News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
DAILY FEATURES >
 CROSSWORD  
 HOROSCOPES  
 CARTOONS  
 DEAR ABBY  
 CLASSIFIEDS  
 EMPLOYMENT  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 REAL ESTATE  
 AUTOMOTIVE  
 REMEMBRANCE  
 GOODS & SERVICES

bound volumes

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 15, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 15, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Agricultural Notice – A meeting of the Agricultural Society of the County of Otsego, will be held at the house of Joseph Munn in Cooperstown, on Thursday, the 26th day of August, inst., for the purpose of organizing the Society, agreeably to the Legislature of this state. Robert Campbell, Rec. Sec. Cooperstown, August 12, 1819.

Welch Indians – It seems that a Society in the State of New York has sent out persons to ascend the Missouri in search of Welch Indians. A Mr. Stoddart collected some years ago and embodied in his sketches of Louisiana, many loose reports and disjointed rumors on this subject. He seemed to give credit to the belief of their existence. Since his time, however, the country supposed to be the place of their residence, and in fact every part of the country in which they could reside, has been explored. There is no exception from the confines of Mexico to the Arctic Circle. No such people as “Welch Indians” have been found.

August 16, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Competition is the life of business. This saying is illustrated in the fact, that the post-coaches between this place and Fort Plain and Canajoharie now make their trips in about three hours. In several instances, Mr. Willoughby has run through in two and one-half hours, affording us the Albany and New York mails by 3 o’clock p.m. Thanks for his diligence.

August 9, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Advertisement: “Cooper House, Cooperstown, New York” The Spacious and Elegant building, formerly known as the “Cooperstown Seminary,” having been altered, improved and adapted to hotel purposes during the past three months, at the expense of over $30,000, was opened for the reception of guests on June 25. The building will be found complete with all the modern improvements, and the situation and attractions of Cooperstown are second to no summer resort in the country. Within about four hours from Albany by railroad and thirteen miles distant from Richfield Springs, and 20 miles from Sharon, amid hill, lake and valley scenery unsurpassed in beauty, and surrounded by the historic and classic associations made famous by the pen of Cooper, it is believed that few points in the country afford equal inducements to the tourist, or to those seeking a rural home during the summer.

August 13, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The “Cuban Giants” always draw well, when playing against the Cooperstown Athletics. Monday last was no exception to the rule. There was a large audience to witness the game. With one man for two days previous on the sick list, and a substitute playing for another, it did not look promising for the home team – but the manner in which they opened the game gave their friends confidence. On the second inning it was a tie. Then the Athletics surged six ahead, after which the Giants closed up the gap steadily, leaving the Athletics the victors at the end by two runs, 16 to 14. It was an exciting game – some fine playing – though marked with a number of errors on both sides. (Ed. Note: Baseball in the early 1890s was played without the aid of gloves for fielding and errors were more common as a result)

August 16, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Leonard and Delmar Hutchings, the former 13 years old, and the latter 15 years old, were sentenced yesterday to a term in the Rochester Industrial School by Justice of the Peace Vanderwerker after they had been accused and admitted breaking into the home of Mrs. Stone Benedict on Main and River streets, and robbing the house of various petty articles. The conviction is part of the program of District Attorney Adrian A. Pierson to break up a number of so-called “boy gangs” about the village who have been committing various depredations from time to time.

August 20, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Miss Helen E. Fry describes her work serving U.S. soldiers in the front-line combat area in Italy with the Red Cross. “We work in two teams, driving our own three-quarter ton trucks. We start out in the morning loaded down with from 2,000 to 4,000 donuts, coffee, sugar, canned milk, Victrola, accordion, guitar, cards, writing paper, etc. A schedule is made out a day in advance, so that at each outfit we go to the fellows are waiting for us with their canteen cups. We serve the coffee and donuts first, and then sit around and talk with the fellows while they eat, play the Victrola, dance, or get someone to play one of the instruments we have along. We make anywhere from four to seven or eight stops a day like this.”

August 16, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The Coleman Family reunion was held on Saturday, August 9, at the Forest of the Dozen Dads in Middlefield. Those attending included Mr. and Mrs. Stuart P. Taugher and family of Cooperstown, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reich and family of Bardonia, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Garbera of Richfield Springs, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Coleman, Sr. and family of Odenton, Maryland, Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Schultz III and family, Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Coleman, Sr. and Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Coleman, Jr. and family, all of Cooperstown. Four generations were in attendance including Mrs. Charles A. Coleman, Sr., her daughter, Mrs. Stuart P. Taugher, her granddaughter Mrs. Jackson Schultz III, and great-granddaughter, Miss Amy Schultz.

August 13, 1969

10 YEARS AGO

Vittoria “Vicci” Demarest, 90, Cooperstown, an early and ardent supporter of the Glimmerglass Opera, died Friday after a brief illness. Ms. Demarest was a graduate of the Knox School in Cooperstown. She attended Skidmore College for two years and graduated from the Traphagen School of Design in New York City. Ms. Demarest was the daughter of the well-known sculptor, Victor Salvatore, and the former Ellen Ryerson, whose father, Arthur Ryerson, died in the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. After a marriage to the late William Demarest, she lived in Guilford, Connecticut for many years. In 1973 she returned to Cooperstown and served on the board of the Glimmerglass Opera and other local organizations.

August 14, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 8, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 8, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

The Progress of the Russian Empire in America – Looking to the east for everything, the people of the United States have contemplated with astonishment the progress of the Russian Empire in Europe and Asia. They have not thought of looking to the west to see this giant power already mounting upon their own backs. Except Mr. Walsh, we do not know an American who has even spoken of the Russian establishments on our continent. He has mentioned them in his “Sketch of the military and political power of Russia,” where he says: “Their establishments extend from Kamschatka to the N.W. coast of America – that they have a fort mounting 100 pieces of artillery at Norfolk Sound, Lat. North 59 degrees; that since 1813 they have descended the coast, passed the mouth of the Columbia 500 miles, and established themselves at Bogada in 38 degrees, 30 minutes, and only 30 miles from the Spanish settlements in California, where they are not only trading with great advantage, but are profiting by a fine climate and fruitful soil, to feed their more northern possessions.”

August 9, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

The Re-Annexation of Texas and its Influence on the Duration of Slavery. One of the arguments in favor of re-annexing Texas seems to have been overlooked in recent discussions. Even Mr. Calhoun seems to suppose that the “peculiar institutions” of the South as it is the fashion to call slavery, are to be rendered more durable by the annexation; and the Abolitionists, as well as some of the more rational opponents of these institutions, object to the annexation on the same ground. Both are wrong, absolutely wrong, and a little attention to facts will prove the error. So far from perpetuating slavery in the United States, the annexation of Texas, or the slave-holding portion of it at least, gives the only well-grounded hope for its ultimate extinction. This may appear to be a paradox. But, it is sober truth, and fully susceptible of demonstration. (Ed. Note: The writer argues that an independent Texas would become a bastion of slavery even more so if slavery was abolished in the United States).

August 12, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Richfield Springs – It is our regular summer program to drive up with a friend or two to “The Springs” for a day at the American during the height of “the season” – and Tuesday last was one of the most enjoyable days of the whole year – not uncomfortably warm along either of the two Lakes, not too cool on the mountain tops. The hotels and boarding houses in the village are filled with summer boarders most of whom come to stay for weeks or months. There were never as many strangers domiciled in Richfield Springs as now. There is to be a Grand Ball at the American Hotel this Thursday evening. We noticed a number of handsome private equipages driving about after dinner. There is not as much style and display seen at Richfield as at Saratoga. That may be one good reason why it is more popular with a large class of quiet and genteel people.

Several dwellings near Richfield Springs were entered and robbed on Saturday and Monday evenings last by experienced burglars. A hotel keeper had his pants taken from beneath his pillow and robbed of about $60. His revolver was also stolen.

August 13, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Henry C. Hinds, a well-known resident and former businessman of this village, aged about 50 years, was accidentally shot near the “Dugway” on the east side of Otsego Lake between 11 and 12 o’clock Friday morning last. Mr. Hinds, Fred House, and Michael Little were fishing with a seine at the Dugway. Mr. Hinds stepped up the bank a short distance to pick some berries. In the woods above him was a young son of C.J. Rumsey of Ithaca, not yet 12 years old, whose family were encamped nearby. He was out of sight and had in his hands a small rifle, which he discharged at a bird. Mr. Hinds was struck on the right side of the head, the bullet lodging in his brain. He ran toward the lake and fell as he nearly reached it. Hinds was carried on board the Mabel Coburn and attended by Dr. Bassett, but shortly died. Mr. Hinds leaves a wife and child, a boy of ten years. His sudden taking is another protest against allowing children to have firearms for amusement.

August 9, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

The Glimmerglass, Cooperstown’s bright and breezy summer daily, has been sold by the Freeman’s Journal Company, its parent and sponsor for eleven years, to the John Wilcox Publishing Co. of Cooperstown, composed of former associates of the Freeman’s Journal. The Freeman’s Journal Company bids The Glimmerglass goodbye much as the fond parent sends its child away to boarding school, knowing however that it will receive kind treatment and good food, and will prosper as it has with its previous owners. The John Wilcox Co. does an extensive business in mail order novelties and school supplies.

