What to know about Peru’s ‘attempted coup’ and first female president     Live updates: Brittney Griner released in swap for arms dealer Viktor Bout     ‘Harry & Meghan’ series trashes British tabloids, but spares royals — so far     What to know about Peru’s ‘attempted coup’ and first female president     Live updates: Brittney Griner released in swap for arms dealer Viktor Bout     ‘Harry & Meghan’ series trashes British tabloids, but spares royals — so far     Iran conducts first known execution of prisoner arrested during protests     Russia wanted Viktor Bout back, badly. The question is: Why?     Who is Viktor Bout, Russian arms dealer swapped for Brittney Griner?     What to know about Peru’s ‘attempted coup’ and first female president     Live updates: Brittney Griner released in swap for arms dealer Viktor Bout     ‘Harry & Meghan’ series trashes British tabloids, but spares royals — so far     What to know about Peru’s ‘attempted coup’ and first female president     Live updates: Brittney Griner released in swap for arms dealer Viktor Bout     ‘Harry & Meghan’ series trashes British tabloids, but spares royals — so far     Iran conducts first known execution of prisoner arrested during protests     Russia wanted Viktor Bout back, badly. The question is: Why?     Who is Viktor Bout, Russian arms dealer swapped for Brittney Griner?     
Peru's New President Faces Same Turmoil That Ousted Predecessor     Brittney Griner Released From Russian Penal Colony in Prisoner Release Deal     Ukraine Says Western Allies Shouldn't Fear Russia Falling Apart     The Five-Year Engineering Feat Germany Pulled Off in Months     Police Seize Weapons in Far-Right German Coup-Plot Investigation     Iran Conducts First Known Execution of Prisoner Arrested During Protests     Ukraine Hit by Deadliest Single Russian Attack on Civilians in Weeks     Foxconn Letter Prodded China to Ease Zero-Covid Rules     Russians March on Foot to Advance in Eastern Ukraine Battle     South Korea Orders Truckers Back to Work as Labor Tensions Rise Globally     Argentina Binges on the World Cup to Forget Soaring Inflation and Unrest     China Braces for Deadly Covid Wave After Loosening Controls     Harry and Meghan Detail Their Royal Woes in Netflix Series     Peru's New President Faces Same Turmoil That Ousted Predecessor     Brittney Griner Released From Russian Penal Colony in Prisoner Release Deal     Ukraine Says Western Allies Shouldn't Fear Russia Falling Apart     The Five-Year Engineering Feat Germany Pulled Off in Months     Police Seize Weapons in Far-Right German Coup-Plot Investigation     Iran Conducts First Known Execution of Prisoner Arrested During Protests     Ukraine Hit by Deadliest Single Russian Attack on Civilians in Weeks     Foxconn Letter Prodded China to Ease Zero-Covid Rules     Russians March on Foot to Advance in Eastern Ukraine Battle     South Korea Orders Truckers Back to Work as Labor Tensions Rise Globally     Argentina Binges on the World Cup to Forget Soaring Inflation and Unrest     China Braces for Deadly Covid Wave After Loosening Controls     Harry and Meghan Detail Their Royal Woes in Netflix Series     
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Letter To Governor: Science, Economics Don’t Support Allowing Fracking In NY

Letter To Governor: Science, Economics

Don’t Support Allowing Fracking In NY

HOMETOWN ONEONTA/The Freeman’s Journal

Edition of Thursday-Friday, Dec. 19-20

Editor’s Note: Governor Cuomo revealed Monday, Dec. 15, on WCNY TV’s “Capitol Pressroom” that a fracking decision may be forthcoming by the end of the month, prompting this letter signed by 140 members of Elected Officials to Protect New York, including 25 from Otsego County, to send this letter to the governor the following day.

What has happened – what have we learned – since 2012?

The current “health review” notwithstanding, the necessary studies have not been done and the standard of safety for all of New York has clearly not been met. There has been no additional review or analysis by the DEC concerning cumulative environmental impacts or socioeconomic costs, at least none that has been made public.

