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News of Otsego County

Sharon Stuart

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 17, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 17, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

100 Years Ago

The Sullivan bill making it a felony to carry concealed weapons has been signed by Governor Dix. Among the provisions is one putting restrictions upon dealers. Every person selling a pistol or revolver must keep a register in which shall be entered at the time of sale, the date of sale, name, age occupation and residence of every purchaser of a revolver, together with the caliber, make and manufacturer’s number of the weapon. The dealer shall also, before delivering a firearm, require each purchaser to produce a permit for carrying or possessing the same as required by law, and shall also enter in such register the number thereon, if any, and the name of the magistrate or other officer by whom the permit was issued.

June 1911

Bound Volumes: June 17, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 17, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Gallantry of an American Youth – In the late conflict between the United States frigate President and the British ship of war Little Belt, a gunner’s boy on board the frigate who had his arm broken by a shot, while under the hands of the surgeon in the cockpit, requested that he would make haste in dressing his wound, that he might get on deck again. On the surgeon’s asking what he would do on deck, wounded as he was, the little American replied, “If I can’t do more, I can at least be shot at!” It is known that the heroism of this lad has attracted the earnest attention of the secretary of the navy.

June 15, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 10, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 10, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The union temperance meeting at the Metropolitan theatre last Sunday evening was a decided success. Over 1,000 persons were present and from beginning to end manifested a deep interest in all the proceedings. Enthusiastic addresses were made by the pastors, Professor Bull and Dr. Morris. The object and aid of the Law and Order League was clearly set forth and the citizens urged to rally to its support. At the close of the addresses signers were called for and over 100 names secured. Since the meeting the pastors have conducted an active canvass and at the present time over 250 names have been secured to the continuation of the league. Scarcely a business or professional man has refused to become a member and several have voluntarily offered liberal financial support for the prosecution of the work of the league.

June 1886

Bound Volumes: June 10, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 10, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Just received and for sale at the Book Store of H. & E. Phinney, The Christian Soldier: or Heaven Taken by Storm – Shewing the holy violence a Christian is put to in pursuit after glory. By Thomas Watson, Minister of the Gospel.

June 8, 1811

BOUND VOLUMES: June 3, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

June 3, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Jacob Duessler informs his old customers and the public in general, that he has removed from his old stand in front of the County Clerk’s Office, to the shop formerly occupied by Orlo Allen, Tailor, directly opposite Messrs. R.I. & I. Cooper’s store where he continues to carry on his business in the newest fashions, and upon short notice. He flatters himself, that by his experience in business, and strict attention to orders, he shall merit the favor of the public’s patronage. N.B. Having received the newest fashions from Albany, he will be enabled to accommodate his customers. Uniform Coats made in the first style. Almost all kinds of grain will be taken in payment for work done at his shop.

June 1, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 3, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 3, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The board of trustees has effected a settlement with Harvey Baker whereby Mr. Baker releases the village from the contract made by the board of trustees of two years ago to grade Main Street from Grove Street to the railroad crossing, to give Mechanic Street a true grade from Main Street to the easterly limits of Mr. Baker’s property and to put a culvert in Mechanic Street, all in consideration of a vacant lot from Mr. Baker on which to erect a building for Wilber Hose Co. The board, as a compromise, agrees to drain the Baker ditch from Victor Street to Mechanic Street, to lay a culvert across Mechanic Street and to grade the Mechanic Street hill as soon as practicable. Mr. Baker withdraws all claims against the village, including that for $600 damages accruing from the time of the commencement of his action against the village to the rendering of judgment in his favor. Under this arrangement, the lot reverts to Mr. Baker, the hose building having been constructed elsewhere.

June 1886

BOUND VOLUMES: May 27, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

May 27, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

From the desk of poor Robert the Scribe – Zounds! Sir, you may as well swear you’ll never do it! I’m out of all patience with these “by and bye” folks. “One hour of the present tense is worth a week in the future.” Why, I know a bachelor as well calculated for matrimonial felicity as every virtue and every accomplishment can render him; but he has been putting off the happy time, from one year to another, always resolving that he would marry “by and bye” – and “by and bye – till the best ten years of life are gone, and he is still re-resolving,” and I fear “will die the same.” He that would gather the roses of matrimony should wed in the May of life. If you wish only the withered leaves and thorns, why, poor Robert says, put it off till September. “Procrastination is the thief of time.”