August 13, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

The Honorable Frank J. Loesch, Cooperstown’s distinguished and beloved summer resident, who won national fame as a militant foe of crime in his home city of Chicago, died Monday night, shortly after 7 p.m. in the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital where he had been a patient since July 18. He was in his ninety-third year. A heart ailment caused his death. Mr. Loesch is credited with having coined the phrase “public enemy,” now so frequently used to designate some of the world’s greatest criminals. Mr. Loesch served ten years as President of the Chicago Crime Commission and earned national repute as an effective fighter of crime in that city.

August 2, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Fly Creek by Lidie Mackie – Steve Shauger and Karl Dystra enjoyed a quick fishing trip in the Atlantic Ocean at Brielle, New Jersey where Karl’s brother keeps a Florida-built fiberglass boat with twin diesel engines. They used outriggers and fished the Hudson Canyon. They fished for Yellow Fin Tuna and Mahi Mahi. Steve brought home both.

August 10, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Aug. 1, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug. 1, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Books just received for sale at the Book Store of H. & E. Phinney. “The New York Justice or a Digest of the Law relative to Justices of the Peace;” “Works of the Rev. John Newton,” 6 Vols. – also his letters and Conversational Remarks; “Cooper’s History of N. America;” “Love’s Surveying;” “Domestic Cookery;” “Woodsworth’s Poems;” “Don Quixote” 4 Vols.; “Young’s Night Thoughts,” and “Young’s Misses’ Magazine;” “Tales of Aunt Mary For boys;” “The Lottery Trial of Charles N. Baldwin;” “Stenography, or the Art of Short Hand Writing Perfected;” “Death, A Vision.”

August 2, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democratic Mass Meeting at Oneonta – August 17, 1844. Democrats we invite you to rally for young Hickory Dallas and Victory. The honest laborer understands and will protect his rights. The people are capable of self-government. The approaching political contest is of intense interest to the people of this country. It is to decide for a long time, at least, whether they will adhere to, and endeavor to advance and perpetuate the principles of Jefferson – themselves continuing the sovereigns – or submit to federal misrule, and tamely crouch to a powerful, moneyed monster. It would seem that they could not long hesitate which to choose. Considering therefore, the immense importance of the next Presidential Election, it has been thought advisable to call a Mass Meeting to be held in the Village of Oneonta on the Seventeenth Day of August at 11 o’clock in the forenoon. A Young Hickory Pole about 125 feet high, with a flag to correspond, will be raised on the occasion. We cannot promise you “roast beef and two dollars a day” but we will extend to you the right hand of fellowship.

August 5, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Volume Sixty-two – With this issue the Freeman’s Journal enters upon the 62nd year in the enjoyment of good health and a vigorous constitution.
Enforce the Law – Our advice to temperance men is to be content with the present License Act, instead of putting forth vain efforts to enact a Prohibitory Law for this State, and endeavor to enforce it. Spur up all Sheriffs, deputies, constables, commissioners and justices to do their whole duty, and aid them in its discharge. The law is violated every week in Cooperstown. Liquor is sold to minors, to intoxicated men, and on the Sabbath. A stop must be put to this business. If necessary, the law-abiding people should band together to secure the enforcement of a wholesome police regulation in regard to the sale of liquor. And, we call upon the Commissioner of Excise to set a mark upon every dealer in the county known to be guilty of selling ale or liquor on Sunday, and to refuse him a license next year.

August 6, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The Freeman’s Journal this week completed its eighty-sixth year, having been established in 1808.
The weather was pleasant on Thursday last, and a very large number of people gathered on the ball grounds to witness the game between the Athletics and the Cuban Giants. There was any amount of disappointment. The playing of the home team was not up to its recent record, while the Giants put up better ball than what was expected of them. (Ed. Note: Sol White, second baseman, and Frank Grant, shortstop, for the Cuban Giants in 1894 are now enshrined and honored as members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. They are believed to have been the first future Hall of Fame members to have played baseball in the Village of Cooperstown. Today, the site where baseball was played in 1894 for the most part is the parking lot adjoining River Street and Atwell to the west of the Bassett Hospital Clinic building and extending out across Fair Street).

August 2, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Carey Webster, about 60 years old, a former resident of Otsego County, but now of Gloversville, is dead at the home of John Blumenstock, a farmer at East Springfield, as the result of a shooting accident on the Blumenstock farm about 5:30 p.m. Sunday afternoon, when a bullet from the rifle of Charles Dentz, also of Gloversville, glanced from a tree and struck Webster, inflicting a wound from which he died within an hour. Dentz was exonerated from any blame in the shooting, on the statement of Dr. W.R. Rathbun of East Springfield, who attended the wounded man. Webster and his wife and Dentz and his wife, were spending the day at the Blumenstock home, having motored from Gloversville. In the afternoon they went out in the fields, each with a rifle, bound on shooting woodchucks. When Dentz fired, he did not know Webster was in his immediate vicinity.

August 6, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

Sgt. John K. Winslow, aged 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chester J. Winslow, Jr., of Hartwick, was killed in action Wednesday of last week while serving with the U.S. Marine Corps in Vietnam. Sgt. Winslow, who was the twentieth Otsego County man to lose his life in the Vietnam fighting, was on his second tour of duty in the war zone. He entered the Marines in August 1965, and was awarded the Purple Heart last year for wounds received in the fighting. After recovering he signed up for his second tour in Vietnam last summer. He was due to return home for discharge later this month. He was killed eight miles north of Vandergrift Combat Base in Quang Tri Province by a misguided friendly air strike in a combat operation. Sgt. Winslow was a 1964 graduate of Cooperstown High School.

August 6, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Fly Creek by Lidie Mackie – Walter Dusenberry will be a judge for the Cooperstown Art Association’s Art Show. He has just returned from teaching at the Vermont carving studio in Rutland. Young Finn Dusenberry attended the annual campout for the karate group. The Otsego Lake Boating Association held its first annual boat parade on Otsego Lake. Charley Michaels won the “Shiniest Boat” prize with his 1963 Chris Craft, “Holiday.” Judges were Mayor Woolson and Catherine Black. After a year as a Rotary exchange student in Argentina Elizabeth Tedesco will attend Middlebury College.

August 2, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES July 18, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

July 18, 2019

By TOM HEITZ & SHARON STEWART • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

200 YEARS AGO

Died at Jerusalem, Ontario, on the 8th inst. – Jemima Wilkinson, commonly called the “Universal Friend,” aged 66 years. Her complaint, we learn, was the dropsy. A few moments previous to her death she placed herself in her Chapel, and called in her disciples one by one, and gave each a solemn admonition, then raised her hands, closed her eyes and gave up the ghost. Thus, the second wonder of the western country has made her final exit. We have not as yet learned whether she will have a successor to speak to her people, or whether, after having lost their religious head, will continue united or not. Much curiosity has been excited since her departure. The roads leading to her mansion were for a few days after her death literally filled with crowds of people, who had been, or who were going to see the Friend. Her mansion stands on a barren heath amidst the solitudes of the wilderness, at some distance from this settlement. (Ed. Note: Jemima Wilkinson (November 28, 1758 – July 1, 1819) was a charismatic American Quaker and evangelist. After suffering a severe illness and fever Wilkinson reported having the experience of death and returned from heaven, reincarnated as a prophet known as “The Universal Friend” who was neither male nor female.)

July 19, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

For President: James K. Polk, of Tennessee; For Vice-President George M. Dallas, of Pennsylvania. Otsego is highly complimented by the democratic press generally for her show of strength on July 4, which she is adding to every day, particularly among the young men who desire to do the right thing in politics, having no narrow-minded prejudices to overcome. The watch fires are being lighted up on every hilltop, and the valleys are illuminating so that every man shall see his way clearly when the horn is sounded and her sons march to battle and to victory, as they will do, claiming the State Banner as the reward of their patriotism.

July 22, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Business on the Cooperstown Railroad starts off well and the receipts fully meet the expectation of the Directors. On Saturday, the Company’s first locomotive, the “Ellery Cory,” brought in the afternoon train, its first run over the road. It is a fine machine, and came in decked with flags and wreaths of flowers, and has on the front part an excellent likeness of the worthy citizen for whom it is named. The large crowd of men and women who had congregated on the depot grounds to welcome the E.C.’s arrival gave emphatic endorsement of the compliment bestowed on one who on all hard work has always been a “motive power” in this village, and whose deserved popularity no man envies.

July 23, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

Purely Personal: Miss Gertrude Birdsall, who has been visiting relatives in New York, arrived last night to spend the remainder of the summer with her parents, the Rev. and Mrs. A.W. Cooke at Edgewater.
Jas. Fenimore Cooper and son Linn Fenimore Cooper, returned yesterday from Albany, where they spent a few days on a business trip.
Dr. M. Imogene Bassett was a dinner hostess at her home on Fair Street, Thursday night. Her guests numbered nine and the evening was spent at bridge.
Miss Elizabeth Ellsworth of New Britain, Conn., is a guest of her mother, Mrs. Mary Ellsworth for a short time.
F. Ambrose Clark spent the weekend at his summer home, Iroquois Farm.
Mrs. Flad and daughter, Miss Flad of St. Louis have arrived at Otsego Hall for the remainder of the summer season.

