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IN REMEMBRANCE: Sam Nader’s Century: ‘Mr. Oneonta’  Turns 100

REPRINTED FROM JULY 2019

Sam Nader’s Century:

‘Mr. Oneonta’ Turns 100

Remember Mayor Who Brought Yankees Here

George Steinbrenner, on leaving baseball, wrote Sam Nader, “They say, ‘All good things must come to an end.’ That will never apply to our friendship, I pray.” (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO,.com)

Editor’s Note:  In remembrance of “Mr. Oneonta,” who passed away yesterday, here is “Sam Nader’s Century,” a profile of the beloved former mayor and baseball entrepreneur that appeared on his 100th birthday in July 2019.

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

ONEONTA – Sam Nader’s life is one great story after another.

Sam’s pal Ted Williams played golf, too.

Here’s a favorite one, about playing golf at the Oneonta Country Club with Hall of Famers Bobby Doerr and the legendary Ted Williams, and the club champion at the time.

Sam played one of the best 18 holes of his life.

“Bobby had a 76 – 3 under par,” Nader, who will turn 100 on July 8, recalled the other day.  “I was 4 over par.  We took them for 10 bucks.”

Ted Williams was so incensed, he broke five clubs – a golf club set – over his knee.  (The Red Sox legend was working for Shakespeare, the quality golf-club maker, so he made good.)

With a laugh, Sam continued: Every time he would see Bobby Doerr and a Hall of Fame event in Cooperstown, the former Oneonta mayor and owner of the Oneonta Yankees would say, “Let’s go up to see Ted and see if he remembers.”

R. Helen Davis, 95; RN’s Parents Immigrants From Finland

IN MEMORIAM:  R. Helen Davis, 95;

RN’s Parents Immigrants From Finland

FLY CREEK – In the early morning hours of Saturday, April 4, 2020, R. Helen Davis, a long-time resident of Fly Creek, retired registered nurse and cherished mother, passed peacefully with family by her side. She was 95 and the last of the Finnish area immigrants residing in Otsego County.

Born July 27, 1924, in a farmhouse off Harrison Hill Road in Mount Vision, she lived her earliest years there, later moving with her family to a Route 205 farmhouse closer to Mount Vision village. Her parents, Jaakko and Anna (Veikkolainen) Puputti, immigrated by ships (the White Star Line “Cedric” and the Scandinavian American Line “United States”) from Jaakima, Finland, in 1905 and 1913, respectively, entering America through Ellis Island. Their names were later immortalized there on the Immigrant Wall of Honor.

R. Helen Davis, 95; RN’s Parents Immigrants From Finland

IN MEMORIAM:  R. Helen Davis, 95;

RN’s Parents Immigrants From Finland

FLY CREEK – In the early morning hours of Saturday, April 4, 2020, R. Helen Davis, a long-time resident of Fly Creek, retired registered nurse and cherished mother, passed peacefully with family by her side. She was 95 and the last of the Finnish area immigrants residing in Otsego County.

Born July 27, 1924, in a farmhouse off Harrison Hill Road in Mount Vision, she lived her earliest years there, later moving with her family to a Route 205 farmhouse closer to Mount Vision village. Her parents, Jaakko and Anna (Veikkolainen) Puputti, immigrated by ships (the White Star Line “Cedric” and the Scandinavian American Line “United States”) from Jaakima, Finland, in 1905 and 1913, respectively, entering America through Ellis Island. Their names were later immortalized there on the Immigrant Wall of Honor.

WILCOX: 2nd Amendment Relic Of Early Republic

LETTER from SAM WILCOX

2nd Amendment Relic

Of Early Republic

To the Editor:

Otsego County is facing a proposal to declare this county a “gun sanctuary.” This would mean that our county board would ban compliance with the Safe Act passed by the state Legislature in 2013.

That act promoted, among other things, background checks, banning assault weapons, and limiting ammunition. It was not anti-gun, rather it was pro-gun safety.

