SUBSCRIBE MY PROFILE
HOME | BREAKING NEWS | IN MEMORIAM | PEOPLE | OPINION |
 JOBS  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 HOMES  
 CARS  
 FUNERAL HOMES  
 GOODS & SERVICES

News of Otsego County

tom heitz history column

BOUND VOLUMES: July 15, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 15, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

185 YEARS AGO

Under an apparent state of inaction as a party in this county, certain of the Whig corps are making preparations for a vigorous onset at the Fall campaign, by a gratuitous and other distribution of the Evening Journal, one of the most violent of the opposition papers published in the state. Having no confidence either in the ability or force of their local agent, a foreign power is sought to effect revolution in public sentiment, and the county is to be flooded with the vituperations and falsehoods of Thurlow Weed, a hireling, whose notoriety as connected with the Morgan excitement, makes him a fit instrument for political mountebanks and knaves to work with. We refer to this movement of the enemy, not because we fear the corrupting influence of Weed’s labors, but simply to apprise our democratic friends that their opponents are not so inert as they would feign induce the public to believe.

July 18, 1836

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 8, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 8, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Kate Farrell, aged 22, whose home is at Starucca, Pennsylvania, has for a few weeks been visiting her sister, Mrs. Frazee, at Gaylord’s store, West Harpersfield. Kate was addicted to the morphine habit.
She obtained as a substitute some hydrate of chloral. Sunday afternoon she visited Agnes Ward of Oneonta, who is caring for her mother, not far from the Gaylord store. Not long after Kate left Agnes she was found down the bank by the roadside, nearly unconscious. She was taken to her sister’s, where she died in a few hours.
The coroner’s jury found that she came to her death from an overdose of chloral, taken in mistake.
The body was buried at Starucca on Tuesday.

July 1886

Bound Volumes: July 8, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 8, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Among items of mail remaining at the Post-Office in the Village of Otsego (Cooperstown) are letters addressed to: Samuel Anderson, Nehemiah Burch, Benjamin Bissell, Isaac Childs, Cornelius L. Cary, William Dean, Sumner Ely, Revilo Ford, Micah French, William Griffin, John Jackson, James Johnston, Jonathan Kingsley, William Lindsley, Darius Moon, Patty Miller, Chauncey Newell, Freedom Potter, Sally Potter, James L. Palmer, John Robinson, Eliphaz Spencer, Stephen Skiff, Isaac Stone, Sally Thatcher, Nathaniel Todd, William Van Brunt, Cornelius W. Van Denburgh, Levi Warner, Sylvanus West and Patty Ward. (Ed. Note: Recipients of mail were liable for postage prior to delivery)

July 6, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 1, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 1, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

A letter to the editor: Allow me to
add a little emphasis to what you say concerning the loafers who are frequenting the Susquehanna House corner. So disagreeable has their presence become that the ladies generally dread to pass the corner, and not infrequently go out of their way to avoid doing so. Aside from being made a target for the eyes of every loafer and for the tobacco juice from the mouths of a dozen rowdies it is not unusual, particularly if a lady is passing alone, for remarks to reach her ears which set every drop of blood in her veins tingling with indignation. In behalf of the ladies of the village I would respectfully ask our trustees if something cannot be done to put a stop to the nuisance.
Sig. A Lady Reader

July 1886

Bound Volumes: June 24, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 24, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

We are informed that Walter Rodgers, the boy wounded on board the frigate, and who behaved with so much firmness, has been appointed a midshipman in the Navy of the United States.
To Farmers—The clear profit in the produce of a farm is nearly all that can give it a certain value, and all that can ever make a farmer wealthy. If he derives no more from the produce of his farm than the mere worth of the labor bestowed on it, his situation is but little better than that of the daily laborer who works for his substance. It is well known that farms in this state
do not average more than a third of the clear profit which is in general derived from the same number of acres in Great Britain; and it is equally certain that farms here,
are upon an average, of better soil than those of that country.

June 22, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 24, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 24, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

100 Years Ago

The death of Harlow Lithbridge, son of Mrs. W.N. Millard, reported last week, from diphtheria, has been followed by the deaths from the same disease of Earnest M. Blend, nine-year-old child of Dr. G.W. Blend, which occurred on Saturday on Dietz Street, and of the wife of Dr. Blend, who died Wednesday evening and was, by order of the Board of Health, buried a few hours afterward. Another child of Dr. Blend is ill from diphtheria, with a prospect of recovery. These cases are the only ones reported to the Board of Health, despite rumors to the contrary. They are thought to be purely sporadic, and due solely to bad sanitary surroundings. The Board of Health has taken every possible precaution against a spread of the disease, and there appears to be no cause for further alarm, particularly if the rules and regulations of the board are properly observed.

June 1861

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 17, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 17, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

100 Years Ago

The Sullivan bill making it a felony to carry concealed weapons has been signed by Governor Dix. Among the provisions is one putting restrictions upon dealers. Every person selling a pistol or revolver must keep a register in which shall be entered at the time of sale, the date of sale, name, age occupation and residence of every purchaser of a revolver, together with the caliber, make and manufacturer’s number of the weapon. The dealer shall also, before delivering a firearm, require each purchaser to produce a permit for carrying or possessing the same as required by law, and shall also enter in such register the number thereon, if any, and the name of the magistrate or other officer by whom the permit was issued.

