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News of Otsego County

Search Results for: november 2017

BOUND VOLUMES: November 26, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

November 26, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Land for Sale Low: One Farm of 44 and three-quarter acres of excellent land lying in Richfield, Otsego County, on the Hamilton and Skaneateles Turnpike road leading from Richfield to Skaneateles, on which is a good framed house and barn, a fine young orchard which bears fruit sufficient for a family’s use. The fences are in good repair and 30 acres of which are under good improvement; and lies near the center of the Town. Also, one other Farm of 83 and five eighth acres of as good soil of land as any in the same section of the County, situated on the Third Great Western Turnpike from Albany to Buffalo, by way of Cherry Valley and Cazenovia, on which is a good house and barn, wood-house, cow-house, and other out buildings, to make it a delightful home for a good farmer.

November 27, 1820

“Scooter”  John Carl Weir, 73 November 14, 1948 – November 27, 2021

In Memoriam

“Scooter”  John Carl Weir, 73

November 14, 1948 – November 27, 2021

John ‘Scooter’ C. Weir

Father, friend, and handyman Scooter’s life came to an end on November 27, 2021 after a short illness with his family by his side.  He was born November 14, 1948 in Cooperstown, NY to Ann (Kallan) Weir and Carl Weir. He was well known to most for his cheerful laugh, helping hand, and bartending skills. The thing he loved the most was being around friends and family.

For 20 years he worked as a caretaker for Steve and MJ Harris in Hartwick. Many times, you could see him riding around on that John Deere tractor mowing lawn or plowing snow.  You might also see him sitting in his truck reading the newspaper or looking over his to do list wondering which task he would do first or thinking to himself what are they thinking with this list.  While not a decorator by trade he always had a way of making the holidays brighter and beautiful around the house.

HOMETOWN HISTORY: November 26, 2020

HOMETOWN HISTORY

November 26, 2020

150 Years Ago

Highway Robbery – Early last Wednesday morning Mr. Moak, driver of the Schenevus Stage, was accosted by a suspicious looking individual near the Russel Bridge who asked for a tobacco chew. Mr. Moak said he did not use the weed, whereat the robber demanded of Mr. M. his money and the mail bags. His request was not acceded to by our modern John, who dismounted from his coach and struck the would-be highwayman with a stick of wood from an adjacent woodpile. The scoundrel dropped and the faithful guardian of the mail bags went his way rejoicing. Work is progressing slowly at the round house during the present cold weather.Lester and Theodore Emmons and Wm. H. Strait have purchased a lot containing 40 feet front and 100 feet back on Broad Street of E.H. Ford, on which they will erect a machine shop for the manufacture of the celebrated Firkin Head Cutter, and a general repair shop.

November 1870

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 15, 2013

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 15, 2013

125 Years Ago
Republican Post-Election Celebrations: The Republicans had a high old time last Thursday evening in celebration of the recent victory. Such a display of good-natured enthusiasm was never before witnessed in Oneonta. There was a parade, fireworks, and speeches by Congressman Wilber, Andrew Davidson, Hobart Krum, J. Lee Tucker, and Wm. H. Johnson. On Friday evening, Oneonta Republicans went to Cooperstown and helped in a celebration there. Three carloads of Oneonta Republicans, packed like sardines in a box, went to Unadilla Monday night and helped the enthusiastic Harrison and Morton men of that aristocratic village “paint” the town a vivid crimson. The visitors were superbly treated. An elegant supper was served free for all. The only unpleasant incident occurred while the procession was marching down one of the back streets, when some miscreants flung a quantity of rotten eggs into the ranks.
November 1888

100 Years Ago
The low bidding firm for the contract to build the Country Club is that of McFee & Borst. The contract calls for its completion by next June 1st. Orlo Epps is the architect. It will consist of two buildings – the main club rooms and an annex which will be connected by a port-cochere. The main building will contain two piazzas, 76 feet by 14 feet, which will face the north and south. From this, one enters the reception room, 14 feet by 15 feet. This contains a large fireplace and permanent seats around the walls. From this room entrance is had to the assembly hall which will be 28 by 36 feet and will also contain a large fireplace. From this room one enters the dining room on the opposite side through another large arch. The dining room will be 14 feet by 18 feet and will be connected to the kitchen, a room 14 feet by 15 feet. Stairways will lead from the front porch, the assembly hall and the kitchen to the second floor. The second floor will contain a ladies parlor, two coat rooms, two toilets, a shower, and three caretakers’ rooms.
November 1913

80 Years Ago
Six members of the Social Club of the Chapin Memorial Universalist Church were partially overcome by coal gas yesterday morning while working in the church kitchen. Mrs. Lee Hamm was said to be the most seriously affected falling in a semi-conscious condition at the door as she tried to get out. Others who suffered from the gas were Mrs. George Wood, Mrs. Mable Smith, Mrs. Fred Paine, Mrs. C.E. Utter, and Mrs. Joseph Hendy. All were reported last night to be recovering well. The group, under the direction of Mrs. Smith, was cleaning the kitchen and a fire had been started in the coal range. In order more quickly to heat the room, the gas water heater was lighted, and the rapid consumption of oxygen by the heater, in addition to the escaping coal gas, drove the women from the room. First aid was given by Mrs. Hugh Tigner, after which the group went to Mrs. Wood’s home at 305 Main Street, where they remained until they regained their strength.
November 1933

60 Years Ago
Oneonta’s State Armory for the next two weeks between the hours of 3:30 and 5 p.m. will be rife with the sounds of rebounding basketballs, running feet, and the voice of Hurley McLean, Oneonta High School’s basketball coach – as the Yellow Jackets shape up for the first game of the season on December 4 against Draper Central of Schenevus. Trying out for the varsity are Ken Chase, Dick Jester, Peter Axhoy, Dick Jacobs, Nick Lambros, Jim Anderson, Dick Vroman, Bill Slawson, Jerry Dirvin, Bob Grygiel, Bill Donnelly, John Skinner, Ken Turner, Pete Jacobs and Gene Clough. Trying out for the junior varsity squad are Frank Sturiale, Joe Corarro, Nat Rhodes, Gene Tompkins, Bob Lewis, Joe Pidgeon, Jim Thomas, Dave VanWoert and Joe Cooper. Don Miller and Morris Cleverley are the only returning varsity players.
November 1953

40 Years Ago
One of the first grade classes at Center Street School, under the direction of Mrs. Jane Sloan, has been working recently with students from the SUCO Home Economics Department. Mrs. Sloan’s first grade students have been studying basic nutrition and etiquette. Along with time spent in class on table settings and manners, the students planned their own breakfast menu and participated in a shopping trip to Loblaws. All of the class work has led up to a breakfast which they planned and put together themselves on Friday morning, November 2. The students enjoyed their breakfast with Richard Picolla, principal, Mrs. Margaret Decker, nurse and Miss Carolyn Edwards, student teacher. Among the students participating were Kelly Fleischer, Darlene Sasina, Cindy Marino, Jennifer Lindell, and Paul Monroe.
November 1973

