News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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BOUND VOLUMES: Dec. 5, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Dec. 5, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Robbery – On the night of Thursday last, the shoe shop of Mr. Stephen Gregory, of this Village, was forcibly entered and robbed of stock and shoes to the amount of at least $250. Suspicion has rested upon John Gardner, who was, late in the evening, seen lurking about town, and had formerly been familiar in the shop. He is a short, thick-set fellow, of dark complexion, with remarkably large eyebrows,
his countenance being indelibly stamped with villainy, and has been a sailor. Several persons have been in pursuit, but as yet no trace of the property can be found.

December 6, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from an essay on Naturalization. “The root of native Americanism is selfishness. Its creed is ‘I, myself.’ It knows nothing of the great principle of doing unto others as you would be done unto. It never heard of the great hypothesis – for if you love them which love you, what reward have you? Do not even the publicans the same? And if ye salute your brethren only, what do you more than others? Do not even the publicans so? Exclusion is at the foundation of Nativism and is therefore repugnant to Christianity, and to the inherent and inalienable rights with which man is endowed by his Creator, and upon which rests the grand theory of all American institutions. The sincere Abolitionist erects a political creed which vindicates human rights in the broadest latitude. It admits no distinctions of persons or of country – no, not even of the most marked distinction which nature has put upon humanity – complexion.

December 2, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Court Proceedings: The County Court and Sessions commenced a term on Monday, Judge Sturges presiding. The Grand Jury was called and sworn, and E.R. Thurber, Esq., appointed foreman. The business in the Sessions was then taken up, and the indictments pending against Samuel Milson and Samuel Ludlam for selling liquor without license were called. The court held the indictments invalid on the ground that the offence was not an indictable one. The law provides a penalty of $50 for each offence, and imprisonment for non-payment of the penalty.

December 9, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

A Brutal Game – The football game for the championship of Washington, D.C. between Georgetown University and the Columbia Athletic Club was witnessed by 7,000 people. The slugging was continuous until in the second half both teams with their substitutes, engaged in a general fight, which the police had to stop. Georgetown had the worst of the casualties, five of the team being disabled. Three men were carried from the field on the shoulders of their comrades in the first fifteen minutes of play. Bahen, quarterback of Columbia, had a broken shoulder bone, and Carmody, captain and halfback of Georgetown, had his collar bone broken and knee wrenched.
Two Harvard men were knocked senseless in the game with Pennsylvania. The week before the papers published the death of two young men, from the effects of playing football. Bernard Feeter, the student of Fairfield Seminary, who went crazy after a game in which he was seriously injured about the head is receiving careful attention at the Utica insane asylum. As a result of the defeat of the University of California by the Stanford football team, “Brick” Whitehouse of the Stanfords was probably mortally shot by Alexander Loughborough, a law student at the University of California. And, this is the sort of sport indulged in and patronized by 7,000 men and women in the nation’s capital, there on the day set apart by solemn proclamation by the President of the United States for “Thanksgiving to God as a Nation.”

December 6, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

More than 700 farmers of Otsego County with their wives and families attended the annual Farm Bureau meeting at the Oneonta Theatre last Thursday. Perhaps the most startling talk of the meeting was that given by Dr. Ruby Green Smith, assistant state leader of Home Economics agents. She declared that wives of farmers of today are “modern slaves.” Her statement was based on a survey of 1,427 farmers’ homes in New York. “Their working day ends,” said Dr. Smith, “16 to 18 hours after it begins. They are the only individuals who earn an income but do not receive it. The hired girl on the farm has become nearly extinct. But nevertheless, the housewife and helpmeet of the farmer is expected to do all the housework, and provide for the temporal needs of the household, and to aid in the caring for poultry, dairy cattle and the garden. While modern implements are provided for the farm work, ordinary household conveniences found in city households are lacking. The city housewife has running water. Many farm wives must carry water from a well.

December 10, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Marine Private First Class Bennett O. Potter, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett O. Potter of Cooperstown, R.D. 5, has recently returned to the United States after 29 months overseas. He has been reclassified and reassigned at a Marine Corps base in this country, and was granted a furlough. A member of the First Marine Division, Pvt. Potter last saw action at Pelelieu, Palau Islands, Pacific. His unit was awarded the Presidential Citation. He is a graduate of Cooperstown High School and joined the Marines in January 1942.

December 6, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

A Cooperstown engineer’s invention is now on the Moon as part of the scientific laboratory left behind by the Apollo XII astronauts. A flexural pivot, a type of frictionless oscillating bearing, invented by Henry Troeger of this village plays a vital role in the operation of the seismometer left by astronauts to measure shock waves from the lunar surface.
The pivot is part of a gimbal system that supports the seismometer and allows it to regain a level position after a shock has been registered. Mr. Troeger joined Bendix in 1941 and is currently the Manager for Advance Design for Utica’s Bendix Fluid Power Division. He resides with his family on Lake Road near Cooperstown.

December 3, 1969

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 28, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 28, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

From the Boston Recorder – Mr. Willis – Although my circumstances do not allow me to do much in the way of spreading the glorious Gospel, yet, taking the hint from the plan for doing good by having a “Missionary Field” on one’s farm, I reserved a spot, nine feet square in the corner of my garden, which is all the land I cultivate, and on the afternoon of election day, planted it with water melons. By the sale of these, I am able to enclose three dollars, which it is my wish should be appropriated to the Jerusalem Mission. And whether I am able to contribute any more, or not, I am resolved, while I live, to pray for the peace of Jerusalem. A Friend to the Missions.

November 29, 2019

175 YEARS AGO

Dr. Wieting’s Lectures – We have been much interested and edified during the past week by attending a course of Lectures on the Anatomy and Physiology of the human body, in connection with the laws of Life and Health, the causes of disease and the means of preventing it, illustrated with a large French Manikin, six feet high, representing to life nearly 2,000 parts of the human body. This wonderful machine, the first completion of whose model is said to have consumed a quarter of a century at hard labor, makes palpable before the eye of the admiring spectator every portion of the Human Form; and a few hours only are required to impart a more perfect knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology in general, than could be possibly obtained from the severest study, even at Medical Colleges, of months, if not years. The attendance of our inhabitants, embracing both sexes, has been large, and we hazard nothing in saying that all have been highly instructed in regard to their own existence and exceedingly gratified with the manner of Dr. Wieting, who united affability and humor with the most profound observations connected with his subject. Never were 12 and a half cents more profitably expended than in attending one of these lectures.

November 25, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Your Reading for 1870 – This is the time of year when publishers of newspapers and magazines are actively canvassing for new subscribers. The competition is so great that care and discrimination are needed to determine which to accept, which to reject – to separate the wheat from the chaff. To meet various wants and needs, especially in large family circles, a choice assortment of publications is desirable. There are many families, however, who do not feel able to take more than one newspaper. To all such The Freeman’s Journal is especially valuable as a local and general newspaper and as giving a choice selection of the best miscellaneous reading the country affords, interesting and instructive alike to young and old. The amount of reading matter it has given has largely exceeded that of any other paper published in this county.

December 2, 1969

125 YEARS AGO

Local: The heavyweights of the Oneonta Normal School proved rather too much for our Y.M.C.A. boys at the game of football played last week. The Minstrel entertainment given by home talent on Friday evening for the benefit of the Orphanage was witnessed by a good-sized audience, and gave entire satisfaction. The jokes were new, and the singing, tumbling and the farce all drew forth merited applause. The Orphanage received $18.10 of the net proceeds.
It will soon be time to lay out plans for next summer. The Cuban Giants have written to know whether they will be wanted for three games at Cooperstown.

November 29, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Royal Kretzinger, who lives on the Gay Hunter farm on Beaver Meadow Road found two of his ducks dead Friday morning. Their heads had been eaten by some animal and the bodies torn. Saturday, a rabbit was found, partially eaten. Mr. Kretzinger set a trap near the spot where he found the dead ducks and rabbit. On Monday he found the destroyer – instead of a fox or skunk that he had expected to find, instead there was an unusually large owl in the trap.

December 3, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Ens. Howard L. Snyder, USNR, is spending a leave at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Snyder at Whig Corners, having completed a month’s training on PBY boats following his
graduation October 17 at Pensacola, Florida when he was awarded his gold wings and the rank of Ensign. A graduate of Cooperstown High School in 1934, Ens. Snyder entered the service in
February 1942, receiving his preliminary training at Colgate University, followed by work at Chapel Hill, N.C. and Peru, Indiana.

November 29, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

James E. Dow, president of Ingalls, Connell and Dow Funeral Home in Cooperstown, has announced the addition of Peter Albin Deysenroth, licensed funeral director, to the staff. Deysenroth brings with him eight years of experience in the funeral profession from his home state of Connecticut. In 1987, he graduated as valedictorian of his class from Simmons School of Mortuary Science in Syracuse with a membership in Mu Sigma Alpha, the mortuary fraternity. He further received his Associates in Applied Science degree in Mortuary Science from Herkimer Community College where he graduated cum laude with membership in Phi Theta Kappa. Deysenroth is also active as a musician and plays pipe organ and piano for his church and others.