However, the Safe Act has been perceived as a violation of Second Amendment rights by citizens who feel that guns are a vital part of their protective system and feel their right to buy any gun and any amount of ammunition is being blocked.

They cite this Amendment as if it were intended to be unchangeable for all time. They seem unaware that the Constitution was drawn up in the turbulent period of seeking independence from England’s exploitive hold on its colonies in the New World.

Too, the war for independence relied not only on the Continental Army but well-armed militias.

Though the Constitution reflected important visionary, democratic rights, there were flaws in it such as lack of democratic regard for women and African-Americans. It was not a perfect, untouchable document. In fact, amendments were soon being made.

The Second Amendment was in the historical context of relying on well-armed militias to defeat lingering efforts of English troops to subdue the rebellious colonials, a condition that no longer prevails.

Yet, pro-gun citizens abetted by the National Rifle Association seem to believe the Second Amendment simply established forever the inalienable right to own guns and ammunition with no restrictions.

Fast forward, and we have a supposedly sane, First World country like the U.S. condoning its populace being armed by guns and unlimited ammunition, even those designed for warfare. This condoning of the vast arsenal of guns in our country ignores evidence that the more guns possessed in any country, the more deaths there will be by gunfire.
No wonder we are among the seven countries of the world with the highest rate of death by gunfire from murder, accident, suicide and mass shootings. It is as if we extol weapons of mass destruction.

Please, let us not take a step backward from the Safe Act by becoming a “gun sanctuary.” We accept many restrictions for car ownership and operation. Why? It lowers the motor vehicle death rate by making driving safer. Why should we not accept similar restrictions about guns?

SAM WILCOX
Cooperstown

IN REMEMBRANCE: Sam Nader’s Century: Icon Turns 100

REPRINTED FROM JULY 2019

Sam Nader’s Century:

‘Mr. Oneonta’ Turns 100

Remember Mayor Who Brought Yankees Here

George Steinbrenner, on leaving baseball, wrote Sam Nader, “They say, ‘All good things must come to an end.’ That will never apply to our friendship, I pray.” (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO,.com)

Editor’s Note:  In remembrance of “Mr. Oneonta,” who passed away yesterday, here is “Sam Nader’s Century,” a profile of the beloved mayor and baseball entrepreneur that appeared on his 100th birthday in July 2019.

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

ONEONTA – Sam Nader’s life is one great story after another.

Sam’s pal Ted Williams played golf, too.

Here’s a favorite one, about playing golf at the Oneonta Country Club with Hall of Famers Bobby Doerr and the legendary Ted Williams, and the club champion at the time.

Sam played one of the best 18 holes of his life.

“Bobby had a 76 – 3 under par,” Nader, who will turn 100 on July 8, recalled the other day.  “I was 4 over par.  We took them for 10 bucks.”

Ted Williams was so incensed, he broke five clubs – a golf club set – over his knee.  (The Red Sox legend was working for Shakespeare, the quality golf-club maker, so he made good.)

New Mozart ‘Flute’ ‘Completely Magical’

New Mozart ‘Flute’ ‘Completely Magical’

Review by PAT THORPE for www.allotsego.com

Sean Panikkar as Tamino and So Young Park as Queen of the Night in The Glimmerglass Festival's 2015 production of Mozart's "The Magic Flute." (Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival)
Sean Panikkar as Tamino and So Young Park as Queen of the Night in The Glimmerglass Festival’s 2015 production of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute.” (Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival)

“The Marriage of Figaro,” “Don Giovanni,” “Cosi fan Tutti” – in five years, Mozart and collaborator Lorenzo Da Ponte produced one hit show after another and changed the shape of opera forever.

But by 1791, Da Ponte was gone and Mozart began working with friend and fellow Freemason Emmanuel Schikaneder on a comic fairy tale for the general public, not just the Viennese elite, a return to the singspiel form of some of Mozart’s early works, using German with spoken dialogue and broad slapstick comedy.

The music ranges from rustic folk songs to tinkling glockenspiel, melting romantic melodies to spectacular coloratura that still challenges singers today.