July 10, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

First Lieutenant Alexander O. Jones, Jr., son of Mrs. Alexander Ogden Jones of Cooperstown, 15th AAF P-47 Thunderbolt fighter pilot who was reported missing in action on March 28, 1944, over Italy, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary achievement in aerial flight
according to a dispatch received Monday from the 15th AAF in Italy. The citation states: “Lieutenant Jones led his flight on an escort mission providing cover for heavy bombers attacking a rail center in Italy when the formation was suddenly attacked by 40 enemy fighters. Although outnumbered four to one, the P-47s engaged the enemy, broke up the attacking formations, destroying six fighters and damaging several more. Lieutenant Jones intercepted a number of enemy aircraft and in the ensuing engagement, destroyed one before the fire of two other enemy fighters destroyed his plane.”

July 19, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Dr. M.M. Jastremski of Bowerstown was re-elected president of the Cooperstown Central School Board of Education at its annual reorganization meeting held Tuesday night of last week. Dr. William H. Mook of Cooperstown was re-elected vice-president. Other members of the Board include Webb J. Weaver of Hartwick, Mrs. John H. Schneider of Cooperstown, and Roy K. Swatling of Fly Creek who was re-elected to a five-year term on the board last week. Donald J. Pier of Hartwick was re-appointed District Treasurer.

July 16, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Parents Choice Foundation Award winner Skip West was the star of the show at a mid-day concert on the lawn at Global Traders on Saturday, July 16. West delighted youngsters with a variety of songs each of which gave the audience a chance to participate. West is a music educator and the time he has spent with young children is evident in his ability to connect with youthful audiences. Some of his songs and sing-alongs integrate the children’s names. Skip West also plays trombone, five-string banjo, mountain dulcimer, piano and synthesizers.

July 19, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Elsewhere, Brian Collis of Latham is known as “Mr. Ding-a-Ling. Here, let’s just call him “Mister.” On July 20, the Cooperstown village trustees issued a “hawking, soliciting and peddling application for the Collis Good Humor Ice Cream Truck to ply local streets this summer. But, T. Margaret Oakley, who will driving the truck, was told she couldn’t be ringing the bell, as it would violate the noise ordinance.

July 24, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES July 11, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

July 11, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Suicide – A man by the name of William Burgin, living in Middlefield, was found dead, near the house of George Boid, Esq. on Wednesday morning last. His left arm (being strongly girt with a garter) had three deep wounds cut in it, from which he had undoubtedly bled to death – and the coroner’s inquest gave their verdict accordingly. It appears he had previously applied to Esq. Boid, one of the poor masters, for assistance from the town – which being refused, he threatened to leave his blood on Boid’s door-steps, before another day – which threat he literally executed as blood was found on Wednesday morning, and his body a short distance off, lying across the path. He was 70 years of age, and has left a wife and children.

July 5, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Barber estimates the numbers in attendance at the Democratic Mass Meeting on July 4 at “4,000, men, women, children and every creeping thing.” This is tolerably liberal for one who has no respect for truth in anything relating to political matters – and, we should let it pass without notice, but for the fact that he has further represented that the assemblage was a scene of rowdiness and drunkenness, such as had not been seen in the place for ten years past. A residence here of a little over six years, seems to beget in him a propensity to speak of “days lang syne,” when he was a subject of King Charles Charter in Rhode Island. Never, during our time, which now counts a domicile on this spot of near thirty-six years, have we seen in the village anything like the number of persons here on July 4. And, we are now satisfied, from conversations with some of our most conscientious and respectable citizens who took the pains to scan the whole ground, that 10,000 as stated in our last paper, is within the number present, and if put at 12,500, it would not have been an exaggeration. There were over 1,000 ladies who sought seats in the Grove, only about half of whom could be accommodated. During four hours’ speaking, not a disorderly sound was heard. No stimulating drinks of any kind were tolerated by the Committee. Is this “rowdiness”? Is this drunkenness? Ask the Ladies present, 500 of whom sat for hours witnessing the scene.

July 15, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Railroad Matters – On Wednesday, the construction train reached the corporation limits and the iron rails crossed the line. The recent favorable weather has been taken advantage
of to push forward the work with energy – some of our business men, Directors and others, going down and lending a helping hand. Wednesday evening, the construction train brought to the village the first car of 11.5 tons freight. The locomotive, so appropriately called the “Ellery Cory” is expected here this week. It is expected that passenger trains will commence to run over the road on Monday next – to be in charge of Mr. O.Z. Brown, Conductor and Mr. Wm. B. Smith, Engineer. The cars will leave Cooperstown at 9:20 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. and return about 12:30 and 6:30 p.m. The fare will be 80 cents to the Junction, $2.85 to Binghamton, $3.10 to Albany, $5.10 to New York City.

July 9, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Otsego Chapter, Daughters of The American Revolution, was founded in June, the charter members being Abby Cory Turner, Genevieve Cory Johnston, Emma Cory, Rexis Wood Clark, Grace Scott Bowen, Ella Wood Cady, Jennie Campbell Randolph, Agusta Prescott Welch, Eveleen Tunnicliff Edick, Fannie Grant White, Maude L. Merchant, Clara Matteson Murdock, There are now 17 members of Otsego Chapter. The five members who are not charter members are: Mrs. Emma W. Babbitt, Dr. M. Imogene Bassett, Mrs. Altana R.B. Davidson, Mrs. Helen C. Church and Mrs. Michaels of Fort Plain.

July 12, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown and its place in Indian history are to be thoroughly discussed here in the early autumn when several of the most prominent archaeologists of the state plan to gather here as guests of the Leatherstocking Chapter, New York State Archaeological Association. It has been thought for some time past that an Indian Village of considerable size existed for many hundred years on the banks of the Susquehanna River just north of the pump house. A few years ago, a skeleton, undoubtedly that of an Iroquois
warrior was dug up by David R. Dorn and George N. Smith of this village. Since that time, arrows, spearheads, and other implements of warfare have been found. The conference will endeavor to ascertain just who these people were and to what tribes they belonged.

July 9, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Announcement was made Saturday of completion of plans for another series of five Victory Sings to be held in Cooperstown on the four Sunday afternoons in August and the first Sunday afternoon in September, thus continuing the program of community singing started here seven years ago. These sings have been much appreciated and enjoyed in the past and have attracted thousands of people to Cooperstown from all parts of Central New York and many from greater distances. Dr. Elmer A. Tidmarsh, Director of Music at Union College, Schenectady, is returning to be the leader again this summer.

July 12, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The new library building of the New York State Historical
Association will be formally dedicated in a two-day
ceremony at Cooperstown, July 12 and 13. Designed by the architectural firm, Moore and Hutchins, the handsome stone-faced building just north of Fenimore House, the Association’s headquarters, is equipped to house the more than 90,000 volumes, special collections, a newspaper storage area for some 500,000 papers, and a special audio-visual room for tapes, records, films, and slides.

July 9, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown Art Association is currently exhibiting two outdoor sculpted stone works on the front lawn at 22 Main, loaned by two nationally recognized artists who reside nearby. Fly Creek sculptor Walter Dusenberry’s “Garden Bench” is composed of partially sandblasted and polished Yellow Travertine. Gilbertsville’s Dennis Stahl’s marble and wood piece is titled “Darma Wheel.” Both works are for sale.

July 2, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES July 4, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

July 4, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown – On Wednesday last, Benjamin P. Day, only son of Mr. Israel Day, of this village, aged 5 years, was unfortunately drowned, by falling out of a boat, on the lake. He with two other boys, entered the boat, probably for the purpose of paddling around the shore, but being driven out by the wind, in their exertions to regain the shore, he fell overboard. His body was taken out in about twenty minutes after he sunk. But every effort to resuscitate him proved unavailing. His remains were interred on Thursday.

July 5, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Otsego in Her Strength – Ten Thousand Warriors in the Field – The Otsegonians to Their Fellow Democrats Greeting. The Fourth of July, 1844, will ever be cherished by the Democrats of Otsego as the proud day in their Calendar. There never was such a gathering, Whig or Democratic within her borders. The number in attendance from nearly every town in the county, is variously estimated. It is pretty well ascertained that there were at least 2,000 vehicles of different descriptions, some carrying as many as 30, and others 24, 18, 12 &c. and none less than two, within the village limits by 12 o’clock. We set down the number at 10,000 at a moderate calculation. There was a single gun at daybreak, and a national salute at sunrise, with the ringing of bells. From an early hour in the morning, the democrats began to pour into the village from all quarters, and by 12 noon the principal streets were literally alive with a moving mass. A nine-pounder on an eminence announced the approach of the several delegations from the towns, as they came in sight – and there was an escort in readiness to go out and accompany them to the place of general gathering – Lewis’s Eagle Tavern, where they were cheered as they came up. Among the interesting incidents of the day was the presentation of a beautiful banner, the handy work of some democratic young ladies of the village to Engine Company No. 2. There was a presentation address by Miss Wilson and a reply on behalf of the Company by Mr. Chas. A. Bowne.

July 8, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Our Old People – There are living upon this corporation 54 persons, 27 men and 27 women who are 70 years of age, or upwards, possibly a few more, whose names we have not on the list before us. The venerable Mrs. Bowers celebrated her 91st birthday in April. There are three other ladies who are 80 or more; one gentleman of 82, another 85, another 89. The average age of these 54 persons is full 74 years. The present population of the Village of Cooperstown is about 1,700.

