News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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bound volumes

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 17, 2018

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 17, 2018

200 YEARS AGO

Communications – The Synod of Albany, at its last sessions in Cherry Valley, divided the Presbytery of Oneida, and formed from it a new Presbytery, to be denominated the “Presbytery of Otsego,” which by order of the Synod, is to hold its first meeting at the Presbyterian Meeting-House, in Cooperstown, on the first Tuesday of November next, at 11 o’clock a.m.
Advertisement – New Grocery. The subscriber respectfully informs the public that he has this day opened a new Grocery Store, the west part of the building opposite Mr. Bradford’s card factory, where he offers for sale a general assortment of groceries all of which are of the first quality, and will be disposed of on the most moderate terms for cash. Tavern keepers and others are invited to call. Jonathan Fitch.

October 18, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democrats of Otsego County! Are you ready for the great contest on November 5? Do you know your exact strength in your respective towns? If not, go to work forthwith, and organize in such a manner as to secure the positive attendance at the polls at an early hour of the day of every Democratic voter. The stake is well worth the labor, and besides, patriotism, love of country, impel to duty in this respect. Let us roll up our majority so as to secure the State Banner! Much is expected of Old Democratic Otsego – let us hold on to our good name, and more than gratify our political friends in other parts of the State. Every man upon duty, and the work is done. Otsego is the Banner County!

October 21, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Orphan House of the Holy Savior – A committee of gentlemen belonging to the Episcopal Church in the new Diocese of Albany, have recently purchased the old Masters’ Farm on the eastern shore of the Lake, two miles from this village, for the purpose of opening a charitable institution under the title of “The Orphan House of the Holy Savior” – a home and industrial school for orphans, half orphans and destitute children. The institution is one of general benevolence, open to all destitute children in this part of the state. Its object is to bring up these children in accordance with Christian principles, to lives of usefulness and respectability. They will be taught to earn an honest livelihood for themselves and thus be prepared to become worthy members of society. The farm consists of 88 acres of land with a front on the lake.

October 5, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

An “Inquirer” asks: “What is the game called “bottle pool?” It is played on a pool table – being a billiard table with six pockets – with three balls, a leather bottle and a cue. It has the main features of billiards, is more fun, and yet requires considerable skill to be played successfully. Mr. S.S. Edick is perhaps the most expert player of the game belonging to the Mohican Club.
The first snow of the season fell Sunday, October 15, 2019, melting as fast as it came. That night the mercury dropped to the freezing point.
A sewer is to be laid through Glen Avenue extending from Railroad to Chestnut Street. And so our village improvements gradually progress.

October 18, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Suitable recognition of Cooperstown as the birthplace of baseball and erection of a monument has been suggested by to the National Baseball Commission by four Ilion, New York fans, three of them big-leaguers of by-gone days. The plan will be the biggest piece of national advertising for this village that has ever been known. The four men who started the ball rolling are Hardie Richardson, one of Detroit’s star players of years ago; Mike Fogarty, another old leaguer; George E. Oliver, the Ilion Cricket Champion; and Patrick F. Fitzpatrick, also of Ilion. In a letter to Sam Crane, well known sports writer of the Hearst newspapers, the four men wrote: “Enclosed you will find express order for $1, being a payment of 25 cents each by the undersigned who are acting upon a suggestion that a memorial of baseball be established at Cooperstown, N.Y. where the game originated. (Ed. Note: Baseball historians have since established that the modern game has multiple geographic, cultural, and human roots which coalesced over decades beginning as early as the 1600s to emerge in the mid-19th century as the game we now know as baseball).

October 15, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The Cardiff Giant, the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people, will observe his 100th birthday on Thursday, October 16, this week. The giant, a prominent exhibit on the grounds of The Farmers’ Museum here for the past 21 years was the subject of a talk by Dr. Louis C. Jones, Director of the New York State Historical Association, at the regular weekly luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club at the Hotel Otesaga on Tuesday. It was just 100 years ago on October 16, 1869 that workmen, who had been called in to dig a well on Stub Newell’s farm near Cardiff, New York, uncovered the giant gypsum marble stone figure that weighs 2,990 pounds and measures 10 feet 4.5 inches in length. (Ed. Note: The Cardiff Giant hoax, conceived in 1867-1868 by George Hull, a disgruntled cigar merchant, created a sensation, attracted international attention, and although debunked, enriched both George Hull and his co-conspirator Stub Newell).

October 5, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

In a dairy world dominated by men, Jennifer Huntington stands out in the crowd. This highly experienced dairy professional exemplifies the increasing role that women are assuming in the dairy industry. In addition to serving as herdsperson for her father at Cooperstown Holstein Corporation Farm just south of Cooperstown, she also sits on the Board of Directors for the Otsego County Cooperative Extension. Besides maintaining the health and performance of an all-Holstein herd of more than 500 animals, she also applies new techniques to get the best possible return from the dairy operation. “Deep down, I always wanted to be in dairy farming,” she said. I enjoy working with cattle and being outside.”

October 19, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

After coming off the second perfect season this decade, the CCS Redskins football team head into the Class C sectionals against Saquoit 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, at Lambert Field.
The team’s 6-0 record, accomplished at home with a 26-0 victory Saturday the 10th against the Herkimer Magicians, bookends the decade of CCS athletic history: The 2001 team likewise had a perfect season, winning eight victories in all before being derailed in sectional competition.
This year as then, “we knew we had a lot of potential,” said Head Coach Steve Pugliese, who also coached during the 2001 undefeated season, and played on coach Ted Kantorowski’s perfect 1970 team.

October 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 10, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 10, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisements: Evening School – Israel Day, will open an Evening School, the Monday evening after the Fair, at his school room in which will be taught Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and English Grammar.
Medical Meeting – Notice is given that an Annual Meeting of the Otsego Medical Society, will be held at the House of Joseph Griffin, in Cooperstown, on Monday, the 18th day of October next at one o’clock p.m. T. Pomeroy, Secretary.
Caution to Trespassers – As many persons have been in the habit of committing trespasses on the estate of the late William Cooper, I offer a reward of double the penalty prescribed by law, to anyone who will give me information of such trespass, and furnish sufficient evidence of the fact. William Cooper.

October 11, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Notices – We are requested to mention that Dr. King will lecture at the Presbyterian Church in Fly Creek on Monday evening , the subject being the effect of alcohol on the human stomach.
Cassius M. Clay and Gerrit Smith are to hold a personal disputation at Syracuse, at a time to be fixed on, on the question whether Henry Clay or James G. Bibney is best qualified to the votes of abolitionists. The former is the challenger, which has been accepted at his convenience by the latter.
At a house warming in Warren, Herkimer County, where 70 farmers and mechanics were present, with 36 yoke of oxen, a vote was taken on the Presidential question, which stood 60 for Polk and 10 for Clay.

October 14, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The New District School opens splendidly as to the number of scholars in attendance. The first day, notwithstanding the rain, 140 were there; the second day 175; on Wednesday nearly 200. The scholars are classified into three general departments. Most of them appear to be under thirteen years of age. They represent all walks in village life. The more advanced scholars occupy the large room in the second story of the building. Two recitation rooms are under the immediate charge of the Principal, Mr. Howe, assisted by Miss Gaylord and Miss Ball. The intermediate department is taught by Miss Reynolds and the Primary by Mrs. Brower. Mr. Howe is a Massachusetts man and a graduate of Albany Normal School. Miss Gaylord is from Ilion, a graduate of the Normal School at Oswego. Miss Ball is “to the Manor born” and one of the best lady teachers we ever had in Cooperstown. Miss Reynolds is from Middlefield, and has had considerable experience in teaching. Mrs. Brower is from Exeter and is a successful teacher of young children. The ship is afloat, well officered. Bon Voyage.

October 8, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Mohican Club – The attendance of members on Friday evening last was unusually large, there being considerable interest felt in the matched games played. In four-ball billiards, 200 points, Charles Page and C.T. Huyck played against Dr. Butler and S.J. Conkling; the former making 200 points and the latter 179, a reasonably close game. In the game of bottle pool, best two and three, 31 points, S.M. Shaw (editor of The Freeman’s Journal) and L.N. Wood played against C.W.G. Ross and C.M. Alison, the former getting the first game, the latter the second and third, the last one by a single shot when they had five to make against four. On Friday evening next at 8 o’clock Dr. Butler and Mr. Page will play a matched game, three ball billiards for 100 points. Mr. Jarvis will umpire.

October 11, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

The first of the series of square dances which will be held every other Friday night during the winter season at the Alfred Corning Clark gymnasium took place on Friday of last week under the direction of Gene Gowing of New York City. A fine time was enjoyed by all and good music was furnished by Mrs. Anita Coleman and Mrs. Florence Sheridan.
Pvt. Murdock Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Hall of this village arrived home Sunday to spend a 21-day sick leave. Pvt. Hall was in the Framington General Hospital at Framington, Massachusetts for several weeks following his return from Europe where he received an eye injury in Normandy.
The Presbyterian Rummage Sale will be held Saturday, October 14, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Chapel on Pioneer Street.

October 11, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown Rotary Club entertained seven Japanese business and professional men at its regular weekly luncheon meeting at the Cooper Inn. The group is headed by Dr. Hiroji Mukasa, a psychiatrist who operates a mental clinic in Nakatsu City on the southern island of Kyushu, and is in this country for two months. The visitors arrived in Cooperstown Tuesday morning and were taken on a tour of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum by Howard C. Talbot, Jr., its treasurer and a past president of the Rotary Club.

