SUBSCRIBE MY PROFILE
HOME | BREAKING NEWS | POLICE & FIRE | IN MEMORIAM | PEOPLE | OPINION
 JOBS  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 HOMES  
 CARS  
 FUNERAL HOMES  
 GOODS & SERVICES

News of Otsego County

agriculture

DUNCAN: Quality Of Food Goes Back To Soil’s Quality
LETTER from R. SCOTT DUNCAN

Quality Of Food Goes

Back To Soil’s Quality

To the Editor:

Vitamins, minerals, and other supplements – there are numbers of people who say you should take vitamins.

Vitamin C for tissue repair, A for healthy skin, B for stress, E for women over 40, and a very popular one today – Vitamin D for overall health.

But the cost of the vitamins keeps getting higher and higher. A men’s multivitamin today will cost well over $50!

I was looking at the label on the jar and it said that a number of the ingredients are foods, from foods? Why not just eat the right foods? Well, they say foods are
not as nutritional us as they used to be.

I remember reading about one genetically modified grain that was created so it would grow faster. One of the reasons that it grows faster was that the roots are shorter. Well , the shorter roots do not go deep enough to absorb enough minerals, which in turn affects the brain function because of the lack of the minerals.

You can see why a lot of people think that you should eat organic, non-GMO foods. So I wonder why isn’t the food as good as it used to be?

A lot has to do with the soil. It’s been depleted and in many places contaminated.

There’s a graveyard for cars around here. Tons of cars lined up near a river. Every time I drive by I think how stupid to be so close to the river. The acid rain comes down on all the cars and carries all the pollutants into the river and into the farmland.

Man just ignores the cycles of nature, giving little respect to the natural process. They think science can do a better job. There is no balance between nature and science. You really don’t want to wait for nature to build the soil back up.

The way she takes care of things! Think about this: the COVID virus. It is keeping people inside, thereby reducing their impact on nature. Example: air pollution. The virus is killing lots of people, which reduces the population and also the stress on the environment.

Nature has her way of balance if we don’t play fair. Building up the quality of soil in Otsego County should be a pretty high priority on the list. Quality of soil equals quality of food equals quality of people.

I wonder what is being done to protect and enrich our local soil for, as they say, future generations?

R. SCOTT DUNCAN
Hartwick Forrest

PIERCE: When Did People Stop Caring For Each Other
LETTER from CHARLIE PIERCE

When Did People Stop

Caring For Each Other

To the Editor:

Yesterday I had a conversation with a lady I’ll call Ginny. Her three grocery carts were stacked high on top and in the bottoms. Asked about “stocking up so much,” Ginny replied, “I do this once a year for our food bank.”

My mother, who worked three jobs seven days a week with two hernias to meet the basic needs of the seven of us had been ordered by our doctor not to work. She also walked 5.5 miles a day to work and back to save having to pay a taxi.

At that point in time, our government bought good foods then poisoned them or dumped them into oceans to keep farm prices higher. Back then, 85 percent of registered voters were farmers and Republicans. Democrats pleaded for those foods to be given to the poor, and to schools for lunch programs. Decades later Democrats succeeded.

Many Republicans make fun of the recipients by calling them all kinds of names instead of paying them a living wage with benefits. It’s the new form of slavery.

One quits or dies and another is hired.

It was found that grocery stores were best equipped to handle foods, especially perishables, so Food Stamps came into being. Because of name-calling in grocery-store lines, the method was changed to SNAP, using plastic “credit cards.” Note: SNAP is a “farm program,” not a program to help the poor.

A 36-percent excise tax on USA dairy products recently put many New York State farmers out of business. Canada now buys its dairy products elsewhere, even though the tax has been lifted. Guess that makes America great!

I worked on farms until age 19. It is hard work and in my opinion farmers should be well respected, not destroyed.

Cows must be milked two or three times a day. Milk is perishable. To give some help to Upstate farmers, Governor Cuomo set up a program to buy the milk and give it away at places like schools.

Cars were lined up from the Gilbertsville-Mount Upton School all the way back to Gilbertsville Village … the result of making America great.

My dictionary has nine definitions of great … but none seem to apply.

Big grain farmers had the same experience but were given $12 billion then $16 BILLION. The tax was dropped and the grains were sold to China, meaning farmers who donate heavily to your President got paid twice. He doles out our tax dollars as if they were his.

I like Ginny’s thinking better. To me people are much more important than greedy enrichment of and by the wealthy. Let’s show the world how good America is and that people, not money, are more important. If you have never been poor and hungry you won’t understand this as much. If you say you are a Christian, perhaps you can wonder what would Jesus say and do. Ginny gets it.

