Live updates: Turkey, Syria earthquake death toll passes 5,000; fears of new humanitarian crisis     Photos: Rescuers search for survivors after earthquake in Syria and Turkey kills thousands     After the balloon, China works on fixing U.S. ties while still looking tough     Live updates: Turkey, Syria earthquake death toll passes 5,000; fears of new humanitarian crisis     Photos: Rescuers search for survivors after earthquake in Syria and Turkey kills thousands     After the balloon, China works on fixing U.S. ties while still looking tough     Ukraine live briefing: Ukraine vows to defend Bakhmut as Russia claims successes in combat      South Koreans wonder: Will the U.S. still protect us from North Korea?     Quake in Turkey and Syria follows a deeper history of disaster     Live updates: Turkey, Syria earthquake death toll passes 5,000; fears of new humanitarian crisis     Photos: Rescuers search for survivors after earthquake in Syria and Turkey kills thousands     After the balloon, China works on fixing U.S. ties while still looking tough     Live updates: Turkey, Syria earthquake death toll passes 5,000; fears of new humanitarian crisis     Photos: Rescuers search for survivors after earthquake in Syria and Turkey kills thousands     After the balloon, China works on fixing U.S. ties while still looking tough     Ukraine live briefing: Ukraine vows to defend Bakhmut as Russia claims successes in combat      South Koreans wonder: Will the U.S. still protect us from North Korea?     Quake in Turkey and Syria follows a deeper history of disaster     
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News of Otsego County

Monthly Archives: August 2014

HOMETOWN HISTORY, August 24, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, August 24, 2012

125 Years Ago
I saw Bob Ford, the murderer of Jesse James at Las Cerrillos, a mining town here recently. He is penniless, or about so, his blood money having been exhausted long since by riotous living. He is a hanger on of saloons and gambling dens, and manages somehow to make a living. He is cordially detested by the people and by miners generally, who are themselves often very rough in ways and deeds, and are too brave do the cowardly trick that removed Jesse James from earth. Ford is alone, in all the desolate sense of that word and it will always be so. Dick Liddell is also here, but he is “reformed” and is receiving the assistance and moral encouragement of well-disposed people. He is a nice looking man, very much unlike the brutal Ford in appearance, in actions and in words. Liddell married a woman of the town, who also “reformed” and the people helped them to start on the right road.
August 1887

100 Years Ago
Wednesday night a hopper on a coal car on a northbound train of the D. & H. Co. broke a little way south of the U. & D. station dumping the entire load of coal along the tracks. Within a short time about 20 people of all ages and descriptions began a harvest of the spilled coal without regard to the ownership of same, and had carried away a large amount of it when the D. & H. detectives, Mssrs. Abell and Fox caught them at their work and took the names of the entire party. All promised to appear before Judge Bolton yesterday morning for examination, and 12 of them did so, these being fined $3 each on their pleas of guilty to the charge of petit larceny. Five others appeared in the afternoon and were fined $4 each for their tardiness in appearing and the remaining three have yet to be disposed of.
August 1912

80 Years Ago
L.A. DeRosia, a representative of the New York headquarters division of the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, arrived in Oneonta yesterday and is making his headquarters at Hotel Oneonta for about a month, while he interviews residents of this vicinity in the interest of that organization. Miss Jane Babcock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Linn H. Babcock of Norwich, is assisting him in the local campaign. Mr. DeRosia is enlisting members for the association and hopes through this endeavor to convince Congressman John D. Clarke of Fraser, Republican candidate for Congress from this district, that the attitude of his constituents toward prohibition has changed since the last referendum was held. Congressman Clarke has consistently voted dry because of the dry majority in that expression. Mr. DeRosia stated last evening that he is led to believe, based on preliminary interviews yesterday, that many Oneontans have changed their position in regard to national prohibition.
August 1932

60 Years Ago
Local postal authorities yesterday announced the opening of a new Highway Postoffice (HPO) for after September 20. The unit will serve 22 communities between Albany and Binghamton, including Oneonta. The new HPO will double round trip mail service in the Susquehanna Valley, according to postmaster Sam Bertuzzi. It will replace a similar mail service discontinued several years ago on the D&H Railroad. The new HPO will not conflict, however, with the present rail mail operation. “We’ll still have to handle the late mails,” said Charles House, divisional superintendent for the D&H. The mail mobile schedule calls for daily trips leaving Albany at 7 a.m., arriving in Binghamton 11:20 a.m.; leaving Binghamton at 1:15 p.m. and arriving back in Albany at 6:35 p.m. with mail being sorted en route and delivered the same day as received. The first round trip will carry only mail stamped with postmarks for collectors’ items. Afterwards, all mail will be handled except parcel post and bulk.
August 1952

40 Years Ago
Carpenters Union demonstrators have quietly been pulled off the picket line at the Pyramid shopping mall now under construction along Route 7 in the East End. An accord on the contractor’s hiring practices has been reached, and a few union carpenters are already working on the job. Negotiations between Pyramid officials and Carlton Atkinson, business manager of the Hudson Valley Council of Carpenters resulted in the addition of four union carpenters to the workforce in what had been a non-union operation until the demonstrations. A court order by State Supreme Court Justice Joseph P. Molinari prevented a continuation of large demonstrations against Pyramid allowing only a few picketers to remain along Route 7 carrying placards.
August 1972

20 Years Ago
Before Hurricane Andrew – Hurricane Andrew surged relentlessly toward southern Florida on Sunday and forecasters warned it would be the most powerful storm to hit the United States in decades. More than 1 million residents were told to flee. Forecasters expected the hurricane to reach Category 5 – the worst category with winds topping 155 mph – as it crosses the Gulf Stream to Florida. Landfall in southern Florida was expected between 6 and 8 a.m. today. Miami is on alert for winds in excess of 150 mph and up to 10 inches of rain. After Hurricane Andrew – Hurricane Andrew struck southern Florida on Monday with 160 mph winds and a 12-foot tidal surge that flattened homes, uprooted trees and flung boats onto land. The most powerful hurricane to strike Florida in 60 years has been blamed for at least eight deaths.
August 1992

10 Years Ago
Local students will tell of the early theater days in America in a play at the State University College at Oneonta. “The Voyage Aboard the Charming Sally” takes place in the 1750s and is about immigrants from England who formed the first theatre troupe in the New World, according to Nancy Bakhuizen, director of the Americorps Program, which is presenting the program in the Little Theater at SUCO. The production is the result of a workshop that started July 29 and ran daily from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. About 50 students from Kindergarten through eighth grade, plus a few older teens, participated.
August 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, August 31, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, August 31, 2012

125 Years Ago
The Local News – The state factory inspector paid Oneonta a visit on Tuesday and Wednesday. Fire escapes and swing doors were ordered in several places, and in one case, a boy under the age of 13 years was ordered out of a cigar factory. The inspector left stating that he should be back before long to see that his orders had been duly complied with.
The Guy table company will turn out 10,000 tables this year and is establishing a reputation such that it could find a ready market for many times that number. Beyond doubt the capacity will be shortly increased and buildings specially adapted to the business provided. The new location will probably be in the neighborhood of the chair factory.
August 1887

100 Years Ago
C.D. Townsend, while motoring near Davenport Center Saturday last, observed what looked to be a roll of bills at the roadside, and although at first inclined to believe that it was a roll of advertising matter in design like Uncle Sam’s bank notes, he stopped the car to investigate. He found that the bills were genuine and were rolled tightly with a rubber band about them. There was about $30 in money and some $50 more in checks inside the roll. The checks were made payable to Mr. Beardsley, the flour and feed merchant at Davenport Center, who it was ascertained later had lost the roll. It is fortunate for Mr. Beardsley that the money was not picked up by one of the numerous tramps now making their way to the hop yards of this section.
August 1912

80 Years Ago
Cavallaro di Moneanrano, Italy – Prof. Auguste Piccard and Max Cosyns, both a little bit shaky, came back to earth from the stratosphere today after having ascended to the highest altitude ever reached by man – more than 10 miles. “We are very well satisfied with our flight,” the professor said, while hundreds of gaping farmers stood about staring at men who had been far above the rain and clouds in a little aluminum ball attached to a balloon. Their altitude was 16,700 meters, or 54,776 feet. Prof. Picard, 48 years old, lean, his head crowned by a shaggy mass of hair, and his 25-year-old assistant, took off at 5:06 o’clock this morning at Dubendorf on the other side of the Alps in Switzerland. They were in the air about 12 hours. The Belgian scientist’s first thought after his aluminum ball had bumped against a stubble field in this tiny village was for the safety of his balloon. That taken care of, he said: “Where is a telephone? I want to phone my wife in Zurich?”
August 1932

60 Years Ago
Oneonta’s Family Service Association yesterday issued an appeal for used school clothing for children as a result of numerous requests for such wearing apparel. “With the high cost of living many parents are finding it very difficult to buy shoes, pants, T-shirts and other clothing for their children to go to school with,” said Mrs. Frank G. Sherman, Family Service Association Director. “If you put yourself in the place of a mother with four or five children whose husband has a limited income, you can see that clothing would be very acceptable,” she said. Youngsters needing such clothing range in age from five to fourteen. Persons wishing to contribute may phone 3169-J or visit the Community House, 17 Ford Avenue between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
August 1952