The Glimmerglass Festival’s new “Magic Flute” is a thorough updating and reworking of Mozart’s classic.  Kelley Rourke, Glimmerglass’ adept dramaturge, has produced a swiftly moving English translation that is both witty and poetic.

Gone are the unintelligible references to Freemason myth and ritual, replaced here by the religion of scientific exploration.  Gone are the sexist and racist attitudes of the original, replaced by welcome themes of diversity and the redemptive power of natural beauty.

The time is the present, although the setting is timeless.  As director Madeline Sayet explains, “Our ‘Magic Flute’ is not a journey to a fantastical other world, but a way of looking more deeply into the real place we live in, the woods around Glimmerglass, if only you open your eyes wide enough.”

The trees on stage will definitely open your eyes; created by set designer Troy Hourie, they are a dominant feature of the production, resourceful and very active.

The “Magic Flute” plot is the classic hero’s journey from confusion to enlightenment, with challenges from monsters (human and otherwise), aid from sidekicks, failures of faith, and a beautiful girl in need of rescue.

The opera’s hero, Tamino, ably brought to life by tenor Sean Panikkar, is a handsome, square-jawed master of the urban universe lost in the woods. His reluctant sidekick Papageno, a hunter hilariously outfitted in camouflage and blaze orange, is played by Ben Edquist with such irresistibly funny physical comedy that you hardly notice what a fine voice he has.

Pamina, our heroine, is trapped in a particularly modern situation, the focus of a bitter custody battle between her mother, the villainous Queen of the Night, and the enigmatic Sarastro, an impressive Soloman Howard.

Jacqueline Echols, a feisty but also poignant Pamina, is back for her third season at Glimmerglass, this time as a star, bringing grace and spirit and a rich soprano to her role.  So Young Park, a diabolical beauty as the Queen, hurls her high Fs like lightning bolts.

This is a thoroughly family friendly production, an inviting opportunity for newcomers to enter the world of opera, as well as the world of the forest.  The supporting cast and the (mostly offstage) chorus are uniformly excellent, energetic and appealing.   As always, Mozart’s music is sublime.  Add to that a stage full of lively trees and vibrant young performers and Glimmerglass has a completely magical new “Flute.”

Hall Leadership Remembers Yogi As Icon, Legend, Great American

Hall Leadership Remembers Yogi

As Icon, Legend, Great American

Jane Forbes Clark
Jane Forbes Clark

“Yogi Berra was an American icon, whose impact on baseball and everyday American culture was enormous. Yogi connected with every baseball fan, as a 10-time World Series winner with the New York Yankees, as one of the world’s most notable personalities, and as one of baseball’s most beloved Hall of Fame members. His contributions to our game and to our country will never be forgotten. The National Baseball Hall of Fame sends its sympathies to his family and to every baseball fan who adored him.”

 – Jane Forbes Clark, Chairman, Baseball Hall of Fame

Jeff Idelson
Jeff Idelson

“The Hall of Fame mourns the loss of a baseball legend, great American, tremendous family man and modern day philosopher. His baseball abilities and acumen are evidenced by his Hall of Fame election in 1972 and as the only manager in history to take both the Yankees and Mets to the World Series.  He joined the Navy at 18, was married to his beloved wife Carmen for 65 years, and had more fun with the English language than any player in history. He will especially be missed in Cooperstown where he was beloved by his fellow Hall of Famers and his adoring fans.”

Jeff Idelson, Hall of Fame President

Caroline Carter, Rotary’s Choice, Will Spend Year On Cote d’Azure

Rotary Chooses Caroline Carter

To Spend Year On Cote d’Azure

Caroline Carter
Caroline Carter

ONEONTA – The Oneonta Rotary Club has awarded the prestigious Rotary Youth Exchange Scholarship to Caroline Carter from Oneonta High School.  She will be leaving in August for Toulon, France, on the Cote d’Azure.

Caroline’s host family has a son who also received a Rotary Youth Exchange Scholarship and is going to Japan.

