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News of Otsego County

bound volumes

Bound Volumes: September 16, 2021

Bound Volumes: September 16, 2021

185 YEARS AGO
Excerpts from a general address to the Farmers, Mechanics and Workingmen of Otsego County: “The time has arrived when it has become necessary for us to come forth as independent freemen, in defense of the rights and privileges for which our fathers fought and bled. Our political institutions which have resulted from the wisdom of those revered statesmen and patriots, and to establish which they nobly periled their lives and their fortunes, are based upon the only true principles of Republican government – the equal rights of every citizen. These rights, we hold, are basely violated by the enactment of unequal, unjust, and unconstitutional laws, and by the encroachments of aristocratical monopolies. These systems of nobility, possessing exclusive privileges, which are spread over every part of our country, will, if not checked, destroy our republican institutions and fasten upon us the change of servitude.”
September 19, 1836

Bound Volumes: September 10, 2021

Bound Volumes
September 10, 2021

210 YEARS AGO
Public Notice – The subscribers, being legally
authorized to use, and to vend to others to be used the impenetrable stucco, invented by Charles Morneveck, for covering the roofs of houses. Notice is hereby given to any person, or persons desirous of making a trial for
themselves, or of purchasing the right to use, or vend the same in any place not previously disposed of, may be accommodated by calling upon the subscribers in Hartwick. Moses Barns, Luke D. Hinman, Luther Bissell.
September 7, 1811

Bound Volumes September 2, 2021

Bound Volumes

200 YEARS AGO
Taken Up – By the subscriber, on the 26th, near Lippitt’s Mills in Hartwick, a chestnut-colored horse, about ten or 11 years old, with white hind feet and a few white hairs in his forehead, and a white spot on the left side of his lower jaw — shod all round. The owner is requested to prove property, pay charges and take him away. Seth Hacket, Hartwick, August 28.
August 31, 1811

Bound Volumes 8-26-2021

Bound Volumes 8-26-2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART with resources courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO
The Great Western Canal – To save expense in the execution of this great national work, Mr. Fulton has invented a machine for digging or removing earth by means of horses, or a steam engine. A steam engine of eight horses’ power, and rendered portable, will do the work of 150 men. The wages of 150 men may be estimated at 120 dollars a day – four men can attend the steam engine 12 hours whose wages will be $6. Two cords of wood at a cost of $2 bring the total to $8. This gives an economy of $112 a day, or for 300 days which the machine would work in a year, the saving in expense would be $32,000 – and five of these machines which would cost about $30,000, would economize about $168,000 a year.
August 24, 1811

Bound volumes: August 19, 2021

Bound volumes

210 YEARS AGO
Regarding the affair with the British Ship Little Belt – We are sorry to hear, upon authority which we cannot doubt, that the article purporting to be Captain Bingham’s official letter to Admiral Sawyer, giving an account of the affair between the President frigate and the Little Belt, is a shameful forgery, fabricated by some young men at New York, in a fit of wantonness. It would be difficult to speak in terms of appropriate reprobation of a transaction so unwarrantable. It has already been productive of no little mischief by irritating the feelings of the public, and may yet be followed by consequences still more serious.
August 17, 1811

Bound Volumes: August 5, 2021

Bound Volumes

August 5, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Wisdom for the Merchant – Are you a merchant? Enter on your day book everything you let go on credit at the moment you dispose of it; never put it off till another time. The memory is treacherous and you may forget the number or price. Post your books every Saturday. Look frequently at your accounts. He who looks at his books often, understands his accounts and turns to them with pleasure; while the man who posts his books but once a year, and turns to them but seldom, always does it with reluctance; he hates to settle an account, and had rather lose a few cents than draw of a bill.

August 3, 1811

Bound Volumes: July 29, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 29, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

With what contempt does the freeman of America glance at the silly attempt of such things as emperors and kings to induce them to join their sanguinary play, which sends thousands in an hour to their long home; while the Americans are infinitely better employed in cultivating their fertile fields and extending their settlements into a vast wilderness, raising flocks and herds of cattle and sheep, and all kinds of grain – making their own ploughs, wheelbarrows and carts, and clothing themselves richly from their own wool, cotton and flax, for the surplus of which the emperors and kings and things in Europe are quarreling for the pre-emption.