New information that is publicly available includes new concerns about direct and collateral damage from fracking, and anecdotal evidence has become empirical data. Currently the independent group Physicians, Scientists, and Engineers for Healthy Energy has cataloged more than 400 peer reviewed studies on fracking and its related activities, nearly all demonstrating harm.

The body of evidence on health impacts is significant and growing, including links to:

• high levels of ozone;

• a range of dangerous toxins in high concentrations in ambient air near fracking infrastructure, including formaldehyde and the carcinogen benzene; and

• numerous water and air pollutants (including carcinogenic radon) that pose a direct threat to human and animal health – we will need companies like Radon One to make sure we aren’t being exposed to harmful levels of air pollution.

The list of environmental issues goes on, with significant impacts across the country, including:

• Anecdotal accounts of fouled wells became 248 confirmed of cases of water contamination, ultimately acknowledged by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

• Other states have also suffered surface and groundwater contamination; and explosions, leaks, spills, and blowouts are common.

• More data and studies reveal that well casing and integrity failures are endemic problems without a solution – meaning that a significant percentage of wells will leak gas and chemicals into groundwater and the atmosphere.

• Early concerns about seismic impacts and earthquakes, associated not just with injection wells – but with fracking itself – have been confirmed.

• Climate change has made extreme weather events and flooding more common, a disaster when combined with fracking sites.

• One of the biggest unresolved issues is how to responsibly handle the enormous quantities of toxic wastewater created along with radioactive drilling wastes. Sending this waste to Ohio’s injection wells, to New York landfills, or spreading it on roads (illegally, or under a “beneficial use determination”) is environmentally irresponsible and completely unsustainable.

A great deal of attention has been given to potential economic benefits of fracking, but time has confirmed much of the initial skepticism over promised jobs and overstated economic benefits.

• In Pennsylvania, only a fraction of the promised jobs materialized; many of them temporary and filled by out of state workers.

• Royalty payments have fallen far short of what many landowners were promised due to “creative business restructuring” by drillers.

• Serious socioeconomic impacts have been documented, among them: rising violent crime, traffic fatalities, enormous amounts of heavy truck traffic, and strain on volunteer first responders.

• Financial institutions and insurance companies have identified threats to mortgages and home insurance, potentially undermining municipal tax bases.

As we have noted before, New York State’s review of the economics of fracking is not only inadequate, but one-sided, reporting inflated potential benefits and neglecting entirely to analyze negative municipal or economic impacts.

Any review of the evidence on fracking that is truly based on science, rather than politics, must also include a hard look at the contribution of this industry to climate change. New research since 2012 gives reason to expect that fracking accelerates climate change. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, 86 times worse than carbon dioxide for the first 20 years it is in the atmosphere. Fugitive emissions of methane occur as part of the fracking process, along the pipelines, and in distribution lines under city streets. As we know that time is running out to stop the disastrous upward trend of global warming, an acknowledgement of fracking’s contribution to climate change should factor into your decision. You have made laudable initiatives to promote renewable energy, the right path forward for New York.

Allowing fracking now would clearly roll back that crucial good work.

Hundreds of health professionals, scientists, and numerous medical societies have reviewed the science, and based on that review, have asked for a firm moratorium of at least three to five years.

We strongly “second” this motion and believe anything less would be negligent.

Our call today for a firm, extended moratorium is in line with our original 2012 request to you. We need to know the real impacts to public health, the cumulative environmental impacts, and the true costs versus the benefits to our local economies. These questions, among others, remain unanswered. Furthermore, new, critical scientific studies are underway or planned; an extended moratorium allows the time for these answers to come forth.

Governor Cuomo, we acknowledge and appreciate the restraint and caution you have shown thus far.

Given your vow to protect the water and ensure the health of all New Yorkers, a longer term moratorium is the right path to take.

Letter from Chip Northrup: Inventions abound

Letter from Chip Northrup

Inventions abound

Cooperstown is famous as the birthplace of the Morse Code, the invention of organ transplants, and now, the invention of the Army’s new method of training soldiers to hit moving targets.