20 Years Ago
The United States has an opportunity to right some historic wrongs – and reduce illegal immigration to its shores—by continuing to support democracy in Haiti, a Haitian exile told an Oneonta audience on Sunday. “A cultural oppression has existed for a long time,” said Pierre Leroy, who fled his native country 32 years ago and hopes to return when it becomes a democracy. “A small elite control the country culturally and also economically.” Leroy told about 25 people at the Universalist Unitarian Church that much of Haiti’s hope lies in exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The U.S. and the United Nations are pressuring Haiti to restore Aristide.
November 1993

10 Years Ago
While his drawings are nearly 500 years old, the ideas of Leonardo da Vinci can still impress children and adults. This was evident when the staff of the Yager Museum at Hartwick College welcomed 40 first-graders from Greater Plains Elementary School to an exhibit titled “The Inventions of Leonardo da Vinci.” “The classes make an annual trip to the museum,” said teacher Corinne Hahn. “They always have an exhibit we can fit into our curriculum.”
November 2003

BOUND VOLUMES, November 21, 2013

BOUND VOLUMES, November 21, 2013

200 YEARS AGO
Domestic Manufactures – It is with singular pleasure we learn that a complete digest of the returns of the U.S. Marshals regarding the manufactures of the United States &c. has been prepared at the Treasury Department, to be laid before Congress at its next season. The grand aggregate value of these manufactures is upwards of one hundred and seventy millions of dollars though the account excludes flour of all kinds, pot and pearl ashes and some other articles, of which the cost of the original material still constitutes the chief value of the manufactured commodity.
November 20, 1813

150 YEARS AGO
Excerpts from a report from the 121st New York State Vols.: The 121st Regiment has again met the enemy – this time with the most gratifying results. We broke camp near Warrenton, Virginia, at daybreak on the 7th inst., and marched with the rest of the corps to within about one mile of Rappahannock Station, at which point the enemy were in considerable force entrenched on both sides of the river. .
November 20, 1863

125 YEARS AGO
A committee previously appointed to make a thorough examination of the edifice, reported to the Baptist Church and Society on Thursday evening of last week, that it was their unanimous opinion, sustained by that of a competent builder, that it was inexpedient to attempt the thorough repair and enlargement of the present building; that it would cost fully half what it would to build a new structure and still it would not be what is desired.
November 23, 1888

100 YEARS AGO
The inconvenience to which many residents of Cooperstown were put by the discontinuance of the gas service this fall bids fair to be overcome by the use of electricity for fuel purposes. The Colliers Light, Heat & Power Company makes the announcement that Cooperstown people may have electricity installed for fuel purposes upon terms that will make its use fully as economical as gas. The company plans to furnish at cost all stoves and apparatus, and will have a demonstrator here soon.
November 19, 1913

75 YEARS AGO
Regulation of outboard motorboats on Otsego Lake is requested in a petition stating in part that the operation of speed boats “has become an intolerable nuisance to the residents along the south shore of Otsego Lake and those further inland including surgical patients in the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital.
November 23, 1938

50 YEARS AGO
The Cooperstown Central School Board of Education has announced plans to construct a six-classroom addition plus shower and locker room facilities at its elementary school on Walnut Street. The board has sign Myron A. Jordan, Richfield Springs architect to draw preliminary plans for the addition. Application has also been made to the State Education Department for approval and for state aid which could amount to 68 percent of the estimated $275,000 cost and bond issue interest.
November 20, 1963

25 YEARS AGO
Cooperstown’s Friends of the Parks group has received two major grants for improvements at Three Mile Point Park with added funds for work three other village park sites. The Clark Foundation granted $25,000, and a matching grant of $37,750 will come from the NYS Office of Parks.
November 23, 1988

10 YEARS AGO
A baseball bat used by New York Yankee slugger Hedeki Matsui was displayed recently by Hall of Fame President Dale Petroskey to 33 members of the Japanese media.
November 21, 2003

BOUND VOLUMES, November 8, 2012

BOUND VOLUMES, November 8, 2012

200 YEARS AGO
Lieut. Col. Myers, Deputy Quarter-Master General, was stationed in charge of Fort Erie, and succeeded in completely silencing the fire of the enemy, drove a detachment from the encampment near the Black Rock, destroyed a barrack, in which was a considerable depot of ammunition. Its explosion must have killed many. The Caledonia, lately captured by the enemy, was destroyed at her moorings. Lieut. Col. Myers speaks highly of the discipline of the detachment of the 49th regiment under Major Ormsby, and of the skill and spirit with which the guns were served, under Captain Kirby and Lieut. Brison of the militia.
November 7, 1812

175 YEARS AGO
Editor’s. Note: In 1837, members of the Democratic Party were commonly referred to as republicans.
Republicans! To The Polls!! Republicans should vote at all times. I do not know of any occasion which furnishes a valid apology for a Jeffersonian Democrat to neglect this invaluable franchise. It was bought with blood; secured to each of you by the patriot firmness and enlightened intelligence of the most revered body of sages that ever deliberated upon the destinies of any people since the world was created. Can a man neglect to vote, when by this simple act, he can sustain those institutions, bought at such an immense cost, in their pristine vigor and purity? Oh no, they cannot do this: the yeomanry of Otsego, cannot do this. They are not made of the stuff to look quietly on, and suffer the President of their choice and delight to be ruthlessly assailed by those who practically show themselves the worst enemies of their country’s welfare!
November 6, 1837

150 YEARS AGO
The draft – Over 1,500 cases have been disposed of by the Commissioner and Examining Surgeon in this County; yet on Tuesday morning there were still about 2,200 still on the list awaiting action. That number will probably not be diminished during the week – the additions keeping fully up with the number disposed of during the day. Either the draft will have to be postponed, or examinations continued after it shall have been made. Yesterday morning the Commissioner’s office was full, and at least one hundred waiting on the outside. We are informed that a majority of the cases which have come before the Surgeon during the current week have failed of their application to be stricken from the roll. The Town of Otsego is paying a bounty of $100 to nine months’ volunteers. If the volunteer is a subscriber to the “town volunteer” fund, he also receives a $100 from that source. Drafted men, if subscribers to the fund to the amount of $10, will receive $100 – one-half the amount received by the volunteer.
November 7, 1862

100 YEARS AGO
Every automobile wrecked at a grade crossing in its zigzag way westward through the Mohawk Valley is an argument in favor of reconstructing the great western turnpike – that great artery of travel a century ago which runs as the crow flies between Albany and Buffalo. It remains today unused, to the detriment of Albany, of Schenectady, Schoharie and Otsego counties, all in the Capitol district, and of others beyond. Its scenery is bewitching and its landmarks are of historic and romantic interest. Once, it opened up a wilderness, which grew and thrived and blossomed for a few short years, only to be closed again and almost forgotten, but not forever. All along its course, villages are waiting for and expecting the day when a far-sighted highway policy will give it a magician’s touch so that they will spring into life.
November 6, 1912

75 YEARS AGO
A rampant band of Redskins, fighting with inspired valor, tackling, blocking, running and punting with a spirit that asked and gave no quarter, beat down the attack of the Yellow Jackets of the Oneonta high school on Doubleday Field Saturday afternoon for a 7-6 victory in one of the most thrilling and masterful exhibitions of the game seen here in years. Delirious pandemonium among the crowd was unleashed when Leon “Sonny” Bailey, 16-year-old, 135-pound halfback received the kickoff immediately after Oneonta had scored, and raced 90-yards down the right side of the field for a touchdown to tie the score. Walter Eggleston, also 16, who tips the scales at 130 pounds, then shot a beautiful drop kick between the goal posts to make the winning point.
November 10, 1937