November 30, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a Letter to the Editor from Irwin Gooen: “Growing up in a home of immigrant parents, my English was good enough when I was in high school to earn me good grades in writing in
spite of splitting infinitives. When I served in the military, sharing space with other young men from around the country, I became more aware of how my companions spoke and got laughed at for my non-standard use of English – say when I wanted someone to turn off a light in the barracks and yelled – ‘Hey, make out the light!” Everyone started mimicking me – ‘Make out, make out!’ But people understood me and my English, which was good enough for me.”

November 27, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 14, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 14, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisements: Fresh Groceries – Among which are the following: Jamaica and St. Croix Rum; Molasses; Lump and Brown Sugars; Hyson and Hyson Skim Teas; Plug, Pigtail, Ladies Twist, and Paper Tobacco; Box, Drum and Keg Raisins; Shad, Mackerel, Herring and Codfish; Black and Scotch Snuff; Pepper, Allspice, Ginger, Starch, and Indigo; Pipes, Soap, Candles, Filberts, Almonds, Alabama and Pea Nuts, Spanish, New Orleans and American Segars; Alum and Pearlash. Also – Turks Island and Basket Salt; Powder and Shot; Bed Cords; Shovels; Corn Brooms; Shoe Brushes; Liquid and Paste Blacking; Penknives; Pocket Books, &c, &c. – All of which will be sold at reduced prices, for cash or approved credit. Philip Thurber, Ira A. Thurber.

November 22, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Ring-Bone and Spavin – Persons having Ring-Boned and Spavined Horses, would do well to call and purchase a bottle of the “Ring-Bone Specific,” prepared by the
subscriber, if they wish their Limping, Spavined, and Ring-Boned Horses cured. The following are a few of the many who have recently cured their Horses by the use of this medicine, viz: Daniel Marvin, Charles Kellogg, Robert Russell, Hassan Monroe, Philip Gano, and Ebenezer House. P.ROOF – Sold by J.H. Babcock, Fort Plain and by the merchants generally in Otsego County. Cooperstown, November 1844.

November 18, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Temporary Relief for Poor – The constant and large increase in the amount of money raised on the Town of Otsego for temporary relief of the poor very naturally attracts attention and calls out comment. The amount voted by the Board of Supervisors this year is $1,260; last year it was $1,000; in 1867, $900; in 1866, $800; in 1865, $600; in 1864, $500. What is the occasion and necessity of this great increase with little or no increase in population, and with ample work for all willing to labor at good wages? Where are the evidences of any increased suffering among the poor classes, or noticeable increase in their numbers? The several church societies in this village, and private individuals disburse no small amount in charity to the deserving poor each year and there is no disposition to see such suffer. As a general thing the most deserving are the least inclined to seek the aid to which they are best entitled. On the other hand is a class who spend a large proportion of their surplus earnings for whiskey, and expect the Town will carry them through the winter.

November 25, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Mrs. George Clarke is to sail for Europe on Saturday, going direct to Genoa, and will spend the winter in the south of France. Her daughters remain at “Dower House” Pegg’s Point.
If satisfactory arrangements can be made a football game will be played here on Thanksgiving Day between the Y.M.C.A. team and one from Oneonta.
The Orphanage is in pressing need of financial aid to carry on its good work being done for a class of poor and unfortunate children. On Friday evening the citizens of Cooperstown and vicinity will be offered an opportunity to show their good will toward that deserving charity, and at the same time to enjoy a lively Minstrel Entertainment, which is to be given at Village Hall by several young men of Cooperstown. The tickets are 25, 35 and 50 cents each – for sale at the drug store of H.C. Church.

November 22, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

What has become of the Chamber of Commerce of Cooperstown, to which several scores of firms and individuals pledged to give their funds in order that “it might be maintained.” E.A. Stanford, the capable and efficient Secretary resigned his position effective October 1. Since then the Chamber of Commerce has been as dead as a door mouse, whatever that may be. There have been two meetings called since then by William Beattie, the temporary secretary. One of these disclosed that not even a quorum of the Board of Directors was interested enough to attend. The second meeting, held two or more weeks ago, disclosed that the board acted on the proposition to have a memorial for baseball placed at the birthplace of the national game in this village.

November 19, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The old Cooperstown High School building at the corner of Chestnut Street and Glen Avenue has been sold to Ralph Larsen, a Cazenovia developer who plans to demolish the structure and erect two twelve-unit apartment houses on the 2.9 acre site. The site has been on the market since the school was vacated last February and the students moved to the new Junior-Senior High School off Linden Avenue. Mr. Larsen, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruno Larsen of Cooperstown, indicated that he hoped to tear the building down this fall and start construction of the two apartment buildings in the spring. The complex will be named Cooper Lane Apartments.

November 26, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Bill Nelson’s seventh grade Social Studies class recently participated in a Colonial fashion show with costumes provided by the Glimmerglass Opera. Students donning the period attire were Aaron Mendelsohn, Martin Park, Charles Miller, Jennifer Jicha, Elena Mabie, Sarah Loveland, Christine Lane, Justin Yerdon, Justin Brooks, Jared Bowen, Ethan Buck, Jennifer Daley, Alexis Turner, Elaine Supp, Angie Erway, Christine Lane, Alan Linn, Athena Hall, Rachel Darling, Melissa Hayes, and Jessica Burgess.

November 23, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

When Cooperstown Rotarians sang “Bye, Bye Blackbird” at their Tuesday, November 17 meeting, Rotarian Margaret Savoie – a new Springbrook Home board member – remarked that her first tap-dancing routine, at age 7, was to that same tune. “I’d pay to see that,” a fellow club member said. “For Springbrook?” Margaret queried. Springbrook fundraiser Mike Stein put up $20, and the club sang “Blackbird” again, as Savoie performed her tap dance routine to the delight of her Rotary colleagues. Later in the meeting, Patricia Kennedy, Executive Director of the Springbrook Children’s Home, spoke about plans for a $5 million fund drive. Afterwards, Rotary Club President Bill Glockler, Treasurer Jake Majaika and Allocations Chairman Chad Welch presented Kennedy with a $1,000 check and announced that the club has committed to donating $5,000 over three years.

November 20, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 14, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 14, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Bank Directors – The following gentlemen were chosen Directors of the Central Bank at Cherry Valley: Joseph White, president, David Little, Elias Bramin, Barnabas Eldredge, Jabez D. Hammond, Levi Beardsley, William Campbell, James O. Morse, Peter Magher, Delos White, William Beekman, Henry Brown, and Thomas Fuller.

November 15, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

When we look back upon the terrible struggle through which the democracy of the Northern States have lately passed, who does not feel the deepest admiration of the sterling character of the electors of our country? Who will now doubt the permanence of our institutions and the incorruptibility of the great masses of our voters? They have been lately tried in a fiery crucible and they have come out purified and strengthened. At no time since the organization of our government, has so concerted and well-devised a plan been carried out by the Whig leaders, for the purchase of power in New York and Pennsylvania, which states it was well known would decide the Presidency of the Union. Never before have such enormous sums of money been raised by the Whigs, as during the late campaign. The Masses have come to the rescue – the triumph is all their own. Every reflecting American must feel a pride in the recent result in this State. Not more because the People have elevated able, upright and honorable statesmen to the first offices in the nation, but because it conclusively shows that money, no matter how well devised, cannot purchase the Presidency of the United States.

November 18, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Attention is called to the fact that the day of publication of this paper has been changed to Thursday. All communications and advertisements should be handed in not later than 10 a.m. of Wednesday – the earlier in the week the better.
Rev. C.L. Watt, a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University, has accepted a call to the Pastorship of the Universalist churches of this village and Fly Creek.
The salary of the Keeper of the County House should be raised to $1,000 a year. When the duties of the place are properly attended to, he will earn that amount. At present he is the poorest paid officer in the county. The position is an important one, which only a good and efficient man, such as we now have, should ever hold.

November 18, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

A New Pastor – At a meeting at the Presbyterian Church of the congregation, it was unanimously decided to extend a call to The Rev. Robert I. McBride of Mount Vernon, to become pastor of the church. He has had three years’
experience in the ministry, chiefly missionary work in New York City and among the “mountain whites” of Virginia.
We did not witness the panoramic farce of “A Trip to the City” given in Village Hall last Saturday evening – in regard to the merits of which there were different opinions expressed, some favorable in part or whole, others quite the reverse. Complaints were made by the company giving the performance that the stage is not deep enough for convenience in acting.
Y.M.C.A. – The “Week of Prayer” is being observed at the rooms of the Association, the services beginning at 8 o’clock. On Thursday evening they will be held in the Baptist Church, when Rev. W.B. Thorp of Binghamton will deliver an address.