October 8, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The winning and the shutouts keep coming for the Cooperstown girls’ soccer team. Over the past week, the Redskins have won three games, outscoring their opponents by a 11-0 margin while extending their winning streak to 12 games. “We had some close ones this week, but we came out okay,” said Cooperstown coach Lisa Cherubin. The Redskins defeated Waterville 2-0 in overtime on Saturday for another Center State Conference win. Saturday’s win gave Cooperstown an overall record of 12-2 and 12-0 in league competition.

October 12, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Gawkers gathered and shutterbugs snapped photos of the two-day-long scene at Main and Railroad in Cooperstown where crews struggled with a crane and a 30-tire flatbed trailer to load and move the 60-ton 1942 ALCO Locomotive that has been parked in the Delaware-Otsego Corporation’s parking lot for 20 years. The railroad relic is headed to a new home in western Maryland. The engine has been purchased with plans to restore it to running order by Bill Miller Equipment Sales of Eckhart Mines, Maryland, one of the largest Caterpillar Equipment dealers in the world. Efforts to uproot a small tree growing out of the smokestack were unsuccessful.

October 9, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 3, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 3, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Ed. Note: October 4, 1819, a Monday, marks the first appearance in Cooperstown two centuries ago of the newspaper still known as “Freeman’s Journal.” John Prentiss the editor introduced the publication to the community as follows: “After a lapse of more than a year, we resume our editorial labors, and at a time, too, inauspicious to an extensive circulation of newspapers, because the pecuniary pressure upon the country is so great as to require a general retrenchment in expenditures. Having incurred great expense in procuring an entire new apparatus, and being resolved to devote our whole time in the business, we rest with confidence upon the liberality of a generous public
for patronage in an undertaking encompassed with many difficulties, arduous in its very nature, and highly responsible in its consequences.”

October 4, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

A Whig Movement Against Foreigners – The Vicksburg Constitutionalist, a paper which displays the names of Clay and Frelinghuysen from its masthead, comes out boldly in favor of shutting out foreigners from the privileges of citizenship until they should have resided among us 21 years. “Let one and all unite in petitioning the very next Congress on this subject. Have the laws altered. Let the term of probation be 21 years and let no foreigner have a foothold in the country without he brings with him irrefutable, conclusive, decisive evidence, beyond a doubt, of his good character at home. We are not at all bound to admit into our country the vile outpourings of any land. We must not suffer the convicts, the criminals, the paupers, the traitors, of three quarters of the world to be shoveled in among us. If we have any immigrants at all, let us have the good and virtuous, and no others. We have enough now, in all conscience.

October 7, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The names of school teachers from the Town of Otsego attending a training institute includes the following: Adelbert Gates, Edwin Bowen, S.B. Bliss, S.I. Haynes, Albert Van Horne, C.F. Brewer, Geo. Temple, Amanda Sitts, Jennie Palmer, Martha Ball, Mary Ball, Lovina House, Ella Lake, Mary Kelley, Mary Hubbell, Hattie Gould, Maggie Russell, Cornelia Hecox, Hattie Williams, Sarah Byrnell, Jennie Byrnell, Lucretia Potter, Ellen Brower.

October 1, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

The Aviators to Go – News comes that the U.S. Aviation Hospital here is likely to break up during the next ten days.

Had this step been decided upon four months ago it would be generally agreed that the aviators and their business would be generally missed in Cooperstown. Perhaps a few frank statements will not be out of place. The presence of the hospital here was, like any other military affair, a distinct novelty at first. But, like everything else military, the novelty wears off. When the hospital was filled to capacity and there were a number of patients and medical officers who took an interest in Cooperstown, and its affairs, they were exceedingly welcome. But when the personnel lagged, interest lagged. And there is little doubt but what a large number of the patients attempted to have things “their own way.” This of course worked to the detriment of the hospital in the village. But, the long and short of it is that Cooperstown is growing a little weary of the continual presence of free and easy soldiers who toil not and spin little, and do not add materially to the citizenship of the village.

October 7, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a Republic Steel advertisement titled “Boys, I’ll tell you what Free Enterprise really is” “It’s a lot of little things – and some mighty big things too. But, in a nutshell, it’s our right to live our own lives, run our own farms and our own businesses in our own way – without needless interference. “It’s our right to criticize the government, bawl out the umpire, belong to the Grange, or make a speech on the public square. It’s our right to travel when and where we choose – to work or not as we please. It offers opportunity to anyone who wants it. It rewards thrift, hard work and ingenuity. It thrives on competition and raises our standard of living. It encourages invention, stimulates research and promotes progress. Yet in spite of all this, some folks would like to change our American way of doing things – and rebuild our whole country under a new and different system. If they had their way, Tom here, wouldn’t own this store. Ed’s farm would belong to the state and Ed would be told how to run it and what to raise. Jim would be working for a state-owned factory with his job and wages frozen. Frankly, I don’t like the name Free Enterprise because it’s the most American thing we have. It really is America. Let’s keep it.”

October 4, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

In Cooperstown – Michael S. Jastremski, son of Dr. and Mrs. Michael M. Jastremski of this village, who graduated cum laude from Hartwick College in June, is attending upstate Medical Center at Syracuse. He and his wife Karen and daughter Kimberly Ann are residing in Syracuse.
Waldo C.M. Johnston, director of the Marine Historical Association at Mystic Seaport, Conn. Will be the guest speaker at the Wednesday, October 8 meeting of the Women’s Club of Cooperstown to be held in the club rooms of the Village Library building. His talk will be titled “The Role of the Outdoor Museum in a Changing Culture” using Mystic Seaport as an example.

October 1, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown High School Science Department will welcome students, parents and community members to a Science Department Open House on Thursday, October 27. The evening will begin with informal tours of the two McIntosh Computer Centers. The Earth Science Computer Center, under the direction of Dr. Frances Hess, is located in Room 102. The McLab, under the direction of Mr. Thomas Good, is located in Room 100. Students in grades 9 to 12 will be on hand to demonstrate many of the applications used in the sciences for data collection, graphing, word processing, drawing and publishing.

October 5, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Sept. 26, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 26, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

One of the first duties of a citizen is to use every effort, by precept and example, to encourage industry and shut out want. No matter how splendid your city may be, whether shady walks, cooling fountains, marble edifices, and magnificent palaces, give tokens of opulence and ease – if your streets are crowded with beggars and your paths haunted by mendacity it is a stain on the character of the economy of its inhabitants. There are so many ways of earning a morsel of bread honestly, that want, arising from indolence should never be tolerated. Rich or poor, all men should remember, whatever may be their situation in life, that it is ordained by Providence, that “man is to live by the sweat of his brow.”

September 27, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Henry Clay has obtained another certificate of good character from one of his partisan clergymen. A letter has just made its appearance in some Whig papers signed by N.H. Hall, who is represented as being the Presbyterian Clergyman of Lexington, KY. This reverend gentleman, having been asked to give his opinion in regard to the moral character and standing of Mr. Clay among his neighbors, replies: “I have never witnessed an act or heard expression from Mr. Clay that was not in conformity with the strictest morality.” This Rev. Mr. Hall, we presume, never heard of the Randolph Duel and the participation of Mr. Clay in the Cilley murder; or the language of Mr. Clay to Colonel Polk – “Go home, God damn you, where you belong!”

September 30, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The Steamboat – the “Mary Boden,” the first steamer designed for Otsego Lake, arrived at Cooperstown, via railroad on Saturday last. Think of it – a steamer for this lake, and arriving here by railroad! We wish that Cooper might have lived to see it and write about it. Mr. D.B. Boden deserves great credit for his enterprise in investing $2,000 in such a craft, and we hope he will find it a paying one. The Mary is built for speed and hard work, and shows very handsome lines. She will go into winter quarters immediately, and will be put in complete order for next summer. The Mary was sledded through Main and Fair Streets – fortunately for the occasion quite muddy – on Wednesday, drawn by about 40 men, three yoke of oxen and two span of horses. She weighs about eight tons.

September 24, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – Dr. E.P. Fowler has this season had a new well drilled for supplying his “Estli” place with water. It is located
south of his house, and is 135 feet deep. A steel windmill is to be erected to hoist the water, which will be carried to the house in iron pipes.
Golf has invaded Otsego County. It first appeared near the head of Otsego Lake, during the past summer, and is confined to that locality. There are grounds at Newport, R.I., Yonkers and a few other points in this country, but no rapid spread of the fad is anticipated. Two or three of our north end neighbors were educated in England. They imbibed the English love of outdoor sports and some of their visitors are outdoor people. To play the game of golf well requires long practice, though one may in a year or two learn to play well enough to take pleasure in the game. However, the sport is not destined to become national, for we Americans rarely devote the time required for its mastery to any one particular thing.

September 27, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Col. Nelson A. Gapen, Medical Corps, U.S. Army, has replaced Major A.E. Ludwick as Commanding Officer of the U.S. Aviation hospital here. Colonel Gapen arrived last week to begin his duties, and will likely be commanding officer of the hospital until its close, which is expected momentarily. Colonel Gapen has been Assistant Surgeon General of the medical detachment of the air service for the past two years, and paid an official visit of inspection to Cooperstown in July. Major Ludwick remains on staff here. Capt. Charles M. Wharton, for several months physical director here, left on Saturday for Philadelphia, his home, where he will be discharged from the service. Capt. Wharton will begin duties as Chair of Physical Culture at the University of Pennsylvania on October 1.