About ten years ago, Chip Northrup, a Texan that summers in Cooperstown, went to the Cooperstown Sportsmen’s Association to learn skeet shooting. In order to hit the clay pigeon, you have to know how far in front to point the shotgun, called the “lead.” No one could tell him exactly how far ahead to point, so, in a brainstorm, he came up with an idea to show the amount of exact lead on any clay pigeon, or any moving object, by displaying it in a virtual reality (VR) headset, as a holographic image in front of the target. Northrup explained how it works. “By practicing with this aim point on in VR, the user can see how far in front to aim. They shoot at the aim point with an electronic trigger, and hit the virtual clay pigeon. Once they have learned that in VR, they can go to the skeet range and hit real targets.” He grinned. “Maybe.”

Editorial: Properly Implement City Charter

EDITORIAL

After 3 Years, It’s Time To

Properly Implement City Charter

Incoming Council member Melissa Nicosia’s fresh perspective cut through the accretions: Qualifications contained in the Oneonta City Charter matter. With her is fellow charter review member David W. Brenner.
Incoming Council member Melissa Nicosia’s fresh perspective cut through the accretions: Qualifications contained in the Oneonta City Charter matter. With her is fellow charter review member David W. Brenner.

Read the city charter: Meg Hungerford does not have the qualifications to be Oneonta city manager.

Efforts to put her in that position regardless damaged the last year of the Miller Administration, and continuing efforts to do so are preventing the implementation of a sensible city charter approved by 75 percent of the voters.

It’s past time for Mayor Gary Herzig to close the door on the Hungerford option and move on.

Instead, by forming an ad hoc committee to review the charter, and asking that the review be done before the end of the year so the current Common Council can fast-track any changes, the new

mayor risks poisoning his administration with many city voters before it’s even begun.

By all accounts, Hungerford is an excellent financial officer. But she lacks the training, experience and qualifications specified in the charter for the $120,000 position:
• One, she lives in East Meredith, 10 miles from Oneonta (and in another county, Delaware, not Otsego.)
• Two, she lacks the master’s degree in public administration or a related field. (Does the home to Hartwick and SUNY Oneonta really believe that doesn’t matter?)
• Three, she lacks the relevant professional experience.

There’s nothing the matter with not meeting the qualifications for Oneonta city manager. Many people don’t. Many brainy, happy and successful people don’t meet the qualifications for brain surgeon, or construction engineer, or ship captain; but they don’t seek do brain surgery, build skyscrapers or pilot a Viking cruise ship.

Better Communications Key For New Town Of Otsego Rep
ANDREW MARIETTA, D-DISTRICT 8

Better Communications Key

For New Town Of Otsego Rep

County Rep.-elect Andrew Marietta share a laugh with wife Melissa and daughters Caroline, 9, and Charlotte, 5, during Breakfast With Santa Sunday, Dec. 13, at The Otesaga. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.COM)
County Rep.-elect Andrew Marietta share a laugh with wife Melissa and daughters Caroline, 9, and Charlotte, 5, during Breakfast With Santa Sunday, Dec. 13, at The Otesaga. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.COM)

 
Editor’s Note: This is the fifth of seven profiles, one each on the seven new members of the Otsego County Board of Representatives elected Nov. 3, that will be posted each Wednesday afternoon up until they take office Jan. 1. 

By JIM KEVLIN • for www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – In the run-up to taking office, county Rep.-elect Andrew Marietta, D-Town of Otsego, has had a chance to chat with County Clerk Kathy Sinnott Gardner about the DMV dilemma.

OtsegoCountySeal-Color-500pix_largeIt’s this: The state requires counties to have Departments of Motor Vehicles, but is sending license renewals to drivers directly, urging them to renew by mail with Albany or online.   “If you do your renewal online,” said Marietta, “we don’t capture any of those revenues.”

So money that could be spent locally – in local establishments, to better fund county operations, or even to keep the tax rate down – is lost.