November 15, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Pfc. Donald C. Reed, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Reed of Cooperstown has been awarded the Purple Heart and Oak Leaf Cluster for having been wounded in action a second time on October 15. Sergeant Reed received his basic training at Camp Croft, South Carolina. He was home on furlough in January 1944 and then returned to Fort Meade, George Meade. He went overseas in February and joined the Fifth Army in Italy. He was first wounded in June. He then rejoined his company and took part in the invasion of Southern France. He was serving with the Seventh Army when last wounded. He is now being treated in a hospital in Italy.

November 15, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Richard A. White, instructor in Mathematics at Cooperstown Central School, has been named varsity
basketball coach at the school, filling the vacancy caused
by the resignation during the summer of John H. “Pete” Clark, Jr. Mr. White was moved up from the Junior
Varsity coaching job which he has held since 1965.
Mr. White played on the Binghamton North High School varsity basketball team while a student there, and on the Paul Smith’s College varsity team for two years. Don Howard, the Eighth Grade Social Studies teacher at CCS succeeds Mr. White as Junior Varsity coach.

November 19, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

A host of village merchants gathered at the Tunnicliff Inn Monday night to listen as the goals and aspirations of a proposed Cooperstown Merchants Association (CMA) were laid on the table. Vin Russo, owner of Mickey’s Place on Main Street, outlined the mission statement and the program ideas that were drawn up by the committee. Russo stated that the main goal of a CMA is to bring people into Cooperstown so that they might leave their money behind.

November 16, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

In 71 years in the meadow between Brooklyn and Susquehanna avenues, the Clark family’s fallow deer have never been attacked by predators, according to Jane Forbes Clark, whose great-uncle Ambrose brought the herd back from Europe in 1938. That changed in recent weeks as a dozen of the animals were bitten in the neck, possibly by a coyote, and either died or had to be put down. “We are going to put up a bigger fence and hope that does it,” said Miss Clark. “We’ll keep fingers crossed,” she added.
Cameras installed along the perimeter fence taped a large coyote inside the pen. There are a handful of spots where the coyote could have entered. Miss Clark said her great-uncle saw fallow deer herds in Europe, “thought they were pretty and wanted to see them from the house.” The house was the 40-room Iroquois Mansion located behind stone walls before it was demolished in 1983.

November 13, 2009

 

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 7, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 7, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

The Editor of the Catskill Recorder, in speaking of the late Agricultural exhibition in this county, commends our citizens for having taken the lead in a march so important to the interests of the state, and says, “the President’s address, the report of the viewing committee, and “The Epitome of Agriculture,” were well-worthy the occasion, as the occasion was well-worthy of them.” He also compliments us upon the improved appearance of this paper, and hopes, that “although we may differ politically, yet in all measures for the advancement of the general interests of society, we may be allied.” To this we respond Amen. The post occupied by the editor of a public journal, is at all times important, and more particularly so, when the public mind seems fitted to judge candidly and impartially upon subjects intimately connected with the prosperity and happiness of the country. It shall always be our study to render as much service as lies in our power, to aid the cause of virtue and support the government which protects our life, liberty and property. And, we are not at all apprehensive, in discharging this duty, that we shall war with an editor so intelligent and respectable as Mr. Croswell, whose paper not only exhibits judgment and a refined taste, but very considerable talent.

November 8, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Election Results – Otsego County: Democratic Majorities – Burlington, 140; Butternuts, 9; Exeter, 25; Edmeston, 52; Hartwick, 22; Laurens, 20; Milford, 50; Maryland, 42; Middlefield, 142; New Lisbon, 152; Oneonta, 138; Otego, 29; Otsego, 175; Pittsfield, 57; Plainfield, 31; Springfield, 86; Unadilla, 210; Westford, 2; Worcester, 42. Total: 1,494 less 172 gives Polk’s overall majority: 1,322, a gain of 508 on the vote of 1840, the majority then being 724. Otsego has done her part in pushing the column to Victory!

November 11, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Thanksgiving Hospital – Second Annual Report (Excerpted): At the close of last year’s report, the hope was expressed that the year 1869 would not pass without an effort being made to pay off at least a small portion of the mortgage; also that the beginning of an endowment fund should be made, were it only a very small sum. These hopes have been more than fulfilled. The entire mortgage of $1,554 with interest to the amount of $146.68, has been paid. The beginning of an endowment fund amounting to $2,050, has also been made. Improvements on the house and grounds to the amount of $506 have been completed. A dumb-waiter, very ingenious in its contrivance, has been introduced, passing upward from the basement to the third floor. Apple trees, plum trees, pear trees, currant and raspberry buses have been set out. A neat plank walk has been laid from the porch to the street.

November 5, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

An enthusiastic meeting of forty or more service men and women was held on Friday night of last week in the Village Club, for the purpose of officially forming the Cooperstown Post of the American Legion, composed entirely of men and women who served the United States in an active capacity during the World War. Dr. George W. Augustin, Otsego County Chairman of the Legion, and representative of the Oneonta Post, together with Dr. F.J. McMenamin, also of Oneonta, addressed the gathering and pointed out the importance of former soldiers and sailors sticking together in the years to come. One important result of this might be, he said, the granting of an additional bonus for servicemen by Congress, which would amount in some instances to about $200 depending on length of service. He was loudly cheered.

November 12, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

In Cooperstown: The Cooperstown Central School basketball squad is hampered by a lack of playing shoes, which cannot be obtained because of a war shortage. Coach Lester G. Bursey therefore is making an appeal to former high school players to turn in their old shoes to the team and thereby aid the cause.

November 8, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The cornerstone of Otsego County’s new office building will be laid Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Supervisor Guy E. Rathbun of Morris, chairman of the Otsego County Building Committee announced plans for the dedication and cornerstone laying ceremony at the final session of the Board of Supervisors. The Board of Supervisors goes out of business December 31 as Otsego County’s legislative body. The following day, the 27-member Board will be replaced by a 14-member Board of Representatives elected a week ago. Eight of the 27 members of the Board of Supervisors, seven Republicans and one Democrat, were named to the new Board of Representatives.

November 12, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Losing a game in the last seconds is always tough. But, if you are a senior, and it’s your last game, it may seem even tougher. Those were the circumstances that the Cooperstown football team, with 15 seniors, dealt with on Saturday afternoon when they lost to host Oriskany 22 to 16 on a 20-yard touchdown pass with nine seconds left in the game. Seniors playing their last game for Cooperstown were Howard Graham, Buddy Lippitt, Mason Sanford, Chris Wells, Fred Koffer, Brian Ough, Tavish Rathbone, Frank Wilsey, Brad Ainslie, Roger Bennett, Dakin Campbell, Josh Maher, Roger Sprague, Jim Clyne and Sean Hill.

November 2, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Brenda Wedderspoon-Gray was honored with receipt of the 2009 Patrick C. Fetterman Award for service to youth from Jane Forbes Clark, President of the Clark Foundation at a luncheon at the Otesaga Hotel on November 2. Wedderspoon-Gray is Aquatics Director at the Clark Sports Center.
Christopher Talevi, Roanoke, Virginia, grandson of Vera and Bruno Talevi, Cooperstown, has achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. Christopher raised $2,500 to build a 10 by 12 foot shed for his city’s recreation department. It took 400 man-hours. Christopher’s father Steven Talevi and his uncle Robert Talevi are also Eagle Scouts.

Bassett Hospital’s Hartwick Clinic for dermatology, pain management, plastic surgery and advanced skincare opened October 19 in a low-slung building on Route 28 that originally served as home to the Corvette Hall of Fame.

November 6, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 31, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 31, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Petticoat Government has rarely been established over nations. Queen Elizabeth exercised it but she was always considered more like a man than a woman. Besides, she governed men under a constitution which men made for their own use and benefit, and she was therefore a kind of usurper in her place. As it has always been difficult for men to contend seriously with women, we advise the ministry and the borough-mongers and let the Spinsters take the business in hand. What the peculiar features of the new constitution shall be, we pretend not to conjecture. Probably one provision of it will be, that the girls shall in future go a courting, and the lads stay at home and be wooed. And we should not be surprised if the old-fashioned mode of travelling on saddles and pillions should be revived, and the poor man be forced to ride behind. Whatever it may be it will be something laughable, that these modern Eves should produce a revolution in a country that has so long withstood the exertions and machinations of so many Burdetts, Hunts, Cartwrights, and Ruta Baga Merchants.