June 1911

Bound Volumes: June 17, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 17, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Gallantry of an American Youth – In the late conflict between the United States frigate President and the British ship of war Little Belt, a gunner’s boy on board the frigate who had his arm broken by a shot, while under the hands of the surgeon in the cockpit, requested that he would make haste in dressing his wound, that he might get on deck again. On the surgeon’s asking what he would do on deck, wounded as he was, the little American replied, “If I can’t do more, I can at least be shot at!” It is known that the heroism of this lad has attracted the earnest attention of the secretary of the navy.

June 15, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 10, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 10, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The union temperance meeting at the Metropolitan theatre last Sunday evening was a decided success. Over 1,000 persons were present and from beginning to end manifested a deep interest in all the proceedings. Enthusiastic addresses were made by the pastors, Professor Bull and Dr. Morris. The object and aid of the Law and Order League was clearly set forth and the citizens urged to rally to its support. At the close of the addresses signers were called for and over 100 names secured. Since the meeting the pastors have conducted an active canvass and at the present time over 250 names have been secured to the continuation of the league. Scarcely a business or professional man has refused to become a member and several have voluntarily offered liberal financial support for the prosecution of the work of the league.

June 1886

Bound Volumes: June 10, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 10, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Just received and for sale at the Book Store of H. & E. Phinney, The Christian Soldier: or Heaven Taken by Storm – Shewing the holy violence a Christian is put to in pursuit after glory. By Thomas Watson, Minister of the Gospel.

June 8, 1811

BOUND VOLUMES: June 3, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

June 3, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Jacob Duessler informs his old customers and the public in general, that he has removed from his old stand in front of the County Clerk’s Office, to the shop formerly occupied by Orlo Allen, Tailor, directly opposite Messrs. R.I. & I. Cooper’s store where he continues to carry on his business in the newest fashions, and upon short notice. He flatters himself, that by his experience in business, and strict attention to orders, he shall merit the favor of the public’s patronage. N.B. Having received the newest fashions from Albany, he will be enabled to accommodate his customers. Uniform Coats made in the first style. Almost all kinds of grain will be taken in payment for work done at his shop.

June 1, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 3, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 3, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The board of trustees has effected a settlement with Harvey Baker whereby Mr. Baker releases the village from the contract made by the board of trustees of two years ago to grade Main Street from Grove Street to the railroad crossing, to give Mechanic Street a true grade from Main Street to the easterly limits of Mr. Baker’s property and to put a culvert in Mechanic Street, all in consideration of a vacant lot from Mr. Baker on which to erect a building for Wilber Hose Co. The board, as a compromise, agrees to drain the Baker ditch from Victor Street to Mechanic Street, to lay a culvert across Mechanic Street and to grade the Mechanic Street hill as soon as practicable. Mr. Baker withdraws all claims against the village, including that for $600 damages accruing from the time of the commencement of his action against the village to the rendering of judgment in his favor. Under this arrangement, the lot reverts to Mr. Baker, the hose building having been constructed elsewhere.

June 1886

BOUND VOLUMES: May 27, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

May 27, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

From the desk of poor Robert the Scribe – Zounds! Sir, you may as well swear you’ll never do it! I’m out of all patience with these “by and bye” folks. “One hour of the present tense is worth a week in the future.” Why, I know a bachelor as well calculated for matrimonial felicity as every virtue and every accomplishment can render him; but he has been putting off the happy time, from one year to another, always resolving that he would marry “by and bye” – and “by and bye – till the best ten years of life are gone, and he is still re-resolving,” and I fear “will die the same.” He that would gather the roses of matrimony should wed in the May of life. If you wish only the withered leaves and thorns, why, poor Robert says, put it off till September. “Procrastination is the thief of time.”

May 25, 1811

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 27, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 27, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

“What Are Boys Worth?” was the title of a lecture delivered by Rev. George W. Perry of Rutland, Vermont at the Universalist Church Tuesday evening. There was a good attendance and a goodly sprinkling of girls who were interested in the answer to the question. The average cost of a boy at 15 was figured by the lecturer to be about $1,500, aside from the toil, the care and the anxiety of bringing him up. The boys were given to understand that they are a far greater factor in society than they are generally given credit for being, and left the church at the close of the lecture invested with new ideas of their importance.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 20, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 20, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A few days since a hard-looking character came to Oneonta, claiming to be a bricklayer. He told an acquaintance that he had fled from Chicago during the recent trouble after hitting a policeman on the head with a club. His description tallied with that of one of the escaped anarchists, and as he professed to be a socialist, Officer Seeger telegraphed the fact of his presence here to the Chicago chief of police. Reply came that a photograph of the man wanted had been forwarded. A search for him revealed that he had suddenly left town. No one knows where to.

May 1886

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103