News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
 BREAKING NEWS 
 POLICE & FIRE 
 IN MEMORIAM  
 HOMETOWN PEOPLE 
 COLUMNS 
 EDITORIALS 
 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

 EMPLOYMENT  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 REAL ESTATE  
 AUTOMOTIVE  
 REMEMBRANCE  
 GOODS & SERVICES

bound volumes

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 23, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 23, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Editorial – Notwithstanding the business talents of Congress, they do not appear to progress very rapidly. Not a single important object of the session has been brought into consideration, other than creating a multitude of enquiries in relation to the expenditure of public moneys. True, there is need enough of investigation upon this subject, because, unless they retrench somewhere, the deficit of five millions, mentioned by the secretary of the treasury, must be put upon the shoulders of the people, and in these times, they would prove restive under the burden.

January 24, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Great Voyage – The Magnolia arrived yesterday with 3,900 pounds of whale and sperm oil. She has been out 25 months and brings a clear profit to her owners of $12,000 or $15,000. Captain Simmons and several of her crew are Vermonters. It takes the Green Mountain boys to grapple with the leviathans of the deep.
Letters addressed to the following persons are among those remaining in the Cooperstown Post Office at the conclusion of December 1844: E.C. Adams, Oliver Burdick, Mrs. M.A. Cooper, Lorenzo D.
Davies, Mrs. Emily Elson, E.E. Ferrey, Elizabeth Green, Ira Hyde, Edwin Johnson,  N.C. Knapp, Mary Lovejoy, Amos W. Mathewson, Hurane Olmsted, Benjamin Pitcher, Hannah E. Rider, W. D. Stocker, Stephen Thorn, Dr. Van Alstine, Isaac Walrath.

January 20, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Ed Note: So-called Minstrel Shows (viewed today as shamefully racist in every respect) were comprised of white performers disguised as African-Americans. Such were common, public entertainments in the post-Civil War era and featured both professional and amateur actors. The following advertisement is typical of the professional, touring genre: “The Band of the Period” at Bowne Hall, Cooperstown, Thursday Evening January 20, 1870 – The Original and Only Happy – Cal Wagner’s Minstrels and Brass Band, with an entire change of programme (not yet copied by “The Great I Am”) – New Songs, New Acts – In Fact Everything New. Peasley and Fitzgerald in their Silver Stature Clog; Happy Cal with his Wonderful Elephant; The Great Burlesque of The Cardiff Giant – The Best Bill of the Season. Admission 35 cents; Reserved Seats 50 cents. Doors Open at 7 p.m. Happy Cal Wagner, Proprietor and Manager. Geo. McDonald, Agent.”

January 20, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Hops – There has been considerable activity in this place and Oneonta during the past week. It is estimated that the agents of shippers have bought not less than 800 bales of Otsego County prime to choice hops and 6.5 to 11 cents, according to quality. We still incline to the opinion that really choice hops are likely to advance two or three cents a pound in the spring, especially if there is a general revival of business in this country, when more beer will be manufactured.

January 24, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

As Cooperstown church bells rang in celebration of the advent of constitutional national prohibition, Otsego County sustained one of the severest blizzards in a number of years. A three-days snow, starting on Friday of last week culminated in the force of the blizzard being received Saturday night and Sunday morning, with a 50-mile per hour gale blowing nearly all day Sunday. Traffic suffered most during this period, not only on the trolley and steam lines, but in the rural districts as well. The Fly Creek Valley, the original home of snowdrifts, was almost impassable in most places until Monday. The state road from Cooperstown to Index was in the same predicament. Forces of men were at work Monday morning endeavoring to eat their way through the snow drifts which in some instances almost reached the height of the cars of the Southern New York lines. Lake roads and roads in Middlefield likewise were impassable.

January 21, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

Japanese soldiers in the jungles fell in considerable numbers before the rifle fire of Pfc. Claude Graham, aged 26, an infantryman from East Springfield. Private Graham, the son of Mrs. Reuben Roberts of East Springfield, was a rifleman in the 24th Infantry Division. In the Hollandia campaign he earned the Combat Infantryman Badge, awarded for exemplary conduct in action against the enemy. “The most satisfying thing to me in combat,” he declared in an interview, “was shooting snipers.
We never feared the Japs, because we could see them, because we figured that the superior fire power of our M1 rifles gave us the edge over any one visible. It was the invisible ones that bothered us, and the snipers mostly were invisible. So, when we located a sniper and brought him down, we always felt that we’d accomplished something.
Despite their cleverness at concealing themselves, we located plenty of them, too.” Private Graham’s infantry regiment took hundreds of prisoners, a feat regarded as unusual since Japanese determined to fight to the death, are difficult to capture. He added, however, that he had seen a number of instances of “hara-kiri” in which Japanese soldiers preferred to kill themselves with bayonets and hand grenades, rather than surrender.