July 2, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

(Edited excerpts) Within the last decade public interest in the North American Indians has undergone a revival induced in part by the assiduous application of ethnologists and archaeologists to Indian subjects and who direct their attentions to the investigation and study of this probably most romantic and poetic people the world has ever known. The day is well- nigh dead for the purity of ceremonial rites and folklore amongst their many hundred nations. Civilization and intermarriage are adulterating those exclusive tribal ordinances that for many centuries have been the stronghold of a most conservative race. With the exception of Finland, the country is unknown that possesses such wealth of folklore as America. There are mines of unchronicled legends and superstitions, each colored by tribal distinctions, that scholars will never unearth, and that will perish with the people whose blood grows annually thinner and paler as their prairies receive the “white man’s footprint” as their rivers ripple to the dip of his oars, as their forests fall at the hurling of his axe, and who will themselves be but a tradition and a memory in the lapse of a century or so.

July 5, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

The seven-passenger Packard touring car belonging to L.H. Spencer of Otsego Hall was somewhat damaged in a collision Tuesday afternoon at the corner of Lake and Chestnut streets with a Pierce-Arrow car driven according to witnesses, by Mrs. George Hyde-Clark of Hyde Hall, when the latter car turned on the wrong side into Lake Street while Mr. Spencer was about to turn on the right side in coming into Chestnut Street. Eye witnesses declared that the woman driver of the northbound car did not blow her horn at the corner, and instead of going to the right of the iron traffic cop, cut into the left, meeting the Spencer car almost head-on. The Spencer car was thrown over to the side of the street, but remained upright. The Pierce-Arrow, it was declared, did not stop after the accident, but put on increased speed after turning into Lake Street. Persons who saw the accident testify to the identity of the driver. Shortly after the accident Constable Charles T. Cooke was preparing a warrant for the arrest of the driver of the Pierce-Arrow car.

July 2, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Miss Susan P. Clarke, a pilot in the Army Ferry Command and daughter of George Hyde Clarke and Mrs. S. Beach Cooke, was killed Tuesday morning in an airplane crash at Columbia, South Carolina. She was 25 years old. Miss Clarke was graduated from Cooperstown High School and attended schools in New York and Italy. She became a licensed pilot three years ago and joined the Ferry Command last year.

July 5, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The sports editor of the North Penn Reporter rode the railroad coach from Lansdale, Pennsylvania to St. Louis an April night in 1943. The next afternoon he was up to his ears in galleys and batting averages at The Sporting News in St. Louis. That was animated Clifford Kachline – always with his nose buried in baseball facts and losing no time about it. He is the new Historian of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, it was announced today by Hall President Paul S. Kerr. The 47-year-old editor, writer and statistician succeeds Lee Allen who died in May.

July 2, 1969

BOUND VOLUMES June 27, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

June 27, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

A new State: The bill providing for the erection of the District of Maine into a new State, has passed the Senate and House of the Assembly of Massachusetts, 193 to 50. Every member from Maine voted for the separation.
The following toast was given at Athens in the State of Georgia at a dinner where the President of the United States was present: “The slave trade, the scourge of Africa, the disgrace of humanity – may it cease forever; and may the voice of peace, of Christianity and civilization, be heard on the savage shores.”
The weather has been uncommonly warm for some days the week past, and the progress of vegetation remarkably rapid. The prospect of abundant crops has not been so good for many years. It is understood that there is much strife among the agriculturalists and there will probably be many candidates for the premiums at the cattle show in the fall.

June 28, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Printers. No trade sends into the world smarter and more active men than that of printing. Look to the posts of trust and honor – where talent and energy are required – and you will be most likely to find them filled by Printers. Who make our best Editors, Lawyers, Preachers, Mayors and Congressmen? Printers! Printing is a glorious business, thus to fit men for honor and usefulness. There are something like a dozen printers in Congress – all of them honors to their profession. Who would not be a printer? To the young apprentices at the case, or the roller stand, with smutty faces or dirty fingers, we would say – “Don’t be discouraged.” A few years ago, all the distinguished men we have named above, were similarly employed.

June 24, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Our Railroad – Next month the Cooperstown Railroad will be completed. Passenger trains will be run about July 12. Then we shall have something to exhibit which cannot be found in the vast empire of China, all western and central Asia, and the whole of Africa, except Egypt and the French and English colonies. The United Kingdom of Great Britain has 14,247 miles; the French empire 9,934; Prussia, including all of North Germany, 7,237; Russia, 4,317; Italy, 4,100; and the Austrian Empire, 4,429. The United States has 42,255 which is as many as Great Britain, France, North Germany and Austria together with all Russia and Denmark besides.

June 25, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The regular Athletic season will open this week Friday with the Athletics playing the Minneconji Indian B.B.C. This team is the one great Indian base ball club of the United States. They come from the Minneconji Reservation of Missouri where they have been playing ball for three years. This is their first trip east, and with their three years practice, they now have a team that can cope successfully with the best. We quote from their Agent’s open letter to Managers: “In symmetry of form, comeliness of features, with willowy grace and rare agility, they are absolutely without a counterpart. It is not only very interesting to watch these copper-colored sons of the plains play ball, but at times very funny. Their ludicrous antics and mad capers, when there is a close play, is a never-ending source of amusement to the spectators, and must be seen to be appreciated.”

June 28, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Otesaga Opens for 1919 Season – With a large number of arrivals, including many motoring parties over the weekend, the 1919 season of the Otesaga, Cooperstown’s palatial summer hotel, opened last Saturday night for the coming season extending to October. A majority of the guests on the opening night were automobile parties who took advantage of the good motoring weather to visit Cooperstown for the weekend. C.B. Knott, the proprietor and manager has been in Cooperstown preparatory to the opening. The staff of the hotel is as follows: Chief Clerk, H.S. Kimball; Room Clerk, Frank M. Pearson; Housekeeper, Mrs. F.E. Gilbert; Steward, George A. McKain; Musical Director, Harry Meyer.
Clark Simmons is officially reported dead. The sad news that Clark F. Simmons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Simmons, of 209 Main Street, had been killed in action, was received by his parents on Wednesday night of last week in a telegram from the adjutant general’s department. This cleared up the suspense of his fate which had been in doubt since last November, when Simmons was reported missing in action.

June 25, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

In Cooperstown – Miss Mary McGown, who has been a student in Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, arrived home for the summer on Saturday.
Dr. Charles H. Peckham of the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital has returned from a meeting of the American Gynecological Society at Hershey, Pennsylvania where he participated in a discussion of several papers on “Eclampsia.”
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Reed received word Tuesday that their son, Pvt. Donald Reed, Jr., was a patient in an Army hospital in Italy with wounds receive recently on the front lines. Pvt. Reed was occupying a building which was hit by a Nazi shell. He sustained a fractured nose, a sprained knee and contusions. He reports that his condition is good.

June 28, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Thanks to New York State taxpayers, $125,000 from New York State’s budget will be going towards renovations at Doubleday Field. Money allocated for Doubleday Field was part of a $135.5 million sports construction package to refurbish or repair 15 minor league baseball fields around the state.

June 28, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

Contractors David Butler and Chris Chandler are putting the final touches on a flag painted on the north side of a barn on Brian Tramontozzi’s farm on the Fly Creek Valley road. The flag, 14 by 30 feet is the correct proportion. Butler, Chandler and Ben Anderson have been restoring the barns on Three Hour Farm, so-named by Tramontozzi because it reflects the time it takes him to drive to Fly Creek from his home in the New York Metropolitan area. Because of the roughness of the barn’s siding, each star was individually cut, dipped in paint and nailed in place.

June 26, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES: June 20, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

June 20, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement: Sale of Pews – The sale of the pews in the Presbyterian Church will take place on Thursday, the first day of July next at 2 o’clock p.m. Six month’s rent will then become due. It is earnestly desired that all would pay at that time. Geo. Pomeroy, Clerk, Cooperstown, June 21, 1819.
Advertisement: The inhabitants of Burlington intend to celebrate the anniversary of our national independence on the fifth day of July next, at Col. Sheldon’s, and invite the attendance of their friends in the adjacent towns. By order of the Committee of Arrangements, Burlington, June 15, 1819.

June 21, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democratic National Nominations – For President: James K. Polk of Tennessee; For Vice-President: George M. Dallas of Pennsylvania. Democratic Celebration – July 4, 1844 – Great Rally of the Democracy for Polk, Dallas and Victory! “Oh, flag of promise unto us, thy stars foretell thy country’s fame, our crimsoned stripes, translated thus, give promise to our foes, of shame.” “Honest labor seeks an equality of rights and privileges, and demands equal and exact justice to all men.” “Be always sure you are right and then go ahead.” In view of the vast consequences and momentous issues involved in the great contest for supremacy in the approaching Presidential Election, the undersigned, a Committee appointed by the “Otsego Democratic Association” for that purpose, hereby invite their fellow Democrats of Otsego and adjoining counties, to assemble in mass meeting in the Village of Cooperstown, on the Fourth of July next, at 10 o’clock a.m. to join in commemorating the glorious anniversary of American Independence and aid in cementing the Union.