50 YEARS AGO
What is the cost of electricity in Cooperstown? Is it higher or lower than in other cities around the country? How much current is consumed locally per year by the average family?
The average monthly bill in Cooperstown for 100 kilowatt hours of electricity amounts to $4.65 as compared with an average of $4.06 a month for other cities in a study of 5.649 communities throughout the United States.
For families consuming 250 kilowatt hours the typical bill locally was $8.10. Elsewhere, the average cost was $7.48. For households consuming 500 kilowatt hours, the typical bill locally was $11.65 as against $10.66. An average family in Cooperstown was found to consume 2,790 kilowatt hours last year as compared with 2,140 in 1958.
November 7, 1962

25 YEARS AGO
The ACC Gym in Cooperstown presented awards to five members for “Conspicuous Personal Achievement” during the past year. Receiving honors were Elda Jenkins, age 67, for her efforts in Nautilus training; Steve Walker, 38, for aerobics; Dale Rothenberger, 30, for his work as a coach and triathlete; Michael Crampton, 16, who is a badminton player; and Heather Freeman, 10, a swimmer. “We want these people to know how special they are to us,” said Fitness Director Barbara Faulkner.
November 11, 1987

10 YEARS AGO
Though suffering a 39-0 defeat at the hands of the Onondaga Tigers in a postseason game at Liverpool, the Cooperstown Redskins ended the season with a winning 8-2 record. Billy Hribar, Jesse Torruella, Michael Kiser, Sean Field, Brian Dibble, Sean Graham and Jeremy Holmes were selected to the Section III Center State Conference Senior All-Star team.
November 8, 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 2, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 2, 2012

125 Years Ago
A narrow escape from a terrible accident was had at Quaker Street last Friday, when engineer Houghton, drawing the Albany excursion train, ran into the rear of a freight train which had out no flag. Fortunately, engineer Houghton, by reversing promptly and applying sand, managed to stop the force of his train to the extent that no passengers were injured. The engine, however, was quite badly wrecked in the collision that followed, as also were a caboose and one or two other cars. Engineer Houghton and his fireman saved their lives by jumping.
November 1887

100 Years Ago
One of the finest musical entertainments ever held in this city was the piano forte lecture and recital given in the assembly hall of the high school building last evening by Edward Baxter Perry, the famous blind musician. The hall was well filled and the audience listened with the closest attention to the interesting description given by Mr. Perry of the circumstances under which the several musical numbers on the programme were composed. The musical was given under the auspices of the Woman’s Club. In technique and finish, in force and feeling and in interpretation and expression, Mr. Perry demonstrated that he is a master of the science to which he is devoted. Every number on the programme received the most enthusiastic applause. Mr. Perry distinguished serious music from popular music saying that the latter combines “a sudden jingle, dash and stir with a more or less insipid sweetness, which is commonly styled ‘pretty.’” As a matter of fact, he held, the best music is not intended to be ‘pretty’ at all, but deals with the intelligence, the emotions, and everything that goes to make up the heights and depths of human experience. True music is the kind which will stir the brain or warm the heart of a cultured human being.
November 1912

80 Years Ago
President Hoover on Monday said that “if Franklin D. Roosevelt is elected President of the United States and the Democratic Tariff policy adopted, the grass will grow in the streets of a hundred cities.” Hoover asserted “that to embark upon this inchoate New Deal, which has been propounded in this campaign, would be to undermine and destroy our American system. “This campaign,” Hoover said, “is more than a contest between two men. It is more a contest between two parties. It is a contest between two philosophies of government. We are told by the opposition that we
must have a change, that we must have a New Deal. It is not the change that comes from normal development of national life to which I object, but the proposal to alter the whole foundations of our national life which have been builded through generations of testing and struggle, and of the principles upon which we have builded the nation.”
November 1932

60 Years Ago
Ultra-modern spooks came out of their eerie haunts last night, under the spell of an Indian Summer moon, and cavorted before 6,000 bewitched onlookers in that parade ground for pixies known as Main Street. The annual “Night of Fun” frolic was distinguished this year by up-to-the-minute goblins, ghosts, gremlins, elves and spritely little folk. Space cadets, a man from Mars, walking ballot boxes, the Statue of Liberty, and most everything except a witch in a helicopter, were prancing in line with the orthodox little people. The Oneonta high school band, directed by Carmen Caiazza went through strictly new maneuvers and exhibited a musicianship and precision that was outstanding. There was a time when fearful property owners anchored their houses and things lest the mischief-makers move them to different wards. But, the Rotary-Kiwanis-Lions Club-spon-

 

sored event evoked not a single complaint to police about mischief.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
Phillip A. Luce, the one-time member of the Progressive Labor Party turned right-wing libertarian, will appear on the State University at Delhi campus, Thursday. Luce, speaking on the topic, “Why the New Left Should Hold No Attraction for You,” will be at the Little Theater at Farrell Hall on the Delhi Campus at 4 p.m. As a college student in the early 1960s Luce was active in many facets of politics of the far left, visiting Cuba on one occasion and arranging trips to the island nation for others. Luce later changed his mind about politics and became a member of the right wing Young Americans for Freedom. His visit to the Delhi area is being sponsored by the local YAF chapter.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Governor-elect Mario Cuomo went jogging and chatted by phone with defeated Republican opponent Lewis Lehrman as he took time off Wednesday to savor a sweet but narrow victory. Cuomo defeated Lehrman by about 164,000 votes in the race to succeed Hugh Carey. It was the lowest margin in a New York gubernatorial race since 1954 when Democrat Averill Harriman beat Republican U.S. Senator Irving Ives by 11,125 votes. Cuomo spent Wednesday relaxing at his home in Queens and working on plans to form a transition team. The first person named to the team – to head the operation – was Cuomo’s 25-year-old lawyer son, Andrew, who has served as a top adviser throughout his father’s campaign. Lehrman conceded defeat 16 hours after the polls closed.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
A city of Oneonta committee reports that it will not ask Otsego County to cut back the hours that bars remain open. Tavern hours are set by the county, and Oneonta’s representatives to the county board had indicated they would support a move by city leaders to shorten tavern hours and mandate closing at 1 or 2 a.m. instead of 3 a.m. The call to have bars close earlier has come in the wake of alcohol-related violence that has plagued downtown Oneonta. However, the committee believes a change is unnecessary. “Based on what we’ve seen, based on the efforts of different organizations – the city, the colleges, the bar owners and the students – our committee doesn’t feel at this time we want to petition the county to bring the drinking time back,” said Robert Bard, 5th Ward Alderman.
November 1992

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 9, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 9, 2012