January 17, 1945

25 YEARS AGO

Tom Heitz, formerly librarian for the National Baseball Hall of Fame since 1983, has hired legal counsel to negotiate a separation settlement in the wake of his termination on January 2. Heitz is represented by Robert Abrams, the former New York State Attorney General. No reason has been given by the Hall for his departure. When asked if Heitz was fired, William Guilfoile, Vice President of the Hall of Fame declined to comment. Abrams also declined to comment stating, “I believe it would be imprudent to comment on anything at this point.”
Ed. Note: With the help of Robert Abrams I did reach a satisfactory settlement with the Hall of Fame. I remain a Life Member of the Hall where I am welcomed as an occasional visitor in the museum or researcher in the library. The baseball library, its staff and its extensive collections are in the excellent care and direction of my successor Jim Gates, whose now 25-year tenure has brought the library to the first rank of sports-related libraries in the country, if not indeed the world.

January 18, 1995

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 16, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 16, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement: Cloth Found, in Milford, in the road between the Village of Cooperstown and Oak’s Creek, on the 6th Inst., a roll of homemade WOOLEN CLOTH. The owner can have the same by applying to the Subscriber, or to B. Fitch, in Cooperstown, on proving property and paying charges. Simeon J. Clinton
Advertisement: Look to It! The subscriber having closed his business in this place, and will leave here on Monday, the 24th inst., it becomes necessary that those indebted to him should settle their Notes and the accounts before that time. Those that neglect this will be sued immediately. A.B. Shankland.

January 17, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

The writings of Dr. Scoresby, a scientific gentleman of England who recently traveled in America, are summarized: “There are certain general national characteristics of the native born American. Among these are pride, perhaps vain-glory, of the Americans in their country and institutions. This was naturally excited by the vast and inexhaustible resources of their country, and by their political constitution and civil institutions, under or in connection with which the masses feel such independency of action and realize such general respectability of condition. There is no country in the world in which the masses of the population are so raised above servile degradation – so independent of the control of the rich – so generally respectable in their condition, as in the northern continent of America. However, it would be but right to anticipate some future inquiry as to whether these are the pure results of a superior constitution, or whether they are results yielded by the riches of the country and the enterprise and talent of the people, in spite of an inferior form of government.”

January 20, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Circuit Court – William Wheeler, indicted for arson in the Third Degree, for burning the barn of Hiram Barton in May, 1869, containing 26 head of cattle, and a large quantity of personal property was tried. The evidence was entirely circumstantial, but the chain of circumstances was so complete that the jury found the prisoner guilty, and the Court sentenced him to six and one-half years hard labor in State Prison – seven years being the limit of the law. The prisoner said he was about 30 years of age, a native of Hartwick and by occupation a farmer. District Attorney for the People; Lynes & Bowen for prisoner.

January 20, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Obituary – Hiram Reed of this Town was born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1816, and died at his home in Pierstown on January 14 in the seventy-ninth year of his age, after a brief illness. He did not marry until he was about sixty years of age. He has left a wife and four children in poor circumstances. Mr. Reed was a very industrious and hard-working man, who had earned the small farm on which he lived and about $1,500 in cash. The latter he loaned to a man who
formerly lived here, without security, and lost it – a misfortune which caused him further severe trouble and hardship. But he fought life’s battle like a brave man, and died respected by his circle of relatives and neighbors.

January 17, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

Purely Personal – Louis A. Pratt, formerly of Central Bridge, and recently of Milford arrived last week to take charge of his new property, the Pioneer Hotel, which he purchased from John Cronauer. Mr. Pratt is making ready to open the hotel about February 1. A great deal of renovation has been planned.
Mrs. William T. Hyde of Cooperstown, the County Agent for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, was in Oneonta Friday accompanied by Dr. H.W. Tillson, the veterinary surgeon. During the afternoon, both attended the auction sale of horses at the stables of H.W. Sheldon. Mrs. Hyde said that the horses disposed of were quite uniformly in good condition and that there was little to correct.