Most people don’t know that, said Marietta.  That’s his point.  And his first goal on taking office Jan. 1 as the county rep for the Town of Otsego, which includes Cooperstown west of the Susquehanna River, will be  better communications.

As one of only four Democrats to the Republicans’ 10-rep majority, it’s unclear what role Marietta will be able to play in county affairs at first.  But he can put his constituents in the information loop immediately.

He plans to launch an e-mail newsletter for the people in his district, and report on county board proceedings promptly.  Voters will be able to sign up for the newsletter at an upgraded version of http://andrewmarietta.com/, his campaign website.

6o ‘ENVISIONEER’ ACHIEVING INCLUSIVE ONEONTA BY 2025

6o ‘ENVISIONEER’ ACHIEVING

INCLUSIVE ONEONTA BY 2025

SUNY Oneonta President Nancy Kleniewski leads a discussion group that includes, clockwise from her right, Ernesto Henriquez from SUNY's Psychology Department; Southside Mall Manager and Foothills board president Luisa Montanti; Kelly Place from the Oneonta Arts Council; Ellen Sokolow, an architect now living in Franklin, and Joyce Miller, who chairs the city's Community Relations & Human Rights Commission.  (Jim Kevlin/allotsego.com)
SUNY Oneonta President Nancy Kleniewski leads a breakout group that includes, clockwise from her right, Ernesto Henriquez from SUNY’s Psychology Department; Southside Mall Manager and Foothills board president Luisa Montanti; Kelly Place from the Oneonta Arts Council; Ellen Sokolow, an architect now living in Franklin, and Joyce Miller, who chairs the city’s Community Relations & Human Rights Commission. (Jim Kevlin/allotsego.com)

City Superintendent of Schools Joseph Yelich reports back on his breakout session.
City Superintendent of Schools Joseph Yelich reports back on his breakout session.

Julia Goff, Destination Oneonta (formerly MSO) director, discusses the challenges a newcomer can face with Mark Vaugh of Corning Inc., keynoter at today's Inclusivity Summit.  Lynne Sessons of ARC Otsego listens.
Julia Goff, Destination Oneonta (formerly MSO) director, discusses the challenges a newcomer can face with Mark Vaugh of Corning Inc., keynoter at today’s Inclusivity Summit. Lynne Sessons of ARC Otsego listens.

ONEONTA – Sixty citizens spent half a day today “envisioneering” – a term coined by late Mayor Dick Miller – on what ONE-onta ought to look like in 2025.  “You have unity in your name,” observed the keynote speaker, Corning Inc. Ph.D. Mark Vaughn.

The occasion was an Inclusivity Summit, hosted in Foothills Performing Arts Center,  and while discussion included the need to make a diverse population welcome, also discussed was how to make everybody – college students, homeowners, natives and newcomers, the well-off and less well-off – be at home in the “City of the Hills.”  One  simple suggestion: Encourage everyone to say “good morning” to everyone they meet.

Only Grassroot Activists Can Save Our Planet

THE VIEW FROM FLY CREEK

Only Grassroot

Activists Can

Save Our Planet

By ADRIAN KUZMINSKI • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Sustainable Otsego has been both a social network and political action committee since its founding in 2007. Over that time, it has advanced three principles around which local life could be organized:

  1. Sustainable Living.
  2. Economic Independence, and
  3. Home Rule.

Today let me address Sustainable Living; I’ll take up the other two in later columns.

Sustainable Living turns out to be a lot harder than many of us thought. The very word “sustainable” has been corrupted by phrases like “sustainable growth” and “sustainable capitalism.” Thanks largely to corporate propaganda and misinformation, it is less and less clear what terms like “sustainable” or “green” mean.

If it means anything, sustainable living means living on renewable resources on a finite planet.

At least that was the idea when the term “sustainability” went mainstream in the early 2000s.