June 17, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

New Grounds for the County Agricultural Society – At a meeting of the Managers two propositions for new grounds for the use of the Society were considered. The Committee appointed to select suitable Fair Grounds reported in favor of the purchase of a lot of Mssrs. Spafard and Hooker, to contain a sufficient number of acres for a first class track of not less than one-half mile, and a small piece called the “Oxbow” – about twenty acres at $250 per acre, and five acres at $150 per acre amounting to $5,750 in all. A resolution was offered authorizing the President and Treasurer to make the purchase, after the Society shall authorize the sale of the lot now owned by it. (Ed. Note: The property referred to is now occupied by the Cooperstown Elementary School, residences along Walnut Street from Delaware, and southward to the high school. The Old Fairgrounds is now occupied by the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, the Bassett Clinic, the parking area and residences along Fair Street).

June 18, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Base Ball – On June 29, the Athletics will play a famous Indian club from the West. They are known as the Minneconji Indians. A parade will be given before the game in full Indian costume. They are the genuine article, and will put up a great game of ball, and run bases like reindeer. They should draw nearly as well as the Cuban Giants. Information has been received that the Athletics have secured Schoenhut, the famous University of Pennsylvania pitcher, for the coming season. With White and Schoenhut as regular pitchers, and J. Hollister for an emergency, Reung, of the University of Pennsylvania as catcher, and Captain Charlie to go behind the bat in the event of any accident, the Athletics will be stronger than ever before. Taylor, our popular big first baseman has been keeping his eye and nerves in order by daily practice at handball and batting.

June 14, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

An effort to have the U.S. Aviation Hospital in Cooperstown perpetuated as an Army Rest & Recreation Camp, as suggested recently at a dinner given in honor of Major Francis H. Poole, commanding officer of the hospital, will be made shortly by a committee of three by the Chamber of Commerce. The committee will confer with Major Poole and Waldo C. Johnston, agent for the Clark Estates and builders of the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital now being used by the army. Inspectors from the Surgeon General’s department at Washington have been here during the meantime, and are said to have been impressed with the vast amount of good done at this hospital for officers of the air service who have come back to this country nearly nervous wrecks.

June 18, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E. Crosier of North Adams, Massachusetts have announced the engagement of their daughter, Susan Carol, to C.R. Jones, son of Mrs. Weston E. Jones and the late Mr. Jones of Charles City, Iowa. Miss Crosier was graduated from Tufts University, studied Art History at the University of Kansas, and received the Master of Arts degree from the Cooperstown Graduate Program in May of this year.
She is Director of the Oneida Historical Society at Utica. Mr. Jones was graduated from Iowa State University at Ames, studied Art History at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts and received the Master of Arts degree from the Cooperstown Graduate Programs in 1965. An October wedding is planned.

June 29, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Approximately 200 community members attended a meeting at Bassett Healthcare in Cooperstown hosted by William F. Streck, M.D., Bassett’s President and Congressman Sherwood L. Boehlert. Boehlert provided the group with an update on health reform progress in Washington. Dr. Streck discussed state-level reform and Bassett’s
response to reform. Boehlert shared his concern that funding of health care reform plans has not been properly addressed. “Regardless of who is driving health reform, changes are coming,” said Dr. Streck.

June 21, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Eight Cooperstown Central School students have been sent home with Swine Flu virus. That news followed CCS nurse Jane Hanson’s decision, Monday, June 15, the last day of classes for the high school and middle school to send home a couple-of-dozen students with flu-like symptoms.
The Cooperstown outbreak followed the confirmation of seven cases at Morris Central School and two at Oneonta High School. Countywide 18 cases have been reported.

June 19, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES June 13, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

June 13, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Illegal Slave Dealing – At a Court of Quarter Sessions held in April last for the County of Sussex (Del.), Lemuel Tam was convicted of selling for exportation, a manumitted slave, and sentenced by the court to pay the sum of $500, the penalty enforced by the Act of the Assembly. At the same term James Jones, who had been convicted at the November term last, was sentenced by the court to pay the sum of $500 for exporting a manumitted slave. The penalties in the above cases will be paid by the defendants.

June 14, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from the Resolutions of the Democrats Meeting at Butternuts – Resolved: That the assemblage of free men to consider and review the acts of their public agents; to deliberate on the best means of preserving our civil institutions and the equal rights of each individual; to brighten the chain of friendship between brethren of the same principle; and to endeavor to promote the prosperity and glory of our beloved country – is not only a duty, but is among the most distinguished and invaluable privileges secured to us by the Constitutions of the State and Nation. Resolved: That though men may change, Truth is eternal; and though as in 1840, men may be deluded by false representations, bewildered by noise and riot, and misled by the exhibition of pageants, the sober second thought of the enlightened citizens of America, will put to flight such delusions, and truth and reason will eventually triumph.

June 10, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The Cooper House approaches completion. A little army of carpenters, masons, painters, paper hangers, gas fitters, plumbers, carpet makers and others are busily engaged, and each day shows a large amount of work accomplished. Men from the firm of Moneuse and Duparquet of New York, are engaged in putting in the kitchen one of their thirteen hundred dollar French cooking ranges. Furniture, beautiful and substantial is arriving in large quantities, soon to be followed by the needed stores. Mr. and Mrs. Watkins are there superintending everything connected with the furnishing of the large building. The parlor furniture alone costs about $3,500. There is a set of silver service for the dining room which cost $2,000. Mr. W. thinks he will have as handsomely furnished a Summer Hotel as can be found in the United States. (Ed. Note: The Cooper House was built on the grounds now occupied by Cooper Lane Apartments and adjoining properties to the south along Chestnut Street)

June 11, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The Athletics – A meeting of the C.A.A. was held on Tuesday evening, when several new members were received. New uniforms for the team were ordered. The team for the season of 1894 is practically made up and will be a strong one – as it must be to meet the competitors who are to appear on the grounds here this season. During the season it is expected that four games will be played with the “Murray Hills” of New York City, four with the “Cuban Giants,” two with the “Ironsides” of Newark, New Jersey, two with the “Pattersons” of Patterson, New Jersey, and several games with teams belonging to the New York State League. The games will all be “first class” – at least that is the hope and intention of the Athletics, who always aim to do the right thing and to give our people good ball. The formation of the team is entirely in the hands of Captain Hollister, and we shall undoubtedly have a strong club.

June 7, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Proof that Cooperstown is proud of Doubleday Field as the national shrine of baseball will be evident to all the fans attending the game July 10 between the Giants and the Tigers. All spring long village workers have been busy at the field putting it in tip-top condition. The outfield and grass sections of the diamond are emerald green and smooth as a billiard table. The baselines have been refilled and worked up to the proper level. In addition every seat in the park has been repainted and the rows in the bleacher section have been re-numbered in such a way as to make the seating more comfortable. Heretofore some of the sections have been too closely crowded.

June 14, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Government leaders in Washington are just now discovering what many county welfare workers have known all along – that many Americans are suffering from malnutrition. At a U.S. Senate Committee hearing, Dr. Arnold Schaefer of the Public Health Service reported on a survey among 12,000 Americans selected at random in Texas, Louisiana, New York and Kentucky. In this land of plenty, chronic hunger and malnutrition exist in many areas, and in addition, there is an alarming presence of diseases commonly associated with undernourishment, diseases that were thought to exist only in the backward areas of Africa and Asia. A return of endemic goiter has been discovered. Many cases of starving Americans have been found. Two main causes of this situation are poverty and ignorance. While spending billions of dollars all around the world, we neglect our own citizens who suffer from hunger and malnutrition.

June 11, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

On June 1, Wilber National Bank’s Otsego Office opened for business on Route 28 just south of Cooperstown. The Otsego Office is Wilber’s tenth banking location in Otsego County. In 1984 Wilber opened its Cooperstown office at 62 Main Street, once the location of the Second National Bank of Cooperstown. The Otsego Office is housed in the former Sperry mansion.

June 14, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Pat Romaine got a shock when she looked out the window of her home off Route 33 in the Town of Milford at 1 p.m. Wednesday, June 3. There was a black bear, about the size of a medium-size man, helping himself to the birdseed at the feeders used over the winter. Pat threw a paint can in the bear’s direction, but he stayed put. Only when a trooper responded to her 911 call did the animal scoot up the hill and into the woods at the sound of the siren.

June 5, 1969

BOUND VOLUMES: June 6, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

June 6, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Sacket’s Harbor – Melancholy. On Thursday last, the unlawful discharge of a musket in this village called together a number of citizens – and sad to relate – upon enquiry, it appeared that a Mr. Walter Hanson, had, by the means of his foot, discharged the contents of a musket through his head, and was then expiring. After his decease, a jury of inquest was called, who found a verdict of self-murder, while insane. The circumstances of this affair are truly melancholy.
On Wednesday, he made an observation to the family in which he boarded that there must be something done – he could not live so, that he had been accused of things of which he was innocent, and stated further, that he had seen those accusations in the public paper, which on examination could not be found. In the evening he appeared more composed, and the next morning was spent in writing and adjusting his attire, apparently to render his person decent. On examination, a written “confession” was found with him, in which he enumerates the several charges brought against him, to all of which he pleads not guilty, save one, which was a false oath taken at Brownville, for which he says “I die.”