January 14, 1920

50 YEARS AGO

Homemade cake with coffee will be the feature of the “dessert bridge” gathering sponsored by the Woman’s Club of Cooperstown on January 23, according to Mrs. F.H. Gardiner and Mrs. Ed Stevens, co-chairs of the food committee. This will be served at the tables at 8 p.m. Tickets for the Helen Hale Scholarship Fund benefit are available at Augurs Bookstore or from any of the following: Mrs. Harry Shepard, Mrs. Donal Wertheim, Mrs. Henry Troeger, Mrs. Frederick McGown, Mrs. Lyle Roberts, Mrs. Ann McDonough, Mrs. Wayne Willis, Mrs. Ed Stevens, Mrs. George Tillapaugh, Mrs. Bruce Buckley, Mrs. Raymond Sprague, or at the door. Tickets are $1. A telephone call to any member of the committee will reserve a table for you. The public is invited – both male and female.
In response to problems now facing our youth, the Cooperstown Parent-Teachers Association will sponsor a program on “The Problems of Drug Addiction” Wednesday evening at the high school at 8 p.m. in the cafeteria. Two narcotics educators, Miss Mary Dobeck and Walter Silver, both Associates in the Bureau of Professional Education, Narcotics Ad
diction Control Commission for the NYS Department of Health will offer a community action program to attack the problem.

January 14, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Four Route 28 parcels and one downtown property have been acquired by the Clark Family Real Estate Investment Partnership through Charisma Partners II Realty Corporation. Edward Stack of the Clark Foundation said that the parcels include Newberry’s on Main Street in Cooperstown as well as properties with a trailer and a house near the Pepper Mill on Route 28, the parcel on which sits the Odbert car dealership and the space next to Wilber National Bank, formerly the Sperry car dealership. “The property is the gateway to Cooperstown and it is very important that the gateway be protected,” Stack said. All of the properties were acquired as long-term investments. “There are no plans to change them. They are still on the tax roll and they will be paying taxes on them,” Stack added. There had been reports that previous owners, the Bettiol Corporation, had planned to build a McDonald’s restaurant and convenience store on one of the Route 28 sites.

January 11, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

The Buffalo-based Tops Friendly Markets is bidding to buy bankrupt P&C’s remaining stores, although no decision on the fate of the Hartwick Seminary outlet has yet been revealed.
A Jan. 8 Tops’ press release announced that Penn Traffic, P&C’s parent company, had accepted its bid to acquire 79 stores and was awaiting U.S. Bankruptcy Court approval.
Employees at the local store say they’ve been told P&C will close the location Feb. 15 if no decision is forthcoming by then.

January 15, 2000

BOUND VOLUMES: Jan. 9, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES:

Jan. 9, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a report to the New York State Legislature regarding progress in the construction of the canal system: “The middle section of the Western Canal, including a lateral canal to Salina, and comprising a distance of more than 96 miles, has been completed. On October 23 last, the Commissioners navigated it from Utica to Rome, and found their most sanguine expectations realized in the celerity, economy, and excellence of the execution; and on November 24, the Champlain Canal was also in a navigable condition. In less than two years and five months 120 miles of artificial navigation have been finished, and thus the physical as well as financial practicability of uniting the waters of the western and northern lakes with the Atlantic ocean has been established without a doubt or cavil. The efforts of direct hostility to the system of internal improvements, will in future be feeble. Honest and well-disposed men, who have hitherto retained doubts, have yielded them to the unparalleled success of this measure.”

January 10, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Selected state popular vote results from the Presidential Election of 1844 in which James K. Polk defeated Henry Clay, 1,385,260 to 1,299,706, a majority of 85,554. New York State: Polk 237,588; Clay 232,408 (Polk’s majority: 5,180); New Jersey: Clay 38,318; Polk 37,495 (Clay’s majority: 823); Mississippi: Polk 25,126; Clay 19,206 (Polk’s majority 5,920); South Carolina: Polk 50,000; Clay 3,054 (Polk’s majority: 46,946; Kentucky: Clay 61,255; Polk 51,988; (Clay’s majority 9,267); Georgia: Polk 44,154; Clay 42,115; (Polk’s majority 2,039); Alabama: Polk 36,022; Clay 24,875; (Polk’s majority 11,147;
Ohio: Clay 155,113; Polk 149,059;
(Clay’s majority 6,054).