40 Years Ago
With a new sanitary landfill and problems with the city’s glass recycling project, many are urging a change to returnable bottles as an alternative. But the returnables are not readily available in Oneonta supermarkets for several reasons. In three of the four major Oneonta supermarkets – Victory, Grand Union and Loblaw’s, Canada Dry soda is sold in returnable bottles. In at least two of those stores the Canada Dry is a top-selling product. Stores, however, do not want to carry more than one brand of returnable bottles because of the sorting that would be necessary. Jamesway is the only store that carries no returnable bottle products. All stores say they would certainly consider selling other soft drinks in deposit bottles if the public demanded it. The returnable bottles are available from nearly all beverage companies, but the companies say the deposit bottles are not wanted by the grocery stores. Edward Morehouse, manager of the Jamesway store says his store does not carry returnables because to do so would require extra manpower and bookkeeping.
August 1972

30 Years Ago
Nearly $1,000 was raised Saturday at the Dairy Queen on Chestnut Street to help cancer research. Joan Lutz, owner of the ice cream parlor said approximately $800 was raised in ice cream sales on Saturday and donations were still coming in on Sunday. Mrs. Lutz and her husband Al Sayers Lutz, agreed to donate all of their store’s proceeds from 4:30 to 11 p.m. on Saturday to help fund cancer research by a Bassett Healthcare doctor. The Lutzes’ 17-year-old son Steven is one of Dr. Pedro de Alacron’s 15 patients. Dr. de Alacron and Dr. Eric Mazur are studying leukemia patients to determine why they develop anemia. They hope to have their studies completed in a few years. “We were very pleased,” Mrs. Lutz said. “We appreciate everything everyone did. Some people just waited all day until they knew it was 4:40 p.m.,” Mrs. Lutz said. The Lutzes annually donate part of their store’s receipts to a charity.
August 1982

10 Years Ago
Hartwick College’s incoming class boasts 109 National Honor Society inductees, 103 captains of varsity sports, 160 community volunteers and 16 presidents of student government. Hartwick’s 417 freshmen and transfer students include a professional sharpshooter, a member of the Screen Actors Guild, a beauty pageant winner, a bagpipe player and a Junior Olympics kayaker. “The class before us is one of the most academically talented classes this college has ever seen,” Dean of Admissions Susan Dileno told students, faculty and parents gathered in Dewar Hall’s Agora for the college’s opening convocation.
August 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 7, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 7, 2012

125 Years Ago
There is no denying that the hops crop this year in New York State will be far heavier than was estimated. In some cases yards are yielding fully one-half more than was calculated upon a few weeks ago. The quality has not been surpassed in many years. Growers are selling freely at 18 cents. John R. Scott has bought the growth of A.G. Morris & Son, 125 bales, at this price, and also the growths of George Rose and Enoch Wright at the same figure. Other dealers have also bought freely at 18 cents. At Hubbardsville, on Saturday, the growth of I.S. Allen, 150 bales, was sold at 18 cents. These hops are mainly for foreign shipment. In Cooperstown, on Tuesday, 20 cents was paid.
September 1887

100 Years Ago
New Postal Regulations – Beginning with the present month the young woman who receives letters at the general delivery window instead of at home will have to convince Uncle Sam that there is nothing out of the way about it. The new regulations to prevent abuses of the general delivery window will then go into effect. These are questions which the clerk in all post offices in the country may ask: Are you 21 years old? Are you using a fictitious name? Is this correspondence illegal? If the first two are answered in the affirmative, the clerk will answer: “The mail will be delivered at your home by the regular carrier.” The law is intended to prevent young women making arrangements with men without their parents’ knowledge.
September 1912

80 Years Ago
With the opening game less than two weeks away, Coach W.E. “Shorty” Long lost no time with the opening of school Tuesday to sound the initial call for candidates for the 1932 football squad of Oneonta High School. Forty-three upper classmen responded, six of which were lettermen. The squad will be augmented today by many freshmen aspirants. For the first week, Coach Long intends to concentrate on conditioning work, fundamental drills and passing. Coach Long expects this year’s squad to average between 155-165 pounds. Among the upper classmen reporting were 12 backfield men. They included Captain Eddie Hague, Ray Baker, Al Townsend, George Wilber, Len Stanton, Bill Horan, Henry Lare and Pierce Ward of last year’s eleven. Veteran linemen who answered the call were Vic Wolchick, center; Bard and Trinkino, guards; Doherty, tackle; and Paul and Pete Ritchko, ends.
September 1932

60 Years Ago
Getting clothing for distribution to unfortunate families is one of the most pressing problems for the Family Service Association, Inc., according to its executive secretary, Mrs. Frank G. Sherman. “A man came to the office one day to say that his wife had left him with four small children, ranging in age from seven months to six years,” Mrs. Sherman reported. They live in two small rooms in a crowded flat. As another example, Mrs. Sherman told how “another young man came in because he had just made a payment on a home he had bought. He had just been asked to move so he had to have a place for his four children. The house needed lots of repair, but he could do that,” she said. “However, he did not have money enough left to buy shoes for his children to go to school. Could I loan him the money?” Our agency does not make a practice of loaning money, since we do not have it to loan, but I did loan this man money,” she said, “and it will come back to us.”
September 1952

40 Years Ago
John Insetta of 562 Main Street was named temporary personnel technician for the city in a special Common Council meeting held last night, after the Council created the $8,000 per year job. Insetta will assist the local Civil Service Commission and the city with personnel and labor relations. Based on CSEA-City of Oneonta negotiations, the position is to be advertised and an examination given but Insetta will serve pending the examination. Insetta will begin his duties on October 2. Insetta, who is presently unemployed, came to Oneonta at the end of June. He is a former operations manager of the Uni-Flex Corporation in Manhattan. He attended Missouri Valley College in Marshall, Missouri and Wagner College, Staten Island. He is married to the former Linda Matthews of Staten Island. The couple has three children.
September 1972

30 Years Ago
Organizers of the “Little Red Caboose Festival” are soliciting contributions to defray the expenses of the four-day celebration. Festival chairman Wayne Miller said approximately $2,000 is needed to get the festival out of the red. He said approximately $10,000 was made during the festival honoring the 99th anniversary of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. “We made a ton of friends and only an ounce of money,” Miller said. Two expense items, train rides and beer keg sales lagged behind expectations. “We were hoping to make $2,000 on the train rides, but we only made $25,” Miller noted. Scheduling problems accounted for the lack of rides, he said. Approximately 9,700 rides were given on the carnival’s midway. The festival was jammed with people after Sunday night’s fireworks display. “That was $3,000 worth of fireworks,” Miller said. “Fireworks aren’t cheap.” Miller said.
September 1982

20 Years Ago
State police continued searching Tuesday for a burglar who broke into an Oneonta home last week and injured a 77-year-old woman in a scuffle. The woman defended herself from the knife-wielding burglar and suffered cuts on her hands and wrists as a result. The woman, whose identity has not been released, was staying in a home on Meadow Brook Lane northeast of the city’s boundary off East Street. The victim was asleep when the man entered the house at about 1:30 a.m. Friday. She woke up and the scuffle began. The only description given was that the man was black. Blood at the scene indicated that the burglar was injured, possibly on his hand or arm, according to H. Karl Chandler, state police investigator. “We’ve tried to examine the hands of all the black people in the community,” Chandler said.
September 1992

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 14, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 14, 2012

100 Years Ago
The Central New York Fair, the big event of the year in this city, opens next Monday for four days. The association will distribute $5,000 in premiums and prizes to exhibitors of articles. An equal amount will be spent for the aviators, the races, and the roof garden attractions for entertainment. The association believes that it will sustain fully its reputation of giving the best value for 25 cents of any county fair in the state. The successful flights made by aviator Ely of the Curtis Exhibition Co. last year, which so delighted all in attendance, resulted in another contract with that reliable concern, which will send one of its most skillful aviators here for the week of the fair. A second aviator has also been engaged to assure an abundance of flights so that there will be no disappointment likely for visitors. The aviation display alone will be worth coming miles to see.
September 1912

80 Years Ago
A herd of seven deer was reported in John Orr’s pasture on the South Side Tuesday afternoon by Grant Wilber who resides on Franklin Mountain, across the road from Noble’s restaurant. The animals were first seen by Mrs. Vernon Townsend, housekeeper at the Wilber home, and she called other members of the household. The deer came out of the woods to drink at a spring near the edge of the pasture, but were soon frightened away by the barking of a dog. They were of medium size, and were apparently young animals. Deer have been seen in the vicinity before, but this is the first time that a herd of this size has been reported.