June 7, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

“Equal Laws, Equal Privileges” is the motto of every opponent of tyranny, and the cardinal maxim of every admirer of our country. While it is strictly adhered to in its true spirit, the machinery of government cannot work to any general ill. But once forgotten or departed from in the most trivial instance, and it opens a door to oppressions, monstrous, insufferable, the natural resistance to which floods the land with civil discord, and covers the nation with regret and mortification. It would be every man’s duty to maintain his fellow’s rights and for this excellent reason – the very moment we admit that he may be molested for differing in his tenets from ourselves, we inevitably admit that we may be proscribed in our own for differing from others.

June 3, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The case of “The People vs. Miss Harriet Rose” of Exeter, indicted for assault and battery in school, in severely whipping and injuring the child of R.P. Brooks. The assault was committed over two years ago and Miss Rose has before been tried for the offense but the jury disagreed. Upon re-trial, the case was well prepared by the District Attorney and by Mssrs. Lynes and Bowen, and very ably summed up by Judge Earl for the defendant, and Mr. Smith for the people. After being out about fifteen minutes, the jury acquitted Miss Rose. We do not censure them for it. The poor boy is now a mere wreck. But, Miss Rose has in these two trials been severely punished. If the child’s dreadful state is, as was claimed on the trial as a result of the whipping, how terrible the punishment to any woman of the least heart. Let this case teach the Teachers of Otsego County not to whip little children severely, if at all, for trivial offenses, and to be careful when administering corporal punishment to control their tempers, and never to strike a child about the head, and never to use an instrument which may easily, even by accident, maim or injure a child.

June 4, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

The Playgrounds Committee of the Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce signed a lease for two years of the Phinney lot in this village for use as a baseball diamond and playgrounds. Thus, the original baseball diamond of America will soon respond with the crack of the bat and ball. An appeal for volunteer labor will be made and the diamond placed in condition at once for games this summer. Since the purchase of the old ball grounds for a hospital site, Cooperstown has been without a baseball diamond and necessarily without a baseball team.
That such a condition should exist in the birthplace of the national game was not deemed proper and the Chamber of Commerce at once took the matter up with the result that local talent will be furnished with a suitable field for their efforts. The suggestion has been made that the local grounds be made a national baseball park and if possible a game be played here each year between National and American League teams.

June 4, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

A thrill ran through Cooperstown Tuesday morning as rising listeners heard their radio announcers detailing the first moves of the invasion of the continent of Europe, which had then been in progress for several hours. Although the news had been expected for weeks, and although there was always behind it the realization of the terrific cost in lives that must be paid in this final step toward complete victory over the Nazi enslavers of mankind, it brought a decided lift to the morale of the community. There were no jubilant demonstrations, but a feeling tense excitement could be discerned wherever one went, or wherever two or more people met. The tedium of waiting was gone at last, and we were hearing the story of real action.

June 7, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Joseph M. Clancy has sold the Doubleday Restaurant on Main Street to Louis J. Bobnick of this village. Mr. Bobnick took over operation of the restaurant this past weekend. Mr. Clancy said he would open a catering service on or about July 1. Mr. Clancy purchased the Doubleday from William J. Grady on May 15, 1957. The Doubleday was first opened as a restaurant in the 1920s by the late Owen G. Clark and was known as Clark’s during his tenure. It was sold in 1940 to Edwin Weegar until purchased by Mr. Grady.

June 4, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Paula DiPerna of Cooperstown, author, film producer and environmental policy analyst, has been appointed by Mario Cuomo as a member of the College Council of the State University College at Oneonta. DiPerna’s most recent book, “His Wife’s Version: The Discoveries of Mrs. Christopher Columbus,” is due for release by Permanent Press in the fall of 1994.

June 7, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Joe Vezza, a Utica native, has been operating New York Pizzeria, 37 Main St., Richfield Springs, since 1996, and that was his sole enterprise for 13 years.
Then, on Jan. 1, he bought the adjoining Chef Diner.
Now, on June 1, he bought Tino’s Pizza, 75 Chestnut St., Cooperstown, from Tino Garufi.
Joe was only 22 when he heard the Richfield Springs pizzeria was for sale, and he and his mother, Giovanna, bought it from Lorenzo Pumilia.

June 5, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES: May 30, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

May 30, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Land for Sale – The subscribers offer for sale Two Hundred acres of Land it being part of the Farm formerly owned by Jacob Ten Broeck, late of the Town of Edmeston, deceased, and is the southeast part of said Farm – through which passes the Cayuga Turnpike Road. The whole is well watered – about sixty or seventy acres only are improved with a small orchard on the same. They will sell the whole or either end thereof, as its form will admit of division to no dis-advantage. Those who wish to purchase, are solicited to see and call for themselves – the terms will be made easy, and a good title in fee simple or warrantee given for the same. Wessel Ten Broeck and George Ten Broeck. The Watch Tower.

May 31, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Tonawanda Indians – The Ogden Company has paid the installment of $75,000 for the purchase of the Seneca Reservation, and would exact the enforcement of the law which compels the Indians to yield up their lands to the Company, and appends the following remarks reported in The Batavia Times: “The Chief of the Senecas (Blacksmith) was in the village last week, endeavoring to borrow money at one of our banks, for the purpose of delaying or preventing the consummation of the treaty. He did not succeed. Sanford, their physician, and a well-educated man for an Indian, says the Senecas cannot bear the idea of being driven out from their old homes, and that, in his opinion, great difficulty will be experienced before their final expulsion.”

May 27, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Local – Persons interested in seeing handsome stone work should take a look at the massive foundation walls of Mr. Edward Clark’s house. Some might think the architect engaged in the erection of a fort or castle. The first freight brought over the Cooperstown Railroad, as far as Milford, will be a quantity of plaster and the stone window and door sills for this mansion, all shipped from Howe’s Cave.
An additional force of masons has been placed on the new
hotel, and their work will soon begin to show. The large piles of stone near the premises are fast taking position in the solid foundation walls of what is to be the finest Hotel of any country village in the State, if not in the Union.

May 28, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – A killing black frost followed the hard rain storm of Monday afternoon and evening. Ice formed in many places, and advanced vegetation in not a few gardens was nipped in the bud.
On two of the incoming steamers last week were Mr. and Mrs, G. Hyde Clarke and children, Mrs. George Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Torry and children, Mrs. Entwisle, Miss Grace Carter, and Mr. Mercer Pell – forming quite an addition to society at the upper end of the Lake.
When the morning train on the Cooperstown railroad reached the Junction last Saturday, it landed about 300 passengers – nearly all of whom were on their way to “The Greatest Show on Earth” at Oneonta.
Twenty-two liquor licenses issued in Oneonta netted $1,585. The same number was issued in Cooperstown and cost only $750.

May 31, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Milford – Before a jury in the Justice Court here Tuesday, Lawrence Graves and Amos Cook, two young men whose homes are in the Fly Creek and Oaksville neighborhoods were found guilty of stealing and selling chickens, and were sentenced to the limit, six months each in the Otsego County jail with a fine of $50 each. The defendants were represented by C.G. Tennant of Cooperstown. The case was prosecuted by W.C. McRorie of Milford. The complaining witness was Charles Spencer of Milford, whose chickens were alleged to have been stolen. The chickens, the prosecution endeavored to prove, were stolen and sold in Cooperstown to Joe Rotchstein, who also was a witness. Work on the part of Sheriff Van Zandt and his deputies resulted in the arrest of the men a short time after the crime was discovered. The men were located in Watertown and brought to the county jail to await trial.

May 28, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

A capacity audience greeted the minstrels sponsored in the Cooperstown Academy Gymnasium by the Westminster Fellowship of the First Presbyterian Church. Proceeds were over $100. Dr. William H. McDonald, acting as interlocutor, was supported by the following cast, all in blackface: Hugh and LaRue Jones, John and Richard Shevalier, David McGown, Burton Beals, Nancy Carpenter, Virginia Johnson, Jane Wedderspoon, Joan Veitsch and Robert Johnston, Jr. Chorus members were Mary Gray, Sally Shumway, Diane and Jacquita Smith, Merrill Nelson, Gloria Thompson, Connie and Marjorie Gray, Gloria Rowe, and Vivian Smith. The Kirsch trio played between the acts. Mrs. Francis Shevalier and the Rev. Gustavus Warfield directed the production, with the assistance of Miss Rhoda Smith, as accompanist. Mrs. Virginia Hamblin was in charge of dramatics and Harry Hamblin directed the instrumental numbers by the brass quartet. George H. Carley assisted with make-up.

May 31, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Fly Creek Notes by Lidie Mackie – Jim Atwell has returned home after two weeks hiking in England. He hiked in West Sussex and the Isles of Wight. The high point of his trip was an evening reception at the Queens Gallery on the grounds of Buckingham Palace. On Thursday, June 2, at 7 p.m., Florence Michaels will lecture to the Methodist Church women. Her topic will be “The Church Calendar Year.” Emma Zigon tells us Joseph is feeling much better. She also told us how proud she was of granddaughter Jaci Aufmuth Domin. Jaci wrote an article that appeared in last week’s paper. Jaci has two sons, Jared 17 and Ben 14.

June 1, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Four new shops have opened downtown – and, heavens, none one them sell baseball memorabilia. Renee LaFond has opened Blue Sky, a “tweens” boutique; Jillian Boss opened an upscale-apparel consignment shop, Frugal Fashionista; Brenda Berstler found a home at 171 Main St. for her successful Internet business, Savor NY, and Rich Busse opened a ladies’ accessory and gift shop, Silver Fox.