January 13, 1855

150 YEARS AGO

The Otsego County Board of Supervisors are now in session in this village to consider plans and specifications for building a new jail and Sheriff’s residence. On all hands it is admitted that the present jail is a disgrace to the County of Otsego – that it is a source of constant large expense – that its insecure condition has a demoralizing effect. It has been repeatedly condemned by Grand Juries and Boards of Supervisors – and the building of a new jail is recommended by all the newspapers in the county. As a matter of wise economy, the jail should be built now, to be paid for say one-fifth at a time in five years.

January 13, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Death of Susan Fenimore Cooper, the eldest daughter of James Fenimore Cooper – We would that the writing of the obituary of this highly noted and gifted woman were done by someone better qualified for the service – one who might speak somewhat in poetic language of the fact that she entered upon the year 1894 by seeing and cheerfully and pleasantly conversing with the few friends who that day called upon her – that upon the last Sunday afternoon of the year she was able to join the little family circle at dinner, appearing unusually well; that she read family prayers before retiring to her room; and then at the dawn of the closing day of the year she peacefully fell upon sleep.

January 3, 1895

75 YEARS AGO

Lieutenant General James H. Doolittle, commanding general of the Eighth Air Force, recently awarded the Bronze Star medal to Major Kenneth W. Root, Jr., of Cooperstown. Major Root is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth W. Root, Sr. Major Root serves as the base engineering officer for the Eighth Air Force Liberator Station in England. During his absence, his wife,
Mrs. Helen Root, is residing in Mansfield, Louisiana, but is currently visiting her parents here. Major Root was graduated from Cooperstown High School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was formerly employed by the Central New York Power Company as a results and test engineer. Major Root entered the service in February, 1941 as a Private in the field artillery and was commissioned as an engineering officer on March 8, 1942.

January 10, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

The Department of Psychiatry at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital will observe its fifteenth anniversary this year with a growing emphasis on mental health care. Dr. Harvey Gurian, psychiatrist-in-chief at Bassett, has issued a report on the operation of the department since its creation in 1955. According to Dr. Gurian, Otsego County has had one of the more stable psychiatry programs that have been developed for a rural area. In addition to Dr. Gurian, the staff includes Dr. Hugh R. Williams, associate psychiatrist (Child Psychiatry); Dr. William J. Nape, Assistant Psychiatrist; and
Dr. Charles W. Lamb, Chief Psychologist. In addition, the department has the
services of Dr. Robert F. Savadove, Assistant Resident in Psychiatry, and Dr. George Ainslie who is interning. “The philosophy behind the department’s development has been to increase service gradually as personnel becomes available,” Dr. Gurian states. “Closer liaison with various community agencies such as the Department of Social Services, the schools and the courts will be developed.”

January 14, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Bassett Healthcare’s Birthing Center rang in the New Year, welcoming Cherry Valley’s newest resident – Brandon Scott Yeardon. The 7-pound, 4-ounce bundle of joy was the first baby arriving at Bassett and in Otsego County at 3:43 a.m. on the morning of January 1. Michael and Jennifer Yeardon are the parents. Bassett’s Birthing Center’s “First Baby of the Year Basket” included a handmade quilt by RN Debbie Blue. RN Libby Akulin made the label for the quilt. Also included was a Carter’s Baby Sleeper from Ellsworth and Sill; a Onesie, a knit hat, and OshKosh socks from Cooperstown Kid Company; health care needs from Church and Scott Pharmacy; a stuffed animal from the Bassett volunteers a floral arrangement from Colonial Florists and baby cream from Straws and Sweets.

January 8, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

Letter to the Editor from Thomas J. Hickey, Owner of the Cooperstown Hawkeyes: “On behalf of Cooperstown’s new baseball team, I would like to thank all those who have supported our efforts to bring a high quality baseball experience to Doubleday Field. Our very successful “Name the Team Contest” concluded recently. Out of 80 entries Cooperstown’s David Pearlman submitted the winning entry – the “Cooperstown Hawkeyes.”

January 8, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 2, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 2, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

From the Editor John H. Prentiss: Since we resumed the publication of this paper, the subscription list has increased more than four hundred, and not a day passes but adds more or less respectable names to it. This fact is mentioned, because we are certain it will be highly gratifying to many gentlemen in the county, who have manifested a warm interest in the prosperity of the establishment.