Launching a surprise attack under cover of darkness, Co. G, Monday night stormed Kiwanis Island in Neawha Park and succeeded in wresting the fortification from the enemy. The attack, which was given all the frills of war, was one of the problems in night operations mapped out by Captain Danforth Bolton, First Lieutenant Frank McCook, and Second Lieutenant Franklin C. Davis. The crackling of rifle fire and the occasional boom of a big gun caused excited speculation among residents of the city until it was learned that a “war” was on. Due to lack of artillery, bombs were used to simulate the “Big Berthas.”
September 1932

60 Years Ago
Fourteen Spaulding Co. truck drivers in the Oneonta area will receive the benefits of a new union contract with the firm, starting Wednesday, September 17. The first immediate benefit of the new contract will be the inauguration of a five-day week. As a result of the shorter work week, in the future, no bread will be delivered on Wednesdays, but drivers will be expected to work more time on some of the other days of the week. Other benefits to be granted, depending on approval first by the Wage Stabilization Board, are a $2 weekly pay increase, and granting of three vacations after ten years of service. The new contract will affect not only drivers in Oneonta, but also Spaulding drivers throughout the firm’s territory, as well as drivers for National Biscuit Co. and Cobako in this area.
September 1952

40 Years Ago
Figures released by the New York State Department of Health reveal that 70 Otsego County residents received induced abortions. A total of 136 abortions were performed in the county during the calendar year 1971. Of the 136 induced abortions in Otsego County, 54 abortions, or 39.7 percent of all abortions in the county were performed on New York residents that live outside the county. Another 12 women received abortions in the county, who live out of state. Eighty women received abortions in Delaware County, with just half of them residents of the county. Another 36 women, or 45 percent, were New York State residents living outside Delaware County. Four others were from out of state. In New York State, a total of 262,807 induced abortions were officially reported to the State Health Department during 1971. Of these, 159,969 were performed on out of state residents, accounting for 60.9 percent of the total. Nearly 79 percent of the induced abortions were performed during the first three months of pregnancy. The procedures most used were suction and curettage, and dilation and curettage. Together, these procedures accounted for 84.5 percent of the reported abortions. Most abortion patients were young. Persons under 25 obtained 63 percent of the total. Four-fifths of the abortion patients were Caucasian.
September 1972

30 Years Ago
The finance committee chairman of the Otsego County legislature, which has been studying a proposed local income tax, said Monday that his group probably will recommend that the state be asked to look into the matter, even though the committee is against the plan at this time. The committee includes Rep. Carl Higgins (R-Edmeston), Charles Bateman (R-Cooperstown) and Leon Kalmus (D-Oneonta). During a committee meeting on August 25, Higgins said, “We all agree that the income tax has probably always been considered the fairest tax that has been devised.” Other disadvantages, however, outweigh the advantages, he added. Proponents of the income tax saw it as a substitute for the property tax, but Higgins said, “We discovered in our study that it would be almost impossible to do away completely with the property tax.”
September 1982

20 Years Ago
About 2,500 spectators witnessed the debut of Hartwick College’s first football team in 42 years on Saturday. Hartwick’s Warriors lost to King’s College (Pennsylvania), 20-17. Last February, the Oneonta Common Council approved a special use permit allowing the college to enlarge its All-Weather Field, previously used for lacrosse and field hockey, by 15 feet. The permit also allowed the school to add 500 additional seats, doubling the bleacher capacity.
September 1992

10 Years Ago
Thomas Golisano, a candidate for governor, called for cutting the number of public school teachers, teaching abstinence from sex to students, and eliminating day-care facilities for teen mothers at schools. Golisano said education in New York State is failing despite the ever-rising amounts of taxpayer dollars the state is contributing.
September 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 21, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 21, 2012

125 Years Ago
There has been a lively movement in real estate in the locality of the proposed Normal School the past week, property having been sold as follows: To L.H. Blend, four lots on Normal Street, $1,200; H.D. Yager, lot on Normal Street, $400; George Kirkland, two lots, corner of Maple and Cedar streets, $1,500; Dr. J.H. Van Rensselaer, lot on Cedar Street, $650; W.H. Mereness, lot on Cedar Street, $650, and lot between State and East streets, $350; Mrs. Moore and Mrs. Rockwell, two lots, corner East and Cedar streets, $1,300; Delos Yager, two lots on East Street, $1,000; E.M. Elmore, two corner lots, State and East streets, $700; F. Wilcox, lot on Cedar Street, $650; Dr. Goldsmith, lot between State and East streets, $300. It is very generally conceded that the lots at the prices at which they are offered, furnish a good opportunity for investment, as is proved by the fact that several of the best business men of Oneonta are buying and negotiating for the property.
September 1887

80 Years Ago
The City Council – The proposition “Shall the showing of moving pictures on Sunday evenings after the hour of 9 p.m. be permitted in the theatres of the city of Oneonta?” will be submitted to the registered voters of the city at the general election to be held November 8. The City Council, which alone has the power to permit Sunday movies, will not be bound by the result of the voting, but many members of the Council have indicated that they will be influenced in their vote by the expression of sentiment. Clarence C. Miller, former mayor and chairman of the Public Safety Commission, appeared before the Council and presented a resolution unanimously adopted by the members of the paid fire department and of the police department in which they voluntarily voted to refund five percent of their salaries from October 15, 1932 to September 30, 1933, to the City Chamberlain for the relief of the unemployed. This refund will amount to about $1,600.
September 1932

60 Years Ago
The first responsibilities of a minister’s wife are crystal-clear to Mrs. Edna Mae (Penny) Lyon, wife of the Rev. Roswell Lyon, pastor of the First Methodist Church. Her biggest duty, she staunchly maintained during an interview yesterday, is creating a pleasant atmosphere and background where a husband-pastor can relax after a hard day’s grind. “I’m definitely not a pastor’s assistant,” declared Mrs. Lyon. “I don’t like to see a minister’s wife running competition with her husband. It might lead to a jealous situation.” Mrs. Lyon admitted that she liked housework as an outcome of majoring in home economics in college at Ohio Wesleyan University where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Mrs. Lyon has taught Sunday Schools at previous pastorates her husband has held, but she cautions, “A pastor’s wife should never be too prominent or too important in the church. My home is my most important job.”
September 1952

40 Years Ago
Private investigator Andrew Liddle will conclude his investigation of the Oneonta Police Department’s operations in mid-October. Liddle said the final report would run to approximately 200 pages and would include a new set of rules and regulations for the department and its officers. Liddle said that he, members of the Safety Board, and special counsel to the Safety Board, Robert Harlem, would interview Police Chief Joseph DeSalvatore last night. DeSalvatore has just returned from the prestigious 12-week FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia, where the chief did exceptionally well, finishing in the top ten percent of the class of 200. Liddle is paid $10 per hour Mayor James Lettis said Liddle works upwards of 40 hours a week on his probe. Liddle and the Council are expected to get together in a private session to review the findings to date.
September 1972

30 Years Ago
The Leatherstocking Railway Historical Society wants to build a Delaware & Hudson Railroad museum, an art gallery, and park on the vacant urban renewal plot in downtown Oneonta. James Loudon, the society’s president said the group will ask the Oneonta Common Council for permission to build on the Broad Street parcel. The group has scrapped earlier plans to build the museum in Oneonta’s Neahwa Park. Loudon proposes to move the “Little Red Caboose,” the site where the Brotherhood of Railroad trainmen was organized in 1883, to the Broad Street parcel. The caboose would be enclosed in glass and visible during closing hours. Oneonta Mayor James F. Lettis opposes the society’s plan. “I’d rather see some retail there if we can get it. He noted that another attempt to build a local rail museum failed several years ago. Another proposal for the Broad Street site is a $10 million shopping mall. The site has been vacant for approximately 10 years.
September 1982

20 Years Ago
The Oneonta Common Council has approved a change in the city charter that gives petitioners the right to speak at the beginning of council meetings. The change puts into law a long-time practice which, however, was never a right, and thus could have been stopped at any time. The change was advocated by the Oneonta League of Women Voters. Alderman John Carney and Kathryn King opposed the measure because they were concerned about lengthy debates preventing the council from doing its work.
September 1992

10 Years Ago
Kate Hendrickson Borg, an Olympic kayaker and former Oneonta high school swimmer, competed in her first triathlon in Madison, Wisconsin, last Sunday. She finished 921st out of 1,801 competitors with a time of 12 hours, 49 minutes and 12 seconds. The course started with a 2.4 mile open-water swim, followed by 112 miles of biking and 26.2 miles of running. The Wisconsin Triathlon, held for the first time this year, was a qualifier for the Kona, Hawaii Ironman competition.
The FIFA Women’s World Cup, which normally resides at the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta, was displayed last week at the Michelle Akers Tribute Game and will be sent to FIFA before the next World Cup in November 2003.
September 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 28, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, September 28, 2012

125 Years Ago
On Monday afternoon, with appropriate ceremonies, the corner stone was laid of the new Presbyterian Church of Oneonta. There was a goodly attendance at the services, many of those having been present having been identified with the Presbyterian Church of Oneonta for a great many years. The services were opened by words of welcome from I.S. Osborn, the senior elder of the church, after which letters were read by G.W. Reynolds, from Rev. Wm. Baldwin and Rev. Geo. O. Phelps, former pastors of the church. Scriptural reading followed by the Rev. A.B. Richardson of the Methodist Episcopal Church and then came prayer by Rev. H.H. Allen, for 17 years, the pastor of the church. The Rev. Leonard ED. Richards, moderator of the Otsego Presbytery then addressed the assembly. Articles placed in the cornerstone include names of the members of the building committee, the Sunday School teacher and class, first contributing for a new church along with other items including a photograph of the church erected in 1816, now being demolished to make way for the new.
September 1887

100 Years Ago
At the Central New York Fair, aviator Walter Johnson gave what must be conceded to be the most satisfactory exhibition ever seen here. He kept close to the grounds and was within sight of the crowds in the grandstand constantly. Back and forth across the valley he sped, now pointing upward and the next moment descending with a graceful sweep close to earth and so close to the grounds that some became fearful and up again and off across the valley and up the hillsides and over the clumps of trees he sped, his machine apparently under perfect control. Back over the grounds in an instant it seemed he came and then would make a short circle directly overhead and then off again for a longer circle. Perhaps never have so many experienced a desire to make a flight as while watching his Thomas machine flying with such apparent ease and grace.
September 1912

60 Years Ago
City Attorney Anthony DeAngelo and Mayor Roger C. Hughes will go to Albany Tuesday for a state-wide seminar on enforcement of the new multiple residence law. The law, which became effective on July 1, is to have a far-reaching effect on housing units where three or more families reside. Oneonta, as well as every city under 500,000, every town and village, must adhere to the law and must set up means of enforcement, DeAngelo reported. The law also takes in dwellings of two or more stories which have five or more boarders, roomers or lodgers in one household; also dormitories, fraternity houses, hotels, clubs, and convalescent homes. Mr. DeAngelo and Mayor Hughes said they are planning as of now to combine the office of multiple residence inspector with a new office of building inspector to be created when the Common Council adopts a building code. Such a building code is now under consideration.
September 1952