October 25, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

A Word of Caution – The Whigs are full of tricks and will resort to any means to prop up their failing cause. Even here in the country, we hear of their maneuvers and attempts at bargaining for votes. It is said that they propose in some cases to vote the Liberty Ticket if Democrats will pledge themselves to do so; in others not to vote at all, or “pair off” with a Democrat; and to vote for Mr. Wright in exchange for a Clay Electoral vote. All this shows a destitution of political principle in the proposer, and warrants the belief that such arrangements would not be regarded by him if made. Our advice then is that Democrats should frown upon every attempt at bargains made by a Whig, and vote as his principles indicate to be his duty to his country. Act honestly, openly, manfully, in exercising the electoral franchise, despising trick and bargain, and Democracy is certain to prevail.

October 28, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Poor Gas – There is a very general complaint among gas consumers in this village, and not without just cause. The price is high, and the gas poor with so little illuminating power for a few nights past that men in a business like ours find it inadequate. The stores are also poorly lighted. At times the smoke from the gas has blackened the walls and annoyed those forced to breathe it. The dry goods merchants say it has damaged fine goods. The consumers have been imposed upon long enough and have borne it patiently until patience has ceased to be a virtue. Scolding in the newspapers will not remedy it. Our citizens feel that they must have better gas from the same source or go back to the use of kerosene, or organize a new gas company. The citizens might also authorize the village Trustees to put up works and run them for the public benefit. If necessary, let a meeting of citizens be called.

October 22, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Mohican Club – At the annual meeting held at the club rooms on Monday evening, the following officers were chosen: G.M. Jarvis, president; Charles T. Brewer, vice-president; L.E. Walrath, secretary; C.W. G. Ross, treasurer; C.T. Brewer, C.R. Burch, M.C. Bundy and S.M. Shaw, trustees.

October 25, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

One of the largest real estate deals in Cooperstown for several months past was consummated on Monday when William Smalley, proprietor of the Village Theatre, became the owner and proprietor of Carr’s Hotel, on Main Street, one of the oldest buildings, and a distinct landmark in the Village of Cooperstown. The consideration was not made public. Mr. Smalley took possession immediately. Smalley then sold the west portion of the hotel, the main structure, to James J. Byrd Jr. The hotel’s annex portion will be torn down next spring and replaced with a handsome new brick business block containing a motion picture theatre with a seating capacity of 1,000. Another portion of the new building will be devoted to a retail business house.

October 22, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Literacy tests for new voters will be given in the Cooperstown Central School building Tuesday, October 31 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and on Election Day, November 7 from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. All new voters must show evidence of literacy to the Election Board. The Regents preliminary certificate or any other higher certificate will be accepted. All people who completed the work of the sixth grade or its equivalent will be issued a Certificate of Literacy without examinations. All others will be required to take the test.

October 25, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Four friends needed quick cash for a restaurant meal, and so decided to stop at an ATM in downtown Brooklyn over the weekend. They ended up thwarting a robbery. Dr. Eric Knight, 29, Bassett Hospital chief resident of internal medicine was with his fiancée, Susan Lasher, owner of Global Traders in Cooperstown, and Katherine Marks, a teacher. They were visiting Brooklyn resident, Elizabeth Cooper, 27. As Cooper was extracting funds from the machine in a bank lobby Enrique Maldonado, 44, of the Bronx attempted to grab the money from Cooper’s hand who then latched on to his arm to resist. Dr. Knight saw the struggle and intervened to help Cooper. As the struggle ensued two bystanders came to the rescue and a police cruiser was flagged down. Maldonado was arrested and charged with robbery and assault.

October 26, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 17, 2018

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 17, 2018

200 YEARS AGO

Communications – The Synod of Albany, at its last sessions in Cherry Valley, divided the Presbytery of Oneida, and formed from it a new Presbytery, to be denominated the “Presbytery of Otsego,” which by order of the Synod, is to hold its first meeting at the Presbyterian Meeting-House, in Cooperstown, on the first Tuesday of November next, at 11 o’clock a.m.
Advertisement – New Grocery. The subscriber respectfully informs the public that he has this day opened a new Grocery Store, the west part of the building opposite Mr. Bradford’s card factory, where he offers for sale a general assortment of groceries all of which are of the first quality, and will be disposed of on the most moderate terms for cash. Tavern keepers and others are invited to call. Jonathan Fitch.

October 18, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democrats of Otsego County! Are you ready for the great contest on November 5? Do you know your exact strength in your respective towns? If not, go to work forthwith, and organize in such a manner as to secure the positive attendance at the polls at an early hour of the day of every Democratic voter. The stake is well worth the labor, and besides, patriotism, love of country, impel to duty in this respect. Let us roll up our majority so as to secure the State Banner! Much is expected of Old Democratic Otsego – let us hold on to our good name, and more than gratify our political friends in other parts of the State. Every man upon duty, and the work is done. Otsego is the Banner County!

October 21, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Orphan House of the Holy Savior – A committee of gentlemen belonging to the Episcopal Church in the new Diocese of Albany, have recently purchased the old Masters’ Farm on the eastern shore of the Lake, two miles from this village, for the purpose of opening a charitable institution under the title of “The Orphan House of the Holy Savior” – a home and industrial school for orphans, half orphans and destitute children. The institution is one of general benevolence, open to all destitute children in this part of the state. Its object is to bring up these children in accordance with Christian principles, to lives of usefulness and respectability. They will be taught to earn an honest livelihood for themselves and thus be prepared to become worthy members of society. The farm consists of 88 acres of land with a front on the lake.

October 5, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

An “Inquirer” asks: “What is the game called “bottle pool?” It is played on a pool table – being a billiard table with six pockets – with three balls, a leather bottle and a cue. It has the main features of billiards, is more fun, and yet requires considerable skill to be played successfully. Mr. S.S. Edick is perhaps the most expert player of the game belonging to the Mohican Club.
The first snow of the season fell Sunday, October 15, 2019, melting as fast as it came. That night the mercury dropped to the freezing point.
A sewer is to be laid through Glen Avenue extending from Railroad to Chestnut Street. And so our village improvements gradually progress.

October 18, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Suitable recognition of Cooperstown as the birthplace of baseball and erection of a monument has been suggested by to the National Baseball Commission by four Ilion, New York fans, three of them big-leaguers of by-gone days. The plan will be the biggest piece of national advertising for this village that has ever been known. The four men who started the ball rolling are Hardie Richardson, one of Detroit’s star players of years ago; Mike Fogarty, another old leaguer; George E. Oliver, the Ilion Cricket Champion; and Patrick F. Fitzpatrick, also of Ilion. In a letter to Sam Crane, well known sports writer of the Hearst newspapers, the four men wrote: “Enclosed you will find express order for $1, being a payment of 25 cents each by the undersigned who are acting upon a suggestion that a memorial of baseball be established at Cooperstown, N.Y. where the game originated. (Ed. Note: Baseball historians have since established that the modern game has multiple geographic, cultural, and human roots which coalesced over decades beginning as early as the 1600s to emerge in the mid-19th century as the game we now know as baseball).

October 15, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The Cardiff Giant, the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people, will observe his 100th birthday on Thursday, October 16, this week. The giant, a prominent exhibit on the grounds of The Farmers’ Museum here for the past 21 years was the subject of a talk by Dr. Louis C. Jones, Director of the New York State Historical Association, at the regular weekly luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club at the Hotel Otesaga on Tuesday. It was just 100 years ago on October 16, 1869 that workmen, who had been called in to dig a well on Stub Newell’s farm near Cardiff, New York, uncovered the giant gypsum marble stone figure that weighs 2,990 pounds and measures 10 feet 4.5 inches in length. (Ed. Note: The Cardiff Giant hoax, conceived in 1867-1868 by George Hull, a disgruntled cigar merchant, created a sensation, attracted international attention, and although debunked, enriched both George Hull and his co-conspirator Stub Newell).

October 5, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

In a dairy world dominated by men, Jennifer Huntington stands out in the crowd. This highly experienced dairy professional exemplifies the increasing role that women are assuming in the dairy industry. In addition to serving as herdsperson for her father at Cooperstown Holstein Corporation Farm just south of Cooperstown, she also sits on the Board of Directors for the Otsego County Cooperative Extension. Besides maintaining the health and performance of an all-Holstein herd of more than 500 animals, she also applies new techniques to get the best possible return from the dairy operation. “Deep down, I always wanted to be in dairy farming,” she said. I enjoy working with cattle and being outside.”

October 19, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

After coming off the second perfect season this decade, the CCS Redskins football team head into the Class C sectionals against Saquoit 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, at Lambert Field.
The team’s 6-0 record, accomplished at home with a 26-0 victory Saturday the 10th against the Herkimer Magicians, bookends the decade of CCS athletic history: The 2001 team likewise had a perfect season, winning eight victories in all before being derailed in sectional competition.
This year as then, “we knew we had a lot of potential,” said Head Coach Steve Pugliese, who also coached during the 2001 undefeated season, and played on coach Ted Kantorowski’s perfect 1970 team.