January 3, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

With this, the first number of our paper for the year 1845, are tendered to its numerous readers the compliments of the Season. We have a long while held converse with them, and of course the acquaintance has strengthened our attachment to their interests, which it will be our pleasure to further and promote to the best of our ability so long as the present interesting relations between us shall exist. The condition of things throughout our widespread country, with the exception of here and there a scudding cloud of disaffection to good order in the observance of the laws, is such as to afford gratification to all, and can safely be counted upon as harbingers of good to the Great Republic. May the propriety of conduct, and good citizenship, characterize us all throughout our lives.

January 6, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Prominent Points Emphasized in the New York State Governor’s Annual Message: The state’s debt has been decreased over four millions during the past year and is now less than thirty-five million. A great reform is demanded in the management of the State Prisons and the prompt action of the legislature is needed. Our Common School system commands the hearty sympathy and support of the people, and may be further perfected. What the Governor so feelingly urges in regard to the condition of the insane poor of the Stare, will command attention and sympathy. It is recommended that the Excise Laws be made general in their application and that there be a return to the old system of granting licenses by local Boards.

January 6, 1870

100 YEARS AGO

The contest between Herkimer High School and Cooperstown High School Basket-Ball teams at the gymnasium on Friday evening last resulted in favor of the home team by the close score of 22-21. A large audience witnessed the struggle. Many took part in the dancing afterward. Music was furnished by Reisman’s orchestra. Games are scheduled for this Tuesday and Friday evenings – Independents vs. All-College for Tuesday and high schools on Friday.
What Pine is worth – The Otsego farmer must plant white, red and Scotch pine. His profit will be in the growth which will accrue year-by-year. An acre of pines at 40 years of age planted six by six feet will be worth $900 on the stump. What better legacy could a father leave his children than a block of pine forest?

December 31, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Aviation cadet Harold V. Clark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harris G. Clark, Sr., of Cooperstown, RD2, a recent graduate of the Army Air Force bombardier school at Kirtland Field, Albuquerque, New Mexico, has been appointed a flight officer and awarded the “Silver Wings” of the aerial bombardier. Flight Officer Clark is a graduate of Cooperstown High School, class of 1942, where as an undergraduate he served as captain of the basketball team and played baseball. In civilian life he was employed as an apprentice carpenter. His brother, also serving in the Air Corps, holds the rank of First Lieutenant. Prior to his successful completion of 18 weeks of flight and combat training in high level precision bombing and navigation at Kirtland Field, Flight Officer Clark was stationed at the Santa Ana California Army Air Base.

January 3, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

The number of working wives is on the increase in Otsego County. No less than 46.3 percent of the married women in the local area leave their homes each day and head for their outside jobs in offices, stores, factories, schools, hospitals and the like. In 1960, the figures show, only 35.1 percent did so. In Otsego County there has been an increase since 1960 in the proportion of females – married and single – who are holding down jobs. The 1960 census listed a total of 6,997 at work, equal to 34.7 percent of the female population over age 14. It has now reached approximately 40.6 percent.
The Fourth Annual Cooperstown Winter Carnival will open with a gala parade through the center of town to the skating rink where a skating exhibition will take place and a Queen will be crowned. Then, it’s on to the Teen Dance, the Western Square Dance, or the Bavarian Beer Party. To round the evening off, a Night Owl’s breakfast will be served at Sherry’s Restaurant. Saturday events will include an art show, a fishing contest, sled and ski races, golf tournament, Klondike derby, snowmobile races, and a squash tournament. Highlight of the afternoon will be the Gymkhanna on ice. The traditional Susquehanna Ball will be followed by a Nite Owl’s Breakfast at Hickory Grove.

January 7, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Plans for a tourist excursion train from Milford to Cooperstown are foundering but the Leatherstocking Railway Historical Society isn’t giving up just yet. The society’s grant request for $700,000 to begin work on the tourist train line was denied. “We’re still working with Assemblyman Bill Magee and Sen. James Seward,” Bruce Hodges, the group’s president said. “We have also contacted Congressman Sherwood Boehlert and are looking into other funding or some other way to pay for this project’s future,” Hodges said. According to Hodges the excursion train would run on tracks now owned by the Delaware-Otsego Corporation and is projected to bring in $8 million per year with 100,000 tourist riders on board while creating 50 jobs in the area.