40 Years Ago
Mayor James F. Lettis announced yesterday that the city has received an $85,320 federal grant for its “open spaces” program. That money will be used primarily to develop a new section of Neahwa Park – 11 acres of land just inside the Gas Avenue entrance to the park. Announcement of the grant came yesterday in a telegram from New York’s two senators, Jacob Javits and James Buckley, to Mayor Lettis. The grant is from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. The new section is expected to include golf putting greens, a hockey rink, basketball courts, a children’s play area and toilet facilities. The grant represents 50 percent of the estimated total cost of the project. The grant also provides for the re-laying of flagstone sidewalks, removal of diseased elm trees, the already completed lighting project at Damaschke Field, and other projects.
September 1972

30 Years Ago
Twenty-eight men and women were graduated from the Otsego Area School of Practical Nursing in ceremonies September 23 at the Oneonta High School. Anne Marie LeoGrande of Oneonta was named the outstanding student of the class. Receiving diplomas were: Julie Bartlett, Rhonda D. Barton, Leon Beach, Beverly A. Bott, Betty Burr, Carolyn Collins, Mary H. Colone, Donna E. Cook, Angela M. Della Torre, Susan Gay, Maureen Harrington, Maureen Haviland, Karen Higgins, Sue Kiser, Anne Marie LeoGrande, Jacqueline Murphy Shea, Michael Murphy, Maietta O’Keefe, Anne Oliver, Patricia Rodemas, Jane Simmons, Bonnie J. Sorbera, Cece Stevens, Betty D. Thompson, Don Tripp, Mari J. Tubbs Allen, Paula D. Ulmer, and Marilyn Zaengle. The graduation address was given by Barbara Chamberlain, assistant director, Pathfinder Village, Edmeston.
September 1982

20 Years Ago
Ninety area students sat spellbound as they listened to sobering stories of the devastating results of substance abuse during the Seventh Annual Delaware County Students Against Driving Drunk Conference at the Phoenix House on Friday. Lisa Schaffer, 28, a Phoenix House counselor, took the floor and described her high school years growing up in Delhi and how she succumbed to peer pressure. She admitted to sneaking out of her house at night to party, after her parents thought she was in bed asleep. Her substance abuse began with alcohol but soon encompassed marijuana, cocaine and speed. “My sobering experience occurred on December 24, 1984,” said Schaffer. “I was sober and on my way home from work when I was hit head on by a drunk driver.”
September 1992

10 Years Ago
Visitors to Huntington Library in Oneonta this week will be able to view displays of books that either have been banned or challenged over the years by people who question their content. Among the books that have been suppressed or censored by school and legal authorities are James Joyce’s “Ulysses,” Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” “MacBeth,” “King Lear” and “Merchant of Venice,” J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” and Shel Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree.” American Library Association officials say Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to express one’s opinion, even if that opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular.” The message of Banned Books Week stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of those unorthodox viewpoints to all who wish to read them.
September 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 5, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 5, 2012

125 Years Ago
Mrs. A.B. Ford has died under peculiar circumstances. On Friday she visited the grounds while the Deposit Fair was in progress, one of the attractions being the balloon ascension. Mrs. Ford watched the balloon as it shot toward the sky, and when the aerialist suddenly dropped from the basket onto the trapeze below, she uttered an exclamation and dropped to the ground unconscious, in which condition she remained until death intervened. A post mortem showed that a blood vessel at the base of the brain had been ruptured.

A party of anarchists undertook to hold a meeting at Union Hills, New Jersey, last Sunday, under a call which denounced all lawfully constituted authorities as a “rabble of thieves and murderers.” It was very properly decided by the mayor of the village that no such lawless assemblage should be suffered. When the hour for the meeting came, the patriots therefore were confronted at the entrance of the hall with a cordon of police. A fierce contest followed in which authorities triumphed, notwithstanding the knives and revolvers of the mob. No anarchist meeting will be advertised at Union Hill again. Would that local governments everywhere were equally enlightened and determined.
October 1887

100 Years Ago
Kenneth L. Nash, who since his graduation from Brown University, at Providence, R.I. last June, has been a member of the Cleveland American League ball team, is calling upon Oneonta friends. Mr. Nash played in several league games since his arrival in Cleveland, but of late has been suffering from a sprained knee and he has been given a leave of absence for the rest of the season, although required to report at the opening of the season next spring, when the team begins the spring practice in Florida. He will teach in a preparatory school in Providence this winter. Mr. Nash has played in Oneonta two summers and has many friends who are pleased to greet him.
October 1912

60 Years Ago
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, United States delegate to the United Nations and widow of the WWII president will be the speaker at a public meeting at 8 p.m. tonight in the auditorium of the Oneonta State Teachers College. Mrs. Roosevelt announced yesterday that her topic will be “Human Relations as It Affects the Community.” Her address, which also will be broadcast direct from the STC auditorium over WDOS, is open to the general public. Mrs. Roosevelt’s talk is under the sponsorship of the Oneonta Brotherhood Council, organized during National Brotherhood Week last year to carry out the purposes of that organization throughout the entire year. Dr. Willis P. Porter, principal of Bugbee School and chairman of the committee will preside. Following her address, Mrs. Roosevelt will be the “guest of honor” in Morris Hall, to which the official representatives and presidents, and their husbands and wives of the 54 organizations affiliated with the Council are invited.
October 1952

40 Years Ago
There is too much noise in the city of Oneonta according to Alderman Helen Baldo. She wants the city’s 18-month-old noise ordinance enforced, even if it means the city will have to purchase equipment to measure noise levels. Mrs. Baldo asked city attorney Harold Vrooman if the ordinance is enforceable. “Yes,” he replied, if the city buys a decibel meter. Although fraternities and sororities were not singled out openly, they were obviously the target of much of the discussion. “When there are noisy houses or parties next door, people shouldn’t have to put up with this,” Mayor James Lettis said. Mrs. Baldo believes there are some obviously noisy situations where the police could act on their own initiative. Meanwhile, she wants the city to look into the purchase of a decibel meter.
October 1972

30 Years Ago
Oscar the Grouch usually hangs out in trash cans along television’s Sesame Street. But this week, he has joined ranks with the Oneonta Fire Department as a fire safety instructor. “If you catch fire, you gotta stop, drop and roll,” Oscar tells elementary school students. Oscar’s appearance in the Oneonta elementary schools is part of National Fire Prevention Week. “The kids think it’s great,” said Captain Francis Russo, who coordinates the program. “They get involved and everyone learns how to stop, drop and roll. Groups of students meet with Oscar in a school cafeteria or gymnasium to sing songs and witness demonstrations of what they should do if they or their home catches fire. The children practice the stop, drop and roll technique on floor mats and are tested toward the end of the program.
October 1982

20 Years Ago
Ten panelists at a SUCO symposium on “hate speech” debated the possibility whether attempts by college administrators to limit speech amounted to the imposition of standards of “political correctness.” Panelist Dineesh D’Souza, author of the book “Illiberal Education,” said that even if there were no codes regulating speech, there were certain opinions that, if raised, could bring a “chill” from students, faculty and administration because they did not embrace the standards of cultural diversity contained in the doctrine of political correctness. “If you stood up in a women’s studies class and denounced Roe versus Wade and said that abortion on demand was unnecessary, your view would not be merely wrong,” he said. “You would be viewed as an enemy of women’s rights.” Nadine Strossen, president of the American Civil Liberties Union, answered that dealing with such criticism is the price one pays for exercising the right of free speech. “One has to learn to say things that are unpopular and deal with the pressure,” she said.
October 1992

10 Years Ago
Ralph Nader, an anti-establishment icon for decades, attacked crime in corporate America on Friday under a Wall Street statue of George Washington. “Take the pledge to crack down on corporate crime,” Nader said, as he stood atop the steps of Federal Hall, where Washington was sworn in as President in 1789. Several thousand protesters stood behind police barricades, some holding placards that read “Stop Cooking the Books” and “Protect Main Street from Wall Street.”
October 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 12, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 12, 2012

125 Years Ago
John Hartigan, brakeman for conductor Carter of train 28, was killed at 11:30 last night near the Fonda Avenue crossing. Hartigan, an unmarried man of 33, came from Binghamton on Train 28, and was making up the train for its return when he went between the engine and car to make a coupling. In some way he missed his calculation, and was caught at the chest between the deadwoods and crushed so badly that he never spoke after his initial cry of anguish. The coupling was made and Hartigan was so firmly held between the engine and car that it took several minutes to release him. He was dead when taken out. Hartigan lived in Binghamton. He has two brothers who are brakemen in the employ of the Delaware and Hudson Company.
October 1887

100 Years Ago
Activity is everywhere apparent in Company G of this city and it is expected that orders will be issued for resuming the company drills. The enlistment of several recruits affords the company considerable satisfaction and all indications point to a prosperous and successful new year. Following the first drill, arrangements will be completed with reference to the intended trip to the inauguration ceremonies at Washington in March. Pullman tourist sleepers have been engaged. The only point regarding which the company has not yet been assured is whether or not the railroad will furnish a kitchen car. In addition to its regular work the company is contemplating the formation of an indoor baseball league and a call will probably be issued shortly for a meeting of those interested in such a proposition. It is the desire of those back of the movement to organize four teams and have two games each week throughout the winter thus permitting each team to play one game per week.
October 1912