October 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 10, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 10, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisements: Evening School – Israel Day, will open an Evening School, the Monday evening after the Fair, at his school room in which will be taught Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and English Grammar.
Medical Meeting – Notice is given that an Annual Meeting of the Otsego Medical Society, will be held at the House of Joseph Griffin, in Cooperstown, on Monday, the 18th day of October next at one o’clock p.m. T. Pomeroy, Secretary.
Caution to Trespassers – As many persons have been in the habit of committing trespasses on the estate of the late William Cooper, I offer a reward of double the penalty prescribed by law, to anyone who will give me information of such trespass, and furnish sufficient evidence of the fact. William Cooper.

October 11, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Notices – We are requested to mention that Dr. King will lecture at the Presbyterian Church in Fly Creek on Monday evening , the subject being the effect of alcohol on the human stomach.
Cassius M. Clay and Gerrit Smith are to hold a personal disputation at Syracuse, at a time to be fixed on, on the question whether Henry Clay or James G. Bibney is best qualified to the votes of abolitionists. The former is the challenger, which has been accepted at his convenience by the latter.
At a house warming in Warren, Herkimer County, where 70 farmers and mechanics were present, with 36 yoke of oxen, a vote was taken on the Presidential question, which stood 60 for Polk and 10 for Clay.

October 14, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The New District School opens splendidly as to the number of scholars in attendance. The first day, notwithstanding the rain, 140 were there; the second day 175; on Wednesday nearly 200. The scholars are classified into three general departments. Most of them appear to be under thirteen years of age. They represent all walks in village life. The more advanced scholars occupy the large room in the second story of the building. Two recitation rooms are under the immediate charge of the Principal, Mr. Howe, assisted by Miss Gaylord and Miss Ball. The intermediate department is taught by Miss Reynolds and the Primary by Mrs. Brower. Mr. Howe is a Massachusetts man and a graduate of Albany Normal School. Miss Gaylord is from Ilion, a graduate of the Normal School at Oswego. Miss Ball is “to the Manor born” and one of the best lady teachers we ever had in Cooperstown. Miss Reynolds is from Middlefield, and has had considerable experience in teaching. Mrs. Brower is from Exeter and is a successful teacher of young children. The ship is afloat, well officered. Bon Voyage.

October 8, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Mohican Club – The attendance of members on Friday evening last was unusually large, there being considerable interest felt in the matched games played. In four-ball billiards, 200 points, Charles Page and C.T. Huyck played against Dr. Butler and S.J. Conkling; the former making 200 points and the latter 179, a reasonably close game. In the game of bottle pool, best two and three, 31 points, S.M. Shaw (editor of The Freeman’s Journal) and L.N. Wood played against C.W.G. Ross and C.M. Alison, the former getting the first game, the latter the second and third, the last one by a single shot when they had five to make against four. On Friday evening next at 8 o’clock Dr. Butler and Mr. Page will play a matched game, three ball billiards for 100 points. Mr. Jarvis will umpire.

October 11, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

The first of the series of square dances which will be held every other Friday night during the winter season at the Alfred Corning Clark gymnasium took place on Friday of last week under the direction of Gene Gowing of New York City. A fine time was enjoyed by all and good music was furnished by Mrs. Anita Coleman and Mrs. Florence Sheridan.
Pvt. Murdock Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Hall of this village arrived home Sunday to spend a 21-day sick leave. Pvt. Hall was in the Framington General Hospital at Framington, Massachusetts for several weeks following his return from Europe where he received an eye injury in Normandy.
The Presbyterian Rummage Sale will be held Saturday, October 14, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Chapel on Pioneer Street.

October 11, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown Rotary Club entertained seven Japanese business and professional men at its regular weekly luncheon meeting at the Cooper Inn. The group is headed by Dr. Hiroji Mukasa, a psychiatrist who operates a mental clinic in Nakatsu City on the southern island of Kyushu, and is in this country for two months. The visitors arrived in Cooperstown Tuesday morning and were taken on a tour of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum by Howard C. Talbot, Jr., its treasurer and a past president of the Rotary Club.

October 8, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The winning and the shutouts keep coming for the Cooperstown girls’ soccer team. Over the past week, the Redskins have won three games, outscoring their opponents by a 11-0 margin while extending their winning streak to 12 games. “We had some close ones this week, but we came out okay,” said Cooperstown coach Lisa Cherubin. The Redskins defeated Waterville 2-0 in overtime on Saturday for another Center State Conference win. Saturday’s win gave Cooperstown an overall record of 12-2 and 12-0 in league competition.

October 12, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Gawkers gathered and shutterbugs snapped photos of the two-day-long scene at Main and Railroad in Cooperstown where crews struggled with a crane and a 30-tire flatbed trailer to load and move the 60-ton 1942 ALCO Locomotive that has been parked in the Delaware-Otsego Corporation’s parking lot for 20 years. The railroad relic is headed to a new home in western Maryland. The engine has been purchased with plans to restore it to running order by Bill Miller Equipment Sales of Eckhart Mines, Maryland, one of the largest Caterpillar Equipment dealers in the world. Efforts to uproot a small tree growing out of the smokestack were unsuccessful.

October 9, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 3, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 3, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Ed. Note: October 4, 1819, a Monday, marks the first appearance in Cooperstown two centuries ago of the newspaper still known as “Freeman’s Journal.” John Prentiss the editor introduced the publication to the community as follows: “After a lapse of more than a year, we resume our editorial labors, and at a time, too, inauspicious to an extensive circulation of newspapers, because the pecuniary pressure upon the country is so great as to require a general retrenchment in expenditures. Having incurred great expense in procuring an entire new apparatus, and being resolved to devote our whole time in the business, we rest with confidence upon the liberality of a generous public
for patronage in an undertaking encompassed with many difficulties, arduous in its very nature, and highly responsible in its consequences.”

October 4, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

A Whig Movement Against Foreigners – The Vicksburg Constitutionalist, a paper which displays the names of Clay and Frelinghuysen from its masthead, comes out boldly in favor of shutting out foreigners from the privileges of citizenship until they should have resided among us 21 years. “Let one and all unite in petitioning the very next Congress on this subject. Have the laws altered. Let the term of probation be 21 years and let no foreigner have a foothold in the country without he brings with him irrefutable, conclusive, decisive evidence, beyond a doubt, of his good character at home. We are not at all bound to admit into our country the vile outpourings of any land. We must not suffer the convicts, the criminals, the paupers, the traitors, of three quarters of the world to be shoveled in among us. If we have any immigrants at all, let us have the good and virtuous, and no others. We have enough now, in all conscience.

October 7, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The names of school teachers from the Town of Otsego attending a training institute includes the following: Adelbert Gates, Edwin Bowen, S.B. Bliss, S.I. Haynes, Albert Van Horne, C.F. Brewer, Geo. Temple, Amanda Sitts, Jennie Palmer, Martha Ball, Mary Ball, Lovina House, Ella Lake, Mary Kelley, Mary Hubbell, Hattie Gould, Maggie Russell, Cornelia Hecox, Hattie Williams, Sarah Byrnell, Jennie Byrnell, Lucretia Potter, Ellen Brower.

October 1, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

The Aviators to Go – News comes that the U.S. Aviation Hospital here is likely to break up during the next ten days.

Had this step been decided upon four months ago it would be generally agreed that the aviators and their business would be generally missed in Cooperstown. Perhaps a few frank statements will not be out of place. The presence of the hospital here was, like any other military affair, a distinct novelty at first. But, like everything else military, the novelty wears off. When the hospital was filled to capacity and there were a number of patients and medical officers who took an interest in Cooperstown, and its affairs, they were exceedingly welcome. But when the personnel lagged, interest lagged. And there is little doubt but what a large number of the patients attempted to have things “their own way.” This of course worked to the detriment of the hospital in the village. But, the long and short of it is that Cooperstown is growing a little weary of the continual presence of free and easy soldiers who toil not and spin little, and do not add materially to the citizenship of the village.

October 7, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a Republic Steel advertisement titled “Boys, I’ll tell you what Free Enterprise really is” “It’s a lot of little things – and some mighty big things too. But, in a nutshell, it’s our right to live our own lives, run our own farms and our own businesses in our own way – without needless interference. “It’s our right to criticize the government, bawl out the umpire, belong to the Grange, or make a speech on the public square. It’s our right to travel when and where we choose – to work or not as we please. It offers opportunity to anyone who wants it. It rewards thrift, hard work and ingenuity. It thrives on competition and raises our standard of living. It encourages invention, stimulates research and promotes progress. Yet in spite of all this, some folks would like to change our American way of doing things – and rebuild our whole country under a new and different system. If they had their way, Tom here, wouldn’t own this store. Ed’s farm would belong to the state and Ed would be told how to run it and what to raise. Jim would be working for a state-owned factory with his job and wages frozen. Frankly, I don’t like the name Free Enterprise because it’s the most American thing we have. It really is America. Let’s keep it.”