Energy analysts had begun to worry about “peak oil” decades earlier, but by the early 2000s compelling evidence of limited conventional oil reserves, as well as of the depletion of other resources (fertile soils, clean water, essential minerals, species diversity), brought the issue of sustainability to a larger public.

The idea of sustainable living was a response to this brewing eco-crisis. It meant avoiding practices that led to pollution and a deteriorating natural world. The idea was to recycle everything, go organic, and use less energy and resources. We were supposed to lower our “carbon footprints” to minimize global warming and mitigate climate change.

Sustainable living became no less than a moral movement, a kind of secular religion where

Nature takes the place of God, cooperation takes the place of competition, holistic thinking replaces partial thinking, and harmony and compassion replace strife and tribalism.

That was a profound cultural moment, and it changed important human behaviors. It’s been the main force behind the progress made in recent years towards surviving on this planet. The hope was to maintain something like the middle-class lifestyle to which we have become accustomed.

The plan was to do it by replacing fossil fuels with eco-friendly renewables, poisonous chemicals with “natural” ingredients, and accumulated waste by recycling and composting.

But it didn’t quite work out that way, at least not yet. New technologies (fracking) expanded access to oil and gas reserves, postponing “peak oil” indefinitely, while locking in our reliance on fossil fuels through low prices. Recycling has yet to absorb the vast waste stream, and organic alternatives, popular as they are, are far from replacing cheap, chemically based products.

In the meantime, the methane and CO2 pumped into the atmosphere by continued fossil-fuel use has brought us to the verge of uncontrollable climate change.

The easy steps of sustainable living – buying a Prius, recycling, eating organic food, switching to

LED lighting, etc. – are no longer enough. We need structural, not just personal, changes.

Our continued post-fracking reliance on cheap fossil fuels has allowed the oil and gas industry to dominate the political system, frustrating the transition to renewables. Corporate-led deregulation has rolled back the environmental standards necessary to fully promote organic products and eliminate waste. Indeed, under Trump we’ve gone backwards on all these fronts.

At this point, only upheaval from below seems likely to change national politics. And that will happen only when the urgency of the biggest threat – climate change – reaches a critical threshold in most minds. Because of it, we’ve witnessed in recent months massive wildfires out West, catastrophic floods in the Midwest, melting glaciers and polar ice packs, another record heat wave in Europe, accelerating wildlife extinctions – the list goes on.

The floods a few years back gave us a taste of what can happen here, though climate change for us so far has been mostly incremental and cumulative, rather than sudden and overwhelming.

But it’s not any less significant for that. Hundred-year floods now occur a lot more than once a century. Storms and power outages are more common. The growing season has lengthened.

Winters are milder. Tornados, once unheard of in our region, now occur repeatedly.

If you experience the weather mostly when walking to and from your car, it’s easy to dismiss all this as some kind of delusion, a fake crisis. But if you’re a farmer, a gardener, someone who works outdoors, or manages infrastructure (powerlines, roads, etc.) exposed to the weather, you’re more likely to recognize that climate change is happening right before your eyes.

Sustainable living is both more important than ever, and even harder to achieve. To recognize its challenge is to feel its urgency, and especially the vital need to replace fossil fuels with renewables.

This is evident in the deliberations of the new Otsego County Energy Task Force, where climate change concerns and economic-development issues are coming together for the first time locally.

In response to this growing crisis Sustainable Otsego has evolved into a political action committee focused on local government. Given the failures of our major parties nationally and locally, Sustainable Otsego remains resolutely non-partisan. Visit us on Facebook, and at sustainableotsego.net.

If we’re to respond successfully to climate change from below, it will be because local grassroots activists – conservatives and liberals alike – insist upon it. Only they can force our representatives – local, state, and national – to do what’s necessary to secure the transition to sustainable living. No one else is going to do it.

Adrian Kuzminski, retired Hartwick College philosophy professor

and co-founder and moderator of Sustainable Otsego, lives in Fly Creek.

 

OFO Closed Shelters With One-Day Notice, County Board Learns Reps Ask: What’s Agency’s Responsibility?