January 4, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

William Durland Preston, a long-time and well-respected sign painter, died Saturday evening, December 26, 2009, surrounded by family at his Fly Creek home. He was 73. Bill was born October 31, 1936, at Bassett Hospital. For many years, Bill was one of the area’s finest sign painters, a passion he pursued for more than 40 years.

January 1, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES: Dec. 19, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Dec. 19, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a letter from the pen of John Jay, then a former Attorney General of New York State, since retired: “Little can be added to what has been said and written on the subject of Slavery. I concur in the opinion that it ought not to be introduced, nor permitted, in any of the new States, and that it ought to be gradually diminished and finally abolished in all of them. To me the constitutional authority of the Congress, to prohibit the migration and importation of Slaves, into any of the States, does not appear questionable. The first article of the Constitution specifies the legislative powers committed to the Congress. The ninth section of that article has these words; “The migration or importation of such persons as any of the now existing states shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808; but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation not exceeding ten dollars for each person.” It will, I presume be admitted, that slaves were the persons intended. The word slaves was avoided, probably on account of the existing toleration of slavery, and its discordancy with the principles of the Revolution, and from a consciousness of its being repugnant to the
following position in the Declaration of Independence.
“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights – that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

December 20, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Honor to whom Honor is due – A Ball, given in honor of James K. Polk, commemorating the joyful event of his election to the Presidency and the triumph of Democratic Principles came off at Middlefield Centre on Friday, November 29, and in a manner creditably to all concerned. The Ball Room was beautifully decorated with Democratic Banners, Devices and Mottos, together with the pictures and portraits of the several Presidents of the United Sates, among which a full-length portrait of the President-Elect attracted particular attention. Such a galaxy of wit and beauty from Middlefield, Springfield and Cooperstown never before assembled in this place; which, together with the exhilarating music, rendered it a scene of peculiar enjoyment. The rooms were thronged with young democrats more than usually gallant, and it was only regretted, not that the company was so numerous, but that the place was not more commodious. The sumptuous entertainment prepared by Mr. Wickwire was characterized by his usual hospitality. A Looker-on. Middlefield, December 3, 1844.

December 16, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Local: Judge Nelson is now at his home in this village, and is in most excellent health. Hard work at Washington seems to agree with him.
We are requested by some of our best citizens again to call the attention of the Trustees of this village to the rowdyism and street fights which so frequently occur in and near the Main Street of this village, and to urge them to appoint at least for a brief period, an efficient and active Police, that will put a prompt and effectual stop to this growing evil.

December 23, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Editorial: “The curse of the retail credit business,” said a dealer here the other day, “is seen more and more. If it does not bankrupt those who pursue it, their profits are cut down to a low figure, or others are charged too much to make up the losses. It is demoralizing and ought to be abandoned.” Very true. But, that is not the whole story, briefly told. It drives away not a few cash customers, who insist that they are entitled to better terms than those who get a credit of six to twelve months. It leads to extravagance in many families – it is too easy to say “charge it,” and often so hard to pay later on. Many an upright man has been driven to suicide, to drunkenness, or some other crime, by being run into debt unnecessarily and heedlessly by his family.

December 20, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Despite the highest population of all states New York is coming into its own as one of the greatest deer-producing regions in the nation. Such was indicated by the still incomplete tabulation of the 1944 take which soared to a new record of 26,305 deer, of which nearly 19,000 were taken in the nineteen Southern Tier and Western counties where damage to agriculture has become serious. With unusually poor hunting conditions this year, 3,756 bucks were taken, a drop from 1943 when 4,515 bucks were reported. In the Catskills, Sullivan County exceeded the previous year’s take of 667 deer by nearly 100.

December 20, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

For the third season, the Mt. Otsego Ski Area in Pierstown has been leased from Lester Hanson of Cooperstown by Harry Peplinski, Theodore Lamb and Robert Pierro. The Cooperstown Ski Club has been making improvements on the hill. They have expanded the main hill on the top. The club has also been working on the lighting for night skiing. The ski area will be open weekends and on school holidays. There are 200 acres of slopes and trails, a T-bar and three rope tows, a ski shop, ski school and snack bar. A ski patrol, under the direction of George Ehrmann, is on duty.