100 Years Ago
A plurality of 200,000 votes for Woodrow Wilson over Taft, and Taft’s lead of 60,000 over Roosevelt, is the result of yesterday’s election in New York State so far as confirmed by nearly complete returns. The Democratic Party presidential plurality is the largest New York State has ever given to that party and it is the first time in the history of the state that the voters outside of the metropolitan district have given a Democratic presidential candidate a plurality. So far, the totals are: Wilson – 648,066; Taft – 477,274; Roosevelt – 381,500. Nationwide Wilson has secured 387 electoral votes; Roosevelt has 89; and Taft only 12. In conceding defeat Taft said he hopes to see organized a national “Republican Club” entirely apart from the Republican National Committee. Such a club he said will “cherish the principles of the party and be a source of political activity, not only during election years, but at all times.” Mr. Taft declared that Mr. Wilson would face a Congress made up to a large extent of untried men who have come to believe that to show their faith with the people they must at times be “insurgents” and oppose the program of the leaders.
November 1912

80 Years Ago
Borne high upon a towering wave of Democratic votes Franklin D. Roosevelt’s lead assumed such impressive proportions that soon after midnight President Hoover conceded the New York Governor’s election to the presidency. Roosevelt will assume office at a time of economic stress which furnished the principal talking points of an unusually intensive and bitter campaign. With a total of 5,506 votes cast in the city of Oneonta Tuesday, President Hoover received 3,493, while Governor Roosevelt polled 1,952. Of the 1,149 voters in the Town of Oneonta, Hoover was the choice of 850 as compared with a vote of 287 for Roosevelt. Judging by the attendance at election smokers and open house gatherings held by clubs and other organizations in the city, most of the citizens remained at home and got the reports of the political warfare over their own radios. A total attendance of considerably less than 300 was reported from seven gatherings at which reports were received over the air.
November 1932

60 Years Ago
The body of Pvt. Jack A. Oliver, a victim of the Korean War, will arrive on the 6:41 p.m. train Wednesday. The funeral has been set for 11 a.m. Saturday in Bookhout Funeral Home, 357 Main Street. The Rev. Roswell Lyon of First Methodist Church will officiate. Burial will be in New Milford, Pa. under charge of the Susquehanna Pa. American Legion. The Oneonta American Legion will take part in the service here. Private Oliver, a 21-year-old medical corpsman died of wounds received September 6. He was drafted about 20 months ago after graduating from Oneonta high school and had been in Korea since last Christmas time. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Helen Oliver; a brother Kenneth E. Oliver of 3 Depew Street; his father Harold Oliver of Binghamton; and an aunt, Mrs. Mabel Olmstead, Scranton, Pa.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
The Hartwick College Women’s Club will present a monodrama by Elizabeth Jenkins Dresser at 12:45 p.m. Tuesday, in the Little Theater, in the basement of Bresee Hall, Hartwick College. Mrs. Dresser will portray Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Her monodramas have been enjoyed by many clubs in the past several years. Her portrayal of the famous poetess includes three scenes – an early meeting with Browning; her elopement to Italy, and her triple role as wife, mother and famous poet. Mrs. Dresser is a graduate of Swarthmore College and of the Leland Powers School of the Theater in Boston. Her original monodramas depicting famous women include Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Lane, an orphan who became hostess for her bachelor uncle President James Buchanan, and Anne Hutchinson, and dramas of Christmas and Grandmothers of Yesterday and Today.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Oneonta’s code enforcement officer said Monday that the city is not able to conduct annual inspections of student housing to see that safety standards are being met. “I’d be the first to acknowledge there are a lot of housing violations out there that I don’t know about,” Adolph Buzzy, code official said. City aldermen are promising an investigation into safety procedures following the death of a third student in off-campus housing this year. David W. Lein, 24, a 1981 SUCO graduate died of smoke inhalation early Saturday morning after fire destroyed his residence at 24 Cedar Street. “I would say there are about 138 houses in the city that have students living in them,” Buzzy said. “The only ones that are inspected are the ones I get complaints on.” Buzzy estimates he would need $250,000, three more inspectors, and two secretaries to inspect every student apartment annually. There are 4,686 residences within the city limits. Buzzy inspected 62 homes last month just for health hazards.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
An unidentified man snatched purses from two Oneonta women Monday. Police believe he is responsible for at least four purse thefts in the last two weeks. The suspect is described as a short, stocky white male about five feet, eight inches tall and weighing 190 to 200 pounds. The suspect has brown hair and has been seen wearing a blue, hooded Adidas sweatshirt, according to Detective William Davis of the Oneonta Police Department. The thefts occurred at various Oneonta institutions including St. Mary’s School and A.O. Fox Memorial Hospital.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
A program of patriotic Veterans Day music will be performed Sunday at 3 p.m. by the Oneonta Community Concert Band in the St. Mary’s Parish Hall. Director Rene Prins will lead a program that includes John Philip Sousa marches and selections in honor of the heroes of our military forces. A highlight of the program will be the performance of “Ode 9/11/01,” a new composition by Prins, written in memory of the tragic events of more than a year ago. Also featured will be a baritone horn solo “Asleep in the Deep,” featuring Tom Murphy on the euphonium.
November 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 16, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 16, 2012

125 Years Ago
When found in the laboratory of his lamp factory in Newark, from which 4,000 lamps a day are now sent out, Thomas Edison said that the commercial phonograph is now the most interesting thing in the world to him. It is perfectly finished, and tools are being made for its manufacture upon a large scale. The stories which Edison tells of what his perfected phonograph will do are so extraordinary that he scarcely expects people to believe him, and yet he says that the apparatus is so simple, so effective, and so immediately useful that he is certain of its rapid introduction into business – far more certain than he was of the universal adoption of the telephone as a business instrument. “My phonograph I expect to see in every business office. The first five hundred will, I hope, be ready for distribution about the end of January. Their operation is simplicity itself and cannot fail. The merchant or clerk who wishes to send a letter has only to set the machine in motion, and to talk in his natural voice and at the usual rate of speed into the receiver. When he has finished, the sheet, or phonograph, as I call it, is ready for putting into the box made on purpose for the mails. We are making the sheets in three sizes – one for letters from 800-1,000 words; another size for 2,000 words; another size for 4,000 words. The receiver of a phonogram will put it into his apparatus, and the message will be given out more clearly, more distinctly, than the best telephone message ever sent.”
November 1887