October 4, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

In Cooperstown – Michael S. Jastremski, son of Dr. and Mrs. Michael M. Jastremski of this village, who graduated cum laude from Hartwick College in June, is attending upstate Medical Center at Syracuse. He and his wife Karen and daughter Kimberly Ann are residing in Syracuse.
Waldo C.M. Johnston, director of the Marine Historical Association at Mystic Seaport, Conn. Will be the guest speaker at the Wednesday, October 8 meeting of the Women’s Club of Cooperstown to be held in the club rooms of the Village Library building. His talk will be titled “The Role of the Outdoor Museum in a Changing Culture” using Mystic Seaport as an example.

October 1, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown High School Science Department will welcome students, parents and community members to a Science Department Open House on Thursday, October 27. The evening will begin with informal tours of the two McIntosh Computer Centers. The Earth Science Computer Center, under the direction of Dr. Frances Hess, is located in Room 102. The McLab, under the direction of Mr. Thomas Good, is located in Room 100. Students in grades 9 to 12 will be on hand to demonstrate many of the applications used in the sciences for data collection, graphing, word processing, drawing and publishing.

October 5, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Sept. 26, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 26, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

One of the first duties of a citizen is to use every effort, by precept and example, to encourage industry and shut out want. No matter how splendid your city may be, whether shady walks, cooling fountains, marble edifices, and magnificent palaces, give tokens of opulence and ease – if your streets are crowded with beggars and your paths haunted by mendacity it is a stain on the character of the economy of its inhabitants. There are so many ways of earning a morsel of bread honestly, that want, arising from indolence should never be tolerated. Rich or poor, all men should remember, whatever may be their situation in life, that it is ordained by Providence, that “man is to live by the sweat of his brow.”

September 27, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Henry Clay has obtained another certificate of good character from one of his partisan clergymen. A letter has just made its appearance in some Whig papers signed by N.H. Hall, who is represented as being the Presbyterian Clergyman of Lexington, KY. This reverend gentleman, having been asked to give his opinion in regard to the moral character and standing of Mr. Clay among his neighbors, replies: “I have never witnessed an act or heard expression from Mr. Clay that was not in conformity with the strictest morality.” This Rev. Mr. Hall, we presume, never heard of the Randolph Duel and the participation of Mr. Clay in the Cilley murder; or the language of Mr. Clay to Colonel Polk – “Go home, God damn you, where you belong!”

September 30, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The Steamboat – the “Mary Boden,” the first steamer designed for Otsego Lake, arrived at Cooperstown, via railroad on Saturday last. Think of it – a steamer for this lake, and arriving here by railroad! We wish that Cooper might have lived to see it and write about it. Mr. D.B. Boden deserves great credit for his enterprise in investing $2,000 in such a craft, and we hope he will find it a paying one. The Mary is built for speed and hard work, and shows very handsome lines. She will go into winter quarters immediately, and will be put in complete order for next summer. The Mary was sledded through Main and Fair Streets – fortunately for the occasion quite muddy – on Wednesday, drawn by about 40 men, three yoke of oxen and two span of horses. She weighs about eight tons.

September 24, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – Dr. E.P. Fowler has this season had a new well drilled for supplying his “Estli” place with water. It is located
south of his house, and is 135 feet deep. A steel windmill is to be erected to hoist the water, which will be carried to the house in iron pipes.
Golf has invaded Otsego County. It first appeared near the head of Otsego Lake, during the past summer, and is confined to that locality. There are grounds at Newport, R.I., Yonkers and a few other points in this country, but no rapid spread of the fad is anticipated. Two or three of our north end neighbors were educated in England. They imbibed the English love of outdoor sports and some of their visitors are outdoor people. To play the game of golf well requires long practice, though one may in a year or two learn to play well enough to take pleasure in the game. However, the sport is not destined to become national, for we Americans rarely devote the time required for its mastery to any one particular thing.

September 27, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Col. Nelson A. Gapen, Medical Corps, U.S. Army, has replaced Major A.E. Ludwick as Commanding Officer of the U.S. Aviation hospital here. Colonel Gapen arrived last week to begin his duties, and will likely be commanding officer of the hospital until its close, which is expected momentarily. Colonel Gapen has been Assistant Surgeon General of the medical detachment of the air service for the past two years, and paid an official visit of inspection to Cooperstown in July. Major Ludwick remains on staff here. Capt. Charles M. Wharton, for several months physical director here, left on Saturday for Philadelphia, his home, where he will be discharged from the service. Capt. Wharton will begin duties as Chair of Physical Culture at the University of Pennsylvania on October 1.

September 24, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Mrs. E. Russell Houghton, Knox School President, announces the school’s opening on September 27, this week, for its thirty-third year and the school’s twenty-fourth year in Cooperstown. The number of students enrolled is the largest since 1929 and the school has had to close its door to further applicants. A majority of the girls are from New York. Other states represented are California, Connecticut, Washington, D.C., Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. There are two girls from Bermuda, one from South America, and one from Aruba, N.W.I.

September 27, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

A group of seven young Japanese men who are spending two months in this country as a team taking part in a Rotary Foundation Group Study Program will visit Cooperstown Rotary Club during its regular luncheon meeting at the Cooper Inn next Tuesday. The visitors represent Rotary District 373 which is on Kyushu, the southernmost island of Japan. They are university trained businessmen and all speak English. Six make up the study team and the group is in the charge of Dr. Hiroji Mukasa who operates a mental clinic at Nakatsu City, Oita. During their one-day stay the visitors will visit Cooperstown’s museums and the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital.

September 24. 1969

10 YEARS AGO

Last Halloween Shirley Walrath decorated her husband George’s grave in Hartwick Cemetery with hardy mums and a pumpkin. George died on Christmas Eve 2004. “We left it there. Six months later we went back and took it away,” Shirley recalled. During a recent visit to the grave, Shirley found her husband’s plot covered with a flourishing vine. Returning the other day, Shirley discovered 10 pumpkins growing there.

October 2, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Sept. 19, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 19, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

There is scarcely a subject that awakens the pride of an American more than the respect which is paid by foreign nations, to the star-spangled banner of this country. We have lived to see the day when foreign princes, potentates and emperors have paid homage to a banner, which but a few years ago was a stranger to the ocean. If such flattering testimonials of respect from
foreign nations do but rouse us to a proper sense, to a just estimation of our own dignity, we may calculate perhaps for centuries to come, on the preservation of our laws, liberties, habits and free republic institutions. Americans are a nation of emperors governed by no other will than their own, when expressed through its constitutional organ. The constitution itself the highest legal authority, which Congress, no less than courts of justice are bound to obey, is but an instrument in the hands of the people and capable of being amended, remodeled, enlarged
or abolished altogether, by our fellow citizens in their collective majesty.

September 20, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

The assemblage of Democrats at Clarkes-Ville (Middlefield) on Saturday, September 16, numbered between three and four thousand. The meeting was numerously attended from the neighboring towns and adjacent counties. Fire Companies number two and three and the Brass Band from Cooperstown, in their uniforms, added greatly to the appearance of the procession and its hilarity on the ground. (Note: The following passage (as edited for brevity) was presented as argument for a resolution: “The Party which originated with Jefferson, and which has been sustained by Madison, Jackson and Van Buren, must become a divided, subdued and sinking people, unless we successfully resist all foreign influence and dictation, and render the overthrow of this British American party final and conclusive. We, who imagined ourselves free from foreign interference; we who fondly hoped to see the Eagle of Liberty, with widespread wings carry the Banner of Freedom to the shores of the Pacific and to the southern extreme of North America, find England and the Holy Alliance in the field against us. The alliance of England and France, formed in 1815, to repress liberty wherever it might be found, has been reorganized and renewed, and its first steps is to limit the territorial possessions of the United States.”

September 23, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

A correspondent complains that there is a place kept open in this village where liquor is sold without a license, and that no steps are taken to put a stop to this violation of a wholesome law; that it is frequently open on Sunday evening; and that drunken men have been seen coming out of it – all of which may be the truth. But what good does he expect to accomplish by simply scolding about it in a public newspaper? Has no enough been said in that way? Now why does he not take pains to bring the facts stated to the Knowledge of the Justice of the Peace, or furnish the Excise Commissioners with the necessary proof to convict the offender? Do your duty, Sir, as a citizen, and do not expect to reform all abuses by mere newspaper talk. It is as much your business as that of any other law-abiding citizen. Let the law be enforced.