‘An Echo Of God’s Compassion’

‘An Echo Of God’s Compassion’

•By LIBBY CUDMORE•  AllOTSEGO.Life

 

Retired Episcopal Bishop Mark Sisk, now of Jefferson, holds a cross appreciative firefighters crafted for him from the wreckage of the World Trade Center. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.life)
Retired Episcopal Bishop Mark Sisk, now of Jefferson, holds a cross appreciative firefighters crafted for him from the wreckage of the World Trade Center. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.life)

On 9/11, just a few short hours after they watched the World Trade Center towers collapse, the Right Rev. Mark Sisk, then the Episcopal bishop of New York, and his archdeacon Michael Kendall waited at Roosevelt Hospital.

“We were waiting to give comfort to the injured,” said Sisk, who with his wife, Karen, attended the 9/11 ecumenical community service at Cooperstown Methodist Church, marking the 13th anniversary of the national tragedy. “But nobody came. The longer that went on, the more ominous it seemed.”

Then a journalist arrived. “He asked us, ‘Where was God when the towers fell?’” Sisk recalled. “And Michael replied, ‘God is in that pile with the suffering and the dying.’ I thought that was the perfect answer.”

The next day, Bishop Sisk put on his clerical gear and drove to the WTC site with Kendall. “We didn’t know if St. Paul’s Chapel had survived,” he said. “We wanted the NYPD, the FDNY to know that they were in our prayers, that we supported them. We didn’t know what we’d encounter, but I felt like I had an opportunity and a duty to go down there.”

They were able to pass through all the barricades with ease, and an officer handed them face masks. “He told us ‘You’ll need these.’ It was 7 a.m., and there was still ash in the air. It was inches deep at our feet. The smell was acrid. I looked down, and there was an air canister with the plane’s flight number on it.”

Miraculously, St. Paul’s was still standing, with only one window broken. And that’s when they got to work. “We made St. Paul’s a respite place,” he said. “We served hot meals, gave massages, gave the firemen and police a place to rest.”
Karen – the Sisks retired a year ago to their long-time get-away home in Jefferson – also joined in helping at the church. “When I got there, I saw a fireman, in full gear, asleep on the pew,” she said. “They were setting up beds in the upper balcony.”

Overwhelmed by both the generosity and the chaos, she and another volunteer set about cleaning up the coffee station. “There was creamer spilled and teabags everywhere,” she said. “That we could deal with.”

Later that day, she helped on the food line, serving hamburgers and hot dogs. “Another volunteer came up to us and said, ‘The workers in the pit are hungry – we need 50 hot dogs with a little bit of ketchup and mustard, wrapped up in foil so we can throw them down.”

Olive Garden donated salads, and local markets sent fruit. “I looked at the fruit and it didn’t look right,” she said. “It was covered in this fine, powdery stuff – ash. There was still debris in the air, even a week later.”

Sisk also began to hear stories of heroism from his parishioners. “One man was coming down the stairs after the plane hit and he saw a woman sitting down, too tired to go on. He told her, ‘I’m not leaving you here, we’ll go down together,’ and helped her get all the way down. He wouldn’t leave her until they got away from the building, and they had just gotten clear before it fell.”

He also listened to stories of grief and guilt. “One man finished having breakfast with his friends and went to catch the elevator. His friend called him back, but he told him he’d catch up with him later. But that was the last elevator that made it down. His friends didn’t get out.”

And when his work was done, the firemen gave him a memento in thanks for all his work – a cross made from melted steel and glass from the towers. “Your own compassion for people is an echo of God’s compassion,” he said.