OFO Closed Shelters

With One-Day Notice,

County Board Learns

Reps Ask: What’s Agency’s Responsibility?

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Martini

ONEONTA – On the morning of Tuesday, March 17, Opportunities for Otsego advised the county Social Services Department it was closing its shelters by 5 p.m. that evening.

“OFO said, because of the new social distancing, they were shutting their doors,” County Attorney Ellen Coccoma advised the county Board of Representatives as this morning’s monthly meeting, held via Facebook Live for the first time.

This involved less than 10 people, and DSS was successful in finding lodging for them in hotels and motels, said county Rep. Adrienne Martini, D-Oneonta, who chairs the county board Human Services Committee.

Creativity Matters, Adamo Tells Development Officers
SUNY CUAD MEETS AT OTESAGA

Creativity Matters, Adamo

Tells Development Officers

The discussion in The Otesaga Ballroom this afternoon had turned to the benefits of technology when Paul Adamo, SUNY Oneonta vice president of college advancement, reminded the annual conference of SUNY's Council for University Advancement not minimize the role of human creativity in the development field. With Adamo are his counterparts at SUNY Albany, Fardin Sanai, right, and SUNY Stony Brook, and Walter Williams, Empire State College, center. The CUAD conference runs through Friday.and includes The Beekman Boys, the Sharon Springs entrepreneurs; Ken Meifert, Hall of Fame vice president/development, and Hal Legg, SUNY Oneonta director of communications, among local presenters. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
The discussion in The Otesaga Ballroom this afternoon had turned to the benefits of technology in fundraising when Paul Adamo, SUNY Oneonta vice president of college advancement, reminded the annual conference of SUNY’s Council for University Advancement not to minimize the role of human creativity in the development field. With Adamo are his counterparts at SUNY Albany, Fardin Sanai, right, and Walter Williams, Empire State College, center. The CUAD conference runs through Friday.and includes The Beekman Boys, the Sharon Springs entrepreneurs; Ken Meifert, Hall of Fame vice president/development, and Hal Legg, SUNY Oneonta director of communications, among local presenters. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Commission Backs Council Member’s Plan To Examine Offensive Plaque

‘We’ve Got Your Back,’ Murphy Told

Rights Commission Supports

Review Of ‘Savagery’ Plaque

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Murphy

ONEONTA – The city’s Commission on Community Relations and Human Rights supported Council member Luke Murphy, First Ward, as he begins reaching out to groups about the plaque in Neahwa Park that refers to “Indian savagery

“I’m excited to say I have made contacts with the Oneida, Onondaga and Mohawk nations,” he said at this evening’s commission meeting. “I also have reached out to the president of the Daughters of the American Revolution. I want to make sure I have complete engagement of all parties before we proceed.”

OPERA REVIEWS: All 4 Productions Rolled Out At Glimmerglass Festival

American Tragedy, Operatic Triumph?

Christian Bowers as Clyde Griffiths and Vanessa Isiguen as Roberta Alden in The Glimmerglass Festival's new production of Tobias Picker's "An American Tragedy." (Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival)
Christian Bowers as Clyde Griffiths and Vanessa Isiguen as Roberta Alden in The Glimmerglass Festival’s new production of Tobias Picker’s “An American Tragedy.” (Karli Cadel/The Glimmerglass Festival)

By ROBERT MOYNIHAN • allotsego.com

Too many superlatives exist in this Glimmerglass production for reservations – yet a few exist. On the positive side, the staging is brilliant – with multiple levels originally seen in Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman.”

However, this staging far surpasses them. The horrible drowning – either by murder or accident – achieves a paradox of representative horror held within emotional bounds. So does the final electrocution, awful, but contained within the boundary of representative art.

Gene Sheer’s libretto moves without impediment – with a beautiful pivot in the church service at the middle of the work. The singing in that sequence is of recognizable melodic pattern.

Helios Care named as finalist for major award

Dan Ayers, CEO and President of Helios Care. (contributed)

Helios Care named as finalist for major award

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Oneonta’s Helios Care is a top 25 finalist for a prestigious award for innovative palliative care.