September 17, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – Some of the oldest and largest elm trees on our streets are becoming rather dangerous, and a few of them should be taken down. Last Sunday afternoon two men came near being struck by a large limb which fell from one of the old elm trees near the corner of Chestnut and Main streets.
The newspapers might as well stop their criticism on the riding of bicycles by ladies. They are going to do it as they have a right to do, and each year in increasing numbers.
The Nelson Avenue sewer is completed. It is 840 feet long and cost $438. The village owes that Avenue to the enterprise of Mr. E.F. Beadle.

September 20, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Advertisement for the Nash Automobile – Two years ago when we first contracted to represent the Nash, we made the prediction that within two years’ time the Nash would be the most popular car of its price class on the market. Today, the Nash is the acknowledged leader among cars selling for $2,500 or less. The Nash is the most quiet- running and economical car selling for between $500 and $3,000. Is it therefore any wonder that at no time since the present series Nash came on the market two and one-half years ago, have we or any other Nash dealers been able to supply one-fourth of the demand for Nash cars?

September 17, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Local football fans will see the 1944 Cooperstown Redskins in action this Saturday at Doubleday Field against a strong Hamilton team. Gone from the team this year are such outstanding players as Captain Bob Meeneghan, Ted Harbison, Arnold Welch, Jack Lavante, LaRue Jones, Arnold Staffin and Everett Bridger. Their loss will be hard felt but there remains a nucleus of players around which this year’s team is built – Vinny Lynch, Charles Hall, Tom Kiley, Bob King, Joe Sapienza, Charles Murdock, Bob Welch, Chet Holbrook and Chuck Coleman. Other players are Joe Mogavero, Dick Johnson, Hugh Jones, Doug Welch, Bill Moakler, Johnny Shevalier, Jerry Clark and Ernie Bosc.

September 20, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

The Otsego County Board of Representatives has taken a step toward installing an emergency 911 system throughout the county. The Board voted 8-5 to sign a letter of intent with NYNEX to order the system equipment. Lyle Jones, Otsego County’s Emergency Services Coordinator, offered a presentation to update the board on the progress of the system. The system should be operational throughout the county within 36 months at a cost of $6,104.54 monthly and an installation fee of $11,457.69. Rep. Hugh Henderson, who lives at a rural route address, opined: “I’m telling you, you can’t imagine the confusion you are going to have in this county by changing addresses, especially those outside of village lines.”

September 14, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Sept. 13, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 13, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

The inhabitants of Texas, disappointed in the hope of being included within the territories of the United States, by the recent treaty between our government and that of Spain, have declared themselves independent of the Spanish crown, and state that they have “prepared themselves to meet and firmly to sustain, any conflict in which this declaration may involve them.”
Died: In this village on Wednesday last, Ellen, an infant daughter of Mr. George Pomeroy.

September 13, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democrats! There will be a Pole Raising in the Village of Cooperstown on Tuesday next at 3 o’clock p.m. to which a general invitation to all Polkers is hereby given.
The State nominations made at Syracuse on the 4th instant, are in conformity with the Democratic voice. The whole proceedings were harmonious, and the Convention
separated with the best feelings. Throughout the entire State, the response from the Democracy has been warm-hearted, inspiring the strongest confidence in our strength, and inspiring a triumphant victory.

September 16, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Baseball – A game of baseball between the first nine of the Haymakers of New Lisbon and the second nine of the Lightfoots of Morris, on the grounds of the former, on Saturday the fourth instant, esulted in victory for the Haymakers, 19 to 10.
Commodore Boden of the Otsego Lake flotilla has recently purchased the steam yacht Mary, formerly a government gun boat employed during the war for operating in southern rivers. The Mary is expected to arrive here today (Friday, September 10, 1869), whence she will be placed on a couple of cars and transported over the Albany and Cooperstown roads. Her machinery will be taken out upon her arrival here. She is about forty feet in length, and intended to be used for picnic parties on the beautiful Otsego Lake, and will also run during navigation, in connection with the C. and S.V. R.R. It will be, we believe, the first steam boat that ever woke the echoes of Natty Bumppo’s cave.

September 10, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local – A fine of $10 may be imposed for fast driving in the streets of this village. If inflicted in a few cases it might work a needed reform.
Mr. E.F. Beadle went up to the old family homestead in Pierstown on Tuesday, the anniversary of his seventy-third birthday.
About 80 young people are expected to join in the sport of “the paper chase,” at Hyde Hall, head of the lake, today, Wednesday.
Inspectors – The following additional inspectors of election have been appointed in the several districts of this town pursuant to Chapter 348 of the laws of 1894, which provides for four inspectors, instead of three – First District, Jesse P. Johnston; Second District, L Grand Brainerd; Third District, Harry Spingler; Fourth District, Alfred T. Williams; Fifth District, Jesse J. Ellsworth.

September 13, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

(Excerpts from an address by Dr. Anna Howard Shaw regarding the costs of World War I as experienced by women and the call for a League of Nations to ensure future peace) “Who can estimate the value of seven million one hundred dead sons of the women of the world? Who can estimate the price which the women have paid for this war? We hear the orators tell us of the courage of our men – how they went across the sea. Very few of them remember to tell us of the courage of our women, who also went across the sea, of the women who died nursing the sick and wounded, the women who died in the hospitals where the terrible bombs came and drove them almost to madness. They tell nothing of the forty thousand English women who went to work back of the trenches in France. If there is any body of citizens in the world who ought to be interested in a League of Nations to ultimately bring to the world peace, it is the mothers of men, and the women who suffered, as only women can suffer in the war and devastated countries.”

September 10, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

Christ Episcopal Church will take a giant step forward in its Christian Education program for adults and students during the coming academic year as it occupies its new and enlarged parish house for church school activities on Sunday, September 14. It will also mark the first time that families may attend services together with study sessions for all at the same time. All classes from pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 will attend the 9 a.m. Holy Communion Service with pre-Kindergarten through Grade 5 students leaving the church for their classes after the offertory. On the second and fourth Sundays of each month these grades will have their own services in the Chapel as they have in the past. Grades 6 through 12 will attend their classes after the 9 o’clock services. All classes will be dismissed at 10:30 a.m.

September 10, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

It’s only a trickle now, but some worry that the exodus of some downtown businesses to locations outside the village may become a stream, carrying away much of the local service village residents desire. Cooperstown Optical moved its Pioneer Street office to the former NYSEG customer service center on south Route 28. Cooperstown Optical’s former neighbor, the Leatherstocking Education on Alcoholism/Addiction Foundation, is set to move September 16 into the Hyde Park Office Complex. “It could be a potential tide,” said village Trustee Giles Russell, who also serves as chairman of the village Planning Commission. Lack of nearby parking for customers and staff was cited by both organizations as a factor in their decision to relocate.

September 7, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

There’s a photo somewhere showing Melanie Oudin’s great-grandmother, Dorothy Savage Oudin, playing tennis in a long white Victorian dress. Her great-granddaughter is taking the tradition farther than Dorothy Oudin could ever have conceived. At the U.S. Tennis Open, Melanie, age 17, of Marietta, Georgia, has beaten Elena Dementiava (ranked number 4), the famed Maria Sharapova (29) and Nadia Petrova (13, to enter the quarterfinals. She is the youngest player to get that far since Serena Williams in 1999.

September 11, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES: Sept. 5, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Sept. 5, 2019

200 YEARS AGO
A Recipe for the Bite of a Mad Dog – Take the plant called “Scull-Cap, gathered either before dog-days begin, or after they are over (that is, before July 30 and after September 10). Cure it in the shade. Cut it fine and bottle it up close. Of this powder take a decoction as strong as common tea, and give it to an adult, half a pint, night and morning, fasting; to a child of three years old, one gill; to a child of 8 years old, 1.5 gill; to a child of 12 years, 2 gills. The patient, on every third day, during the period of taking the decoction must miss taking it; and instead of it must take two tea-spoons full of roll of brimstone, with molasses, or sufficient to procure a free passage. Continue this course for 40 days. The patient must abstain from butter or milk, or anything of a greasy nature in the diet and wholly free from spirituous liquors. It is important that the feet should not be wet.
August 30, 1819

175 YEARS AGO
To the Abolitionists of Montgomery, Otsego & Fulton Counties. The friends of freedom and the rights of man, in the County of Herkimer, aware of the importance of the current crisis in the struggle between Liberty and Slavery in this county, and believing that the people only need light on this subject, to induce them to throw off all allegiance, political and ecclesiastical, to the Slave Power, have established a Liberty Paper at Little Falls, called the Herkimer Freeman, a leading object of which will be to exhibit facts and arguments showing the inconsistency and wrong of slavery and its deadly injury to the whole country.
August 26, 1844

