a daughter of Anthony and Philomena (Vendetti) DiPaola.  She married Edward A. Bachand, Sr. on November 21, 1942.

Throughout her life Kathleen was employed in cafeterias at several schools, as well as at Aetna Insurance Company in Hartford.  Her true career was caring for her home and family.

IN MEMORIAM: Thomas Ray Blaske, 65; Oversaw BOCES’ Culinary Arts Program

IN MEMORIAM:  Thomas Ray Blaske, 65;

Oversaw  BOCES’ Culinary Arts Program

Thomas R. Blaske
Thomas R. Blaske

HARTWICK – Thomas Ray Blaske, 65, known as “B,” who ran the Culinary Arts Program at BOCES in Milford for over 30 years, died Tuesday at Bassett Hospital.

He was born May 23, 1949, to Helen J. Reamer of Michigan.  He graduated from the Culinary Institute of Technology.  In addition to working at BOCES, he was a certified executive chef and a certified culinary educator through the American Culinary Federation.

In 35 years living in Hartwick, Cooperstown and Milford, he enjoyed cooking, working with people, gardening and providing for those he loved.

Survivors include his children, Matthew Thomas Blaske, Hartwick; Jason Thomas Blaske, Boston, and Alicia Ann Blaske, California; his close friend Gerald Snyder, Hartwick; the mother of his children, Deborah Blaske; his protégé Christina Quadrio, and the hundreds of students he inspired over the years and the many lives he touched.

A celebration of his life is planned at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 19, at 15 Wells Ave., Hartwick.  Open to all.

Arrangements were entrusted to the Ottman Funeral Home, Cherry Valley.

IN MEMORIAM: Jim Georgeson, 95; Former Mayor, Civic Leader In City

IN MEMORIAM:  Jim Georgeson, 95;

Former Oneonta Mayor, Civic Leader

JAMES N. GEORGESON
JAMES N. GEORGESON

ONEONTA – One of Oneonta’s foremost citizens, James Nicholas Georgeson, 95, a former mayor, businessman and SUNY Oneonta official, passed away Wednesday at Focus Otsego Manor.

In recent years, he lived in Oneonta and Green Valley, Ariz.

Jim was born Oct. 4, 1919, in Oneonta, the son of Christina Vlahos and Nicholas Georgeson, both natives of Greece. He married Charlotte Lunn of Oneonta in 1951.

Jim was a lifetime resident of Oneonta except for his teenage years, when he lived in Norwich. After graduating from Norwich High School in 1937, he attended State Teachers College (now SUNY Oneonta) and then Hartwick College.

His formal education was interrupted by World War II:  In February 1942, he entered the Army Air Corps. Jim spent four years stationed at Tyndall Field in Panama City, Fla., where he served as supervising officer of 80 aerial gunnery instructors. Following his discharge from active duty in 1946, Jim remained in the Air Force Reserve for 23 years, retiring at the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1969.

IN MEMORIAM: Shirlene Ouimet, 66; Retired From Job Corps

IN MEMORIAM:  Shirlene Ouimet, 66; Retired From Job Corps

Shirlene Ouimet
Shirlene Ouimet

ONEONTA – Shirlene M. Ouimet, 66, who worked for the Oneonta Job Corps for 34 years, passed away unexpectedly on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014 at the Chestnut Park Nursing Home.

Shirlene was born on May 12, 1948 in Oneonta, the daughter of the George W. and Ann M. Oliver. She married Alfred H. Ouimet on Aug. 3, 1996, in Oneonta.

IN MEMORIAM: Lyle N. Steere, 93; WWII Vet, Highway Superintendent

IN MEMORIAM: Lyle N. Steere, 93;

WWII Vet, Highway Superintendent

CHRISTIAN HILL – Lyle N. Steere, 93, a World War II veteran and retired Otsego town highway superintendent, died Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, in the house he built on Christian Hill with his family by his side.

Born in Hartwick on March 15, 1922, he was the son of Kendrick and Mary Elwood Steere. He married Elsie Ruparshek on Sept. 25, 1948, in Cooperstown.  They lived in Fly Creek and Christian Hill during their 57-year marriage until Elsie died June 19, 2006.