May 25, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 27, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 27, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

“What Are Boys Worth?” was the title of a lecture delivered by Rev. George W. Perry of Rutland, Vermont at the Universalist Church Tuesday evening. There was a good attendance and a goodly sprinkling of girls who were interested in the answer to the question. The average cost of a boy at 15 was figured by the lecturer to be about $1,500, aside from the toil, the care and the anxiety of bringing him up. The boys were given to understand that they are a far greater factor in society than they are generally given credit for being, and left the church at the close of the lecture invested with new ideas of their importance.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 20, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 20, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A few days since a hard-looking character came to Oneonta, claiming to be a bricklayer. He told an acquaintance that he had fled from Chicago during the recent trouble after hitting a policeman on the head with a club. His description tallied with that of one of the escaped anarchists, and as he professed to be a socialist, Officer Seeger telegraphed the fact of his presence here to the Chicago chief of police. Reply came that a photograph of the man wanted had been forwarded. A search for him revealed that he had suddenly left town. No one knows where to.

May 1886

BOUND VOLUMES: May 20, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

May 20, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

200 YEARS AGO

The following is copied from the London Courier: The sea is ours, and we must maintain the doctrine – that no nation, no fleet, no cockboat shall sail upon it without our permission. America declares that England must not presume to declare a port in a state of blockade, unless she can keep a force actually before that port. England must replay; we will not condescend to mince and carve out and dwindle down our system of blockade. We will not talk of this port and that port. There is but one Navy in the world, the British Navy. The whole continent we consider as one port, and so long as Bonaparte persists in his present system, we warn all powers that the Continent is in a state of blockade, and they must not presume to trade with it without our leave. This is the doctrine which we must enforce, and the sooner we do it the better!

May 18, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 13, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 13, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The first locomotive explosion that ever occurred on the Albany & Susquehanna railroad occurred on Tuesday afternoon about one-half mile east of Schenevus, a few rods east of what is known as DeLong’s swamp. The result was disastrous, the engine being blown to pieces and completely wrecked, killing the engineer and badly injuring the fireman, beside tearing up the track and doing other damage. The train was a wildcat of some 12 or 15 gondolas, Shepard Edick, conductor, James Gleason, engineer, and Abisha E. Loucks, fireman. The engine was No. 159 – one of the huge moguls, the cab of which rests over the boiler. The train was moving at a speed not to exceed 12 miles an hour. Those nearest the scene describe the report as terrific. Houses in Schenevus village, half a mile away, were shaken as if by an earthquake.

May 1886

BOUND VOLUMES: May 13, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

May 13, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

185 YEARS AGO

Nature is beginning a length to throw off her sable mantles and everywhere Spring is appearing in all its primitive loveliness – the God of the seasons is breathing upon the autumnal earth and changing it from gloom to glory. There is a lofty and peculiar spirit belonging to the vernal developments of nature which man would do well to imitate. As the harvest in autumn depends upon the seed committed to the earth in spring, also the character of the man depends upon the principles implanted in the minds of youth in the springtime of life.

May 9, 1836

BOUND VOLUMES: May 6, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

May 6, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

185 YEARS AGO

Congress has been between five and six months in session and the general appropriation bill is not yet passed. The consequence is that the salaries due on the first of April have not been paid, to
the great inconvenience of those officers of the government who have no other dependence. In the meantime, the members of Congress take better care of themselves and they draw their pay at their pleasure, even in advance. This is not very fair. To whom should the blame attach? If we look at the daily account of doings of Congress we find the proceedings filled with dilatory motions – speeches of some days duration made upon an amendment to defeat an ordinary appropriation and supported by only six votes after consuming 58 days in the discussion.

May 2, 1836

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 6, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 6, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The wretches who flaunted the red flag and hurled dynamite with fatal effect in Chicago Tuesday evening are not to be confounded with the honest workingmen there, or anywhere else, who seek to better their condition by agitation within the law. They were anarchists – cranks whose proper place is the lunatic asylum. Your anarchist is against all order, all existing institutions – the law, the schools, religion and the Ten Commandments. If this does not qualify him for the insane asylum then his proper place is the state prison. The country has tried ridicule long enough. It is time the anarchist was summarily wiped out. It will not be a difficult matter. Anarchism is a foreign plant with very little hold in American soil. Were it not for dynamite it might be left to die of itself. But unfortunately, that invention makes even one anarchist formidable.

May 1886

BOUND VOLUMES: April 29, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

April 29, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Who was the first Democrat? A gentleman claiming the name of federal, requested to be informed whence the name of democrat came, and who was the first democrat? For the information of such gentleman, I would observe, that the word democrat came from Democritus, a Grecian philosopher, who flourished between three and four hundred years before the Christian era; this same Democritus was the first Democrat I can find by searching the ancient writings; I take it his political opinion was, that the supreme power ought to remain the people; and this is the opinion of his followers to this day.

April 27, 1811

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