80 Years Ago
On the basis of his utterances on his long campaign swing around the continent which ended with his return to Albany, Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt may be fairly regarded as the most promising nominee that either major party has put forward for the presidency in the present century. The trip, indeed, has been one long series of promises. The candidate has promised to solve every vexatious social or economic problem that burdens his countrymen, easily and effortlessly. But he has failed, in virtually every instance, to give more than a vague hint as to what his solution of a given problem might be. And he has failed to explain why he has not undertaken the solution of more of these problems while governor of New York.
“Problems of a Theatre Manager” was the subject of an interesting address by Harry F. Rose, manager of the Oneonta Theatre, at the meeting of the Business Women’s Club at the club rooms over the Oneonta Theatre last evening. Mr. Rose corrected the impression that a theatre manager has little to do other than come down and open the theatre. He mentioned that 16 and more hours a day are the usual practice. The speaker said that the theatre manager has little choice in the selection of films. He stated that often the theatre must contract for its pictures a year ahead, whether or not it likes the films. Mr. Rose told how employees of the theatre preview the pictures and that their reactions form the basis for cutting any portion of the films that might be objectionable to Oneonta audiences.
October 1932

60 Years Ago
A 24-year-old record was surpassed Saturday as Oneonta voters trooped to the polls in unprecedented numbers to register for voting in the coming presidential election. By the close of the registration period on Saturday, a total of 6,652 voters had registered. The previous high number in Oneonta’s electoral history was 1928 when the Smith versus Hoover contest brought 6,400 voters to register. A total of 1,501 voters signed the register on Saturday, the last day.
October 1952

30 Years Ago
The Planned Parenthood Association of Delaware and Otsego Counties is celebrating its tenth anniversary in 1982. Two clinics were opened in 1972 to assist local people in family planning education and medical services. The clinics were opened through the efforts of Norma Lee Havens of Oneonta and a group of hardworking, committed people from both counties. Fox hospital was the site of the Otsego County office for three years and the other clinic was opened in Delaware Valley Hospital in Walton. The first year 800 people were served. The Oneonta Center moved to Market Street and a clinic was added in Stamford. More than 3,000 people were served last year.
October 1982

20 Years Ago
With violent behavior appearing more frequently among college students, volunteers with the Alternatives to Violence Project are approaching high schools in an attempt to stop the problem before it starts. “It would be ever so nice to start when people are young,” said Kate Ryan, a facilitator from Delhi. She and Rose Marie Sheehan will be explaining what their workshops can do for students at the next Delaware Academy school board meeting on Monday, October 19. “We want to incorporate the workshop in some form,” Ryan said. “We want to open people’s eyes.” In the past two years, Ryan has led two-day workshops for Delaware Academy’s student senate members and teachers. Through the program, students realize that violence is not limited to physical abuse.
October 1992

10 Years Ago
Former President Jimmy Carter won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for his “untiring effort” to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts and to advance democracy and human rights. The Norwegian Nobel Committee contrasted Carter’s success in finding peace between Egypt and Israel through diplomacy with President Bush’s vow to oust Iraq’s Saddam Hussein, by force if necessary.
Hartwick College will host a lecture titled “Man, Chimps and War” at 8 p.m. Monday in Yager Hall. R. Brian Ferguson of Rutgers University, founder and director of the Working Group on Political Violence, War and Peace at the Center for Global Change and Governance at Rutgers University, will present the lecture.
October 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 19, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 19, 2012

125 Years Ago
Stephen Parish, an old and respected resident of Oneonta, died on Thursday last at his home, on River Street. Mr. Parish was a son of the late Andrew Parish, and was born on the farm owned by him at his death, on the south side of the river near this village. This farm the father, Squire Parish, whose widow is still living on River Street, bought when that part of Oneonta was in the Town of Kortright, and here his family of boys was born. It is related that on one occasion the tax gatherer called upon Mr. Parish for his tax, but twenty-five cents. Mr. Parish had plenty of barter, but no cash, and, strange as it may seem, the money could not be found in the town, barter then being all the go. The tax gatherer, therefore, went away without the money. A few days afterward it was procured by Mr. Parish and he trudged his way on foot to Kortright and placed it in the tax gatherer’s hands. Stephen was a man of good judgment and strict integrity, and had filled with credit local offices, representing the town in the Board of Supervisors for one or more terms. For many years he had been actively identified with the Presbyterian church.
October 1887

100 Years Ago
Colonel Theodore Roosevelt was shot and slightly wounded Monday night when leaving Milwaukee’s Gilpatrick Hotel for the auditorium to make a speech. The wound was superficial and the colonel went on to the hall and began his speech after he had seen his assailant arrested and taken to the police station. Henry F. Cochems seized the man and held him until policemen came up. A mob surged around the prisoner who apparently is mentally upset on the subject of Roosevelt running for another term as president. The man, who is small of stature, admitted firing the shot and said “that any man looking for a third term ought to be shot.” In notes found in the man’s pockets at the police station were statements that the man had been visited in a dream by the spirit of William McKinley, who had said, indicating Colonel Roosevelt, “This is my murderer; avenge my death.” An X-ray of Colonel Roosevelt’s wound shows the bullet lodged in the chest wall and did not penetrate the lung. (Ed. Note: Later reports add that one of Colonel Roosevelt’s ribs was fractured in the attack)
October 1912

80 Years Ago
Dr. and Mrs. Lewis R. Morris or Morris, donors to the city of Oneonta of Neahwa Park, are opposed to the application to have the Gas Avenue entrance to that park reopened to provide a thoroughfare for vehicular traffic. In a letter to the Common Council and Mayor Francis H. Marx, Dr. Morris states: “I am very much opposed to such an idea for several reasons. In the first place I think it would be an element of great danger for the people who visited the park, as trucks and automobiles would drive through from River Street to the east end of Oneonta so as to cut off going through Main Street. This would also be a great danger to the children who play around the park and tennis courts who would continually cross the roads back and forth in that part of the park.” A clause in the deed of gift reads: “This conveyance is made by the parties…on the express condition that the lands and premises hereby conveyed shall be used as a public park and place of recreation and amusement.” Dr. Morris states: “It seems to Mrs. Morris and me that this opening up of a public street through the park for traffic would be a subversion of the gift to the city of Oneonta.”
October 1932

60 Years Ago
Approximately $200 was raised at a Del-Sego Theater benefit show last night toward purchase of a special invalid car for Floyd Briscoll. Gate receipts after taxes totaled $132, Bert Mitchell and William Warnken, Jr., proprietors said. In addition, Briggs Lumber Co. contributed $50 and several small donations were made. Mr. Mitchell pointed out that the temperature at Emmons dropped to 28 degrees during the show, which was the coldest show time so far this year. The care will cost $495, and Mr. Briscoll’s friends hope to raise the balance by helping in his annual sale of Christmas cards. Mr. Briscoll, now 39, has been an invalid since age 12. His time is spent in bed or in a wheel chair at his home, 34 Reynolds Ave.
October 1952

40 Years Ago
The new Navy wasn’t ready for Seaman Recruit Kathleen M. Licalzi. Miss Licalzi is among the first contingent of women assigned to regular seaman duties at the U.S. Naval Station across the Severn River from the U.S. Naval Academy. She and her female shipmates arrived a week ago. But their new quarters in the enlisted men’s barracks were not ready yet. In the meantime, the 10 girls are staying in cramped quarters on a yawl, one of the boats used for training midshipmen at the academy. Navy women have always been allowed to hold the rank of seaman, but it was not until the new Navy policy that women were permitted to go to sea.
October 1972

20 Years Ago
The Leatherstocking Pony Club, for the fourth year in a row, had a qualifying participant in the Pony Club Nationals. Alexis Gounis, age 16, competed with the Western New York Show Jumping team. The team consisted of five members, four riders and one stable manager, and was coached by Kevin Price of Otego. The team placed second in horse management and eighth overall. Gounis had five clear rounds.
October 1992

10 Years Ago
Upstate New York gained 155,000 private sector jobs in the last 10 years according to a study released Friday that rebuts claims made by Gov. George Pataki’s challengers. A study commissioned by the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce shows that New York had a net gain of 572,000 private sector jobs statewide between 1991 and 2001, 155,000 upstate.
October 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 26, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, October 26, 2012

125 Years Ago
Another of the old landmarks of Oneonta goes with the razing of the old Goodyear saw mill at this village. The mill has become practically useless because of the failure of the water power by reason of the change in the channel of the Susquehanna above the dam. It is understood that the mill yard is to be divided into building lots by Miss Lyman and sold as such.

The members of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union have engaged Mr. P.A. Burdick to hold a seventeen days gospel temperance meeting in Oneonta commencing Thursday evening, November 10th, and continuing until the 27th. Mr. Burdick has been engaged in this commendable work for several years and has engagements until next July. The ladies are fortunate in securing him at all. His success in every place where he has labored is unprecedented. The largest halls are unable to hold the crowds who gladly listen to his stirring appeals. The committee has engaged the theatre and the opera house. He depends upon the free will offerings of the people for his remuneration. Mr. Burdick asks the committee engaging him to provide his railway fare.
October 1887

100 Years Ago
Organization of the Indoor Baseball League has been completed, with five teams to compete for honors. The business affairs of the organization will be under the general management of Company G, with an advisory committee of one member from each team. The games will be played on Tuesday and Thursday with umpires chosen from non-competing teams. The 14-inch ball will be used and the standard rules will apply to all games during the series. The price of admission will be 21 cents for reserved seats; 15 cents general admission, and 10 cents for ladies. Teams competing are: High School Club, Company G, Liberty Club, D&H Shops, and D&H Clerks.