CHARLIE PIERCE
Otego

Labor, Dairy & Trade Top Agriculture Concerns

COMMISSIONER AT FARMERS’ MUSEUM

Top Agriculture Concerns:

Labor, Dairy, Trade, Ball Says

Labor, dairy and trade are his biggest concerns, Richard Ball, state Ag & Markets commissioner, told The Farmers’ Museum sixth annual Celebration of Our Agricultural Community this morning in the Louis C. Jones Center.  “In the old days, farmers only had to think about their cows and their towns,” said Ball.  “Now, they have to consider the value of our currency, what is China doing, what is happening in Washington, or if New Zealand had a good year. Trade effects our local farmers now more than ever.” He urged farmers to make themselves and their concerns known to their legislators, because representation of farmers has been on the decline. “They need to know who you are and that you are involved in agriculture.”  Keynote speaker Dr. Jason Evans, inset right,  SUNY Cobleskill, described farmers’ adoption of new technologies: “When industry is worried about not having enough labor, they mechanize. Agriculture adapts faster than any other area to advancing technology. We need to get properly scaled technological advancements to our small and medium farms.” (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3

Day Of The Dead Celebration

14-19eventspage

FAMILY PROGRAM – Noon – 2 p.m. Celebrate Latino Heritage month with Day of the Dead event. Make paper flowers, learn about Mexican traditions, listen to story time, more. Participants encouraged to bring photo of loved one who’s passed away. Designed for children aged 4-12 + family. Light snacks provided. Cooperstown Village Library. 607-547-8344 or visit www.facebook.com/VillageLibraryOfCooperstown/

FUNDRAISER – 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Construct you cat a cardboard castle with Superheroes in Ripped Jeans. Materials provided. Bring goods or monetary donation. 3rd floor, Community Room, Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-432-1980 or visit www.facebook.com/hmloneonta/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11

Theatrical Performance

‘A Raisin In The Sun’

14-19eventspage

THEATER – 7:30 p.m. Performance of “A Raisin In The Sun” following the Youngers, a black family in a Chicago apartment, as matriarch awaits an insurance check and family debates what to do with it. General admission, $5. Hamblin Theater, SUNY Oneonta. Visit oneonta.campuslabs.com/engage/event/2805226

WORD THURSDAY – 7 – 10 p.m. Writers are invited to share works at open mic followed by refreshments & featured author Kelly Bean, whose work discusses how we arrive at conclusions about literature, the world, what is knowledge; and Lisa Wujnovich, author of 2 poetry books ‘Fieldwork,’ ‘This Place Called Us.’ Bright Hill Press and Literary Center, 94 Church St., Treadwell. 607-829-5055 or visit www.facebook.com/brighthp/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUGUST 18
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

Hops History Festival

14-19eventspage

HOPSEGO – 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Family friendly festival featuring activities, fun, games, opportunities to learn local history and craft brewing. The Farmers’ Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1450 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org/Hopsego

ANTIQUE TRACTORS – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Antique tractors, engines, working exhibits on display. All brands, sizes, shapes, colors, conditions accepted. Fun for all. Roseboom. 607-264-9327 or visit www.farmershotline.com/farm-events/18th-annual-roseboom-antique-power-days

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for MONDAY, JULY 9
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for MONDAY, JULY 9

5K Fundraiser For YMCA

14-19eventspage

5K RACE – 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Oneonta Outlaws Race to benefit the Oneonta YMCA. Damaschke Field, James Georgeson Ave., Oneonta. Call 607-432-0010 or visit www.facebook.com/OneontaFamilyYMCA/

DISCUSSION – 5 p.m. New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health leads discussion with the 4-H Junior Livestock Show on safe spaces on the farm. Followed by awards for best posters displayed in visitors tent. Iroquois Farm Showgrounds, 1659 Co. Hwy. 33, Cooperstown. Call 607-547-1452 or visit www.farmersmuseum.org/Junior-Livestock-Show

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, FEB.13
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, FEB.13

Education Documentary Film

14-19eventspage

FILM SCREENING – 4:30 p.m. Showing “Backpack Full of Cash,” narrated by Matt Damon. A documentary exploring the growing issue of privatization of public schools. Free, open to the public. Hunt Union Ballroom, SUNY Oneonta. Call 607-436-3075 or visit connect.oneonta.edu/event/1760298

CORN DAY – 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Farmers participate in seminars and discussion of the latest news in Corn Cultivation. Cost, $30/person. Registration required. The Otesaga, Cooperstown. Call 315-866-7920 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2018/02/13/2018-corn-day

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUG. 19
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUG. 19

Visit With History

14-19eventspage

CIVIL WAR REENACTMENT – 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Experience a civil war encampment with the 125th and 61st New York Regiments. Includes Civil War weaponry, tactics, drills, and firing demonstrations. Also a concert and a battle reenactment. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park, Cooperstown. Call (607) 547-5098 or visit hydehall.org/event/civil-war-weekend/

HOPS FESTIVAL – 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Learn and celebrate the local history of hops in the Cooperstown area. Includes family friendly activities, an exhibit, visiting with the tradesmen to learn how hops were incorporated into daily life. There will be opportunities to brew and taste craft bears. Finish the day with some food and drink with your friends on the Bump tavern green. Tickets, $12 adults, $10.50 seniors, $6 juniors. The Farmers Museum, Cooperstown. www.farmersmuseum.org/Hopsego

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103