 

HOMETOWN HISTORY, July 6, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, July 6, 2012

125 Years Ago
The Local News – A beautiful sight was witnessed at the residence of Lester Eaton, Fairview Street on Monday evening – the blossoming of a night-blooming cereus. Seven buds gradually opened during the evening, filling the room with fragrance and bringing exclamations of delight from all who were privileged to watch the flowers as they unfolded.
The weather this past week has been the hottest known in years. For several days the mercury has managed to creep above ninety degrees, the highest altitude attained being ninety-seven in the shade. Still, there are those who mechanically inquire, “Is it hot enough for you?”
A.D. Yager now carries a fine gold watch which he won by guessing the number of beans in a bottle at the auction rooms of Mr. Close. Mr. Yager guessed within two of the right number as did also G.W. Raymond. Mr. Raymond sold Mr. Yager his interest in the watch.
July 1887

100 Years Ago
It is a fact of much gratification to the faculty and board of education of the Oneonta high school that almost every individual member of this year’s graduating class is planning to continue the search for education in the higher branches next year and a very large percentage of these young men and women are to enter college in September, while a large number also will enter the Normal or continue at the high school for a post graduate course as preparation for college. According to present plans the Normal will receive Misses Janet Mary Ainslee, Agnes Bell Bailey, Ruth Luella Clark, Grace Madge Crouch, Blanche Eldred, Sarah McCracken Emory, Lila Mae Hall, Ethel May Kidder, Louise Marie Kirchoff, Marion Marcia Lull, Mae Elizabeth MacDonald, and Mable Neva Reynolds. Clyde Frederick Bresee will enter New York University; Herbert Clapsaddle Getman, Hamilton College; Earl Sewell Hoyt, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Daniel Luce, Jr., Yale University; Raymond Maure, Wesleyan University; Douglas Stewart McCrum, Amherst College; Ernest Granville Rathbun, Cornell University; and William Henry Stratton, Colgate University.
July 1912

80 Years Ago
Five play centers opened for the summer on Tuesday with a trained staff of playground workers with recreational programs for the young folks of the city. This summer marks the eighth season of playground activity in this community. All sorts of equipment will be at the disposal of the various groups and a varied and interesting program of crafts, games, and sports is in readiness. A trained worker is in charge of the boys’ and girls’ groups respectively at each unit of the system, and careful consideration is shown to each child in attendance. The girls will have their time available for soap carving, basketry, weaving, paper-modeling, leather braiding, and the making of yarn gifts as well as the many games and sports. The boys will begin immediate work on athletic badge tests, with an opportunity for all ages to earn a badge on the successful completion of the standard tests for his age. These tests include running, jumping, chinning, ball throw, etc.
July 1932

60 Years Ago
General Douglas MacArthur, the old soldier who didn’t fade away after all, set the Republicans on fire last night calling for a mighty all-party crusade against making America “a socialistic, or even later a Communistic state.” The five-star general of the Army set off a long, wild ovation when he came before the strife-torn Republican National Convention to flay the Democrats for “tragic blunders” leading the nation, he said, toward a third world war. MacArthur’s speech struck two main chords: One – The Democratic Party has been captured by schemers who are wrecking the American standard of living, making world conquest easy for the Russians and setting this nation’s course “unerringly toward the socialistic regimentation of a totalitarian state.” Two – The Republicans have a golden opportunity in the November election to enlist Americans with no distinctions of race, creed or political affiliation in a crusade for peace, prosperity and tranquility.
July 1952

40 Years Ago
How do you create a project that will combine science, mathematics, art and reading for a group of fifth-graders with the added feature of keeping them actively interested? Fifth grade teacher Wendall Bachman of Greater Plains found the answer. Take a trip – a trip to Mars, that is. Bachman’s class created a “space craft,” planned their trip, computing the time and distance on a scale of three minutes equaling one day, programmed a scale flight progress model, and took off for Mars. The youngsters went so far as to remain in school over Friday night, so that the flight wouldn’t be interrupted. “Blast-off” was at 12:02 p.m., Friday, June 16, with the flight schedule landing on Mars at 9:46 p.m. on December 23. Part of the astronauts’ schedule was a series of “walks on Mars” during which astronauts Steve Lawton and Tom Gaffney gathered “specimens of plant life” as well as samples of the Martian “soil.” They left Mars at 10:16 p.m., January 4, and landed back on earth at 8:01 a.m. July 15. Mr. Bachman and his wife stayed with the youngsters during the entire experiment, camping out in the classroom with them Friday night.
July 1972