The 26th annual convention of the Otsego County Women’s Christian Temperance Union, which was held at Otego Wednesday and Thursday, proved a very successful affair, and the delegates were favored by delightfully pleasant weather. Twenty-five unions were represented; 65 delegates being present. At the business session the following officers were elected for the coming year: President, Mrs. Georgia Wheaton, Oneonta; vice-president, Mrs. Lula Walker, Oneonta; corresponding secretary, Mrs. J.S. Smith, Oneonta; recording secretary, Mrs. Nellie Finch, Worcester; treasurer, Mrs. Julia Halbert, Gilbertsville; general secretary, L.T.L, Mrs. Edith Hotaling, Oneonta.
October 1912

80 Years Ago
Franklin D. Roosevelt told thousands of Marylanders, amid boos for the Republican administration and cheers for himself, that he was fighting against the four horsemen of the Republican leadership – “destruction, delay, deceit, despair.” In an assault on Republican policies and assertions on the tariff, farm relief, governmental finances, prohibition, economy, and relief, the Democratic presidential candidate brought to Maryland an appeal for the support of that border state in his quest for the key to the White House. Roosevelt’s one mention of the word “beer” set a crowd that police estimated at 25,000 into a one-minute demonstration that set the rafters to ringing. Roosevelt called for modification of the Volstead Act to permit the sale of beer.
October 1932

60 Years Ago
News from the Bresee’s Store (Editor’s note: the first escalators are installed) – Hi everybody! The spooks will soon be spooking and the haunts will be haunting, and with every haunt and spook it brings us that much closer to the escalator promotion that will start on the 17th of November – You are going to be here, aren’t you? – Ceremonies will start at 10 a.m. with Mr. and Mrs. Santa to give this huge present to our very wonderful customers…there will be souvenir gifts and you will want to be on hand to take advantage of all the values and to ride the escalators. The escalators are well on the way and if you have been in the Men’s Shop lately you will notice that the temporary partition is down and they definitely have come out of hiding in that department…you will notice too, that Dick Fowler of the Philadelphia Athletics is back with us again this year and makes a nice addition to the Men’s Shop.
October 1952

40 Years Ago
Two separate fires in dormitories at Hartwick College last night caused a total of $2,300 damage in two rooms. City firemen extinguished a minor fire in a second story room of the three-story Dewar Hall dormitory. Captain Gerald Fisher of the fire department said the fire apparently started when students burned a candle on a dresser. That fire, at 5:15 p.m., caused about $300 worth of damage to the room. Dewar Hall is coed, with women in one room and men in the next. Just two hours later, firemen were again called to extinguish a fire at Saxton Hall where a high intensity lamp was left on causing an estimated $2,000 in damage to a table, lamp, bed, wall-hanging and carpet.
October 1972

30 Years Ago
Approximately 50 SUCO students denied the right to vote in local elections last week have joined a statewide lawsuit challenging the denials. The students tried to register to vote during a voter registration drive in the city on October 16. The registrations were rejected by the Otsego County Board of Elections after the board ruled the students were not eligible to vote locally. “We’re very hopeful that we will win,” said Lea Stein, SUCO’s representative to the Student Association of the State of New York (SASU).
October 1982

10 Years Ago
A year after state legislation banned the use of hand-held phones while driving, local police officials report that very few tickets have been written locally. New York was the first – and is still the only – state to enact a ban on driving while using a hand-held phone. In the first six months of the ban, nearly 3,500 tickets were handed out by the New York State Police. Besides the state police, sheriff’s deputies and other police have issued nearly 40,000 tickets since January according to Assemblyman Felix Ortiz (D-Brooklyn) who first proposed the ban.
October 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 2, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 2, 2012

125 Years Ago
A narrow escape from a terrible accident was had at Quaker Street last Friday, when engineer Houghton, drawing the Albany excursion train, ran into the rear of a freight train which had out no flag. Fortunately, engineer Houghton, by reversing promptly and applying sand, managed to stop the force of his train to the extent that no passengers were injured. The engine, however, was quite badly wrecked in the collision that followed, as also were a caboose and one or two other cars. Engineer Houghton and his fireman saved their lives by jumping.
November 1887

100 Years Ago
One of the finest musical entertainments ever held in this city was the piano forte lecture and recital given in the assembly hall of the high school building last evening by Edward Baxter Perry, the famous blind musician. The hall was well filled and the audience listened with the closest attention to the interesting description given by Mr. Perry of the circumstances under which the several musical numbers on the programme were composed. The musical was given under the auspices of the Woman’s Club. In technique and finish, in force and feeling and in interpretation and expression, Mr. Perry demonstrated that he is a master of the science to which he is devoted. Every number on the programme received the most enthusiastic applause. Mr. Perry distinguished serious music from popular music saying that the latter combines “a sudden jingle, dash and stir with a more or less insipid sweetness, which is commonly styled ‘pretty.’” As a matter of fact, he held, the best music is not intended to be ‘pretty’ at all, but deals with the intelligence, the emotions, and everything that goes to make up the heights and depths of human experience. True music is the kind which will stir the brain or warm the heart of a cultured human being.
November 1912

80 Years Ago
President Hoover on Monday said that “if Franklin D. Roosevelt is elected President of the United States and the Democratic Tariff policy adopted, the grass will grow in the streets of a hundred cities.” Hoover asserted “that to embark upon this inchoate New Deal, which has been propounded in this campaign, would be to undermine and destroy our American system. “This campaign,” Hoover said, “is more than a contest between two men. It is more a contest between two parties. It is a contest between two philosophies of government. We are told by the opposition that we
must have a change, that we must have a New Deal. It is not the change that comes from normal development of national life to which I object, but the proposal to alter the whole foundations of our national life which have been builded through generations of testing and struggle, and of the principles upon which we have builded the nation.”
November 1932

60 Years Ago
Ultra-modern spooks came out of their eerie haunts last night, under the spell of an Indian Summer moon, and cavorted before 6,000 bewitched onlookers in that parade ground for pixies known as Main Street. The annual “Night of Fun” frolic was distinguished this year by up-to-the-minute goblins, ghosts, gremlins, elves and spritely little folk. Space cadets, a man from Mars, walking ballot boxes, the Statue of Liberty, and most everything except a witch in a helicopter, were prancing in line with the orthodox little people. The Oneonta high school band, directed by Carmen Caiazza went through strictly new maneuvers and exhibited a musicianship and precision that was outstanding. There was a time when fearful property owners anchored their houses and things lest the mischief-makers move them to different wards. But, the Rotary-Kiwanis-Lions Club-spon-

 

sored event evoked not a single complaint to police about mischief.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
Phillip A. Luce, the one-time member of the Progressive Labor Party turned right-wing libertarian, will appear on the State University at Delhi campus, Thursday. Luce, speaking on the topic, “Why the New Left Should Hold No Attraction for You,” will be at the Little Theater at Farrell Hall on the Delhi Campus at 4 p.m. As a college student in the early 1960s Luce was active in many facets of politics of the far left, visiting Cuba on one occasion and arranging trips to the island nation for others. Luce later changed his mind about politics and became a member of the right wing Young Americans for Freedom. His visit to the Delhi area is being sponsored by the local YAF chapter.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Governor-elect Mario Cuomo went jogging and chatted by phone with defeated Republican opponent Lewis Lehrman as he took time off Wednesday to savor a sweet but narrow victory. Cuomo defeated Lehrman by about 164,000 votes in the race to succeed Hugh Carey. It was the lowest margin in a New York gubernatorial race since 1954 when Democrat Averill Harriman beat Republican U.S. Senator Irving Ives by 11,125 votes. Cuomo spent Wednesday relaxing at his home in Queens and working on plans to form a transition team. The first person named to the team – to head the operation – was Cuomo’s 25-year-old lawyer son, Andrew, who has served as a top adviser throughout his father’s campaign. Lehrman conceded defeat 16 hours after the polls closed.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
A city of Oneonta committee reports that it will not ask Otsego County to cut back the hours that bars remain open. Tavern hours are set by the county, and Oneonta’s representatives to the county board had indicated they would support a move by city leaders to shorten tavern hours and mandate closing at 1 or 2 a.m. instead of 3 a.m. The call to have bars close earlier has come in the wake of alcohol-related violence that has plagued downtown Oneonta. However, the committee believes a change is unnecessary. “Based on what we’ve seen, based on the efforts of different organizations – the city, the colleges, the bar owners and the students – our committee doesn’t feel at this time we want to petition the county to bring the drinking time back,” said Robert Bard, 5th Ward Alderman.
November 1992

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 9, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 9, 2012

100 Years Ago
A plurality of 200,000 votes for Woodrow Wilson over Taft, and Taft’s lead of 60,000 over Roosevelt, is the result of yesterday’s election in New York State so far as confirmed by nearly complete returns. The Democratic Party presidential plurality is the largest New York State has ever given to that party and it is the first time in the history of the state that the voters outside of the metropolitan district have given a Democratic presidential candidate a plurality. So far, the totals are: Wilson – 648,066; Taft – 477,274; Roosevelt – 381,500. Nationwide Wilson has secured 387 electoral votes; Roosevelt has 89; and Taft only 12. In conceding defeat Taft said he hopes to see organized a national “Republican Club” entirely apart from the Republican National Committee. Such a club he said will “cherish the principles of the party and be a source of political activity, not only during election years, but at all times.” Mr. Taft declared that Mr. Wilson would face a Congress made up to a large extent of untried men who have come to believe that to show their faith with the people they must at times be “insurgents” and oppose the program of the leaders.
November 1912