May 29, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES May 23, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

May 23, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – New School. The subscriber gives notice that he has opened a Private School, at his dwelling house in Fair Street, where he will devote his time, and use every exertion in his power to facilitate the improvement of the pupils entrusted to his care – whilst strict attention shall be paid to their manners and morals. His number will be select and limited. The advantages of such a school every person is capable of appreciating. The subscriber hopes, by his exertions, to merit the patronage of the people in this vicinity. He will be pleased by having his employers and friends visit his school, as often as they may find it convenient, that the true merits or demerits thereof may be known. His terms for tuition are $2 per quarter, and no extra charges. Israel Day. The Watch Tower.

May 24, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

The timid in politics, fair weather Democrats, have been panic stricken, caused by the brag game and hurrahs of the Whigs. But the sky is clearing up, even to their vision; and as the hour approaches for the decision of the Democratic National Convention in regard to a Presidential candidate, the blood warms with devotion to the Cause, and all doubts of success are thrown to the winds. Although great efforts have been made at Washington to detract from Mr. Van Buren’s popularity with the masses and bring the Delegates against him, we have reason to know that they have utterly failed, and are sure that his name will this day be presented to the Democracy of the country as their standard-bearer in the great struggle for political supremacy, and that complete success is certain to await the count of the ballot boxes.

May 27, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Base Ball – On Saturday last a match game of ball, the third and last of a series, was played by the Olympics of Hartwick Seminary, and the Clinton Club of Clintonville, which resulted in favor of the Olympics by a score of 29 to 27. The match consisted of the best two out of three games. The following is the complete score: Tuesday, April 27,
9 innings – Olympics 50, Clinton 18; Monday, May 10,
9 innings – Olympics 40, Clinton 42; Saturday, May 15,
6 innings – Olympics 29, Clinton 27. Totals: Olympics 119, Clinton 87.
The late Col. Prentiss. We feel very much indebted to Mrs. John H. Prentiss for a fine photographic likeness of her deceased husband, who established The Freeman’s Journal 61 years ago and remained its distinguished editor for 40 years. At our solicitation it was kindly presented to the office, to remain a permanent fixture, we trust, so long as the Journal shall continue to be published. The Colonel was a remarkably fine-looking gentleman of the old school, and this picture, enlarged by W.G. Smith from an excellent daguerreotype is recognized by all who have seen it as a life-like portrait.

May 21, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

The Danger of Sectionalism – The result of the Civil War in this country was in favor of a race of freemen, involving the abolition of slavery, and the maintenance of the Union. It was the strongest possible declaration against Sectionalism, after a contest that cost thousands of lives and untold wealth. We came out of that memorable contest with the old motto on our banners: “United we stand!” It was the common remark – “North and South, East and West – There will never again be an effort made to overthrow or divide this Union.” There are events occurring today which challenge the correctness of this hopeful declaration – and observing men, who closely observe the signs of the times, cannot fail to recognize them.

May 24, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Newest Wrinkle to Dislodge Car – A resourceful motorist whose car has been stuck in the mud does not always have to fall back on a pair of mules to get free. For such an emergency the United States Tire Co. offers a suggestion that may prove valuable. This calls for having stored away somewhere in the car a stack of old newspapers. When the car gets stuck and the wheels refuse to take hold, feed in some of the old papers between the tires and the mud. Usually, only a few will have to be worked in before the wheels begin to grip and the car will start forward.

May 21, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

More than 20 Rotary International Exchange students who are spending a year in the area encompassed by Rotary International District 717, attended classes at Cooperstown Central School on Friday and were guests of Cooperstown students at over the weekend.
The temperature hit 82 degrees here Saturday afternoon, making it the warmest day of the year so far. On Sunday, the mercury touched 81 for only the third time this year temperatures have topped 80 or more.
Lieutenant and Mrs. David A Sanford of this village left May 12 from McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey, for Augsburg, Germany, where Lt. Sanford will be stationed with the Army’s 34th Field Artillery Battalion.

May 21, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown girls took the Center State Conference’s East Division Championships on Tuesday, May 17. The girls’ team finished in first place, while the boys
placed second. As she has done all season, Megan Sanford helped lead the girls’ team to the championship with a
four-event winning performance. She took the 100 (13.0), the 200 (27.2), the 400 (1:01.7) and was a member of the winning 400 relay team (54.5) along with Betsy Roesch, Lisa Alicino, and Annie Winslow. Megan Sanford had a tremendous day and has had a tremendous season, Cooperstown Coach Connie Herzig said.

May 24, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

After a first sighting a few days ago, a “big cat” or mountain lion has been reported again. Maureen Wren, a DEC spokesperson said it is possible that a former pet may be ranging the west side of Otsego Lake. She also said the animal could have been a fisher cat or a bob cat. The last verified sighting of a wild cougar or mountain lion in New York State dates to 1894.

May 22, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES, May 16, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES,

May 16, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Medical Meeting – An adjourned meeting of the Otsego County Medical Society will be held at the house of Joseph Griffin, in the Village of Cooperstown on Tuesday, the 25th, at 1 o’clock p.m. To Pomeroy, Secretary. Notice – Robert Campbell, Recording Secretary of the Otsego County Agricultural Society, has just received a variety of Foreign Seed Grains, to be delivered to such members of the Society as may call in time.
Notice – The Trustees of School District No. 1 will open a school in the public school house in this village, on Wednesday, the Twenty-first, inst. under the direction of Mr. L. Squires. Terms of Tuition $2 per quarter. A portion of public money to be applied on the first quarter. N.B. Any one sending in after the school commences, will not have any more to pay than their proportion of time from the time of commencing. Eseck Bradford, Buckingham Fitch, Trustees.

May 17, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Major Daverac spent a few days in our village last week, having been received and entertained with the kindest feelings by our citizens generally, growing out of his associations with the veteran Jackson, coupled with his well-known devotion to the Democratic Cause. Monday evening, upon the invitation of the Literary Association, he delivered a lecture to a numerous auditory of both sexes, “Works of Fiction Amongst the Ancients and Moderns.” This evinced much learning and a highly cultivated taste in composition, producing high gratification to the large assemblage who listened to the speaker with the most riveted attention.

May 20, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Summary of News – For Europe: Mr. and Mrs. Edward Clark sailed from New York on the first inst. for France. They will remain abroad about a year. Their new mansion within this village cannot be completed within that time.

Charged with Murder – In the month of August, 1867, John Deforest of the Town of Unadilla, was shot by Gilbert Rogers, a neighbor, and died in a few days from the effects of the wound. Rogers was arrested and an examination had before a Justice of that town. He claimed that he was hunting in a piece of woods near where Deforest was cutting briars, and that he shot him by accident. He was discharged by the Justice, and immediately went west, leaving his property. Meantime, District Attorney Edick became convinced from certain facts and circumstances that the shooting was not accidental and he presented Rogers to the Grand Jury for indictment in October last. This spring Rogers paid a visit to Unadilla where he was arrested and brought to Cooperstown where he will have his trial for murder in June.

May 14, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Our villagers will be sorry to learn that Principal Strong Comstock several weeks ago sent in his resignation to the Board of Education, to take effect at the close of the current school year. He has for the past four years been in charge of the Union School of Cooperstown, during which period the school has continued to prosper and to maintain its usual high rank among educational institutions of that grade. The Union School will next fall open under the charge of Mr. W.D. Johnson, who is a graduate of the Albany Normal School, has had twelve years’ experience as Principal, and is now at the head of the Union School at Morris, where he has done excellent work as instructor.

May 17, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Several of the country’s leaders in the field of aeronautics came to Cooperstown to pay final tribute to Fly Creek’s A. Leo Stevens, American pioneer aeronaut, whose funeral took place Thursday afternoon at the Ingalls funeral home. The Rev. T.P. Hurd, rector of St. Mary’s Episcopal church of Springfield Center, officiated, and burial was made at the cemetery in Fly Creek. The importance of the life work of A. Leo Stevens was emphasized by Major August Post, Secretary of the Aerial League of America, who declared that in his opinion “Mr. Stevens merits credit for making a remarkable contribution toward winning the war through his invention of the rip cord device that opens parachutes. Before Mr. Stevens’ invention, parachutes were opened by a chain or cord attached to a plane or balloon. Stevens’ device provided a cord that was pulled after an aerialist was clear, removing danger of entanglement. Today, the parachute is a front-line combat weapon and probably will win the war. It will play a tremendous part in the Allied offensive on Hitler’s Fortress Europe, which is at hand.”

May 17, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The Iroquois Farm will discontinue the operation of its Ayrshire dairy cattle operation this summer. The approximately 50 head of registered stock will be sold at a dispersal sale scheduled at the farm on July 11. Thus will come to an end 55 continuous years of operation of one of the top Ayrshire herds in the world, founded by the late F. Ambrose Clark in 1914, and continued since his death in 1964, by his nephew Stephen C. Clark, Jr. Iroquois Farm’s herdsman for the past 34 years has been George A. Jackson who came to Iroquois in June 1930 from Connecticut Agricultural College, now the University of Connecticut.

May 14, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

When Sgt. Phil Stocking, a member of the Cooperstown police force is asked to recall cases that have meant a lot to him, he doesn’t talk about murders solved or robberies thwarted. Instead, he talks about a five-year-old boy he once found sitting under a tree crying, upset because his father had not picked him up from school. Stocking drove the child home. That boy is now a junior in college.