30 Years Ago
The 194th General Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America declared its opposition Monday to a proposed constitutional amendment, endorsed by President Ronal Reagan. The amendment reads in part: Nothing in this Constitution shall be construed to prohibit individual or group prayer in public schools or other public institutions. No person shall be required by the United States or by any state to participate in prayer.
July 1982

10 Years Ago
Catskill Area Hospice & Palliative Care, Inc. is set to offer its first Child/Teen Bereavement Camp. Called “Camp Forget Me Not,” the campers will meet on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at the State University College at Oneonta Camp. The camp is free of charge to area children and teens in grades K-12 who have suffered the loss of a parent, sibling, or other close relative or friend. There will be fun activities mixed with grief support and counseling.
July 2002

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12

‘Renaissance Men’

Vocal Ensemble Performance

14-19eventspage

CONCERT – 7:30 p.m. Boston’s premier vocal chamber ensemble “Renaissance Men” perform vocal music from all periods, by many composers. Tickets, $25 general admission. First United Methodist Church, 66 Chestnut St.,Oneonta. 607-433-7252 or visit oneontaconcertassociation.org

SQUARE DANCE – 7:30 p.m. Dance with friends at Doubleday Dancers Western Square Dance Clubs Fall All Plus Dance. Features Keith Harter as Plus caller, Jeanne Harter as Cuer. Admission, $5/person. Cooperstown Elementary School. 607-264-8128.

HOMETOWN HISTORY, April 26, 2013

HOMETOWN HISTORY, April 26, 2013

100 Years Ago
The lives of more than 100 miners were snuffed out shortly after noon today (April 23, 1913) when a disastrous explosion occurred in the Cincinnati Mine at the Monongahela Consolidated Coal and Coke Company at Finleyville, about 27 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. More than three score of workmen in the mine made thrilling escapes to the surface, crawling most of the time on their hands and knees through deadly gas fumes and over debris. Many of the men sustained burns. By 11 o’clock tonight 70 bodies of victims had been recovered having been located by rescuing squads of the United States Bureau of Mines and the coal company. The fire which followed the explosion has been subdued, it is said. From 76 to 78 men made their escape. Only a few of the miners who reached the surface were in a condition to talk. Seven foreign miners, who crawled from one of the entrances, all seriously burned, said the mine was “full of dead people.”
April 1913

80 Years Ago
An Englishman traveling through the United States jotted down some of the names of towns he passed through. In Mississippi they have Hot Coffee, Whynot, Possum Neck, Yoso, and Ten Mile; in Florida, Fifty-seven Mile, Three Sisters, Sonny Boy, Sisters Welcome, Jap Jay and Two Egg; in North Carolina, Hog Quarter Maiden, Matrimony, and Red Bug; in South Carolina, Six Mile, Sixty-Six, Ninety-Six and Nine Times; in Virginia, Ego, Pancake, Red Eye, Topnot and Swallow Well; in Arkansas, Fifty-Six, Poorman, Riddle, Self, Seldom and Smackover; in Louisiana, Blanks, Wham, Rufus and Uncle Sam; in Tennessee, Calf Killer and Gizzards; in Alabama, Java.
April 1933

60 Years Ago
Oneonta firemen proved their mettle early yesterday morning when an oil truck caught fire and threatened to blow the Chestnut and West Streets neighborhood to smithereens. With the rear of the huge truck completely aflame, firemen could have “played it safe” by fighting the blaze from a distance and hoping for the best. But they didn’t. Unmindful of their own safety, but fearful that some 4,500 gallons of oil might explode any second and wreck the vicinity they rushed right up to the truck and began spraying foam and chemicals. Few bystanders realized the seriousness of the dramatic duel between five men and a hot fire. “Anything could have happened. We might have been hurt or killed,” Chief Joseph Scanlon said. In the late 1930s, when another oil tanker caught fire at River and Main, Francis Wright drove it all the way to the Pony Farm crossing to avoid any explosion in a heavily populated residential area. Several years ago, another tanker hit icy pavement on Main Street and cracked into a tree. Its oil load spilled into the street. In each case, firemen risked death to save lives and property. “You’ve got to take chances,” Chief Scanlon said. “That’s our job. Thank God, we’ve never had difficulties.” Chief Scanlon’s crew included Frank Angellotti, Kenneth Hooks, Nicholas Gardner, and Howard Fields. Other Oneonta firemen include Edward McDonough, Lester Haines, Donald Rarick, Herbert Sweet, and James Gill.
April 1953