80 Years Ago
Borne high upon a towering wave of Democratic votes Franklin D. Roosevelt’s lead assumed such impressive proportions that soon after midnight President Hoover conceded the New York Governor’s election to the presidency. Roosevelt will assume office at a time of economic stress which furnished the principal talking points of an unusually intensive and bitter campaign. With a total of 5,506 votes cast in the city of Oneonta Tuesday, President Hoover received 3,493, while Governor Roosevelt polled 1,952. Of the 1,149 voters in the Town of Oneonta, Hoover was the choice of 850 as compared with a vote of 287 for Roosevelt. Judging by the attendance at election smokers and open house gatherings held by clubs and other organizations in the city, most of the citizens remained at home and got the reports of the political warfare over their own radios. A total attendance of considerably less than 300 was reported from seven gatherings at which reports were received over the air.
November 1932

60 Years Ago
The body of Pvt. Jack A. Oliver, a victim of the Korean War, will arrive on the 6:41 p.m. train Wednesday. The funeral has been set for 11 a.m. Saturday in Bookhout Funeral Home, 357 Main Street. The Rev. Roswell Lyon of First Methodist Church will officiate. Burial will be in New Milford, Pa. under charge of the Susquehanna Pa. American Legion. The Oneonta American Legion will take part in the service here. Private Oliver, a 21-year-old medical corpsman died of wounds received September 6. He was drafted about 20 months ago after graduating from Oneonta high school and had been in Korea since last Christmas time. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Helen Oliver; a brother Kenneth E. Oliver of 3 Depew Street; his father Harold Oliver of Binghamton; and an aunt, Mrs. Mabel Olmstead, Scranton, Pa.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
The Hartwick College Women’s Club will present a monodrama by Elizabeth Jenkins Dresser at 12:45 p.m. Tuesday, in the Little Theater, in the basement of Bresee Hall, Hartwick College. Mrs. Dresser will portray Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Her monodramas have been enjoyed by many clubs in the past several years. Her portrayal of the famous poetess includes three scenes – an early meeting with Browning; her elopement to Italy, and her triple role as wife, mother and famous poet. Mrs. Dresser is a graduate of Swarthmore College and of the Leland Powers School of the Theater in Boston. Her original monodramas depicting famous women include Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Lane, an orphan who became hostess for her bachelor uncle President James Buchanan, and Anne Hutchinson, and dramas of Christmas and Grandmothers of Yesterday and Today.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Oneonta’s code enforcement officer said Monday that the city is not able to conduct annual inspections of student housing to see that safety standards are being met. “I’d be the first to acknowledge there are a lot of housing violations out there that I don’t know about,” Adolph Buzzy, code official said. City aldermen are promising an investigation into safety procedures following the death of a third student in off-campus housing this year. David W. Lein, 24, a 1981 SUCO graduate died of smoke inhalation early Saturday morning after fire destroyed his residence at 24 Cedar Street. “I would say there are about 138 houses in the city that have students living in them,” Buzzy said. “The only ones that are inspected are the ones I get complaints on.” Buzzy estimates he would need $250,000, three more inspectors, and two secretaries to inspect every student apartment annually. There are 4,686 residences within the city limits. Buzzy inspected 62 homes last month just for health hazards.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
An unidentified man snatched purses from two Oneonta women Monday. Police believe he is responsible for at least four purse thefts in the last two weeks. The suspect is described as a short, stocky white male about five feet, eight inches tall and weighing 190 to 200 pounds. The suspect has brown hair and has been seen wearing a blue, hooded Adidas sweatshirt, according to Detective William Davis of the Oneonta Police Department. The thefts occurred at various Oneonta institutions including St. Mary’s School and A.O. Fox Memorial Hospital.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
A program of patriotic Veterans Day music will be performed Sunday at 3 p.m. by the Oneonta Community Concert Band in the St. Mary’s Parish Hall. Director Rene Prins will lead a program that includes John Philip Sousa marches and selections in honor of the heroes of our military forces. A highlight of the program will be the performance of “Ode 9/11/01,” a new composition by Prins, written in memory of the tragic events of more than a year ago. Also featured will be a baritone horn solo “Asleep in the Deep,” featuring Tom Murphy on the euphonium.
November 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 16, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 16, 2012

125 Years Ago
When found in the laboratory of his lamp factory in Newark, from which 4,000 lamps a day are now sent out, Thomas Edison said that the commercial phonograph is now the most interesting thing in the world to him. It is perfectly finished, and tools are being made for its manufacture upon a large scale. The stories which Edison tells of what his perfected phonograph will do are so extraordinary that he scarcely expects people to believe him, and yet he says that the apparatus is so simple, so effective, and so immediately useful that he is certain of its rapid introduction into business – far more certain than he was of the universal adoption of the telephone as a business instrument. “My phonograph I expect to see in every business office. The first five hundred will, I hope, be ready for distribution about the end of January. Their operation is simplicity itself and cannot fail. The merchant or clerk who wishes to send a letter has only to set the machine in motion, and to talk in his natural voice and at the usual rate of speed into the receiver. When he has finished, the sheet, or phonograph, as I call it, is ready for putting into the box made on purpose for the mails. We are making the sheets in three sizes – one for letters from 800-1,000 words; another size for 2,000 words; another size for 4,000 words. The receiver of a phonogram will put it into his apparatus, and the message will be given out more clearly, more distinctly, than the best telephone message ever sent.”
November 1887

80 Years Ago
The imperative necessity to the railroads of a cut in governmental costs and a resulting reduction in the national tax burden which now amounts to $14,500,000,000 billion or about $125 annually for every person in the country is stressed in a statement issued by Frederick E. Williamson, president of the New York Central lines. The 1931 taxes paid by the New York Central were 42.88 percent of the company’s net revenue from railway operations. This year, for the first eight months, tax accruals have risen to 51.63 percent or more than half of the company’s net revenue from railway operations. “Our taxes,” Williamson points out, “have reached a point where they are stifling the purchasing power of the railroads, which normally are the country’s largest single purchaser. As a result, many of the largest industries in the country, that normally employ many thousands, are suffering severely because of our inability and that of other railroads to purchase needed supplies even on a scale commensurate with our reduced traffic.”
November 1932
60 Years Ago
Advertisement – The Eight Friendly Shopping Services at Bresee’s – The purchase refund event: The drawing on our big Purchase Refund Event takes place every Thursday night at 9:30 p.m. – up to $5,000 refunded on ten sales slips. Parcel Checking – Make shopping more enjoyable by checking your parcels at our checking desk located on the second floor. Ladies Lounge – Ladies, relax while shopping in our newly decorated and comfortable lounge located on the second floor. Health Bar Restaurant – Meet your friends at the famous Health Bar Restaurant – famous for good food and courteous service. Public Address System – We are able to locate anyone at anytime over our Public Address System – also to bring you special announcements. Buy Now, Pay in January – To open a charge account, apply at Bresee’s Credit Office on the second floor. Do your shopping the easy way. Contract Plan – You pay as little as 15 percent down and the unpaid balance in monthly payments up to one year. Lay-Away Plan – You pay a small deposit and we will hold for you any item you wish to purchase.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
A committee appointed by President Nixon in 1971 to study the state of health education across the country reported its findings Wednesday. The committee’s overall conclusion is that “health education throughout America, especially in non-white areas, is a neglected, underfinanced, unhealthy, fragmented activity” which requires a major overhaul. The investigative committee, staffed with private health professionals, also found that “no agency, in or out of government, is responsible for establishing health education goals.” To remedy the problem, the committee recommends a major new commitment of federal money and a reallocation of current and future funding by federal, state, local and private sources so the money will be spent more wisely.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Are the following statements true or false? Teachers tend to discipline boys more harshly than girls. Women are absent from jobs more often than men due to illness. Most young women do not need to plan careers as they will be homemakers. Most high school students feel that boys should pay the expenses on a date. Teachers talk more with girls than they do with boys. These questions are part of a game found in a program kit that examines expanding roles for young people and challenges youth to consider their own outlooks on sex-role stereotyping without pressure to change their minds. The program was pioneered through the Cornell Cooperative Extension.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
An Elmira high school junior was removed from school after she went to class with packaged condoms decorating her clothing and hair. Thursa Hargrove, 16, said she wore the prophylactics as both a statement for safe sex and fashion. “It was a fashion statement at first, but there are a lot of teenagers out there that are embarrassed about them,” said Hargrove, who is the mother of an 18-month-old son. “People need them and shouldn’t be embarrassed by them,” she said. But officials at Elmira Free Academy, a public school, said the wearing of condoms was distracting to other students.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
Big industry sank deeper into its slump, with production plunging in October by the largest amount in a year. Production at the nation’s factories, mines and utilities dropped 0.8 percent from the previous month. However, most economists continue to believe the country will avoid falling back into a double-dip recession.
November 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 23, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 23, 2012

125 Years Ago
Yesterday afternoon, a passerby the residence of W.D. Bissell on Main Street, would at a glance have noted that something unusual was going on. The front porch of Mr. Bissell’s residence was fairly covered with baskets and large, carefully wrapped packages, and every few moments a wagon would be driven briskly up, one or more of the packages placed in it, and away it would dash again at a lively speed. Investigation revealed that the women of Oneonta – members of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, and others – were engaged in the most commendable work of supplying worthy families of the town with Thanksgiving dinners. It had somehow leaked out that it was their intention to do this, and soon they were fairly deluged with contributions from many quarters. One generous person sent six dollars in cash, another sent chickens, another turkeys, another groceries, and so on, until it became apparent that there was to be enough to supply the demand, and the work of arranging and sending out was begun in earnest. Every package or basket was supplied with vegetables in profusion and either a chicken or turkey or fine roast.
November 1887

