Indonesia’s parliament votes to ban sex outside of marriage     Ukraine live briefing: Attacks on Russian airfields carried out by Ukrainian drones, Kyiv official says      The gold-mining city that’s destroying a sacred Venezuelan mountain     Indonesia’s parliament votes to ban sex outside of marriage     Ukraine live briefing: Attacks on Russian airfields carried out by Ukrainian drones, Kyiv official says      The gold-mining city that’s destroying a sacred Venezuelan mountain     Strep A: What to know about the usually mild infection leading to children’s deaths     Ukrainian drones hit two air bases deep inside Russia in brazen attack     Russian mercenaries accused of using violence to corner diamond trade      Indonesia’s parliament votes to ban sex outside of marriage     Ukraine live briefing: Attacks on Russian airfields carried out by Ukrainian drones, Kyiv official says      The gold-mining city that’s destroying a sacred Venezuelan mountain     Indonesia’s parliament votes to ban sex outside of marriage     Ukraine live briefing: Attacks on Russian airfields carried out by Ukrainian drones, Kyiv official says      The gold-mining city that’s destroying a sacred Venezuelan mountain     Strep A: What to know about the usually mild infection leading to children’s deaths     Ukrainian drones hit two air bases deep inside Russia in brazen attack     Russian mercenaries accused of using violence to corner diamond trade      
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News of Otsego County

10-20-22

To Barn or Not to Barn …

To Barn or Not to Barn …

By Helen K. B. Rees
Photo of original Swart-Wilcox barn. (Provided by Fanny Southard)

The Swart-Wilcox Barn Committee met on Monday, October 3 to discuss the possibility of a barn for the Swart-Wilcox House Museum complex. There had been a barn on the property from the 1790s until 1968. At that time it was burned down by the City as a fire-fighting exercise.

It is now felt that a barn would help tell the story of the early settlers, who were mainly farmers. Several factors have contributed to thoughts of a barn for the Swart-Wilcox farm property.

Finding an appropriate old barn, or building a new barn with the old floor plan, is the first decision.

LIFE SKETCHES: Out On The Ice
Life Sketches by Terry Berkson

Out On The Ice

Pinkie

One bitterly cold morning, Joe Gravelding, my muskrat-trapping partner, didn’t come to call for me. It was the weekend, so I figured he slept in knowing he could count on me to go and check the line. When I left the house, my dog, Pinkie, began to follow me. I threw a few snowballs at him and yelled for him to go home, but he kept trailing me.

Pinkie might sound like an effeminate name for a male dog, but he was no sissy. Every time a dog in my old Brooklyn neighborhood had puppies they seemed to have Pinkie’s black and white color and markings.

It was a dry, sunny morning and the snow crunched beneath my feet like hands rubbing on an inflated balloon.

News from the Noteworthy: Workforce Wellbeing Impacts Business Bottom Line
News from the Noteworthy

Workforce Wellbeing Impacts
Business Bottom Line

The cost of doing business and staying in business is rising these days. It’s not just inflation, supply chain, COVID fallout and keeping the lights on. For most business owners and managers, that would be more than enough to contend with. We also know that it’s about the workforce and the overall wellbeing of the people we work with and work for. We are emerging from a dual pandemic (COVID and overdose deaths). Together, they have taken a significant toll on working adults and their families.

In a recent pilot study of central New York businesses (https://doi.org/10.1177/08901171221112488c), we found many hidden costs related to the wellbeing of people in the workforce. I identify them as hidden because they don’t typically show up by name in the usual metrics that are tracked by businesses.

Coop Vendors, Officials: 2022 a ‘Good Year’

Coop Vendors, Officials:
2022 a ‘Good Year’

By Caspar Ewig
Cooperstown Patrolman Brad Ross prepares the parking meters for winter. (Caspar Ewig/AllOtsego.com)

Now that the parking meters have received their winter covers, it is time to assess the results of summer 2022 in Cooperstown.

The meters, which spring into function on Memorial Day and fall into disuse on Columbus Day, as well as the trolley ridership from the parking lots that surround Cooperstown, represent a good barometer of the town’s commercial health. Using that yardstick as a guide, this summer has proved to be a good exit from the pandemic doldrums.