September 24, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Mrs. E. Russell Houghton, Knox School President, announces the school’s opening on September 27, this week, for its thirty-third year and the school’s twenty-fourth year in Cooperstown. The number of students enrolled is the largest since 1929 and the school has had to close its door to further applicants. A majority of the girls are from New York. Other states represented are California, Connecticut, Washington, D.C., Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. There are two girls from Bermuda, one from South America, and one from Aruba, N.W.I.

September 27, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

A group of seven young Japanese men who are spending two months in this country as a team taking part in a Rotary Foundation Group Study Program will visit Cooperstown Rotary Club during its regular luncheon meeting at the Cooper Inn next Tuesday. The visitors represent Rotary District 373 which is on Kyushu, the southernmost island of Japan. They are university trained businessmen and all speak English. Six make up the study team and the group is in the charge of Dr. Hiroji Mukasa who operates a mental clinic at Nakatsu City, Oita. During their one-day stay the visitors will visit Cooperstown’s museums and the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital.

September 24. 1969

10 YEARS AGO

Last Halloween Shirley Walrath decorated her husband George’s grave in Hartwick Cemetery with hardy mums and a pumpkin. George died on Christmas Eve 2004. “We left it there. Six months later we went back and took it away,” Shirley recalled. During a recent visit to the grave, Shirley found her husband’s plot covered with a flourishing vine. Returning the other day, Shirley discovered 10 pumpkins growing there.

October 2, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Sept. 19, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 19, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

There is scarcely a subject that awakens the pride of an American more than the respect which is paid by foreign nations, to the star-spangled banner of this country. We have lived to see the day when foreign princes, potentates and emperors have paid homage to a banner, which but a few years ago was a stranger to the ocean. If such flattering testimonials of respect from
foreign nations do but rouse us to a proper sense, to a just estimation of our own dignity, we may calculate perhaps for centuries to come, on the preservation of our laws, liberties, habits and free republic institutions. Americans are a nation of emperors governed by no other will than their own, when expressed through its constitutional organ. The constitution itself the highest legal authority, which Congress, no less than courts of justice are bound to obey, is but an instrument in the hands of the people and capable of being amended, remodeled, enlarged
or abolished altogether, by our fellow citizens in their collective majesty.

September 20, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

The assemblage of Democrats at Clarkes-Ville (Middlefield) on Saturday, September 16, numbered between three and four thousand. The meeting was numerously attended from the neighboring towns and adjacent counties. Fire Companies number two and three and the Brass Band from Cooperstown, in their uniforms, added greatly to the appearance of the procession and its hilarity on the ground. (Note: The following passage (as edited for brevity) was presented as argument for a resolution: “The Party which originated with Jefferson, and which has been sustained by Madison, Jackson and Van Buren, must become a divided, subdued and sinking people, unless we successfully resist all foreign influence and dictation, and render the overthrow of this British American party final and conclusive. We, who imagined ourselves free from foreign interference; we who fondly hoped to see the Eagle of Liberty, with widespread wings carry the Banner of Freedom to the shores of the Pacific and to the southern extreme of North America, find England and the Holy Alliance in the field against us. The alliance of England and France, formed in 1815, to repress liberty wherever it might be found, has been reorganized and renewed, and its first steps is to limit the territorial possessions of the United States.”

September 23, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

A correspondent complains that there is a place kept open in this village where liquor is sold without a license, and that no steps are taken to put a stop to this violation of a wholesome law; that it is frequently open on Sunday evening; and that drunken men have been seen coming out of it – all of which may be the truth. But what good does he expect to accomplish by simply scolding about it in a public newspaper? Has no enough been said in that way? Now why does he not take pains to bring the facts stated to the Knowledge of the Justice of the Peace, or furnish the Excise Commissioners with the necessary proof to convict the offender? Do your duty, Sir, as a citizen, and do not expect to reform all abuses by mere newspaper talk. It is as much your business as that of any other law-abiding citizen. Let the law be enforced.

September 17, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – Some of the oldest and largest elm trees on our streets are becoming rather dangerous, and a few of them should be taken down. Last Sunday afternoon two men came near being struck by a large limb which fell from one of the old elm trees near the corner of Chestnut and Main streets.
The newspapers might as well stop their criticism on the riding of bicycles by ladies. They are going to do it as they have a right to do, and each year in increasing numbers.
The Nelson Avenue sewer is completed. It is 840 feet long and cost $438. The village owes that Avenue to the enterprise of Mr. E.F. Beadle.

September 20, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Advertisement for the Nash Automobile – Two years ago when we first contracted to represent the Nash, we made the prediction that within two years’ time the Nash would be the most popular car of its price class on the market. Today, the Nash is the acknowledged leader among cars selling for $2,500 or less. The Nash is the most quiet- running and economical car selling for between $500 and $3,000. Is it therefore any wonder that at no time since the present series Nash came on the market two and one-half years ago, have we or any other Nash dealers been able to supply one-fourth of the demand for Nash cars?

September 17, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Local football fans will see the 1944 Cooperstown Redskins in action this Saturday at Doubleday Field against a strong Hamilton team. Gone from the team this year are such outstanding players as Captain Bob Meeneghan, Ted Harbison, Arnold Welch, Jack Lavante, LaRue Jones, Arnold Staffin and Everett Bridger. Their loss will be hard felt but there remains a nucleus of players around which this year’s team is built – Vinny Lynch, Charles Hall, Tom Kiley, Bob King, Joe Sapienza, Charles Murdock, Bob Welch, Chet Holbrook and Chuck Coleman. Other players are Joe Mogavero, Dick Johnson, Hugh Jones, Doug Welch, Bill Moakler, Johnny Shevalier, Jerry Clark and Ernie Bosc.

September 20, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

The Otsego County Board of Representatives has taken a step toward installing an emergency 911 system throughout the county. The Board voted 8-5 to sign a letter of intent with NYNEX to order the system equipment. Lyle Jones, Otsego County’s Emergency Services Coordinator, offered a presentation to update the board on the progress of the system. The system should be operational throughout the county within 36 months at a cost of $6,104.54 monthly and an installation fee of $11,457.69. Rep. Hugh Henderson, who lives at a rural route address, opined: “I’m telling you, you can’t imagine the confusion you are going to have in this county by changing addresses, especially those outside of village lines.”

September 14, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Sept. 13, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 13, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

The inhabitants of Texas, disappointed in the hope of being included within the territories of the United States, by the recent treaty between our government and that of Spain, have declared themselves independent of the Spanish crown, and state that they have “prepared themselves to meet and firmly to sustain, any conflict in which this declaration may involve them.”
Died: In this village on Wednesday last, Ellen, an infant daughter of Mr. George Pomeroy.

September 13, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democrats! There will be a Pole Raising in the Village of Cooperstown on Tuesday next at 3 o’clock p.m. to which a general invitation to all Polkers is hereby given.
The State nominations made at Syracuse on the 4th instant, are in conformity with the Democratic voice. The whole proceedings were harmonious, and the Convention
separated with the best feelings. Throughout the entire State, the response from the Democracy has been warm-hearted, inspiring the strongest confidence in our strength, and inspiring a triumphant victory.

September 16, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Baseball – A game of baseball between the first nine of the Haymakers of New Lisbon and the second nine of the Lightfoots of Morris, on the grounds of the former, on Saturday the fourth instant, esulted in victory for the Haymakers, 19 to 10.
Commodore Boden of the Otsego Lake flotilla has recently purchased the steam yacht Mary, formerly a government gun boat employed during the war for operating in southern rivers. The Mary is expected to arrive here today (Friday, September 10, 1869), whence she will be placed on a couple of cars and transported over the Albany and Cooperstown roads. Her machinery will be taken out upon her arrival here. She is about forty feet in length, and intended to be used for picnic parties on the beautiful Otsego Lake, and will also run during navigation, in connection with the C. and S.V. R.R. It will be, we believe, the first steam boat that ever woke the echoes of Natty Bumppo’s cave.

September 10, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – A fine of $10 may be imposed for fast driving in the streets of this village. If inflicted in a few cases it might work a needed reform.
Mr. E.F. Beadle went up to the old family homestead in Pierstown on Tuesday, the anniversary of his seventy-third birthday.
About 80 young people are expected to join in the sport of “the paper chase,” at Hyde Hall, head of the lake, today, Wednesday.
Inspectors – The following additional inspectors of election have been appointed in the several districts of this town pursuant to Chapter 348 of the laws of 1894, which provides for four inspectors, instead of three – First District, Jesse P. Johnston; Second District, L Grand Brainerd; Third District, Harry Spingler; Fourth District, Alfred T. Williams; Fifth District, Jesse J. Ellsworth.

September 13, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

(Excerpts from an address by Dr. Anna Howard Shaw regarding the costs of World War I as experienced by women and the call for a League of Nations to ensure future peace) “Who can estimate the value of seven million one hundred dead sons of the women of the world? Who can estimate the price which the women have paid for this war? We hear the orators tell us of the courage of our men – how they went across the sea. Very few of them remember to tell us of the courage of our women, who also went across the sea, of the women who died nursing the sick and wounded, the women who died in the hospitals where the terrible bombs came and drove them almost to madness. They tell nothing of the forty thousand English women who went to work back of the trenches in France. If there is any body of citizens in the world who ought to be interested in a League of Nations to ultimately bring to the world peace, it is the mothers of men, and the women who suffered, as only women can suffer in the war and devastated countries.”