Oneonta’s Newest Million Dollar Winner Accepts Check at Hannaford

Oneonta’s Newest Million Dollar Winner

Accepts Check at Hannaford

Christmas came early for Jessica McLean, who purchased a lottery ticket at the Oneonta Hannaford that ended up being a winner for 1 Million dollars! Jessica is pictured here with Christina Helm, left, and Heidi Elie, right. (Ian Austin/allotsego.com)
Christmas came early for Jessica McLean, who purchased a lottery ticket at the Oneonta Hannaford that ended up being a winner for 1 Million dollars! Jessica is pictured here with Christina Helm, left, and Heidi Elie, right. (Ian Austin/allotsego.com)
Cooperstown Leadership Scholarship Winners Unite

Cooperstown Leadership Scholarship Winners Unite

Rich McCaffrey, originator of the Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce annual Leadership Scholarship given to a CCS student, sent along this photo a few minutes ago.  It shows
Rich McCaffery, originator of the annual Leadership Scholarship given to a CCS student, sent along this photo a few minutes ago. It shows this year’s winner, Christina Noto and McCaffrey, at center, flanked by, from left, Christopher Harloff, 2013 co-winner; Ellen Vibbard, 2014; Sarah Dewey, 2011, and Kayla Haggerty, 2013 co-winner.  Missing at Thursday’s scholarship reception at The Otesaga was Rachael Fort, 2012 winner.
Senator Seward Celebrates YMCA, Lunch Program

Senator Seward Celebrates

YMCA, Free Lunch Program

Senator Jim Seward stopped by the free lunch program in Neahwa Park  to visit the YMCA Lunch Bunch, who had just finished eating.  Seward was in town visiting the Y's Safety Around Water program at the Wilber Park pool.   In the front row: Eyden Nelson, Sasha Sloth, Tyler Ives, James Erikson, Seleyna Michols, Anya Sloth, Christina Merlino, Cameron Comstock, Herman Conklin. Back Row: Justin Norton, Ayden Nelson, Alex Smith, Ayden Dougherty, Mylee McIntyre, Malina Dukaczewizz, Sebastian Dukaczewizz, Spencer Volpe, Elizabeth Reynolds, Natalie Jackson, Jayden McIntyre and Brendan Halstead. (Ian Austin/allotsego.com)
Senator Jim Seward was in Oneonta this morning to observe the YMCA’s “Safety Around Water” program and stopped by the free lunch program in Neahwa Park to visit the YMCA Lunch Bunch, who had just finished eating.  In the front row; Eyden Nelson, Sasha Sloth, Tyler Ives, James Erikson, Seleyna Michols, Anya Sloth, Christina Merlino, Cameron Comstock, Herman Conklin.
Back Row: Justin Norton, Ayden Nelson, Alex Smith, Ayden Dougherty, Mylee McIntyre, Malina Dukaczewizz, Sebastian Dukaczewizz, Spencer Volpe, Elizabeth Reynolds, Natalie Jackson, Jayden McIntyre and Brendan Halstead. (Ian Austin/allotsego.com)

Marietta Stays On Ballot As Democrat, Judge Rules

MARIETTA STAYS ON BALLOT

AS DEMOCRAT, JUDGE RULES

Judge Robert C. Mulvey
Judge Robert C. Mulvey

COOPERSTOWN – In a decision filed today, Administrative Judge Robert Mulvey ruled that Andrew Marietta’s name will remain on the Democratic line for District 8 county representative in the Nov. 3 elections.

He is running against county Rep. Rick Hulse, R-8.

The judge found Marietta’s petitions, which had been challenged by Lynn Krogh, Republican County Committee secretary and wife of GOP County Chairman Vince Casale, were valid.  Casale did not return a phone call this evening asking if he plans to challenge Mulvey’s opinion.

Arguments were presented last Thursday in Courtroom #1 of the Otsego County Courthouse, with the Republicans represented by attorney Bryon McKim, Balston Spa, and the Democrats by Carol Malz, Oneonta.