125 YEARS AGO
Baseball: Athletics 7, Richfields 4 – A most disgraceful termination to the series with the Richfield club occurred
on the latter’s grounds. Before the game took place, the Captain of the Athletics was informed by persons of
repute that the umpire had been “bought” by betting men of Richfield, in the interests of their home club. Upon this information, our Captain requested that some other man be secured to umpire the game, and at first refused to play unless such change was made. The Richfield managers and captain declined to have any other umpire, and after protest, the game began. The umpire displayed his unfairness from the first inning. Even the Richfield pitchers declared his
decisions unjust toward the Athletics. At the close of the fifth inning the score stood 4 to 1 in favor of Richfield. In the sixth, the Athletics made six runs – score 7 to 4 in favor of the Athletics. When the Richfields came to bat, they made no effort to hit balls that were pitched squarely over the center of the plate, waist high; and such balls, which should have been “strikes,” were called “balls” by the
umpire. The first batter received his base in this way.
He was caught napping between the bases and put out by White throwing to Taylor. The umpire declared that White had made a balk, and gave the man his base. Mitchell,
who was catching, went down to the pitcher’s box, and protested against the decision. In the argument that
followed, the umpire is said to have called him a “d__d” liar,” and Mitchell knocked the umpire down! A fat man wearing glasses, threw off his coat and started for the seat of war, but a punch in the stomach doubled him up and calmed his enthusiasm. Mitchell was arrested and put
under $500 bond to appear before the Grand Jury. Mr.
R.H. White went his bond. The umpire declared the game for Richfield, 9-0.
August 30, 1894

100 YEARS AGO
The Cooperstown Air Service Corporation, with a capital stock of $6,000 and with Articles of Incorporation now pending, was formed in the Chamber of Commerce rooms on Monday afternoon this week for the purpose of conducting a business in airplane travel, and of filling contracts for exhibition flying at various fairs and towns in this vicinity. The corporation was formed by former Lieutenant
Wilfred (Tony) Yackey, recently a patient at the U.S.
Aviation Hospital here, and recently discharged from
the army, and by Lieutenant Goodsell, also a former patient. Yackey will pilot the Canadian Curtiss airplane which the corporation voted to purchase. More than 40 Cooperstown businessmen are interested in the corporation. A Board of Directors of five has been elected as follows: Dr. B.W. Dewar, Orange L. Van Horne, George Hyde Clark, William Smalley and R.W. Ellsworth.
August 27, 1919

75 YEARS AGO
Ryerson shoots 69 On Local Golf Course – Playing one of his best rounds of golf in recent years, Jack Ryerson toured the Cooperstown golf course in 69 strokes, three under par. He was out in 35 and back in 34. The present nine-hole course, now being played, measures around 3,225 yards, or 6,450 yards for 18 holes, as against 6,372 yards for the regular 18-hole layout which was played up to two years ago. Ryerson was playing a four-ball match with
Edward Marion, Bert McCloskey and Len Rayner.
August 30, 1944

50 YEARS AGO
Cooperstown Central School’s football squad will
commence practice sessions at 6 p.m. Wednesday on the new high school athletic field according to Head Coach
Ted Kantorowski. The six lettermen returning to the squad are Co-captains Mike Phillips and Lyle Jones, defensive backs Richard Irving and Edward Ayers, quarterback
Alan Vines and center Tim Bliss. The following boys are expected to see action during the coming season – Carter Coleman, end; Cliff Coleman, end and back; John Phillips, guard; Craig Phillips, tackle; Paul Brown, center; Bruce Buffet, Tom Barns, Richard White and Greg Dibble,
all running backs.
August 27, 1969

25 YEARS AGO
Fly Creek by Lydie Mackie – The “Senior Renditions”
duo was discovered audiotaping themselves in the United Methodist Church basement. Elaine Harvey, our postmistress,
and Len Price sing beautifully together and have entertained in Fly Creek. They were last heard at the Historical Society’s “Music Day” in the firehouse. Marie King, wife of Rev. King, also performed at the Music Day. Dressed as a clown, she sold and delivered singing telegrams. At a quarter each she cleared $1.25 for the Historical Society.
August 31, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Aug, 29, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Aug, 29, 2019

200 YEARS AGO
Cattle Show and Fair – The Bye-Laws of the Otsego County Agricultural Society declare that “there shall be an Annual Cattle Show and Fair at Cooperstown, on the first Tuesday of October, to continue that and the succeeding day.” It is important that candidates for premiums should be made acquainted with the conditions upon which they will be entitled to the rewards of the Society. To effect this object, permit me to state, that the “Act to improve the Agriculture of this State, passed April 7, 1819, requires “that each person, to whom any premium shall be awarded for any Agricultural product, before the receipt thereof, make an accurate description of the process used in cultivation, the soil and in raising the crop, or of feeding the animal, as may be, and shall in all cases describe the nature of the soil, the kind and quantity of the manure, the state thereof, and the time of year in which applied, and deliver the same to the President of the Society.” No person can receive a premium at the hands of the Society without conforming to the letter and spirit of this law.
September 6, 1819

175 YEARS AGO
Effects of perpetual day upon the mind, feelings and avocations of men is described thus in the narrative of Buchan’s Expedition to the North Pole: “Nothing made so deep an impression on our senses as the change from alternative day and night, to which we had been habituated from our infancy, to the continued daylight to which we were subjected as soon as we crossed the arctic circle. Where the ground is but little trodden even trifles are interesting. The novelty, it must be admitted, was very agreeable, and the advantage of constant daylight, in an unexplored and naturally boisterous sea, was too great to allow us to wish for a return of the alternations above alluded to. But the reluctance we felt to leave the deck, when the sun was shining bright upon our sails, and retire to our cabins to sleep, deprived us of many hours of necessary rest. And, when we returned to the deck to keep our night watch and still find the sun gliding the sky, it seemed as if the day would never finish. To many persons, it will no doubt appear that constant daylight must be a valuable acquisition in every country. I think the reverse is really the case. We cannot overestimate the blessings we derive from the wholesome alterations of labor and rest and be truly thankful for that merciful provision with which nature has endowed the more habitable portions of the globe.”
September 2, 1844

150 YEARS AGO
Local – A Fancy-Dress Masquerade Party, held at the house of one of our citizens is numbered with the several pleasant social affairs which have come off in Cooperstown during the present season. The costumes were quite varied and presented an amusing study – most of them the product of skillful hands at home – others ordered from abroad. Sharp eyes failed to detect many of the disguised ones until the time for unmasking came, and the merry dance commenced. Cooperstown, we are assured by old residents, was always noted for the clever manner in which such things were carried out in this village. Some of the “young old folks” brought into service articles of apparel that were in fashion and use in the preceding century.
On Monday last 190 “Hop girls,”
mostly Germans, came over the Cooperstown railroad from Albany.
September 3, 1869

125 YEARS AGO
Local – This year, among the hundreds of hop pickers who were in town on Sunday, the absence of intoxicated persons was noticeable – due partly to the closed bars and more to the fact that a good class of people are doing the work in the hop yards.
Among the oldest and well preserved buildings in the Village is that of the old Masonic Hall, corner of Lake and Pioneer Streets, the frame of which was raised
June 25, 1797.
September 6, 1894

75 YEARS AGO
Thirty-five hundred people attended the fifth and last of the 1944 Cooperstown
Victory Sings on the Otesaga Hotel grounds Sunday afternoon and listened to an address
by Quentin Reynolds, radio’s star war commentator in his most moving vein, and lifted their voices in a great and harmonious chorus under the direction of Dr. Elmer A. Tidmarsh. Reynolds spoke of Russia, which he has visited twice, and found it confusing. “No one knows much about Russia,”
he declared, “not even the Russians themselves.” He said it is a “strange and paradoxical country.” Reynolds declared that the “spirit of the Russian is a spirit that the rest of us haven’t got. They feel that they are fighting beasts and will accomplish feats that seem impossible to other nations. After the war, I feel that Russia will be a friendly neighbor and a great customer of the United States for at least 25 years while she is rebuilding her cities.”
September 6, 1944

50 YEARS AGO
An informal opening ceremony will be held at Cooperstown’s new sewage treatment plant south of the village Friday afternoon. Several state and county officials have been invited, along with members of the village government. The new plant was placed in operation last November. Among the guests will be Board of Education President Dr. M.M. Jasremski, Dr. William H. Hermann, administrator of Bassett Hospital, Frederick L. Rath, Jr., Chairman of the Village Planning Commission and Robert C. Smullins, president of the Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce.
September 3, 1969

25 YEARS AGO
It is only a trickle right now, but some worry that the exodus of downtown Cooperstown businesses may become a stream, carrying away much of the village service providers residents desire. Cooperstown Optical moved its Pioneer Street office to the former New York State Electric and Gas customer service center just south of the village on Route 28. Also, the Leatherstocking Education on Alcohol/Addiction Foundation (LEAF) is set to move to the Hyde Park office complex. “It could be a potential tide,” said village Trustee Giles Russell, who also serves as Chair of the Village Planning Commission.
September 7, 1994

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