September 10, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

Christ Episcopal Church will take a giant step forward in its Christian Education program for adults and students during the coming academic year as it occupies its new and enlarged parish house for church school activities on Sunday, September 14. It will also mark the first time that families may attend services together with study sessions for all at the same time. All classes from pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 will attend the 9 a.m. Holy Communion Service with pre-Kindergarten through Grade 5 students leaving the church for their classes after the offertory. On the second and fourth Sundays of each month these grades will have their own services in the Chapel as they have in the past. Grades 6 through 12 will attend their classes after the 9 o’clock services. All classes will be dismissed at 10:30 a.m.

September 10, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

It’s only a trickle now, but some worry that the exodus of some downtown businesses to locations outside the village may become a stream, carrying away much of the local service village residents desire. Cooperstown Optical moved its Pioneer Street office to the former NYSEG customer service center on south Route 28. Cooperstown Optical’s former neighbor, the Leatherstocking Education on Alcoholism/Addiction Foundation, is set to move September 16 into the Hyde Park Office Complex. “It could be a potential tide,” said village Trustee Giles Russell, who also serves as chairman of the village Planning Commission. Lack of nearby parking for customers and staff was cited by both organizations as a factor in their decision to relocate.

September 7, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

There’s a photo somewhere showing Melanie Oudin’s great-grandmother, Dorothy Savage Oudin, playing tennis in a long white Victorian dress. Her great-granddaughter is taking the tradition farther than Dorothy Oudin could ever have conceived. At the U.S. Tennis Open, Melanie, age 17, of Marietta, Georgia, has beaten Elena Dementiava (ranked number 4), the famed Maria Sharapova (29) and Nadia Petrova (13, to enter the quarterfinals. She is the youngest player to get that far since Serena Williams in 1999.

September 11, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES: Sept. 5, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 5, 2019

200 YEARS AGO
A Recipe for the Bite of a Mad Dog – Take the plant called “Scull-Cap, gathered either before dog-days begin, or after they are over (that is, before July 30 and after September 10). Cure it in the shade. Cut it fine and bottle it up close. Of this powder take a decoction as strong as common tea, and give it to an adult, half a pint, night and morning, fasting; to a child of three years old, one gill; to a child of 8 years old, 1.5 gill; to a child of 12 years, 2 gills. The patient, on every third day, during the period of taking the decoction must miss taking it; and instead of it must take two tea-spoons full of roll of brimstone, with molasses, or sufficient to procure a free passage. Continue this course for 40 days. The patient must abstain from butter or milk, or anything of a greasy nature in the diet and wholly free from spirituous liquors. It is important that the feet should not be wet.
August 30, 1819

175 YEARS AGO
To the Abolitionists of Montgomery, Otsego & Fulton Counties. The friends of freedom and the rights of man, in the County of Herkimer, aware of the importance of the current crisis in the struggle between Liberty and Slavery in this county, and believing that the people only need light on this subject, to induce them to throw off all allegiance, political and ecclesiastical, to the Slave Power, have established a Liberty Paper at Little Falls, called the Herkimer Freeman, a leading object of which will be to exhibit facts and arguments showing the inconsistency and wrong of slavery and its deadly injury to the whole country.
August 26, 1844

125 YEARS AGO
Baseball: Athletics 7, Richfields 4 – A most disgraceful termination to the series with the Richfield club occurred
on the latter’s grounds. Before the game took place, the Captain of the Athletics was informed by persons of
repute that the umpire had been “bought” by betting men of Richfield, in the interests of their home club. Upon this information, our Captain requested that some other man be secured to umpire the game, and at first refused to play unless such change was made. The Richfield managers and captain declined to have any other umpire, and after protest, the game began. The umpire displayed his unfairness from the first inning. Even the Richfield pitchers declared his
decisions unjust toward the Athletics. At the close of the fifth inning the score stood 4 to 1 in favor of Richfield. In the sixth, the Athletics made six runs – score 7 to 4 in favor of the Athletics. When the Richfields came to bat, they made no effort to hit balls that were pitched squarely over the center of the plate, waist high; and such balls, which should have been “strikes,” were called “balls” by the
umpire. The first batter received his base in this way.
He was caught napping between the bases and put out by White throwing to Taylor. The umpire declared that White had made a balk, and gave the man his base. Mitchell,
who was catching, went down to the pitcher’s box, and protested against the decision. In the argument that
followed, the umpire is said to have called him a “d__d” liar,” and Mitchell knocked the umpire down! A fat man wearing glasses, threw off his coat and started for the seat of war, but a punch in the stomach doubled him up and calmed his enthusiasm. Mitchell was arrested and put
under $500 bond to appear before the Grand Jury. Mr.
R.H. White went his bond. The umpire declared the game for Richfield, 9-0.
August 30, 1894

100 YEARS AGO
The Cooperstown Air Service Corporation, with a capital stock of $6,000 and with Articles of Incorporation now pending, was formed in the Chamber of Commerce rooms on Monday afternoon this week for the purpose of conducting a business in airplane travel, and of filling contracts for exhibition flying at various fairs and towns in this vicinity. The corporation was formed by former Lieutenant
Wilfred (Tony) Yackey, recently a patient at the U.S.
Aviation Hospital here, and recently discharged from
the army, and by Lieutenant Goodsell, also a former patient. Yackey will pilot the Canadian Curtiss airplane which the corporation voted to purchase. More than 40 Cooperstown businessmen are interested in the corporation. A Board of Directors of five has been elected as follows: Dr. B.W. Dewar, Orange L. Van Horne, George Hyde Clark, William Smalley and R.W. Ellsworth.
August 27, 1919

75 YEARS AGO
Ryerson shoots 69 On Local Golf Course – Playing one of his best rounds of golf in recent years, Jack Ryerson toured the Cooperstown golf course in 69 strokes, three under par. He was out in 35 and back in 34. The present nine-hole course, now being played, measures around 3,225 yards, or 6,450 yards for 18 holes, as against 6,372 yards for the regular 18-hole layout which was played up to two years ago. Ryerson was playing a four-ball match with
Edward Marion, Bert McCloskey and Len Rayner.
August 30, 1944

50 YEARS AGO
Cooperstown Central School’s football squad will
commence practice sessions at 6 p.m. Wednesday on the new high school athletic field according to Head Coach
Ted Kantorowski. The six lettermen returning to the squad are Co-captains Mike Phillips and Lyle Jones, defensive backs Richard Irving and Edward Ayers, quarterback
Alan Vines and center Tim Bliss. The following boys are expected to see action during the coming season – Carter Coleman, end; Cliff Coleman, end and back; John Phillips, guard; Craig Phillips, tackle; Paul Brown, center; Bruce Buffet, Tom Barns, Richard White and Greg Dibble,
all running backs.
August 27, 1969

25 YEARS AGO
Fly Creek by Lydie Mackie – The “Senior Renditions”
duo was discovered audiotaping themselves in the United Methodist Church basement. Elaine Harvey, our postmistress,
and Len Price sing beautifully together and have entertained in Fly Creek. They were last heard at the Historical Society’s “Music Day” in the firehouse. Marie King, wife of Rev. King, also performed at the Music Day. Dressed as a clown, she sold and delivered singing telegrams. At a quarter each she cleared $1.25 for the Historical Society.
August 31, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Aug, 29, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug, 29, 2019

200 YEARS AGO
Cattle Show and Fair – The Bye-Laws of the Otsego County Agricultural Society declare that “there shall be an Annual Cattle Show and Fair at Cooperstown, on the first Tuesday of October, to continue that and the succeeding day.” It is important that candidates for premiums should be made acquainted with the conditions upon which they will be entitled to the rewards of the Society. To effect this object, permit me to state, that the “Act to improve the Agriculture of this State, passed April 7, 1819, requires “that each person, to whom any premium shall be awarded for any Agricultural product, before the receipt thereof, make an accurate description of the process used in cultivation, the soil and in raising the crop, or of feeding the animal, as may be, and shall in all cases describe the nature of the soil, the kind and quantity of the manure, the state thereof, and the time of year in which applied, and deliver the same to the President of the Society.” No person can receive a premium at the hands of the Society without conforming to the letter and spirit of this law.
September 6, 1819

175 YEARS AGO
Effects of perpetual day upon the mind, feelings and avocations of men is described thus in the narrative of Buchan’s Expedition to the North Pole: “Nothing made so deep an impression on our senses as the change from alternative day and night, to which we had been habituated from our infancy, to the continued daylight to which we were subjected as soon as we crossed the arctic circle. Where the ground is but little trodden even trifles are interesting. The novelty, it must be admitted, was very agreeable, and the advantage of constant daylight, in an unexplored and naturally boisterous sea, was too great to allow us to wish for a return of the alternations above alluded to. But the reluctance we felt to leave the deck, when the sun was shining bright upon our sails, and retire to our cabins to sleep, deprived us of many hours of necessary rest. And, when we returned to the deck to keep our night watch and still find the sun gliding the sky, it seemed as if the day would never finish. To many persons, it will no doubt appear that constant daylight must be a valuable acquisition in every country. I think the reverse is really the case. We cannot overestimate the blessings we derive from the wholesome alterations of labor and rest and be truly thankful for that merciful provision with which nature has endowed the more habitable portions of the globe.”
September 2, 1844

150 YEARS AGO
Local – A Fancy-Dress Masquerade Party, held at the house of one of our citizens is numbered with the several pleasant social affairs which have come off in Cooperstown during the present season. The costumes were quite varied and presented an amusing study – most of them the product of skillful hands at home – others ordered from abroad. Sharp eyes failed to detect many of the disguised ones until the time for unmasking came, and the merry dance commenced. Cooperstown, we are assured by old residents, was always noted for the clever manner in which such things were carried out in this village. Some of the “young old folks” brought into service articles of apparel that were in fashion and use in the preceding century.
On Monday last 190 “Hop girls,”
mostly Germans, came over the Cooperstown railroad from Albany.
September 3, 1869