December 17, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The untimely death of a senior at Cooperstown Central School has wrought grief among students and faculty alike. Carey Ann Thayer, 18, died suddenly at her home Monday morning. “We got word today,” said Middle School Principal David Pearlman Monday evening, “about what happened that a senior girl had died. I was called out of class at about 1 p.m. and I went into a meeting with Doug Bradshaw, Barry Gould,” members of the crisis team. The senior class had just returned from its senior trip to New York City to see a play, getting back at 2 a.m. Sunday. “We were all shocked,” Pearlman added, “especially in light of the senior trip. She’s with friends one day, and a few days later you hear that she’s gone.”

December 14, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Dec. 12, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Dec. 12, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Greensburgh, Kentucky – Peter Kingensmith of Hempfield County has returned to his friends after an absence of 37 years, 9 of which he was a captive of the Seneca Indians. He was captured when eight years old, by a party of Senecas,
who massacred his father, mother and aunt. His existence was recently and accidentally discovered in Canada. He has five children and has a farm on the shores of Lake Erie, to which he intends to return. He speaks good English and says he lives in a neighborhood of English people.

December 13, 1812

175 YEARS AGO

Good Loco Foco Times! Mr. Elijah French, of Hartwick, in this county has made the past season from the milk of twelve cows 2,425 pounds of butter, and this to without extra feed. The butter sold for 14 cents cash, yielding $339.50. Mr. F. feels secure against “hard times” and Whig panics, believing that diligence in any pursuit, with good management, will insure a fair reward for enterprise and labor, particularly under a democratic administration of government, which seeks stability in all things.

December 9, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Local – Mr. George Clarke stated to gentlemen of the Agricultural Society living in this village, at the annual meeting on Tuesday last, that as soon as the transfer of Fair Ground property shall be made, and the Society gives up possession to him, the Trustees of this village will be at liberty to open a street through the same; and that, even at an earlier date they may with his free consent proceed to run Fair Street through the Cooper Grounds property – an improvement and convenience very much desired by our citizens.
Court: Aaron Cross, Agent vs. John D. Waldron – Action to recover for a mowing machine claimed to have been sold to defendant. The testimony showed that if on trial the machine suited, defendant was to pay for it; on using the machine it broke down, and defendant refused to take it. The jury found for the defendant, and reversed judgment of $40 given by the Justice in the court below. E. Countryman for the Plaintiff and Lynes and Bowen for Defendant.

December 16, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

Purely Personal: Philadelphia papers last week
announced the resignation of Captain Charles P. Wharton as Coach of the University of Pennsylvania football team, after 26 years of service. Captain Wharton is well-known in Cooperstown, having been one of the most popular officers at the late U.S. Aviation Hospital here. Captain Wharton is noted for having evolved the Pennsylvania system of defense in football, which has often been declared second to none.
Mrs. James Pepper, who teaches the fourth grade pupils was unable to attend to her school duties Friday on account of illness. Mrs. Donald Root substituted for her.
J. Harry Cook and Ben Reisman were in Detroit last week, returning with a shipment of new Dodge cars for the local agency.
Rowan D. Spraker and Franck C. Carpenter spent a few days in New York on business last week.
Miss Pearl Matson spent last Wednesday to Friday in Albany attending a Western Union Conference.

December 10, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

The body of Mrs. Minnie U. (Marsh) White was found in the fourth floor of her home on Pine Boulevard on Monday afternoon by her chauffeur, Joseph O’Malley who had been in her employ thirty years. Mr. O’Malley became suspicious when he had not seen Mrs. White for some time. Coroner Harry V. Frink of Richfield Springs gave a verdict of death by suicide. Mrs. White’s health had been failing for the past several months. Her household and friends had noticed increasing signs of despondency when her health failed to improve. Mrs. White was born in the Town of Middlefield on July 23, 1872 and was the daughter of John and Emma (Smith) Marsh. She came to Cooperstown with her family at
the age of five and resided at Carr’s Hotel for several years. They then moved to number 8 Eagle Street where the family
remained for many years. She was graduated from the Coop-erstown High School in the class of 1887 at the age of 15.