80 Years Ago
The imperative necessity to the railroads of a cut in governmental costs and a resulting reduction in the national tax burden which now amounts to $14,500,000,000 billion or about $125 annually for every person in the country is stressed in a statement issued by Frederick E. Williamson, president of the New York Central lines. The 1931 taxes paid by the New York Central were 42.88 percent of the company’s net revenue from railway operations. This year, for the first eight months, tax accruals have risen to 51.63 percent or more than half of the company’s net revenue from railway operations. “Our taxes,” Williamson points out, “have reached a point where they are stifling the purchasing power of the railroads, which normally are the country’s largest single purchaser. As a result, many of the largest industries in the country, that normally employ many thousands, are suffering severely because of our inability and that of other railroads to purchase needed supplies even on a scale commensurate with our reduced traffic.”
November 1932
60 Years Ago
Advertisement – The Eight Friendly Shopping Services at Bresee’s – The purchase refund event: The drawing on our big Purchase Refund Event takes place every Thursday night at 9:30 p.m. – up to $5,000 refunded on ten sales slips. Parcel Checking – Make shopping more enjoyable by checking your parcels at our checking desk located on the second floor. Ladies Lounge – Ladies, relax while shopping in our newly decorated and comfortable lounge located on the second floor. Health Bar Restaurant – Meet your friends at the famous Health Bar Restaurant – famous for good food and courteous service. Public Address System – We are able to locate anyone at anytime over our Public Address System – also to bring you special announcements. Buy Now, Pay in January – To open a charge account, apply at Bresee’s Credit Office on the second floor. Do your shopping the easy way. Contract Plan – You pay as little as 15 percent down and the unpaid balance in monthly payments up to one year. Lay-Away Plan – You pay a small deposit and we will hold for you any item you wish to purchase.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
A committee appointed by President Nixon in 1971 to study the state of health education across the country reported its findings Wednesday. The committee’s overall conclusion is that “health education throughout America, especially in non-white areas, is a neglected, underfinanced, unhealthy, fragmented activity” which requires a major overhaul. The investigative committee, staffed with private health professionals, also found that “no agency, in or out of government, is responsible for establishing health education goals.” To remedy the problem, the committee recommends a major new commitment of federal money and a reallocation of current and future funding by federal, state, local and private sources so the money will be spent more wisely.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Are the following statements true or false? Teachers tend to discipline boys more harshly than girls. Women are absent from jobs more often than men due to illness. Most young women do not need to plan careers as they will be homemakers. Most high school students feel that boys should pay the expenses on a date. Teachers talk more with girls than they do with boys. These questions are part of a game found in a program kit that examines expanding roles for young people and challenges youth to consider their own outlooks on sex-role stereotyping without pressure to change their minds. The program was pioneered through the Cornell Cooperative Extension.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
An Elmira high school junior was removed from school after she went to class with packaged condoms decorating her clothing and hair. Thursa Hargrove, 16, said she wore the prophylactics as both a statement for safe sex and fashion. “It was a fashion statement at first, but there are a lot of teenagers out there that are embarrassed about them,” said Hargrove, who is the mother of an 18-month-old son. “People need them and shouldn’t be embarrassed by them,” she said. But officials at Elmira Free Academy, a public school, said the wearing of condoms was distracting to other students.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
Big industry sank deeper into its slump, with production plunging in October by the largest amount in a year. Production at the nation’s factories, mines and utilities dropped 0.8 percent from the previous month. However, most economists continue to believe the country will avoid falling back into a double-dip recession.
November 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 30, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 30, 2012

125 Years Ago
On Thanksgiving evening the streets of Oneonta were for the first time lighted by electricity. The evening was stormy and disagreeable and the bright, cheerful light did not a little to dissipate the gloom which seemed in the unusual quiet of the day to have settled over the town. The American system is used for street lighting and thus far the lights have been entitled to all the praise they have received, which is not a little. The company displayed enterprise and liberality in furnishing the light for Thanksgiving evening. There are now some twenty-five arc lights in use about the village and in business places, and the demand for the incandescent light – the Westinghouse – is so active that a majority of the stores have already subscribed for it.
November 1887

100 Years Ago
Monday morning, shortly after 11 o’clock, a young woman walked into the Oneonta Hotel and was shown to the Ladies’ parlor by one of the bell boys. Ten minutes later she calmly produced a bottle of laudanum from her pocket and after pouring the contents of the bottle into a glass drank the deadly poison and fell to the floor unconscious. Two ladies who were in the writing room adjoining the parlor saw the act of the young woman and the next moment heard her groans of agony. As quickly as possible they notified Mr. DeLorme, the day clerk at the hotel. Together they rushed back to the parlor where the woman was apparently dying. Mr. DeLorme used all first aid relief measures known to him and then summoned Dr. G. W. Augustin, who found her with respiration entirely stopped. By the use of powerful stimulants and artificial respiration, Dr. Augustin succeeded for a time at least in keeping her alive. During two minutes of consciousness, the young woman mumbled that she had taken a large quantity of laudanum, that she had no father or mother and that all she wished to do was die. She was eventually identified as Nioskaletta Van Wie, daughter of Lorenzo Van Wie, residing at Davenport Center. Miss Van Wie was 19 years of age.
November 1912

80 Years Ago
The Oneonta checker team opened its season with a victory over Richfield Springs Friday night, winning 47 games, losing 27 and drawing 20. The match was played in the American Legion rooms at Richfield Springs. J.F. Roberts, New York State match champion, a member of the home team, scored five victories and a draw out of six games played. Perry, former Oneonta City champion, succeeded in getting a draw with Roberts. W. Quaif of Richfield Springs had a clean slate for the evening, winning all four games he played. A. Fenton came through with three wins and three draws in six games. Oneonta’s M. Anderson was the outstanding player of the evening winning 13 games, losing three and drawing one. A comparatively recent arrival in the ranks of local checker enthusiasts, he has made a careful study of the game and has been baffling some of the old-timers by his cleverness.
November 1932

40 Years Ago
Oneonta State is the new soccer kingpin in the City of The Hills. Playing before more than 6,000 spectators, the Red Dragons defeated Hartwick College by a convincing 3-0 score on Monday. Oneonta State thus became the college division champion of New York State. The Red Dragons earned their way to the championship contest by trouncing Adelphi last Wednesday. But, a spell of bad weather nearly prevented the championship game from taking place. An early snow storm, followed by freezing weather, then rain, left the city’s playing fields in all but unplayable condition by Thursday. Late Wednesday night Oneonta Mayor James Lettis offered, on behalf of the city, the use of Damaschke Field for the game and officially decreed Monday “Soccer Day” in The City of The Hills.” Prior to the contest there were predictions that lumping the rabid fans of the opposing teams together in one ballpark would result in riots, mayhem and property damage. The predictions proved unfounded. Oneonta, indeed, had one of its finest hours.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
President Reagan is urging city officials around the country to support his proposal for a five-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax increase to finance a highway repair and jobs program. Reagan is also considering a plan to accelerate next July’s 10 percent income tax cut by six months so it would take effect in January. White House officials said last week that Reagan was leaning toward speeding up the tax cut in hopes of stimulating the nation’s faltering economy. However, Republican Congressional leaders already have told Reagan there are not enough votes to pass the speed-up because of concern it would add to the mounting budget deficit. An earlier announcement that the administration was considering fully taxing the unemployment benefits of the nation’s jobless caused a furor and was quickly withdrawn. Reagan personally vetoed that idea saying it was “not the type of thing I want to do.”
November 1982

20 Years Ago
A year after a proposed state law would have forced deer hunters to wear blaze orange coats and hats, red and black check coats are still the garb of choice for hunters shopping at the Stevens Hardware store in Oneonta. “There has been a lot of talk about blaze orange over the years, especially last year when they thought about making a law, but to tell you the truth we have a hard time selling it,” said proprietor John Stevens.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
Pollsters face a growing number of obstacles while doing their work – such as the rapid growth of cell phone use, caller-ID technology, and answering machines. Researchers believe less than five percent of households use only a cell phone, although the number is higher among certain groups like young urban adults. The overall number using only cell phones is likely to grow. Most agree, however, that these developments have not yet crippled telephone surveys. The polling industry is unlikely to abandon telephone surveys without something more reliable to take their place.
November 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 1, 2013