125 YEARS AGO
Local – This year, among the hundreds of hop pickers who were in town on Sunday, the absence of intoxicated persons was noticeable – due partly to the closed bars and more to the fact that a good class of people are doing the work in the hop yards.
Among the oldest and well preserved buildings in the Village is that of the old Masonic Hall, corner of Lake and Pioneer Streets, the frame of which was raised
June 25, 1797.
September 6, 1894

75 YEARS AGO
Thirty-five hundred people attended the fifth and last of the 1944 Cooperstown
Victory Sings on the Otesaga Hotel grounds Sunday afternoon and listened to an address
by Quentin Reynolds, radio’s star war commentator in his most moving vein, and lifted their voices in a great and harmonious chorus under the direction of Dr. Elmer A. Tidmarsh. Reynolds spoke of Russia, which he has visited twice, and found it confusing. “No one knows much about Russia,”
he declared, “not even the Russians themselves.” He said it is a “strange and paradoxical country.” Reynolds declared that the “spirit of the Russian is a spirit that the rest of us haven’t got. They feel that they are fighting beasts and will accomplish feats that seem impossible to other nations. After the war, I feel that Russia will be a friendly neighbor and a great customer of the United States for at least 25 years while she is rebuilding her cities.”
September 6, 1944

50 YEARS AGO
An informal opening ceremony will be held at Cooperstown’s new sewage treatment plant south of the village Friday afternoon. Several state and county officials have been invited, along with members of the village government. The new plant was placed in operation last November. Among the guests will be Board of Education President Dr. M.M. Jasremski, Dr. William H. Hermann, administrator of Bassett Hospital, Frederick L. Rath, Jr., Chairman of the Village Planning Commission and Robert C. Smullins, president of the Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce.
September 3, 1969

25 YEARS AGO
It is only a trickle right now, but some worry that the exodus of downtown Cooperstown businesses may become a stream, carrying away much of the village service providers residents desire. Cooperstown Optical moved its Pioneer Street office to the former New York State Electric and Gas customer service center just south of the village on Route 28. Also, the Leatherstocking Education on Alcohol/Addiction Foundation (LEAF) is set to move to the Hyde Park office complex. “It could be a potential tide,” said village Trustee Giles Russell, who also serves as Chair of the Village Planning Commission.
September 7, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 22, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 22, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement in the Otsego Herald: The undersigned intends, about the First of September next, to commence the publication of a paper in this village, under the above title. It will be printed upon an entire new type, and in size correspond with any interior paper in the State. J.H. Prentiss, Cooperstown, August 23, 1819. (Ed. Note: Thus was announced in the Otsego Herald, the beginning of this newspaper 200 years ago and still known as the “Freeman’s Journal.”

August 23, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Political Poetry – “Freemen! Cheer the Hickory Tree. In storms its boughs have sheltered thee. O’er Freedom’s soil its branches wave; T’was planted on the Lion’s grave.”

We learn from those who were present on the occasion that the Democratic gathering at Oneonta on Saturday, August 17, numbered from 4,000 to 6,000 persons, and was animated with enthusiasm in support of the nominees of the Democratic Convention and the Doctrine of Popular Rights and Privileges. It was a strong demonstration of public feeling on the political questions at issue before the country

August 26, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The Report of the seventy-fourth Anniversary of the Otsego Baptist Association gives the following statistics: Churches comprising the Association, 19; Ministers ordained, 14; Licentiate, 1; Additions during past year, 79; Losses, 96; Present number of church members, 1,325. In 1864, with 18 churches, the membership was 1,523. In 1852 with 17 churches the membership was 1,382. There is shown to be a considerable falling off in the aggregate number, notwithstanding fair additions to many of the churches. They lose largely by emigration to the cities and to the west. There needs to be a lifting up out of old ruts, worn deep many years ago. If our Baptist friends will permit, we will point out a weakening element in these Associations. It is the presence of Agents from all leading Societies of the Denomination for the purpose of preaching “begging sermons” to the most liberal members of the churches – taking up nearly all the time in “presenting the cause” which they are paid to advocate, and taking up collections or soliciting subscriptions. The time is so much taken up by Society Agents, not enough attention is paid to the weak and destitute churches. Of about $2,767 reported by the Treasurer as received during the past year, only $80 was for “destitute churches.” A decided reform in these particulars is needed.

August 20, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The “Players” – The second of what we may hope will become a series of annual entertainments was given by the “Players” last Thursday evening in Village Hall. Two pieces were presented. The first was a translation from the French entitled “Comedy and Tragedy.” The characters in this were taken by Misses Marion and France Gregory, Dr. Sill and Mr. R.S. Hooker. Something of the life of an actress at home was shown, and her conflicting feelings toward a young admirer whom, at his father’s request, she tries to get rid of, and ends by falling in love with, were credibly delineated. The second piece was the farce “”Poor Pillicoddy.” The characters were played by Mrs. Emily and Alice Gregory, Miss Bessie Patterson, Mr. Wolcott and Mr. S. Patterson. The various comical incidents of the play were cleverly set forth, and continually amused the audience. After the performance light refreshments were served, and an informal dance followed. Many invitations had been issued and about 300 people were present.

August 23, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Baseball – A team composed of Coopers-town business men and diamond old-timers defeated a team of employees of the Arthur H. Crist Co. Thursday evening by a score of 14 to 1. Champlin and Ames were the battery for the businessmen. Entrances to the ball park are through Dr. Dewar’s Lane on Susquehanna Avenue and from Elm Street opposite the Baptist Church and between the Crist Co. and the First National Bank. Milford and Delhi are playing a game of baseball on Doubleday Park, this village, this Wednesday.

August 27, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Under perfect weather conditions Sunday afternoon, a throng of 2,000 attended the third in the series of five Victory Sings on the lawn of the Otesaga Hotel overlooking Otsego Lake, participated in the chorus singing under the leadership of Dr. Elmer A. Tidmarsh of Schenectady, and were presented with a thoughtful review of the war and stirring picture of the situation as it appears today by Paul Schubert the well-known American author and radio commentator. It was the largest attendance yet this summer by several hundred.

August 23, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The second annual stamp show sponsored by the Leatherstocking Stamp Club will be held at the Community House, 63 Pioneer Street, Cooperstown, on Friday, Saturday and Sunday of this week. According to Mrs. Mary Pangborn, secretary-treasurer of the club, and coordinator of the stamp show, this year’s event promises to be a marked improvement over the show held last year, in time open to the public, variety of exhibits on display, and coverage of Philatelic material. To date, nearly 100 frames of stamps have been registered. A movie “Postman of the Skies” at 2 p.m. will show how mail is delivered by helicopter in the City of Chicago.

August 20, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

More than 120 teams, made up of 500 ironmen and women, participated in the rain-soaked and shortened 12th Annual Glimmerglass Triathlon Sunday at Glimmerglass State Park. Several hundred spectators dared the driving rain to watch the three event race, which was originally scheduled to include a 6.4 mile run, a 27-mile bicycle race and five mile canoe race. However, 2 to 3 foot swells on Otsego Lake along with reports of thunderstorms in the area, forced race officials to cancel the canoeing. The final results were tabulated from the standings of teams and individuals after the bicycle race. The fastest overall time was posted by the team of Steve Simpson, Jim Benkos, Gary Place and Mark Micotello who covered the course in 1:35:17. Jim Mattingly posted the fastest individual time finishing in 1:53:18. Among women, Joan Butler and Shelly Kempton took team honors (2:00:13) and Kelly O’Brien was the lone Iron Woman (2:32:04).

August 24, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 15, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 15, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Agricultural Notice – A meeting of the Agricultural Society of the County of Otsego, will be held at the house of Joseph Munn in Cooperstown, on Thursday, the 26th day of August, inst., for the purpose of organizing the Society, agreeably to the Legislature of this state. Robert Campbell, Rec. Sec. Cooperstown, August 12, 1819.

Welch Indians – It seems that a Society in the State of New York has sent out persons to ascend the Missouri in search of Welch Indians. A Mr. Stoddart collected some years ago and embodied in his sketches of Louisiana, many loose reports and disjointed rumors on this subject. He seemed to give credit to the belief of their existence. Since his time, however, the country supposed to be the place of their residence, and in fact every part of the country in which they could reside, has been explored. There is no exception from the confines of Mexico to the Arctic Circle. No such people as “Welch Indians” have been found.

August 16, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Competition is the life of business. This saying is illustrated in the fact, that the post-coaches between this place and Fort Plain and Canajoharie now make their trips in about three hours. In several instances, Mr. Willoughby has run through in two and one-half hours, affording us the Albany and New York mails by 3 o’clock p.m. Thanks for his diligence.

August 9, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Advertisement: “Cooper House, Cooperstown, New York” The Spacious and Elegant building, formerly known as the “Cooperstown Seminary,” having been altered, improved and adapted to hotel purposes during the past three months, at the expense of over $30,000, was opened for the reception of guests on June 25. The building will be found complete with all the modern improvements, and the situation and attractions of Cooperstown are second to no summer resort in the country. Within about four hours from Albany by railroad and thirteen miles distant from Richfield Springs, and 20 miles from Sharon, amid hill, lake and valley scenery unsurpassed in beauty, and surrounded by the historic and classic associations made famous by the pen of Cooper, it is believed that few points in the country afford equal inducements to the tourist, or to those seeking a rural home during the summer.