July 27, 1811

Bound Volumes: July 22, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 22, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

A Comet! Another of those singular and extraordinary bodies has made its appearance within view of our globe. It was discovered a few evenings since, but its apparent smallness and the haziness of the atmosphere, prevented its being again seen for several evenings. Its present place at dark is a little south of west, and about 25 degrees above the horizon. It has changed its place considerably since it was first observed, and is now apparent five degrees higher above the horizon. From this it is evident that it has passed its perihelia, and it must be receding from the sun, and the the planets. (Ed. Note: The writer witnessed this comet in May in Chillicothe, Ohio)

July 13, 1811

BOUND VOLUMES: July 15, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 15, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

185 YEARS AGO

Under an apparent state of inaction as a party in this county, certain of the Whig corps are making preparations for a vigorous onset at the Fall campaign, by a gratuitous and other distribution of the Evening Journal, one of the most violent of the opposition papers published in the state. Having no confidence either in the ability or force of their local agent, a foreign power is sought to effect revolution in public sentiment, and the county is to be flooded with the vituperations and falsehoods of Thurlow Weed, a hireling, whose notoriety as connected with the Morgan excitement, makes him a fit instrument for political mountebanks and knaves to work with. We refer to this movement of the enemy, not because we fear the corrupting influence of Weed’s labors, but simply to apprise our democratic friends that their opponents are not so inert as they would feign induce the public to believe.

July 18, 1836

Bound Volumes: July 8, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 8, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Among items of mail remaining at the Post-Office in the Village of Otsego (Cooperstown) are letters addressed to: Samuel Anderson, Nehemiah Burch, Benjamin Bissell, Isaac Childs, Cornelius L. Cary, William Dean, Sumner Ely, Revilo Ford, Micah French, William Griffin, John Jackson, James Johnston, Jonathan Kingsley, William Lindsley, Darius Moon, Patty Miller, Chauncey Newell, Freedom Potter, Sally Potter, James L. Palmer, John Robinson, Eliphaz Spencer, Stephen Skiff, Isaac Stone, Sally Thatcher, Nathaniel Todd, William Van Brunt, Cornelius W. Van Denburgh, Levi Warner, Sylvanus West and Patty Ward. (Ed. Note: Recipients of mail were liable for postage prior to delivery)

July 6, 1811

Bound Volumes: July 1, 2021

Bound Volumes

July 1, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Celebration of Independence at Hartwick – An assemblage of 1,200 republicans, at 10 a.m. took place, at the house of Philo West, in the Town of Hartwick, and a procession formed by Capt. Calvin Comstock, officer of the day, which marched to the meeting house, escorted by Captain Baker’s and Captain Bowen’s companies of militia in the following order: Officer of the Day, Clergy, Orator, Civil Authority, Militia Officers. The Declaration of Independence was first read, and a sermon appropriate to the occasion was delivered by elder Bostwick, and an oration by Dr. Comstock. The procession then returned in the same order to Mr. West’s, where they set down to an excellent dinner prepared for the occasion. After dinner the young people performed a number of dialogues, &c. to the great satisfaction of all present, after which they retired to their respective homes. Not a jarring sound was heard during the day, nor was anyone known to be intoxicated.

July 6, 1811

Bound Volumes: June 24, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 24, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

We are informed that Walter Rodgers, the boy wounded on board the frigate, and who behaved with so much firmness, has been appointed a midshipman in the Navy of the United States.
To Farmers—The clear profit in the produce of a farm is nearly all that can give it a certain value, and all that can ever make a farmer wealthy. If he derives no more from the produce of his farm than the mere worth of the labor bestowed on it, his situation is but little better than that of the daily laborer who works for his substance. It is well known that farms in this state
do not average more than a third of the clear profit which is in general derived from the same number of acres in Great Britain; and it is equally certain that farms here,
are upon an average, of better soil than those of that country.

June 22, 1811

Bound Volumes: June 17, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 17, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Gallantry of an American Youth – In the late conflict between the United States frigate President and the British ship of war Little Belt, a gunner’s boy on board the frigate who had his arm broken by a shot, while under the hands of the surgeon in the cockpit, requested that he would make haste in dressing his wound, that he might get on deck again. On the surgeon’s asking what he would do on deck, wounded as he was, the little American replied, “If I can’t do more, I can at least be shot at!” It is known that the heroism of this lad has attracted the earnest attention of the secretary of the navy.

June 15, 1811

Bound Volumes: June 10, 2021

Bound Volumes

June 10, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Just received and for sale at the Book Store of H. & E. Phinney, The Christian Soldier: or Heaven Taken by Storm – Shewing the holy violence a Christian is put to in pursuit after glory. By Thomas Watson, Minister of the Gospel.

June 8, 1811

BOUND VOLUMES: June 3, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

June 3, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

210 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Jacob Duessler informs his old customers and the public in general, that he has removed from his old stand in front of the County Clerk’s Office, to the shop formerly occupied by Orlo Allen, Tailor, directly opposite Messrs. R.I. & I. Cooper’s store where he continues to carry on his business in the newest fashions, and upon short notice. He flatters himself, that by his experience in business, and strict attention to orders, he shall merit the favor of the public’s patronage. N.B. Having received the newest fashions from Albany, he will be enabled to accommodate his customers. Uniform Coats made in the first style. Almost all kinds of grain will be taken in payment for work done at his shop.

June 1, 1811

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