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 1, 2013

125 Years Ago
Attention Laboring Men: The recent strike on the Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley railroad was due to a reduction of wages paid the Italian laborers employed from $1.25 to $1.00 per day. On the street railway recently built in Oneonta, mainly through the efforts of Hon. David Wilber, wages were $1.50 a day and home labor was employed – something of a contrast in methods. Laboring men here will appreciate the difference and being aware that the Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley management, now as two years ago, are opposing the election of Mr. Wilber, regardless of politics, will see to it, we have no doubt, that such opposition results, as heretofore, to Mr. Wilber’s advantage.
November 1888

100 Years Ago
City attorney Owen C. Becker was the speaker before the Fortnightly Club at a meeting at the residence of Supt. George J. Dann on Watkins Avenue at which nearly 30 members were in attendance. His subject was “Some Tendencies of the Times.” The speaker declared his belief that conditions are growing better in politics, referring to the time when legislatures were bought and sold and corruption was winked at everywhere. Although the progress has been slow, we have lived to see reforms in our election laws, from a condition when floaters were bid for at the polls to a condition when comparatively little money is used for the purpose of influencing the voters. The last 25 years have seen rapid progress and advancement in the cause of labor. Laws have been enacted protecting women and children in industry; providing safety appliances and sanitation in working places, providing compensation for industrial accidents, providing a minimum wage scale, and recently providing for the arbitration of differences between employers and employees.
November 1913

80 Years Ago
One-fifth of all children in New York State under the age of 16 years are in families receiving public relief. This is brought out in a report released by the State Temporary Emergency Relief Administration. Individuals over 16 years of age whose families, or who themselves, are on relief rolls comprise one-twelfth of all people over the age of 16 years in the state. The collection of these figures was for the purpose of computing the amount of cod-liver oil necessary to carry relief children through the winter. The state administration advocates that local relief officials provide a pint of cod liver oil each month for each child under three years of age, and for each undernourished child. The state likewise advocates the extensive use of milk in relief families. A quart of milk a day is considered the proper minimum amount for each child under six years and between 10 and 16 years. Other children are supposed to receive a pint of milk a day and expectant and nursing mothers ordinarily receive a quart a day.
November 1933
40 Years Ago
Four Oneonta natives who are making a name for themselves in music circles throughout the northeast will begin a two-week engagement at the Oasis Motor Inn this week. It’s the first local stand for the quartet known as “The 69th Amendment” although the four members have performed as individuals in Oneonta on many occasions before. The group is composed of Ed Michelson, 24, on piano; Brian Kreger, 28, on drums; and brothers Ray Cameron, 26, and Dave Cameron, 25, who play lead guitar and bass. Since forming their band in 1971, the quartet has toured New England. They were once hired for a two-day stand at The Berkshire Motor Inn in Great Barrington, Massachusetts and ended up spending four months there as the featured band. They have also played the Penthouse Lounge at the Colonial Hilton in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the Living Room in Boston, Bounty Tavern at the New Sheraton Bangor in Bangor, Maine and the Chateau DeVille in Framingham, Massachusetts. “The 69th Amendment’s repertoire stretches from ballads to the Jitterbug, to 50s medleys and the music of the 60s. All four young men grew up together as students at St. Mary’s School and Oneonta High School.
November 1973

30 Years Ago
Religious leaders said Tuesday they were “near despair” over Governor Mario Cuomo’s leadership and his consideration of an executive order to ban discrimination against homosexuals in state government. The clergymen believe that if Cuomo issues a gay rights executive order, it will give government sanction to homosexuality. They warned in a telegram to Cuomo that they would “begin to work in earnest to arouse our constituencies concerning you and your policies, which we believe are inimical to the best interest of New Yorkers.” “You are lending the moral legitimacy of your office to something that is off the wall,” the Rev. William Smith, dean of St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Seminary in Yonkers, told Cuomo at a meeting with the Governor and about 20 clergymen last week.
November 1983

20 Years Ago
Esther Effenbein, who began her work at SUCO in 1950 as a costume researcher, received the Esther Hubbard Whitaker Award, in recognition of her her outstanding service to the college in the performing arts. Effenbein has designed costumes for more than 1909 productions at the college and for the Glimmerglass Opera Company. She continues to serve as a visiting assistant professor in the Speech Communication and Theatre Department. She also developed a program at Bassett Hospital using stage make-up in occupational therapy for patients.
November 1993

10 Years Ago
A study says the number of foreign students attending U.S. colleges increased by less than one percent in 2002-2003 – the lowest growth rate in seven years. It’s just the latest piece of evidence that international students are shying away from the United States because of tough immigration rules. The Institute of International Education (IIE) said tightened visa procedures enacted after the 2001 terrorist attacks, which have delayed the entry of many foreigners into the U.S., contributed to the low growth rate. In each of the previous two academic years, foreign student enrollment has increased by 6.4 percent. U.S. schools want foreign students both for the revenue they bring in, about $12 billion annually, and for their research contributions.
November 2003

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 29, 2013

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 29, 2013

125 Years Ago
The women of our land are daily gaining a firmer foothold in all the business of the country, and winning more of public recognition of their ability and genius. For some time past, many of the higher grades of social and literary events, in some of our large cities, have been in their hands, and in situations and vocations where a few years ago there was no thought of competition, women are acknowledged to be equally competent as men.
November 1888

100 Years Ago
John Kendrick Bangs lectured to the students of the Oneonta Normal and High School course. The title of his talk was “Salubrities I Have Met.” By “Salubrities” Mr. Bangs explained that he meant the pleasant, whole-souled, genial men and women whose humor, tact, and gentle courtesy make life worth living. The lecture was incomparable as a genial, wholesome, overflowing of humor out of the very heart of the speaker’s personal experiences. To say that his audience was pleased is but a trite expression, for an emotion which followed with keenest interest every statement and expression, laughing heartily at quip and jest, smiling at the gentle touches of a rarer humor and betimes saddening at the pathos of his word.
November 1913

80 Years Ago
Three Greek letter organizations on the Hartwick College campus held their informal initiation ceremonies Monday evening at their respective houses. Two sororities and one fraternity participated, initiating a total of 17 students. A mock initiation ceremony, in which all the members acted as members of an Indian tribe, featured the informal initiation of Phi Sigma Phi sorority held at 8 Cozy Avenue. The pass words “wekum,” “wakum,” and “wokum” were used. Those initiated were the Misses Galey Cop, Catherine Fox, Elizabeth Gregory, Janet Holden, Ida Moshier, and Lucille Remey. The pledges came dressed to represent a politician, an old maid school teacher, a hobo, a football hero, and a farmer. The remaining one was termed indescribable.
November 1933

60 Years Ago
Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill declared today that the danger of war has lessened because now the Russians – along with the rest of mankind – fear the annihilation an atomic conflict would bring. In an optimistic review of foreign affairs, the Prime Minister told the House of Commons he believed the Russian people and their leaders have lost their stomach for aggression. Churchill held that the fearful nature of atomic weapons which “cast their shadows on every thoughtful mind” may force the human race to keep a lasting peace. The 78-year-old Prime Minister stated: “I do not find it unreasonable or dangerous to conclude that internal prosperity, rather than external conquest is not only the deep desire of the Russian people, but also the long interest of their rulers.”
November 1953

40 Years Ago
Fox Hospital, in a move to expand its emergency room services, has hired a veteran physician to become is first chief of Emergency Medical Services. The appointment of Dr. Joseph B. Fowler, 59, formerly of Salt Lake City, was announced yesterday. Also, Dr. Stephen W. Van deCarr, 30, joined the hospital staff as a fulltime member of the Emergency Room staff. Already serving on the Emergency Room staff is Dr. John Spoor of Gilbertsville. The hospital expects to hire a fourth physician for the Emergency Room “within a month or two.”