May 17, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Chris and Christine Vuolo got a shock on driving home from their five-year-old son’s T-ball game. Heading west on Armstrong Road about a half mile this side of Tanner Hill Road, their car startled a mountain lion, which then dashed away over an open field. Chris, a retired police officer from Long Island with 20-20 vision, estimated the cat weighed at least 150 pounds, since the family dog weighs 100, and he dwarfed my dog.”

May 15, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES • April 18, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES • April 18, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement – Notice: The Trustees of School District No. 1, will open a school, in the public school house in this village, on Wednesday, the 21st inst. under the direction of Mr. L. Squires. Terms of Tuition $2 to be applied on the first quarter. N.B. Any one sending in after the school commences, will not have any more to pay than their proportion of time from the time of commencing. Eseck Bradford, Buckingham Fitch, Trustees. Cooperstown, April 17, 1819.

April 19, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Judge Gridley held his Circuit Court here during the past week. A slander suit was tried, which from the standing of the parties Secor vs. Gilbert, both residents of Middlefield, excited much interest. Mr. Gilbert had lost from the money-drawer of his store in May last $568 in bank notes, and some circumstances had fixed suspicion upon Dr. Emenzo Secor as the aggressor, which led to the remark by Mr. G., pointing towards him in a room “there’s the rascal that stole my money,” or words of similar import. The suit was founded upon this charge, and a plea of justification put in. The words were proved, and the defense entered upon, being confined exclusively to circumstantial evidence, the detail of which would occupy more space than we have to spare. The case was summed up with ability by Mr. J.A. Spencer and Mr. Bowne and committed to the Jury by a luminous charge from Judge Gridley. The Jury were out about five hours, when they returned a verdict of $30 for the plaintiff.

April 15, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The Seminary as a Hotel. It may be remembered that several weeks since Mr. H.F. Phinney offered to take one-fourth of the stock necessary to reorganize the Seminary as a first-class institution, provided our citizens would take the rest. This offer has met with no response. Believing that the building, which is too large for a school, except of mammoth proportions, is eminently fitted by its location, grounds, prospects, internal arrangements, and convenient distance from the railroad station, for a summer boarding house, Mr. Phinney has decided to offer it for sale or lease for this purpose, holding that the best interests of our village will be consulted by this disposition of the property. (Ed. Note: The structure referred to was built in the mid-1850s to serve as a Seminary for the education of men and women. Cooper Lane Apartments are the current structures on the site.)

April 16, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

A few shad occasionally appear in the Cooperstown markets. They used to make their way up here at the time of the settlement of this village, via the Susquehanna River, on which there were no dams. There is a tree still standing in the village of Unadilla from one of the upper branches of which a shad was brought down by a rifle ball! The shad in question was held captive by a large fish hawk – fact! In 1887, it is stated, 1,568,637 shad were captured in the Hudson River. That was the banner year for shad.

April 19, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

(Excerpt from “Tail Spins” the newspaper of the Officers at the Aviators’ Hospital) “The periodic hike was pulled off last Friday (April 11) when some 65 or 70 pilots, observers, engineers, two sympathizers of the fair sex, and Mac the dog with Rags the little dogette headed out on the excellent state road south to the village of Milford. The vanguard was led by Captain Wharton who has charge of physical training of the Army flyers, and Lieutenant Cartmell, physical director, was in one of the scattered groups. The genial Mr. Smith who is a leading spirit of hikes and outdoor sports, was along to point out things of interest to the boys.”

April 16, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

From an Eighth A.A.F. Bomber Station in England comes the thrilling account of a flying fortress the crew of which missed death by inches when the propeller from one of its engines flew off, but which, though riddled with enemy fire, was able to return to base. One of the members of this crew was John A. Sill, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Reed Sill of Cooperstown, the tail gunner. The pilot who brought the plane in from an attack on war plants in Berlin, with two of its engines knocked out and its oxygen system damaged, is Lieutenant James L. Abernathy of Roselle, Illinois. The Flying Fort had dropped its bombs when a flak burst clipped its number three engine.

April 19, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Cooperstonian Stan Hall withdrew his application for a permit to open a brew pub in an old barn at the end of Cooper Lane at a meeting of the village planning board, held Tuesday, April 12. Hall stopped the application after the board informed him that there was insufficient access to the property for the use he had in mind. The withdrawal was apparently welcome news to about 20 area residents in attendance, many of whom had written letters of protest to the board and signed a petition against the project. “I’m glad that it went the way it went,” said Madeline Sansevere, who had organized the petition campaign, which collected 83 signatures. Sansevere added that she was not opposed to the idea of a pub, but rather to the location which raised concerns about traffic and customers at the pub disrupting the residential area.

April 19, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES • April 11, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES • April 11, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

From official documents transmitted to Congress during the last session, it appears that the total amount of gold, silver and copper coinage of the mint of the United States, from the date of the establishment up to the end of the year 1807, was $14,183,768.36; and that the amount of gold coins made during the year 1818, was $242,940; of silver, $1,070,427.50; of copper, $52,,320, making a total amount of $1,365,687.50 – which added to the aggregate of coinage in former years, makes the amount coined up to the first day of the present year $15, 549, 456.06. It further appears, that the net amount chargeable to the coinage of gold, silver and copper, from the commencement of the institution to December 31, 1818, including the cost of lots, buildings and machinery, was $514,046.

April 12, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

The meeting of the Otsego Democratic Association on the evening of Tuesday last, in commemoration of the birthday of the illustrious Jefferson was well-attended and went off with a great spirit. As the time for the meeting of the Democratic National Convention nears, the attention of the electors is more particularly directed to political considerations, and the democratic principle warms into active exercise. Such an influence was manifest on this occasion, when the speeches of Messrs. Starkweather and Bowne were applauded to the echo. The right spirit is awakened here – let it be diffused throughout the county by organization for effective political purposes connected with the spread of information. The Whigs have been busy for months with their Junius Tracts, Tribunes, &c., in answer to which let Truth and Facts be laid before the people with the same industry. That’s all honest men want, for they repudiate the federal sentiment that “the people are their own worst enemies.”

April 8, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

People are now talking of a park. Some gathering place, pleasing and cheery would be very desirable. But, for pity’s sake, do not let us call it a park! Let it be a “Green” or a “Common,” as more appropriate to our modest extent as a town. Nothing should be called a park under 50 acres. As well might we call Otsego Lake an Ocean! But, a “Green,” or a “Common,” or a “Playstow,” or “Playground,” of some acres, well planted with trees, flowering shrubs, with beaches, arbors and neat walks would be very pleasant.

April 9, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – Edward S. Clark and Walter C. Flanders sailed for Europe on Saturday last. They are to be gone until early next autumn.
Andrew J. Seymour, said to be the world’s greatest mind-reader, human thought magnet, and spirit medium, is to appear at Bowne Opera House next Wednesday evening.

April 12, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

A New Feature in The Freeman’s Journal – “In the Realm of Womankind” – Here’s a little department just in its infancy, to be sure, that should grip every woman reader of The Freeman’s Journal – snappy little articles that range from the latest quirks in needle art to the great things the women of the United States are doing. Later on there’ll be a weekly fashion letter, and perhaps a pattern design. And for next week there’ll be a brand new newspaper in Cooperstown. It will be Cooperstown’s guests – the patients at the U.S. Aviation Hospital. A certain portion of page two of the Journal will be roped off for their little news hangar. Lieutenant E.C. Miller, an old newspaperman from Nashville, Tennessee will be editor.

April 9, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The Law Day Committee of the Otsego County Bar Association announces that Mr. Stephen C. Clark, Jr., of Cooperstown has been selected for the annual Liberty Bell Citizenship Award for outstanding community service. The award will be presented to Mr. Clark by Supreme Court Justice Joseph P. Molinari at a dinner at the Otesaga Hotel in Cooperstown on May 1. During a major part of each year, Mr. Clark, like his father before him, is seen in Cooperstown and the surrounding countryside, analyzing and helping to guide the many activities of the organizations with which he is connected.

April 9, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Who says you can’t go home again? Don’t tell that to Christine McBrearty-Hulse who graduated from Cooperstown High School in 1984, went away to college, and then returned to work as a counselor at Cooperstown Elementary School. Not only has she succeeded at her job and initiated many new programs, but she was also selected as the New York State Elementary School Counselor of the Year by the New York State School Counselor Association. In her five-year tenure at Cooperstown, McBrearty-Hulse has started up and initiated many programs in the elementary school. Among these are LINKS (Linking Interested Notable and Kind Students), Pickle Pals, Banana Splits and the Lunch Bunch, New Student Groups, CATS (a chemical awareness team), Caring and Sharing Week, and the
Primary Mental Health Project.

April 12, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Ted Spencer, who came to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum from a corporate communications position in Philadelphia 29 years ago, has announced his retirement as Curator at the museum. Spencer will be succeeded by Erik Strohl, a CGP alumnus, who will take the title Senior Director of Exhibitions. During his tenure at the Hall, Spencer applied his corporate experience in developing the Grandstand Theater. Spencer is also noted for his work to document the contributions of “Women in Baseball.” Spencer plans to volunteer time in retirement to sorting through 60 years of letters and documents that have never been organized.

April 10, 2009

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103