CLICK HERE TO REVIEW TEXT OF JUDGE MULVEY’S DECISION

Dance Star Leads Class At Jillian’s Dance Arts

‘So You Think You Can Dance’ Star

Leads Class at Jillian’s Dance Arts

Members of Jillian's Dance Arts Isabella Bonnici, Oneonta, Sopjia Bonici, Oneonta, Morgan Newan, Unatego, Matraca Harman, Sidney, Christina Heegan, Oneonta,Mary KAte Catella, Oneonta, Cassidy Fetterman, Unatego, and Megan Catella, watch as Stanley Glover, Chicago, dances at their dance studio Thursday evening. Glover was featured on the 11th season of So You Think You Can Dance, and was one of the Top 20 on the show. Studio owner Jillian Skidmore had met Glover during the Dance America competition and the two became friends and kept in touch and eventually Glover offered to teach a workshop at her studio. After a ballet warm up, the company worked on modern, jazz and contemporary based dance routines. (Ian Austin/ allotsego.com)
Members of Jillian’s Dance Arts Isabella Bonnici, Oneonta, Sopjia Bonici, Oneonta, Morgan Newan, Unatego, Matraca Harman, Sidney, Christina Heegan, Oneonta,Mary Kate Catella, Oneonta, Cassidy Fetterman, Unatego, and Megan Catella, watch as Stanley Glover, Chicago, preforms his own interpretive dance. Glover was one of the top 20 on the 11th season of ‘So You Think You Can Dance’.  Studio owner Jillian Skidmore had met Glover during the Dance America competition and the two became friends and kept in touch over social media. Eventually Glover suggested the idea of teaching  a workshop at her studio and Jillian accepted. So, this evening, after a ballet warm up, Stanley, Jillian and the girls worked on routine incorporating modern, jazz and contemporary dance styles. (Ian Austin/ allotsego.com)

HOMETOWN History 1-4-19

HOMETOWN History

Compiled by Tom Heitz and SHARON STUART, with resources courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

150 Years Ago

Oneonta: The entertainment at Union School Chapel on New Year’s evening was a very delightful affair, and despite a wild, wintry storm aAdd Newnd the deep snow it was very well attended. So boisterous was the weather that all of the farmers and child-players could not be there, but all who did come bore their parts so well as to please all the observers. Indeed, it is now proved that Oneonta Union School with its live, hard-working teachers and its newly awakened plucky scholars, can get up any sort of proper “doings” in short order, and in a style which honors themselves and the town.

We are looking anxiously with many others for the cheap coal that is coming from Scranton via Binghamton next week. We learn that Bissell & Yager have arrangements completed for an early and constant supply.

On New Year’s Day a coat was stolen from the basement of Miller & Pope’s store. The coat belonged to A. Wing and was worth about $14.

January 1869

125 Years Ago

100 Years Ago

Three months have now passed since the city became dry and figures as to the number of arrests are interesting and suggestive, especially in view of the fact that under the former regime the police officers sent home many who were still able to navigate while now the orders are to place under arrest all who are seen on the streets in an intoxicated condition. During October four arrests were made, in November two and in December six. Several of those during the latter month came directly to Oneonta from other cities which are wet. In fact, the largest proportion of all the arrests during the three months have been traceable to purchases made outside the city. In the corresponding months of 1917, the arrests were 15, 17 and 12, respectively, or a total of 44, nearly four times as many. The police have some parties under surveillance at present and quite likely before many weeks pass arrests will follow. The supporters
of the “dry movement” are unanimous in support of the change.

January 1919

 

80 Years Ago

A new kind of million-volt x-ray tube, equal to $90,000,000 worth of radium with a structure resulting from the discovery of a new electrical principle was announced today in Schenectady. This tube was made for treatment of human cancer, but is also designed for industry, and will give both sectors a new tool. In cancer it furnishes an amperage or volume of current, far in excess of anything previously known. For industry it is the first of these million-volt giants that can be carried on a truck. Such rays, useful for looking through steel have been available only for jobs that could be transported to them. The tube was built by scientists of the General Electric Research Laboratory for installation by the General Electric X-ray Corporation. It will be placed this spring in the new $4,000,000 memorial hospital now nearing completion at 68th Street and New York Avenue, New York City. This hospital is designed to be the world’s most completely equipped cancer institute. The director of cancer work, James Ewing, M.D., one of the nation’s ranking cancer scientists, says the great amperage will be useful to try on resistant types of cancer. “No one knows what the effect will be, “he explained, because no such amperage has been available.

January, 1939

 

60 Years Ago

Four families were left homeless in near zero weather when fire raged through an attic in a three-story frame house at 1 River Street about noon. Members of seven families were forced to flee. An overheated chimney set fire to the roof, firemen said. Eleven persons resided in the dwelling. Those forced to evacuate in near zero weather were Mrs. Pearl Tooley, Mrs. Maud Curry, Mrs. Christina Shaw, Bernard McDonald whose wife and two children were out of town visiting, Mrs. Martha Calvey and her two children, William Zobey and Isaac Beardsley. Asst. Chief Kenneth Hooks estimated the damage at $5,000. The home is owned by Mrs. Anna Chickering, 34 Main Street. Chief Joseph M. Scanlon commended Vincent A. “Jimmy” Microni, operator of the service station next to the burning building, for aiding several persons to escape.