November 1973
30 Years Ago
Local Young Volunteers in Action have given more than 3,141 hours of volunteer service in 1982-1983 according to Nancy Kroll Y.V.A. coordinator. She expects the program, started in December, 1982, to generate 5,000 volunteer hours over the next twelve months. Y.V.A. gives youth, 14 to 22 years of age, a chance to get involved in their communities while exploring their career interests.
November 1983

20 Years Ago
More than 80 children from the Oneonta area begin their school day every morning by going to an office complex, filing past architectural and software firms and into their classroom – a converted optometrist’s office. It’s quite a change from the last six school years, when the non-denominational Oneonta Community Christian School was located in Baptist churches. School officials made the move into their new site at 3200 Chestnut Street, formerly known as the Trade Mart, in September.
November 1993

BOUND VOLUMES, November 28, 2013

BOUND VOLUMES, November 28, 2013

200 YEARS AGO
Common Schools – Excerpts from directions for inspectors of common schools disseminated by G. Hawley, State Superintendent of Schools: “The trust which the statute has reposed in the inspectors of schools is great. In the discharge of it they are to proceed with caution and fidelity. In the examination of a candidate for teaching a public school they are to look, not less to moral, than to literary qualification; the character of the man, his temper of mind, his patience, and moral habits, are at least as proper subjects for enquiry, as his sufficiency in learning.
November 27, 1813

175 YEARS AGO
Excerpts from an editorial by John H. Prentiss: “If the people of the United States have a ruling passion, it is the love of money. In the days of the Revolution and for a few succeeding years, patriotism – a love of country and a love of liberty – were the predominant characteristics. But freedom achieved, gave scope and impetus to enterprise, which under favorable auspices, brought first comfort, then plenty, and lastly superfluity. Hence, naturally and almost imperceptibly, arose first the desire and then the love of wealth – for avarice, or the spirit of gain, is like jealousy – ‘it grows, by that which it doth feed on.’ Gains, unusual and unlooked for gains, came, under these circumstances, to all who had ordinary industry and ordinary prudence.
December 3, 1838

125 YEARS AGO
The Watch-Care of Daughters – Parental instinct will guide all who have children of their own in the watch-care which should be bestowed upon their daughters. It will lead them to know what they read, with whom they associate, where they spend their leisure hours.
November 30, 1888

100 YEARS AGO
The Delaware and Hudson Railroad was the only bidder at the sale of the Town of Otsego’s railroad stock in front of the Court House last Wednesday. The sale was therefore made to the D &H for $7,500, the price they had agreed to pay for it. The company was represented at the sale by C.A. Walker of New York City, treasurer of the D&H, and Lewis E. Carr, Jr., an attorney. The sale is accompanied by certain conditions which include the removal of all extra or arbitrary freight rates in and out of Cooperstown and the erection of a suitable railroad station in the near future.
November 26, 1913

75 YEARS AGO
Charles Cooke, son of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Cooke of this village, is the author of the sensationally successful novel “Big Show.” Cooke has the distinction of having written the first book ever to find a place amid the bright lights of New York’s Great White Way. At Broadway and 43rd Street, in the heart of Times Square, there has just been painted on the blank side of the Strand Hotel, across the street from the famous Paramount Building, a huge sign, covering one thousand square feet and extending over four and a half stories of the building.
November 30, 1938

50 YEARS AGO
The tragic death by assassination last Friday of President John F. Kennedy brings deep sorrow to the hearts of every American. Americans join in expressing our heartfelt sympathy to Mrs. Kennedy, their two children, his parents, and his brothers and sisters in this period of utmost grief.
November 27, 1963

25 YEARS AGO
The Fourth Grade Cooperstown Elementary honor roll: Candace Clark, Andrew Deichman, Justin Deichman, James Leinhart, Jamie Muehl, Edward Clow, Jennifer Clark, Sarah Heitz, Natalie Laidlaw, Ryan Miosek, Rebecca Alpern, Christoper Bussman, Jamie Bertino, Renee Welch, Ben Ingalls, Lindsay Coleman, Kasey Connor, Maud Selendy, Karen Lettis, Megan Oberriter, Kenneth MacLeish, Christopher Lott, Shawn Pokorney, Mary Beth Crippen, Kate Deringer, Emera Bridger, Melissa Walrath, Molly Welch, Alanna Murphy, Fred Obermeyer, Terri Miller, Amanda Coleman, Justin Bennett, Gretchen Morrison, Summer Killian, Micah Porter, Natalie Wightman, and Matt Trolio.
November 30, 1988

10 YEARS AGO
Congressman Sherwood Boehlert (R-New Hartford) supports passage of the amended Medicare Prescription Drug Bill that will bring an additional $60 million to 10 hospitals in his district. Additionally, reimbursement rates for physicians will increase by 1.5 percent instead of taking a 4.5 percent cut. Over the next ten years Bassett Hospital will receive more than $5.6 million under the amendment lobbied by Boehlert and other upstate Republicans.
November 28, 2003

BOUND VOLUMES, November 29, 2012

BOUND VOLUMES, November 29, 2012

200 YEARS AGO
Beware of Counterfeits – There are in circulation, imitations of some of the twenty dollar notes of the Bank of North America, dated the 21st of February, 1812, issued payable to D. Etwein, or bearer. The citizens are cautioned not to receive such notes, without a careful examination. The editors of papers will render a service to the community by republishing this caution.
November 28, 1812

175 YEARS AGO
Ed. Note: John H. Prentiss, editor of The Freeman’s Journal, was elected to the House of Representatives in the election of 1837. He therefore informed readers of his intentions with regard to the newspaper with the following message:
“The discharge of public duties imposed upon him by his fellow-citizens, will require the absence of the editor of this paper from this date. Congress will commence on the 4th proximo, and probably continue in session 6 or 7 months, during which time the charge of furnishing matter for the Journal, will be committed to Mr. Wm. L. Crandall, who recently officiated in the same capacity. He is a young man of sound principles, and respectable talents, and the trust is resigned to him in the fullest confidence that it will be discharged, not only with faithfulness, but with ability. The business of the office, in other respects, is committed to the charge of Mssrs. Ezra D. Burr and Pembroke S. Booth, whose acts will be ratified by the proprietor.”
November 27, 1837

150 YEARS AGO
Complaints constantly reach the government that soldiers, with wounds permanently disabling them for active service in the field are sent here (Washington, D.C.) from large cities as deserters. In many instances, the discharges are destroyed, or they are refused the privilege of going to their homes to procure the evidence of their discharge, and in case of soldiers on leave, their passes are taken away from them, and torn up. The only incentive to these outrages is the reward of $5, which the government pays for the arrest of each deserter. There is an effort making on the part of the military authorities to put a stop to these outrages, being not only a swindle upon the government, but causing very great annoyance to the friends and relatives of the victims.
November 28, 1862