100 Years Ago
From the indications of last night indoor baseball in the city will be a great success during the winter months. The gallery was crowded with fans who kept up a constant cheering for their favorites, and as the ninth inning closed with victory for Company G when Finley walloped the ball with a mighty stroke for the winning run, bedlam broke loose with the score 23-22. An analysis of the two teams would show that the high school team is the better fielding organization, while their heavier opponents are better with the stick. The high school has in Downing by far the best pitcher displayed, though Company G may develop a man who will prove as good. Downing pitched the entire nine innings and only walked four men. For Company G, Orr passed one, Bond gave a free ticket to four, and Westcott issued ten free passes to the initial sack.
November 1912

60 Years Ago
A total of 140 children received their initial triple vaccine shots for protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough, at the first city clinic of this season held at the health center in the Oneonta high school. In charge of the clinic was Dr. Reade S. Sisson. He was aided by Mrs. Gertrude Cornell, Mrs. Ruth Rabeler, Mrs. James Nesbitt, Mrs. Carrie Lockwood, Mrs. Gilbert Driggs, and Miss Grace Miller.
Pvt. Henry L. Hulbert of 12 Walling Blvd. has arrived at Fort Dix, N.J. and has been assigned to the 9th Infantry Division for eight weeks of basic training. Private Hulbert is the son of Burton Hulbert. Before entering the service he attended Oneonta high school, St. Lawrence University and Columbia Law School.
November 1952

40 Years Ago
Today is National Kettle Day, marking the beginning of The Salvation Army’s Christmas Appeal to give a happy Christmas to needy families. Kettles will be located in front of Bresee’s in downtown Oneonta, FBC in the west end, at Jamesway, and possibly the Pyramid Mall in the East End. Bell ringers will be out Wednesday through Saturday, December 23. The Rotary Club will be manning a kettle at Bresee’s on Saturday, December 9 and the Kiwanis Club will man it on Saturday, December 16. The Christmas letter appeal will be sent out in Oneonta on December 1. One hundred and twenty dolls have been purchased by the Army for distribution to needy children at Christmas. These dolls are dressed by local individuals and groups in the community. Canned goods are donated through the school system. That project was kicked off by Bugbee School at its annual Thanksgiving Program this past Tuesday. Canned goods will be picked up at the schools on Wednesday, December 13. The canned goods are included in food baskets made up for distribution before Christmas.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
Administrators at A.O. Fox Memorial Hospital this week will begin studying suggestions dealing with a projected $2 million deficit in the hospital’s 1983 budget. Earlier this month, hospital officials announced that they may be forced to cut 50 employees from the facility’s staff to cope with the shortfall. However, they were quick to add that, whenever possible, the cuts would be made through attrition, and by not filling vacancies. The hospital currently employs about 650 people. The budget problem stems from a state decision, made in October, to place a ceiling on Medicare and Medicaid cost increases. Under the new limits hospitals would be allowed to increase medical costs covered by the two programs by 16 percent above 1981 prices for the years 1983 and 1984. Payments from Medicare and Medicaid make up roughly 70 percent of the hospital’s annual budget.
November 1982

20 Years Ago
SHARE (Self-Help & Resource Exchange) is a food cooperative that allows anyone regardless of income, to buy $35 worth of food for $14 and two hours of community service each month. SHARE, started in 1983 by an American businessman, is now found in 22 states. SHARE arrived in Otsego County about six months ago. This past Saturday, a whopping 29,205 pounds of food was handed out to area families according to Marie Lusins, coordinator of SHARE-Otsego. The food varies every month but always includes meat, fruit, vegetables and a staple such as potatoes or pasta, Lusins said.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
The meal for the Otsego County Senior Meals Program for Monday, November 25, will be: German sausage, sauerkraut and mustard; German potato salad; carrots; orange juice; hot dog roll, tapioca pudding. For Tuesday, November 26: Sliced turkey with gravy; bread stuffing; winter squash; tomato juice; rye bread; pumpkin pie. For Wednesday, November 27: Roast beef with gravy; mashed potatoes; red cabbage; pumpernickel bread; white cake with whipped topping. Thursday, November 28: Closed for Thanksgiving Day. Friday, November 29: Spaghetti and meatballs with sauce; Parmesan cheese; salad; warm garlic bread; chocolate chip cookie. Reservations must be made one day in advance.
November 2002

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 30, 2012

HOMETOWN HISTORY, November 30, 2012

125 Years Ago
On Thanksgiving evening the streets of Oneonta were for the first time lighted by electricity. The evening was stormy and disagreeable and the bright, cheerful light did not a little to dissipate the gloom which seemed in the unusual quiet of the day to have settled over the town. The American system is used for street lighting and thus far the lights have been entitled to all the praise they have received, which is not a little. The company displayed enterprise and liberality in furnishing the light for Thanksgiving evening. There are now some twenty-five arc lights in use about the village and in business places, and the demand for the incandescent light – the Westinghouse – is so active that a majority of the stores have already subscribed for it.
November 1887

100 Years Ago
Monday morning, shortly after 11 o’clock, a young woman walked into the Oneonta Hotel and was shown to the Ladies’ parlor by one of the bell boys. Ten minutes later she calmly produced a bottle of laudanum from her pocket and after pouring the contents of the bottle into a glass drank the deadly poison and fell to the floor unconscious. Two ladies who were in the writing room adjoining the parlor saw the act of the young woman and the next moment heard her groans of agony. As quickly as possible they notified Mr. DeLorme, the day clerk at the hotel. Together they rushed back to the parlor where the woman was apparently dying. Mr. DeLorme used all first aid relief measures known to him and then summoned Dr. G. W. Augustin, who found her with respiration entirely stopped. By the use of powerful stimulants and artificial respiration, Dr. Augustin succeeded for a time at least in keeping her alive. During two minutes of consciousness, the young woman mumbled that she had taken a large quantity of laudanum, that she had no father or mother and that all she wished to do was die. She was eventually identified as Nioskaletta Van Wie, daughter of Lorenzo Van Wie, residing at Davenport Center. Miss Van Wie was 19 years of age.
November 1912

80 Years Ago
The Oneonta checker team opened its season with a victory over Richfield Springs Friday night, winning 47 games, losing 27 and drawing 20. The match was played in the American Legion rooms at Richfield Springs. J.F. Roberts, New York State match champion, a member of the home team, scored five victories and a draw out of six games played. Perry, former Oneonta City champion, succeeded in getting a draw with Roberts. W. Quaif of Richfield Springs had a clean slate for the evening, winning all four games he played. A. Fenton came through with three wins and three draws in six games. Oneonta’s M. Anderson was the outstanding player of the evening winning 13 games, losing three and drawing one. A comparatively recent arrival in the ranks of local checker enthusiasts, he has made a careful study of the game and has been baffling some of the old-timers by his cleverness.
November 1932

40 Years Ago
Oneonta State is the new soccer kingpin in the City of The Hills. Playing before more than 6,000 spectators, the Red Dragons defeated Hartwick College by a convincing 3-0 score on Monday. Oneonta State thus became the college division champion of New York State. The Red Dragons earned their way to the championship contest by trouncing Adelphi last Wednesday. But, a spell of bad weather nearly prevented the championship game from taking place. An early snow storm, followed by freezing weather, then rain, left the city’s playing fields in all but unplayable condition by Thursday. Late Wednesday night Oneonta Mayor James Lettis offered, on behalf of the city, the use of Damaschke Field for the game and officially decreed Monday “Soccer Day” in The City of The Hills.” Prior to the contest there were predictions that lumping the rabid fans of the opposing teams together in one ballpark would result in riots, mayhem and property damage. The predictions proved unfounded. Oneonta, indeed, had one of its finest hours.
November 1972

30 Years Ago
President Reagan is urging city officials around the country to support his proposal for a five-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax increase to finance a highway repair and jobs program. Reagan is also considering a plan to accelerate next July’s 10 percent income tax cut by six months so it would take effect in January. White House officials said last week that Reagan was leaning toward speeding up the tax cut in hopes of stimulating the nation’s faltering economy. However, Republican Congressional leaders already have told Reagan there are not enough votes to pass the speed-up because of concern it would add to the mounting budget deficit. An earlier announcement that the administration was considering fully taxing the unemployment benefits of the nation’s jobless caused a furor and was quickly withdrawn. Reagan personally vetoed that idea saying it was “not the type of thing I want to do.”
November 1982

20 Years Ago
A year after a proposed state law would have forced deer hunters to wear blaze orange coats and hats, red and black check coats are still the garb of choice for hunters shopping at the Stevens Hardware store in Oneonta. “There has been a lot of talk about blaze orange over the years, especially last year when they thought about making a law, but to tell you the truth we have a hard time selling it,” said proprietor John Stevens.
November 1992

10 Years Ago
Pollsters face a growing number of obstacles while doing their work – such as the rapid growth of cell phone use, caller-ID technology, and answering machines. Researchers believe less than five percent of households use only a cell phone, although the number is higher among certain groups like young urban adults. The overall number using only cell phones is likely to grow. Most agree, however, that these developments have not yet crippled telephone surveys. The polling industry is unlikely to abandon telephone surveys without something more reliable to take their place.
November 2002

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