40 Years Ago
An interesting new book at the Huntington Library is titled “The Pact” by Orlando R. Petrocelli. This is a novel about a well-established Wall Street financier with a reputation for being ruthless in his business dealings. Although the Carlanas had become a premier family in the country, this man wanted to see one of his sons in the White House. If you liked “The Godfather” you’ll love “The Pact.”
Private Brenda Muehl, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Muehl, Oneonta, has graduated from Marine Recruit Training, Parris Island, South Carolina. Private Muehl is a 1972 graduate of Oneonta Senior High School and enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps for a period of four years.April 1973

30 Years Ago
Otsego County Republican Elections Commissioner Guy Maddalone has named Ann Paradis of Oneonta to succeed Violet Schallert as his full-time deputy commissioner and clerk in the Board of Elections office. Mrs. Paradis is the owner of R.E. Brigham Jewelers, Main Street, Oneonta. She is currently president of the Otsego County Women’s Republican Club and serves as vice-chairman of the Otsego County GOP Committee. She also coordinated last fall’s campaign to elect state assemblyman John McCann.
April 1983

20 Years Ago
Hartwick College students will try to set a new category and world record for the Guiness Book of World Records by making the “World’s Largest Group Hug” on Thursday evening. Hartwick students, faculty, staff and administrators, plus students from the State University College at Oneonta, and Oneonta residents are invited to participate in the event. After the group meets at Hartwick’s Astroturf Playing Field at 6 p.m. instructions on making the hug will be given. The activity is part of “Wellness Week,” Hartwick’s alternative to “Alcohol Awareness Week.” The latter is supported by a brewing concern that raises a conflict of interest. “Wellness Week” emphasizes six areas of life – physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social and occupational.
April 1993

10 Years Ago
Hartwick College officials are expected to choose a successor to outgoing President Richard Detweiler from among three finalists by the end of next week. The search committee is expected to make its final recommendation to the Board of Trustees on Friday, May 2. Scheduled for today’s interview on campus is Richard P. Miller, Jr., vice chancellor and chief operating officer of the State University of New York. A graduate of Middlebury College, Miller was senior vice-president and chief operating officer at the University of Rochester from 1986 to 2000. He also serves as a trustee of Hobart and William Smith College. He is a decorated Vietnam War veteran.
April 2003

BENNETT: The Question Of Out-Of-Towners

WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER

The Question Of

Out-Of-Towners

By LARRY BENNETT • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

FOR: First is the idea that all have the right to remove their family from a place of apparent danger to a place seen to be safer. Second is the economic idea that second-home owners have the absolute right to relocate to those homes, which they own and pay taxes on.

Larry Bennett, recently retired Brewery Ommegang creative director who is active in local causes, resides in East Merideth.

Presumably that is also true if a city resident can afford to rent a seasonal home here, or borrow one from friends or family who are not using it.

It’s hard to argue with the humanity of the first idea. It’s why the U.S. offers refuge to people fleeing failed states to the south. It’s why Europe offers refuge to people fleeing the Syrian war and other such catastrophes.

Yet nations never do this as well as is possible, and they almost never welcome the poor as graciously as the well-to-do. But that’s a different story.

The second idea also seems reasonable. If you have a right to flee and have the economic resources, you are entitled to utilize your resources to their maximum, and do or go where you desire. If you have been smart enough, or lucky enough, or born into the right family, who’s to say “no” to you leaving everyone else to their fate?