125 YEARS AGO
If the old “Cooper Grounds” on which once stood the Hall of James Fenimore Cooper, where are still growing the trees which he planted, and which he owned at his death – could be bid off on Friday by any capitalist with reference to making it in time a memorial place to the name of the great American novelist, and to which perhaps could be removed the monument erected to his memory, there are those here and elsewhere who would contribute liberally to such object. The opportunity should not be lost and we commend it to the prompt attention of real estate owners and others of Cooperstown.
December 2, 1887

100 YEARS AGO
Not in recent years, if ever, have the people of Cooperstown had the opportunity of witnessing a genuine wrestling match. There being no other attraction in this village for Thanksgiving Day, the management of the Star Theatre took advantage of an opportunity to book a company of well-known wrestlers for a performance both afternoon and evening in connection with the regular programme of moving pictures. Miss Cora Livingston, the champion female wrestler of the world, and her company, after closing a tour of the big theatres in central New York this week, were induced to play in Cooperstown. The company also includes Miss Dunne of Kansas City who is the wrestling partner of Miss Livingston; Charles Kaiser of Gloversville and Harvey Parker of Brockton. Massachusetts. The entertainment will be high class in every respect. Miss Livingston is a well-educated woman who writes entertainingly for the magazines and newspapers on health and hygienic topics. The price of admission will be 25 cents.
November 27, 1912

75 YEARS AGO
Five women, the first representatives of the fair sex ever to sit on a trial jury in Supreme Court in Otsego County, were drawn Monday morning to consider the evidence in the first jury case to be tried at the November term at the courthouse in Cooperstown. Justice Ely W. Personius of Elmira presided. Sitting with them were seven of the sterner sex which in the past has had a monopoly of this service to the state. No longer in New York state will verdicts be rendered by “twelve good men and true,” for the new law passed at the last session of the legislature allows the ladies, if they wish, to do their patriotic duty. The first five women to hear evidence in a case on trial in Supreme Court in this county were Ruth MacDuff, of Schenevus, Frances B. McCarthy of Oneonta, Theodora Peters of Westford, Edith Vandenberg of Cooperstown and Nellie Balcom of South Hartwick. The matter involved a breach of contract.
December 1, 1937

25 YEARS AGO
Ron Head, Cooperstown’s village justice, is resigning as of March 31, 1988. “It’s time to move on,” said Head, who has served on the bench for a decade. The job has become increasingly more demanding and complicated. Head estimates that the village has handled more than 500 driving while intoxicated cases during his tenure. These cases take time and range in complexity. Head teaches economics, law and history at Cooperstown Central School.
December 2, 1987

10 YEARS AGO
Village residents and tourists may find relief more readily available in the near future thanks to a $50,000 Capital Projects Grant secured by Assemblyman Bill Magee. The money is earmarked for the construction of restrooms on Main Street, according to Mayor Carol Waller. “The need for centrally located public bathrooms has been identified repeatedly, and there was no way that the village could afford such an amenity. We are thrilled,” Waller said. The location of the restrooms has yet to be determined. “We will be relying on the Planning Board to guide us as we go forward,” Waller said.
November 29, 2002

BOUND VOLUMES, November 14, 2013

BOUND VOLUMES, November 14, 2013

175 YEARS AGO
Election in Otsego County – The official canvass of the votes given in this county at the recent general election, shows a majority of 867 for Governor Marcy, 831 for Lt. Governor Tracy, 837 for Senator Clark, 508 for Prentiss for Congress, and an average of 733 for the Democratic Assembly Ticket. In 1836, there were 6,982 votes polled for Governor, — this year 9,025 – making an increase of 2,043. In 1836, there were 7,013 votes polled for Congress, — this year 8,940, — making an increase of 1,927, of which latter number the Democratic candidate received 940, increasing his whole vote to that amount over his vote in 1836. (Ed. Note: The Democratic candidate for Congress was John H. Prentiss the editor and publisher of The Freeman’s Journal)
November 17, 1838

150 YEARS AGO
A fine improvement – We spent an hour one pleasant morning last week in looking over the important village and neighborhood improvement, present and prospective, going on in the south part of the village, which contemplates the extension of West Street to the new Iron bridge, just beyond the corporation line, the opening of a very desirable road from near Hinman’s tannery to a point on Fifth Street and the extension of Walnut Street crossing Elm, to a point intersecting the latter. If fully carried out as we presume it will be, the building of the road in question, and the extension of Walnut and West Streets will open up to easy access a number of desirable building lots and fine sites for first-class residences, which will be for sale; and, an easier and shorter route to the place will be afforded a large number of farmers and others living in a portion of Middlefield and towns lying east and south. The new road runs for the most part through the farm of Mr. Russell; and, at a large expense, he has erected a substantial iron bridge across the Susquehanna.
November 13, 1863

125 YEARS AGO
Young men – In accordance with the request made by the Y.M.C.A., several of the Pastors of the Cooperstown churches on Sunday morning last preached to and in behalf of Young Men. The sermon to which we listened pointed out the most prominent needs and the temptations of that class, and spoke of the work of the Association. The preacher depicted in plain terms the evil of bribery at elections, as illustrated in his sight at the polls held in Cooperstown on the 6th inst., when young men, perhaps casting their first Presidential ballots, were tempted by open and shameless bribery.
November 16, 1888

100 YEARS AGO
Over 800 relics of Indian times have been presented
to the museum at the Village Club by Dr. James C. Ferguson of St. Paul, Minnesota, a former resident of Cooperstown. The specimens are now being catalogued by Manager George N. Smith and will soon be on exhibition. Three hundred of the specimens were picked up along the Susquehanna River and the shores of Otsego Lake. Many of the remaining relics were found near Ontario, Canada, at Chickamunga Park, Tennessee, and at Richfield Springs. Several spear heads were found in the collection as are some of the copper arrowheads. Also found in the collection are beads used in barter and as ornaments of dress, as well as bone awls with which the Indians bored holes, and a number of bone drills which are in an excellent state of preservation.
November 12, 1913

75 YEARS AGO
The Board of Trustees of Cooperstown, by unanimous action, has leased to the New York State Historical Association the building known as the Village Club & Library. Immediate possession will be given, subject to commitments with groups already occupying the quarters. The lease was signed by Cooperstown Mayor Theodore R. Lettis and clerk John J. O’Connell on behalf of the village. Signing for the historical association was Dixon Ryan Fox, President of Union College who is also president of the association and Frederick B. Richards of Glens Falls, secretary of the association. The office of Dr. Edward P. Alexander, director of the association, will be sited in the new quarters. Dr. Alexander will edit the association’s quarterly magazine “New York State History” which goes out to the association’s 2,000 members.
November 9 & 16, 1938

50 YEARS AGO
Members of the Church & Scott softball team in Cooperstown had the unique distinction of having their team photograph published in the “American Druggist” magazine in the October 14 edition. The Church & Scott team, which won the league trophy this year, was made up of young Cooperstown men who were home from college for the summer. The roster included Theodore P. Feury, Jr., James Schaeffer, John Schaeffer, Les Grigsby, Tom Weeks, Don Wertheim, Robert Winne, James Moyer, Don Rogers, and Joe Polulech. The team was managed by William S. Adsit, treasurer of the firm. Mr. Adsit is a pharmacist as is Albert J. Meehan, the team sponsor and president of the firm.
November 13, 1963

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