Based on the parking income, Deputy Mayor Cindy Falk was quite encouraged that Cooperstown had bounced back.

“In a good year, we expect gross parking income to reach $450,000. This year we collected $300,000 from the meters and $59,000 from the parking app,” Falk said.

HAMILL: Cardelle Speech Inspires, Motivates
Letter from Andrew Hamill

Cardelle Speech Inspires, Motivates

As a student at SUNY Oneonta, I am honored to have taken part in President Cardelle’s Inauguration as the ninth president of SUNY Oneonta. In the nine months that he has been president, he has and still continues to do a phenomenal job. His inaugural address was not only inspiring but motivating. On behalf of those who are still college students, I wish President Cardelle good luck in his role as president of SUNY Oneonta. Good luck and God bless you and your family, President Cardelle.

Andrew (A.J.) Hamill
City of Oneonta

NAACP Membership: It’s Not About Color

NAACP Membership:
It’s Not About Color

By Monica Calzolari
Sorin’s book has been described as an excellent history (“The New Yorker”) and a tour de force (“Bloomberg.”)

I just joined the Oneonta Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People after hearing Professor Gretchen Sorin speak about her book and documentary film by the same name, “Driving While Black.”

I joined because I support equality and I was appalled by what I learned during her presentation at SUNY Oneonta’s Center for Racial Justice and Inclusive Excellence on October 13.

Although I am painfully aware that white supremacy exists and that George Floyd and many other African Americans have been murdered, it hit me on a deeper level that this country used to be even more blatantly discriminatory.

Glimmerglass Film Days Marks Tenth Year

Glimmerglass Film
Days Marks Tenth Year

By Tara Barnwell
Otsego 2000 Executive Director Ellen Pope shows off this year’s Film Days poster, designed by Doreen DeNicola with photo by Mike Reynolds.

This year, Glimmerglass Film Days is offering five days of independent films, filmmaker talks, art, parties, live music and events. The films will be screened at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Fenimore Art Museum, The Farmers’ Museum, Templeton Hall and the Cooperstown Village Hall.

“Connection is the theme this year,” Ellen Pope, executive director of Otsego 2000, said. “After two years of the pandemic and social isolation, we thought a lot about what the theme should be. The film festival used to be about not just great films but the social and human connection of watching films together. We didn’t have that for two years, so we wanted to focus on how important connection is—the human connection, connecting the dots between humans and climate and nature.”

“This year we started a submission process on Film Freeway. It’s a database where filmmakers can put their films out there for festivals to review and hopefully choose,” Pope said.

STERNBERG: World Polio Day Celebrated Next Week
Column by Richard Sternberg M.D.

World Polio Day
Celebrated Next Week

October 24 is World Polio Day, an international commemoration of the efforts to eliminate poliomyelitis in the entire world, recognize those fighting the disease, and bring awareness to the public of the danger of the disease and how they can help to end it. The eradication of polio is, or maybe better to say was, in the last mile of a marathon, but complacency and a decreased emphasis on eradicating it has put at risk the end goal of a polio-free world.

We discussed the current outbreak of polio on August 25 and September 15 of this year in my column and in a piece by Michael Jerome on October 19, 2019. These articles can be found on allotsego.com by searching for “polio.”

EDITORIAL: Noble Barns
Editorial

Noble Barns

Baker Barn in Richfield Springs, built 1882. (Photo by Cliff Oram Photography)

The Swart-Wilcox House, the oldest in Oneonta, is looking for a 19th-century English barn to replace the original one destroyed by fire in 1968.

Upstate New York is rural. Its towns, villages, and cities are spread out and difficult to reach. There are fields and forests and lakes. For most of its over-200-year history agriculture has been, and still might be, the main industry. Upstate New York is beautiful, bucolic, serene, clear, compelling. Rolling hills encircle cool lakes; fields interrupt clumps of forest. Farmhouses, barns, and outbuildings reveal their uses by their shapes and locations. Barns, in fact, are the distinctive feature of our part of the state. Early farms had multiple crops and livestock—wheat, oats, rye; sheep, cows, pigs, chickens—which called for multiple buildings: horse barns, ox barns, hay barns, chicken houses, workshops, corn cribs, granaries, wagon sheds, and the like. The farms resembled villages.