August 13, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The “Cuban Giants” always draw well, when playing against the Cooperstown Athletics. Monday last was no exception to the rule. There was a large audience to witness the game. With one man for two days previous on the sick list, and a substitute playing for another, it did not look promising for the home team – but the manner in which they opened the game gave their friends confidence. On the second inning it was a tie. Then the Athletics surged six ahead, after which the Giants closed up the gap steadily, leaving the Athletics the victors at the end by two runs, 16 to 14. It was an exciting game – some fine playing – though marked with a number of errors on both sides. (Ed. Note: Baseball in the early 1890s was played without the aid of gloves for fielding and errors were more common as a result)

August 16, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Leonard and Delmar Hutchings, the former 13 years old, and the latter 15 years old, were sentenced yesterday to a term in the Rochester Industrial School by Justice of the Peace Vanderwerker after they had been accused and admitted breaking into the home of Mrs. Stone Benedict on Main and River streets, and robbing the house of various petty articles. The conviction is part of the program of District Attorney Adrian A. Pierson to break up a number of so-called “boy gangs” about the village who have been committing various depredations from time to time.

August 20, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Miss Helen E. Fry describes her work serving U.S. soldiers in the front-line combat area in Italy with the Red Cross. “We work in two teams, driving our own three-quarter ton trucks. We start out in the morning loaded down with from 2,000 to 4,000 donuts, coffee, sugar, canned milk, Victrola, accordion, guitar, cards, writing paper, etc. A schedule is made out a day in advance, so that at each outfit we go to the fellows are waiting for us with their canteen cups. We serve the coffee and donuts first, and then sit around and talk with the fellows while they eat, play the Victrola, dance, or get someone to play one of the instruments we have along. We make anywhere from four to seven or eight stops a day like this.”

August 16, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The Coleman Family reunion was held on Saturday, August 9, at the Forest of the Dozen Dads in Middlefield. Those attending included Mr. and Mrs. Stuart P. Taugher and family of Cooperstown, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reich and family of Bardonia, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Garbera of Richfield Springs, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Coleman, Sr. and family of Odenton, Maryland, Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Schultz III and family, Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Coleman, Sr. and Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Coleman, Jr. and family, all of Cooperstown. Four generations were in attendance including Mrs. Charles A. Coleman, Sr., her daughter, Mrs. Stuart P. Taugher, her granddaughter Mrs. Jackson Schultz III, and great-granddaughter, Miss Amy Schultz.

August 13, 1969

10 YEARS AGO

Vittoria “Vicci” Demarest, 90, Cooperstown, an early and ardent supporter of the Glimmerglass Opera, died Friday after a brief illness. Ms. Demarest was a graduate of the Knox School in Cooperstown. She attended Skidmore College for two years and graduated from the Traphagen School of Design in New York City. Ms. Demarest was the daughter of the well-known sculptor, Victor Salvatore, and the former Ellen Ryerson, whose father, Arthur Ryerson, died in the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. After a marriage to the late William Demarest, she lived in Guilford, Connecticut for many years. In 1973 she returned to Cooperstown and served on the board of the Glimmerglass Opera and other local organizations.

August 14, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 8, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 8, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

The Progress of the Russian Empire in America – Looking to the east for everything, the people of the United States have contemplated with astonishment the progress of the Russian Empire in Europe and Asia. They have not thought of looking to the west to see this giant power already mounting upon their own backs. Except Mr. Walsh, we do not know an American who has even spoken of the Russian establishments on our continent. He has mentioned them in his “Sketch of the military and political power of Russia,” where he says: “Their establishments extend from Kamschatka to the N.W. coast of America – that they have a fort mounting 100 pieces of artillery at Norfolk Sound, Lat. North 59 degrees; that since 1813 they have descended the coast, passed the mouth of the Columbia 500 miles, and established themselves at Bogada in 38 degrees, 30 minutes, and only 30 miles from the Spanish settlements in California, where they are not only trading with great advantage, but are profiting by a fine climate and fruitful soil, to feed their more northern possessions.”

August 9, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

The Re-Annexation of Texas and its Influence on the Duration of Slavery. One of the arguments in favor of re-annexing Texas seems to have been overlooked in recent discussions. Even Mr. Calhoun seems to suppose that the “peculiar institutions” of the South as it is the fashion to call slavery, are to be rendered more durable by the annexation; and the Abolitionists, as well as some of the more rational opponents of these institutions, object to the annexation on the same ground. Both are wrong, absolutely wrong, and a little attention to facts will prove the error. So far from perpetuating slavery in the United States, the annexation of Texas, or the slave-holding portion of it at least, gives the only well-grounded hope for its ultimate extinction. This may appear to be a paradox. But, it is sober truth, and fully susceptible of demonstration. (Ed. Note: The writer argues that an independent Texas would become a bastion of slavery even more so if slavery was abolished in the United States).

August 12, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Richfield Springs – It is our regular summer program to drive up with a friend or two to “The Springs” for a day at the American during the height of “the season” – and Tuesday last was one of the most enjoyable days of the whole year – not uncomfortably warm along either of the two Lakes, not too cool on the mountain tops. The hotels and boarding houses in the village are filled with summer boarders most of whom come to stay for weeks or months. There were never as many strangers domiciled in Richfield Springs as now. There is to be a Grand Ball at the American Hotel this Thursday evening. We noticed a number of handsome private equipages driving about after dinner. There is not as much style and display seen at Richfield as at Saratoga. That may be one good reason why it is more popular with a large class of quiet and genteel people.

Several dwellings near Richfield Springs were entered and robbed on Saturday and Monday evenings last by experienced burglars. A hotel keeper had his pants taken from beneath his pillow and robbed of about $60. His revolver was also stolen.

August 13, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Henry C. Hinds, a well-known resident and former businessman of this village, aged about 50 years, was accidentally shot near the “Dugway” on the east side of Otsego Lake between 11 and 12 o’clock Friday morning last. Mr. Hinds, Fred House, and Michael Little were fishing with a seine at the Dugway. Mr. Hinds stepped up the bank a short distance to pick some berries. In the woods above him was a young son of C.J. Rumsey of Ithaca, not yet 12 years old, whose family were encamped nearby. He was out of sight and had in his hands a small rifle, which he discharged at a bird. Mr. Hinds was struck on the right side of the head, the bullet lodging in his brain. He ran toward the lake and fell as he nearly reached it. Hinds was carried on board the Mabel Coburn and attended by Dr. Bassett, but shortly died. Mr. Hinds leaves a wife and child, a boy of ten years. His sudden taking is another protest against allowing children to have firearms for amusement.

August 9, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

The Glimmerglass, Cooperstown’s bright and breezy summer daily, has been sold by the Freeman’s Journal Company, its parent and sponsor for eleven years, to the John Wilcox Publishing Co. of Cooperstown, composed of former associates of the Freeman’s Journal. The Freeman’s Journal Company bids The Glimmerglass goodbye much as the fond parent sends its child away to boarding school, knowing however that it will receive kind treatment and good food, and will prosper as it has with its previous owners. The John Wilcox Co. does an extensive business in mail order novelties and school supplies.

August 13, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

The Honorable Frank J. Loesch, Cooperstown’s distinguished and beloved summer resident, who won national fame as a militant foe of crime in his home city of Chicago, died Monday night, shortly after 7 p.m. in the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital where he had been a patient since July 18. He was in his ninety-third year. A heart ailment caused his death. Mr. Loesch is credited with having coined the phrase “public enemy,” now so frequently used to designate some of the world’s greatest criminals. Mr. Loesch served ten years as President of the Chicago Crime Commission and earned national repute as an effective fighter of crime in that city.

August 2, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Fly Creek by Lidie Mackie – Steve Shauger and Karl Dystra enjoyed a quick fishing trip in the Atlantic Ocean at Brielle, New Jersey where Karl’s brother keeps a Florida-built fiberglass boat with twin diesel engines. They used outriggers and fished the Hudson Canyon. They fished for Yellow Fin Tuna and Mahi Mahi. Steve brought home both.

August 10, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 1, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 1, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Books just received for sale at the Book Store of H. & E. Phinney. “The New York Justice or a Digest of the Law relative to Justices of the Peace;” “Works of the Rev. John Newton,” 6 Vols. – also his letters and Conversational Remarks; “Cooper’s History of N. America;” “Love’s Surveying;” “Domestic Cookery;” “Woodsworth’s Poems;” “Don Quixote” 4 Vols.; “Young’s Night Thoughts,” and “Young’s Misses’ Magazine;” “Tales of Aunt Mary For boys;” “The Lottery Trial of Charles N. Baldwin;” “Stenography, or the Art of Short Hand Writing Perfected;” “Death, A Vision.”

August 2, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democratic Mass Meeting at Oneonta – August 17, 1844. Democrats we invite you to rally for young Hickory Dallas and Victory. The honest laborer understands and will protect his rights. The people are capable of self-government. The approaching political contest is of intense interest to the people of this country. It is to decide for a long time, at least, whether they will adhere to, and endeavor to advance and perpetuate the principles of Jefferson – themselves continuing the sovereigns – or submit to federal misrule, and tamely crouch to a powerful, moneyed monster. It would seem that they could not long hesitate which to choose. Considering therefore, the immense importance of the next Presidential Election, it has been thought advisable to call a Mass Meeting to be held in the Village of Oneonta on the Seventeenth Day of August at 11 o’clock in the forenoon. A Young Hickory Pole about 125 feet high, with a flag to correspond, will be raised on the occasion. We cannot promise you “roast beef and two dollars a day” but we will extend to you the right hand of fellowship.