January 1959

 

40 Years Ago

Second degree murder indictments against two Oneonta residents and two West Oneonta teenagers were handed down in Otsego County Court at Cooperstown. Charged in the single indictment for the death of 17-year-old William “Billy” Adkins of the Town of Hartwick on December 14, were David R. Northrop, 22, of Oneonta, Mark P. Brown, 17, also of Oneonta, Charles Larsen and Christian Tenace, both 15, and each a resident of the West Oneonta area. Indictment of the two 15-year-olds marks the first time Otsego youths have been charged under the state’s new Violent Offenders law. The law permits the juveniles to be tried as adults. The two-count indictment accuses the four defendants of “intentionally aiding each other with the intent to cause the death of William Adkins. The indictment charges they killed the youth with three stab wounds in the area of his heart. A second count charges the four with “a depraved indifference to human life.” After beating Adkins with fists and feet and throwing him to the ground they left him and failed to secure medical assistance.

January 1979    

 

20 Years Ago

Senators from both parties say President Clinton should not deliver his annual State of the Union address to Congress if the scheduled date conflicts with his impeachment trial in the Senate. The January 19 date for the speech thus provides a concrete deadline for Senators now searching for a way to bring a quick end to the impeachment trial. When Congress convenes on Wednesday the Senate’s first order of business is to determine the shape of the trial on House-passed articles of impeachment, which charge the President with perjury and obstruction of justice in the Monica Lewinsky affairs.

January 1999

 

10 Years Ago

 

When the time came for Hometown Oneonta to name its first Citizen of the Year, the choice was an easy one, times 20:  The Oneonta Centennial Committee, representatives from business, the arts, academe, the medical field, young and less young, a cross-section of the city itself.

Co-Chaired by Tom Clemow and Kevin Herrick, committee members included: Maggie Barnes, Theo Basdekis, Lucy Bernier, Bob Brzozowski, July Carney, Will Clemons, Diane Georgeson, David Hayes, Fred Hickein, Jim Koury, Dana LaCroix, Angie Neilsen, Madolyn Palmer, Edie Polhamus, Janet Potter, Mark Simonson and Art Torrey.  Emily McDonald was intern on the effort.

January 2, 2009

 

Kids to Downtown: Trick-or-Treat!

Kids To Downtown:

TRICK OR TREAT!

Christina Vasquez, Oneonta, trick-or-treats with her children Gaby, Anaya and Jada in downtown Onetona before the parade begins at 7pm.
Christina Vasquez, Oneonta, trick-or-treats with her children Gaby, Anaya and Jada in downtown Oneonta before the annual Halloween parade begins at 7pm.
A Skeleton (Hannah Ashe) and a nudist on strike (brother Noah Ashe, Oneonta) enjoying themselves at Oneonta's downtown Trick-or-Treating.
A skeleton (Hannah Ashe) and a nudist on strike (brother Noah Ashe, Oneonta) march towards their next candy score during Oneonta’s downtown trick-or-treating.
Cynthia M. Grant, 54; Loved Crocheting For Her Grandchildren

IN MEMORIAM: Cynthia M. Grant, 54;

Loved Crocheting For Her Grandchildren

Cindy Grant

NEW BERLIN – Cynthia “Cindy” M. Grant, 54, of New Berlin, passed away peacefully surrounded by loving family at Albany Medical Center on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018.

Cindy was born on Dec. 30, 1963 in Oneonta, to Steve & Grace Simmons.

Cindy was a lifelong resident of the Edmeston and New Berlin areas, graduating from Edmeston Central School in 1983.  She later attended the Utica School of Commerce completing her paralegal studies.

BOUND VOLUMES 01-10-19

BOUND VOLUMES

Compiled by Tom Heitz and SHARON STUART, with resources courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

200 YEARS AGO

Amidst the numerous and interesting objects which have experienced the benevolence of individuals, and the countenance of the government, it is pleasing to observe that the interests of the Dumb and the Insane have not been overlooked – two unfortunate descriptions of our fellow creatures, shut out from the blessings of social communion, and entitled to our deepest sympathy. The liberal grant of $10,000 a year to the Governors of the New York Hospital has enabled them to erect a most spacious and accommodating asylum for lunatics, about seven miles from the city, and on the island of New York – and the application of the fund has been so judiciously directed by its benevolent administrators, that the contemplated edifices and accommodations will be completed during the next season, and without the existence of any debt after the expiration of 15 years. (Excerpt from Governor DeWitt Clinton’s Annual Message to the Legislature)

January 11, 1819

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