AGAINST: What is the greater good? What happens when your flight brings threats to those who live where you are fleeing? What if you leave the physical location of your troubles but unknowingly bring the underlying conditions of those troubles with you?

If you live in New York City and other downstate areas, you live in the eye of the COVID-19 storm. What if you flee the storm but bring the weather? It is going to happen. It is unavoidable.

What about the fact that every health expert says containment is only way to defeat the virus? In a closed population it runs its course, and the severity of the course depends on how well the population follows the rules. If they do it well the virus runs out of opportunity faster and with less damage.

The CDC and the governor’s directive is, “Don’t travel unnecessarily and if you have to go out, keep your distance. Don’t spread the virus.”

Traveling unnecessarily might be taking the subway uptown to visit a friend, or driving out to Coney Island to find some sun and fresh breezes. Urban residents are being clearly directed not to do so. Is packing up their cars and driving three hours to here ignoring the directive?

News stories tell of an influx of people in The Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard and other vacation destinations for the wealthy.

Those communities are not prepared for the crowds. They typically staff up in May, not now – hiring more people at everything from grocery stores to medical facilities, and increasing inventory of consumable goods, be they food or medical goods.

The communities are now feeling overwhelmed. Year-’round residents are now going to have to compete with short-term residents – or even just visitors – for common needs such as food, on up to vital needs such as tests, hospital beds and respirators.

There are reports of wealthy visitors arriving and immediately going into grocery stores to buy thousands of dollars of staples at a time. And those actions also raise the issue of the 14-day self-isolation that travelers to a new location are supposed to observe, but many do not. All of these actions are cause for real concern.

A friend says that it is wrong to discriminate against people because of where they are from. But what if it’s not because of where they are from, but because of what they may bring with them?

Since the virus only travels through people it’s inevitable that they will bring more of the virus up here. On the other hand, we are not going to the city – for any reason – and bringing the virus back.

Should we do our best to welcome and help urban dwellers who rightfully fear the chaos and uncertainty in the city? If so, are there measures to take to better protect ourselves? Or should we implore the residents to please not leave the city – to not bring us a bigger share of chaos and uncertainty, which we are ill-equipped to handle?

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, APRIL 20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, APRIL 20

Presenting ‘Of Mice And Men’

14-19eventspage

THEATER – 8 p.m. Presenting a performance of “Of Mice and Men.” Tickets, $17/adult. Foothills Performing Arts Center, Oneonta. Call 607-431-2080 or visit foothillspac.org

MOVIE NIGHT – 7 – 8:30 p.m. Screening of “Landfill Harmonic,” a film about ‘The Recycled Orchestra,’ a group of children from a Paraguayan slum who play instruments made entirely of garbage. Milford Central School, 42 Main St., Milford. Call 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/earth-festival-movie-night-2/

 

If Johnson City, Then Why Not Cooperstown?

COLUMN

If Johnson City, Then

Why Not Cooperstown?

Editor’s Note: Oneonta’s City Hall is actively helping private developers revive its downtown, but downstate developers are starting to recognize a demand for housing Upstate and seeking to fill the need. Per this report on BBJN.com, might someone consider Cooperstown’s vacant downtown CVS as an opportunity?

A New York City developer has been lured to Johnson City, near Binghamton, to construct an apartment house on a site similar to the CVS in Cooperstown’s downtown.

JOHNSON CITY – A New York City developer has plans to build a three-story, multi-family apartment building in Johnson City.
Praveen Kamath, founder and managing member of AOM Investments LLC, broke ground Wednesday, May 15, for the LOFTS@JC project at 128 Grand Ave.

The total estimated project cost is more than $6 million, the Agency said in a Thursday news release.

Crews will build the new apartment complex at the site of the “abandoned” Dollar Bazaar location, which will be demolished, per the news release.

This site has sat vacant for a number of years and has “contributed to the blight” in Johnson City, the Agency said. The project will bring new tax revenue and “much needed” housing availability to the village of Johnson City.

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21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103