August 5, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Volume Sixty-two – With this issue the Freeman’s Journal enters upon the 62nd year in the enjoyment of good health and a vigorous constitution.
Enforce the Law – Our advice to temperance men is to be content with the present License Act, instead of putting forth vain efforts to enact a Prohibitory Law for this State, and endeavor to enforce it. Spur up all Sheriffs, deputies, constables, commissioners and justices to do their whole duty, and aid them in its discharge. The law is violated every week in Cooperstown. Liquor is sold to minors, to intoxicated men, and on the Sabbath. A stop must be put to this business. If necessary, the law-abiding people should band together to secure the enforcement of a wholesome police regulation in regard to the sale of liquor. And, we call upon the Commissioner of Excise to set a mark upon every dealer in the county known to be guilty of selling ale or liquor on Sunday, and to refuse him a license next year.

August 6, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The Freeman’s Journal this week completed its eighty-sixth year, having been established in 1808.
The weather was pleasant on Thursday last, and a very large number of people gathered on the ball grounds to witness the game between the Athletics and the Cuban Giants. There was any amount of disappointment. The playing of the home team was not up to its recent record, while the Giants put up better ball than what was expected of them. (Ed. Note: Sol White, second baseman, and Frank Grant, shortstop, for the Cuban Giants in 1894 are now enshrined and honored as members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. They are believed to have been the first future Hall of Fame members to have played baseball in the Village of Cooperstown. Today, the site where baseball was played in 1894 for the most part is the parking lot adjoining River Street and Atwell to the west of the Bassett Hospital Clinic building and extending out across Fair Street).

August 2, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Carey Webster, about 60 years old, a former resident of Otsego County, but now of Gloversville, is dead at the home of John Blumenstock, a farmer at East Springfield, as the result of a shooting accident on the Blumenstock farm about 5:30 p.m. Sunday afternoon, when a bullet from the rifle of Charles Dentz, also of Gloversville, glanced from a tree and struck Webster, inflicting a wound from which he died within an hour. Dentz was exonerated from any blame in the shooting, on the statement of Dr. W.R. Rathbun of East Springfield, who attended the wounded man. Webster and his wife and Dentz and his wife, were spending the day at the Blumenstock home, having motored from Gloversville. In the afternoon they went out in the fields, each with a rifle, bound on shooting woodchucks. When Dentz fired, he did not know Webster was in his immediate vicinity.

August 6, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

Sgt. John K. Winslow, aged 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chester J. Winslow, Jr., of Hartwick, was killed in action Wednesday of last week while serving with the U.S. Marine Corps in Vietnam. Sgt. Winslow, who was the twentieth Otsego County man to lose his life in the Vietnam fighting, was on his second tour of duty in the war zone. He entered the Marines in August 1965, and was awarded the Purple Heart last year for wounds received in the fighting. After recovering he signed up for his second tour in Vietnam last summer. He was due to return home for discharge later this month. He was killed eight miles north of Vandergrift Combat Base in Quang Tri Province by a misguided friendly air strike in a combat operation. Sgt. Winslow was a 1964 graduate of Cooperstown High School.

August 6, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Fly Creek by Lidie Mackie – Walter Dusenberry will be a judge for the Cooperstown Art Association’s Art Show. He has just returned from teaching at the Vermont carving studio in Rutland. Young Finn Dusenberry attended the annual campout for the karate group. The Otsego Lake Boating Association held its first annual boat parade on Otsego Lake. Charley Michaels won the “Shiniest Boat” prize with his 1963 Chris Craft, “Holiday.” Judges were Mayor Woolson and Catherine Black. After a year as a Rotary exchange student in Argentina Elizabeth Tedesco will attend Middlebury College.

August 2, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES July 18, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

July 18, 2019

By TOM HEITZ & SHARON STEWART • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

200 YEARS AGO

Died at Jerusalem, Ontario, on the 8th inst. – Jemima Wilkinson, commonly called the “Universal Friend,” aged 66 years. Her complaint, we learn, was the dropsy. A few moments previous to her death she placed herself in her Chapel, and called in her disciples one by one, and gave each a solemn admonition, then raised her hands, closed her eyes and gave up the ghost. Thus, the second wonder of the western country has made her final exit. We have not as yet learned whether she will have a successor to speak to her people, or whether, after having lost their religious head, will continue united or not. Much curiosity has been excited since her departure. The roads leading to her mansion were for a few days after her death literally filled with crowds of people, who had been, or who were going to see the Friend. Her mansion stands on a barren heath amidst the solitudes of the wilderness, at some distance from this settlement. (Ed. Note: Jemima Wilkinson (November 28, 1758 – July 1, 1819) was a charismatic American Quaker and evangelist. After suffering a severe illness and fever Wilkinson reported having the experience of death and returned from heaven, reincarnated as a prophet known as “The Universal Friend” who was neither male nor female.)

July 19, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

For President: James K. Polk, of Tennessee; For Vice-President George M. Dallas, of Pennsylvania. Otsego is highly complimented by the democratic press generally for her show of strength on July 4, which she is adding to every day, particularly among the young men who desire to do the right thing in politics, having no narrow-minded prejudices to overcome. The watch fires are being lighted up on every hilltop, and the valleys are illuminating so that every man shall see his way clearly when the horn is sounded and her sons march to battle and to victory, as they will do, claiming the State Banner as the reward of their patriotism.

July 22, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Business on the Cooperstown Railroad starts off well and the receipts fully meet the expectation of the Directors. On Saturday, the Company’s first locomotive, the “Ellery Cory,” brought in the afternoon train, its first run over the road. It is a fine machine, and came in decked with flags and wreaths of flowers, and has on the front part an excellent likeness of the worthy citizen for whom it is named. The large crowd of men and women who had congregated on the depot grounds to welcome the E.C.’s arrival gave emphatic endorsement of the compliment bestowed on one who on all hard work has always been a “motive power” in this village, and whose deserved popularity no man envies.

July 23, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

Purely Personal: Miss Gertrude Birdsall, who has been visiting relatives in New York, arrived last night to spend the remainder of the summer with her parents, the Rev. and Mrs. A.W. Cooke at Edgewater.
Jas. Fenimore Cooper and son Linn Fenimore Cooper, returned yesterday from Albany, where they spent a few days on a business trip.
Dr. M. Imogene Bassett was a dinner hostess at her home on Fair Street, Thursday night. Her guests numbered nine and the evening was spent at bridge.
Miss Elizabeth Ellsworth of New Britain, Conn., is a guest of her mother, Mrs. Mary Ellsworth for a short time.
F. Ambrose Clark spent the weekend at his summer home, Iroquois Farm.
Mrs. Flad and daughter, Miss Flad of St. Louis have arrived at Otsego Hall for the remainder of the summer season.

July 10, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

First Lieutenant Alexander O. Jones, Jr., son of Mrs. Alexander Ogden Jones of Cooperstown, 15th AAF P-47 Thunderbolt fighter pilot who was reported missing in action on March 28, 1944, over Italy, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary achievement in aerial flight
according to a dispatch received Monday from the 15th AAF in Italy. The citation states: “Lieutenant Jones led his flight on an escort mission providing cover for heavy bombers attacking a rail center in Italy when the formation was suddenly attacked by 40 enemy fighters. Although outnumbered four to one, the P-47s engaged the enemy, broke up the attacking formations, destroying six fighters and damaging several more. Lieutenant Jones intercepted a number of enemy aircraft and in the ensuing engagement, destroyed one before the fire of two other enemy fighters destroyed his plane.”

July 19, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Dr. M.M. Jastremski of Bowerstown was re-elected president of the Cooperstown Central School Board of Education at its annual reorganization meeting held Tuesday night of last week. Dr. William H. Mook of Cooperstown was re-elected vice-president. Other members of the Board include Webb J. Weaver of Hartwick, Mrs. John H. Schneider of Cooperstown, and Roy K. Swatling of Fly Creek who was re-elected to a five-year term on the board last week. Donald J. Pier of Hartwick was re-appointed District Treasurer.

July 16, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Parents Choice Foundation Award winner Skip West was the star of the show at a mid-day concert on the lawn at Global Traders on Saturday, July 16. West delighted youngsters with a variety of songs each of which gave the audience a chance to participate. West is a music educator and the time he has spent with young children is evident in his ability to connect with youthful audiences. Some of his songs and sing-alongs integrate the children’s names. Skip West also plays trombone, five-string banjo, mountain dulcimer, piano and synthesizers.

July 19, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Elsewhere, Brian Collis of Latham is known as “Mr. Ding-a-Ling. Here, let’s just call him “Mister.” On July 20, the Cooperstown village trustees issued a “hawking, soliciting and peddling application for the Collis Good Humor Ice Cream Truck to ply local streets this summer. But, T. Margaret Oakley, who will driving the truck, was told she couldn’t be ringing the bell, as it would violate the noise ordinance.

July 24, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES July 11, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

July 11, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Suicide – A man by the name of William Burgin, living in Middlefield, was found dead, near the house of George Boid, Esq. on Wednesday morning last. His left arm (being strongly girt with a garter) had three deep wounds cut in it, from which he had undoubtedly bled to death – and the coroner’s inquest gave their verdict accordingly. It appears he had previously applied to Esq. Boid, one of the poor masters, for assistance from the town – which being refused, he threatened to leave his blood on Boid’s door-steps, before another day – which threat he literally executed as blood was found on Wednesday morning, and his body a short distance off, lying across the path. He was 70 years of age, and has left a wife and children.