Hometown History: October 20, 2022

Hometown History

October 20, 2022

135 Years Ago
Stephen Parish, an old and respected resident of Oneonta, died on Thursday last at his home, on River Street. Mr. Parish was a son of the late Andrew Parish, and was born on the farm owned by him at his death. The father, Squire Parish, whose widow is still living on River Street, bought this farm when that part of Oneonta was in the Town of Kortright, and here his family of boys was born. It is related that on one occasion the tax gatherer called upon Mr. Parish for his tax, but twenty-five cents. Mr. Parish had plenty of barter, but no cash, and, strange as it may seem, the money could not be found in the town, barter then being all the go. The tax gatherer, therefore, went away without the money. A few days afterward it was procured by Mr. Parish and he trudged his way on foot to Kortright and placed it in the tax gatherer’s hands. Stephen was a man of good judgment and strict integrity, and had filled with credit local offices, representing the town in the Board of Supervisors for one or more terms. For many years he had been actively identified with the Presbyterian church.

October 1887

Bound Volumes: 10-20-22

Bound Volumes

October 20, 2022

160 YEARS AGO
Choice Fruit – There was quite a display of choice fruit in our sanctum on Monday last, Dr. Byram, of this village, being the sole exhibitor. He might have carried off a premium had he made the exhibition at the Fair last week. He had three varieties of grapes, all grown in the open air (for which the present season has been unusually favorable) — the Green Cheslass, the Black Gamut, and the Isabella; the first named is a white grape which grows in large clusters. Of the pears there were four varieties, including the sickle and virgule. The people of Otsego are finding out that the choice varieties
of certain fruits can be grown in this county. They can make it a source of pleasure and profit.

October 17, 1862

GOAT-ober Festival a Rollicking Success

GOAT-ober Festival
a Rollicking Success

By Vanessa J. Pellegrino
GOAT-oberfest’s yoga session ended with “goat bridges.” (Photo by Emily W.)

It was a beautiful autumn day. The sun was shining, the air was crisp, and the views of the rolling hills filled with shades of reds, yellows, oranges, and greens were breathtaking. Folks were excited to experience the local buzz of Gilbertsville Farmhouse and their infamous goats!

On Sunday, October 9 from 3-6 p.m., more than 70 GOAT-oberfest attendees practiced their yoga, enjoyed the company of 19 baby Nigerian dwarf goats and strolled the farmhouse grounds at 336 Coye Brook Road, South New Berlin, owned by Sharon and Aldo Boustani.

While sitting in a chandelier-lit barn on a yoga mat, the goat yoga instructor told us that it was totally okay to get lost in the presence of adorable baby goats, to have fun, be present, and to go with the flow!

Local Equestrian Finds Success at Capital Challenge Horse Show

Local Equestrian Finds Success
at Capital Challenge Horse Show

Grace Shipman and the team from Findlay’s Ridge at Capital Challenge Horse Show—Grace Shipman on horse, Calamanzo, with Val Renihan, Chris Strucker, and Grady Lyman.

Grace Shipman of Cooperstown and Ridgefield, CT competed in Equitation Weekend of the Capital Challenge Horse Show last weekend, September 29 through October 2, at Prince George’s Equestrian Center in Maryland. Shipman rode Calamanzo, a grey Holsteiner gelding, to earn champion in the 16-Year-Old Equitation Division–Section A.

She and Calamanzo went on to place ninth in the Palm Beach International Academy-sponsored North American Junior Equitation Championship, a national final in which the fences to navigate are 3’6” in height. There were 148 competitors in this North American championship. Shipman took home a seventh place in the PBIA North American Junior Equitation Flat Championship, as well, which judges the riders on the flat rather than jumping.

A Fond Farewell to Fall

A Fond Farewell to Fall

Photo by Trista Haggerty

Otsego County and Central New York are expected to hit peak leaf peeping season in the coming days, with foliage estimated at 65 percent changed in Cooperstown last week according to the I LOVE NY “Fall Foliage Report.” This year, shades of orange and yellow seem to be outshining the reds, as shown here. The top photo showcases the view from Beaver Meadow Road in Cooperstown, the middle picture is a shapshot of Allen Lake Road in Richfield Springs and, below, a flock of Canada geese enjoy their layover in Otsego Lake on their way to points south.

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