The John A. Hartford Foundation Tipping Point Challenge, sponsored by the Center to Advance Palliative Care, is a “national competition to catalyze the spread of skills, ideas and solutions that will improve health care delivery for all people living with a serious illness,” according to its website.

“We are absolutely honored to be included with Mount Sinai and Indiana University and all the other prestigious groups,” said Helios CEO/President Dan Ayers. “I think we are the smallest group on the list by far. There is one from Kentucky. Obviously, they cover a rural area, but we are smaller.”

‘Uxurious’ Misread Fateful Visit

‘Uxurious’ Misread Fateful Visit

Painted As Figure Of Fun, Susan B. Anthony Went On To Make History

Editor’s Note: Here is The Freeman’s Journal Feb. 9, 1855, account – in prose and poetry – of Susan B. Anthony’s appearance in Cooperstown, to be commemorated with a State Historical Marker that has just arrived at the village’s First Presbyterian Church. The tone marks the flippant attitude in some quarters at that time.

Mr. Editor:
Your readers should be apprised that last Friday was a great and eventful day in the history of human events. It was one of these epochs whereat Time pauses to set down a stake from which after generations may measure his further flight.
Henceforth, let it be noted in Phinney’s calendar that the 9th day of February, 1855, was the day when the memorable “Woman’s Rights Convention” was held at Cooperstown! – and let the mothers of Otsego, in all coming ages, teach their children to revere its anniversary, as the day when “the strong-minded women” gave the horn of liberty such a rousing blast among the echoing hills of our county.
…A gentleman was called to the chair, and a secretary and two vice-presidentesses were appointed. The president, after a few appropriate remarks, introduced to the audience, Miss Susan B. Anthony, who took the rostrum.


Her theme – the wrongs that
patient woman bears;
To sew, to spin, to mop and darn
her lot;
To do the drudg’ry, while man
takes the pay.
She all the pangs of Eden’s curse endures,
While man her pleasures shares,
but not her pains.
Give woman but the right of
suffrage, she
Will soon have equal laws,
and what is wrong
Will speedily set right.

Audible sobs were heard among the henpecks

Opinion by Elizabeth Chloe Erdmann: Telling a story of hope in an age of emotions

Opinion by Elizabeth Chloe Erdmann
Telling a story of hope in an age of emotions

These days deep emotions seem to burst forth at unexpected moments.

While in the car between visiting a pumpkin farm owned by friends and the local cider mill, I decided to pull out a crumpled paper with my brief presentation on the history of Crete. “Does anybody want to hear a story?” I asked my captive audience of one of my best friends and her three boys. “Yes!” As the fall foliage whirled by, I started reading, thinking that attention would wander soon, and I’d put it away. To my surprise the boys wanted me to keep reading and even asked that I continue the story when we returned to the car after a break to feed ducks.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Independence Day Boat Parade 07-04-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, JULY 4

Independence Day Boat Parade

14-19eventspage

BOAT PARADE – 3 p.m. Get out for the annual ‘We Love Our Lake’ decorated boat parade. This years theme ‘Lets Celebrate – It’s The 4th Of July.’ All boats welcome from human powered to motor powered and all in between. Participants are reminded to practice social distancing. Parade assembles at 3 Mile Point and proceeds on West Side of the Lake to Lakefront Park, Cooperstown. 518-542-6630 or visit otsegolakeassociation.org for info.

TedxOneonta to return Friday

TedxOneonta to return Friday

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

TedxOneonta returns for its fourth event in five years, with an evening of presentations beginning at 6 p.m., Friday, Sept. 24, at the Foothills Performing Arts and Civic Center in Oneonta.

This year’s theme, a holdover from the canceled 2020 event, is “Changing World.”

“We basically have been planning this for two years,” said Dan Buttermann, TedxOneonta co-founder and executive director.

The local version of Ted talks — the x means it is an independent event and not run by the national organization — this year will feature four speakers.

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