July 5, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Barber estimates the numbers in attendance at the Democratic Mass Meeting on July 4 at “4,000, men, women, children and every creeping thing.” This is tolerably liberal for one who has no respect for truth in anything relating to political matters – and, we should let it pass without notice, but for the fact that he has further represented that the assemblage was a scene of rowdiness and drunkenness, such as had not been seen in the place for ten years past. A residence here of a little over six years, seems to beget in him a propensity to speak of “days lang syne,” when he was a subject of King Charles Charter in Rhode Island. Never, during our time, which now counts a domicile on this spot of near thirty-six years, have we seen in the village anything like the number of persons here on July 4. And, we are now satisfied, from conversations with some of our most conscientious and respectable citizens who took the pains to scan the whole ground, that 10,000 as stated in our last paper, is within the number present, and if put at 12,500, it would not have been an exaggeration. There were over 1,000 ladies who sought seats in the Grove, only about half of whom could be accommodated. During four hours’ speaking, not a disorderly sound was heard. No stimulating drinks of any kind were tolerated by the Committee. Is this “rowdiness”? Is this drunkenness? Ask the Ladies present, 500 of whom sat for hours witnessing the scene.

July 15, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Railroad Matters – On Wednesday, the construction train reached the corporation limits and the iron rails crossed the line. The recent favorable weather has been taken advantage
of to push forward the work with energy – some of our business men, Directors and others, going down and lending a helping hand. Wednesday evening, the construction train brought to the village the first car of 11.5 tons freight. The locomotive, so appropriately called the “Ellery Cory” is expected here this week. It is expected that passenger trains will commence to run over the road on Monday next – to be in charge of Mr. O.Z. Brown, Conductor and Mr. Wm. B. Smith, Engineer. The cars will leave Cooperstown at 9:20 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. and return about 12:30 and 6:30 p.m. The fare will be 80 cents to the Junction, $2.85 to Binghamton, $3.10 to Albany, $5.10 to New York City.

July 9, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Otsego Chapter, Daughters of The American Revolution, was founded in June, the charter members being Abby Cory Turner, Genevieve Cory Johnston, Emma Cory, Rexis Wood Clark, Grace Scott Bowen, Ella Wood Cady, Jennie Campbell Randolph, Agusta Prescott Welch, Eveleen Tunnicliff Edick, Fannie Grant White, Maude L. Merchant, Clara Matteson Murdock, There are now 17 members of Otsego Chapter. The five members who are not charter members are: Mrs. Emma W. Babbitt, Dr. M. Imogene Bassett, Mrs. Altana R.B. Davidson, Mrs. Helen C. Church and Mrs. Michaels of Fort Plain.

July 12, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown and its place in Indian history are to be thoroughly discussed here in the early autumn when several of the most prominent archaeologists of the state plan to gather here as guests of the Leatherstocking Chapter, New York State Archaeological Association. It has been thought for some time past that an Indian Village of considerable size existed for many hundred years on the banks of the Susquehanna River just north of the pump house. A few years ago, a skeleton, undoubtedly that of an Iroquois
warrior was dug up by David R. Dorn and George N. Smith of this village. Since that time, arrows, spearheads, and other implements of warfare have been found. The conference will endeavor to ascertain just who these people were and to what tribes they belonged.

July 9, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Announcement was made Saturday of completion of plans for another series of five Victory Sings to be held in Cooperstown on the four Sunday afternoons in August and the first Sunday afternoon in September, thus continuing the program of community singing started here seven years ago. These sings have been much appreciated and enjoyed in the past and have attracted thousands of people to Cooperstown from all parts of Central New York and many from greater distances. Dr. Elmer A. Tidmarsh, Director of Music at Union College, Schenectady, is returning to be the leader again this summer.

July 12, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The new library building of the New York State Historical
Association will be formally dedicated in a two-day
ceremony at Cooperstown, July 12 and 13. Designed by the architectural firm, Moore and Hutchins, the handsome stone-faced building just north of Fenimore House, the Association’s headquarters, is equipped to house the more than 90,000 volumes, special collections, a newspaper storage area for some 500,000 papers, and a special audio-visual room for tapes, records, films, and slides.

July 9, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown Art Association is currently exhibiting two outdoor sculpted stone works on the front lawn at 22 Main, loaned by two nationally recognized artists who reside nearby. Fly Creek sculptor Walter Dusenberry’s “Garden Bench” is composed of partially sandblasted and polished Yellow Travertine. Gilbertsville’s Dennis Stahl’s marble and wood piece is titled “Darma Wheel.” Both works are for sale.

July 2, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES July 4, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

July 4, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown – On Wednesday last, Benjamin P. Day, only son of Mr. Israel Day, of this village, aged 5 years, was unfortunately drowned, by falling out of a boat, on the lake. He with two other boys, entered the boat, probably for the purpose of paddling around the shore, but being driven out by the wind, in their exertions to regain the shore, he fell overboard. His body was taken out in about twenty minutes after he sunk. But every effort to resuscitate him proved unavailing. His remains were interred on Thursday.

July 5, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Otsego in Her Strength – Ten Thousand Warriors in the Field – The Otsegonians to Their Fellow Democrats Greeting. The Fourth of July, 1844, will ever be cherished by the Democrats of Otsego as the proud day in their Calendar. There never was such a gathering, Whig or Democratic within her borders. The number in attendance from nearly every town in the county, is variously estimated. It is pretty well ascertained that there were at least 2,000 vehicles of different descriptions, some carrying as many as 30, and others 24, 18, 12 &c. and none less than two, within the village limits by 12 o’clock. We set down the number at 10,000 at a moderate calculation. There was a single gun at daybreak, and a national salute at sunrise, with the ringing of bells. From an early hour in the morning, the democrats began to pour into the village from all quarters, and by 12 noon the principal streets were literally alive with a moving mass. A nine-pounder on an eminence announced the approach of the several delegations from the towns, as they came in sight – and there was an escort in readiness to go out and accompany them to the place of general gathering – Lewis’s Eagle Tavern, where they were cheered as they came up. Among the interesting incidents of the day was the presentation of a beautiful banner, the handy work of some democratic young ladies of the village to Engine Company No. 2. There was a presentation address by Miss Wilson and a reply on behalf of the Company by Mr. Chas. A. Bowne.

July 8, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Our Old People – There are living upon this corporation 54 persons, 27 men and 27 women who are 70 years of age, or upwards, possibly a few more, whose names we have not on the list before us. The venerable Mrs. Bowers celebrated her 91st birthday in April. There are three other ladies who are 80 or more; one gentleman of 82, another 85, another 89. The average age of these 54 persons is full 74 years. The present population of the Village of Cooperstown is about 1,700.

July 2, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

(Edited excerpts) Within the last decade public interest in the North American Indians has undergone a revival induced in part by the assiduous application of ethnologists and archaeologists to Indian subjects and who direct their attentions to the investigation and study of this probably most romantic and poetic people the world has ever known. The day is well- nigh dead for the purity of ceremonial rites and folklore amongst their many hundred nations. Civilization and intermarriage are adulterating those exclusive tribal ordinances that for many centuries have been the stronghold of a most conservative race. With the exception of Finland, the country is unknown that possesses such wealth of folklore as America. There are mines of unchronicled legends and superstitions, each colored by tribal distinctions, that scholars will never unearth, and that will perish with the people whose blood grows annually thinner and paler as their prairies receive the “white man’s footprint” as their rivers ripple to the dip of his oars, as their forests fall at the hurling of his axe, and who will themselves be but a tradition and a memory in the lapse of a century or so.

July 5, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

The seven-passenger Packard touring car belonging to L.H. Spencer of Otsego Hall was somewhat damaged in a collision Tuesday afternoon at the corner of Lake and Chestnut streets with a Pierce-Arrow car driven according to witnesses, by Mrs. George Hyde-Clark of Hyde Hall, when the latter car turned on the wrong side into Lake Street while Mr. Spencer was about to turn on the right side in coming into Chestnut Street. Eye witnesses declared that the woman driver of the northbound car did not blow her horn at the corner, and instead of going to the right of the iron traffic cop, cut into the left, meeting the Spencer car almost head-on. The Spencer car was thrown over to the side of the street, but remained upright. The Pierce-Arrow, it was declared, did not stop after the accident, but put on increased speed after turning into Lake Street. Persons who saw the accident testify to the identity of the driver. Shortly after the accident Constable Charles T. Cooke was preparing a warrant for the arrest of the driver of the Pierce-Arrow car.

July 2, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Miss Susan P. Clarke, a pilot in the Army Ferry Command and daughter of George Hyde Clarke and Mrs. S. Beach Cooke, was killed Tuesday morning in an airplane crash at Columbia, South Carolina. She was 25 years old. Miss Clarke was graduated from Cooperstown High School and attended schools in New York and Italy. She became a licensed pilot three years ago and joined the Ferry Command last year.

July 5, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The sports editor of the North Penn Reporter rode the railroad coach from Lansdale, Pennsylvania to St. Louis an April night in 1943. The next afternoon he was up to his ears in galleys and batting averages at The Sporting News in St. Louis. That was animated Clifford Kachline – always with his nose buried in baseball facts and losing no time about it. He is the new Historian of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, it was announced today by Hall President Paul S. Kerr. The 47-year-old editor, writer and statistician succeeds Lee Allen who died in May.

July 2, 1969

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