December 13, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Second Lieutenant Terrance C. Graves, 22, a 1963 graduate of Edmeston Central School, has been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, posthumously, for saving the lives of Marine comrades in Viet Nam. The nation’s highest award for valor was presented to his family in Washington, D.C. by Vice President Spiro T. Agnew.
His father, a former Navy officer was until 1963 the supervising principal at Edmeston Central School. Lt. Graves was killed February 16, 1968 while on a long-range
reconnaissance mission. After Lt. Graves’ eight-man patrol ambushed seven enemy soldiers the unit was counterattacked by a large force. Lt. Graves then called for air support and artillery fire. After tending to his wounded men Lt. Graves launched an assault against surviving enemy soldiers before coming under heavy attack a second time. Although wounded himself, Lt. Graves called for rescue aircraft. However, the helicopter in which he was rescued was
hit by intensive ground fire and crashed, killing all aboard.

December 10, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

For more than a hundred years Cooperstown has been home to a facility called the Alfred Corning Clark Gymnasium. That will change after the holidays, according to A.C.C. Gym Director J. Bart Morrison. The new name will be The Clark Sports Center. “It’s because there is a belief that it is time to modernize the name of the organization and arrive at something with more of an illustration of our breadth and scope,” Morrison stated.

December 7, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Three people suggested the name “Hawkeyes” for Cooperstown’s prospective baseball team. But, Dave Pearlman of Leatherstocking Street suggested it first. So the Pearlman family will enjoy a free pass next summer when the New York Collegiate Baseball League team comes to Doubleday Field, according to franchise owner Tom Hickey of Fly Creek. Other suggested names included “Leatherstockings,” Barrelmakers,” “Mohicans,” “Ghosts,” “Trappers” and “Phinneys.” “The name Hawkeyes,” said Hickey, “is consistent with Cooperstown history and the association with James Fenimore Cooper and his books.”

December 11, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES: Dec. 5, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Dec. 5, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Robbery – On the night of Thursday last, the shoe shop of Mr. Stephen Gregory, of this Village, was forcibly entered and robbed of stock and shoes to the amount of at least $250. Suspicion has rested upon John Gardner, who was, late in the evening, seen lurking about town, and had formerly been familiar in the shop. He is a short, thick-set fellow, of dark complexion, with remarkably large eyebrows,
his countenance being indelibly stamped with villainy, and has been a sailor. Several persons have been in pursuit, but as yet no trace of the property can be found.

December 6, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from an essay on Naturalization. “The root of native Americanism is selfishness. Its creed is ‘I, myself.’ It knows nothing of the great principle of doing unto others as you would be done unto. It never heard of the great hypothesis – for if you love them which love you, what reward have you? Do not even the publicans the same? And if ye salute your brethren only, what do you more than others? Do not even the publicans so? Exclusion is at the foundation of Nativism and is therefore repugnant to Christianity, and to the inherent and inalienable rights with which man is endowed by his Creator, and upon which rests the grand theory of all American institutions. The sincere Abolitionist erects a political creed which vindicates human rights in the broadest latitude. It admits no distinctions of persons or of country – no, not even of the most marked distinction which nature has put upon humanity – complexion.

December 2, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Court Proceedings: The County Court and Sessions commenced a term on Monday, Judge Sturges presiding. The Grand Jury was called and sworn, and E.R. Thurber, Esq., appointed foreman. The business in the Sessions was then taken up, and the indictments pending against Samuel Milson and Samuel Ludlam for selling liquor without license were called. The court held the indictments invalid on the ground that the offence was not an indictable one. The law provides a penalty of $50 for each offence, and imprisonment for non-payment of the penalty.

December 9, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

A Brutal Game – The football game for the championship of Washington, D.C. between Georgetown University and the Columbia Athletic Club was witnessed by 7,000 people. The slugging was continuous until in the second half both teams with their substitutes, engaged in a general fight, which the police had to stop. Georgetown had the worst of the casualties, five of the team being disabled. Three men were carried from the field on the shoulders of their comrades in the first fifteen minutes of play. Bahen, quarterback of Columbia, had a broken shoulder bone, and Carmody, captain and halfback of Georgetown, had his collar bone broken and knee wrenched.
Two Harvard men were knocked senseless in the game with Pennsylvania. The week before the papers published the death of two young men, from the effects of playing football. Bernard Feeter, the student of Fairfield Seminary, who went crazy after a game in which he was seriously injured about the head is receiving careful attention at the Utica insane asylum. As a result of the defeat of the University of California by the Stanford football team, “Brick” Whitehouse of the Stanfords was probably mortally shot by Alexander Loughborough, a law student at the University of California. And, this is the sort of sport indulged in and patronized by 7,000 men and women in the nation’s capital, there on the day set apart by solemn proclamation by the President of the United States for “Thanksgiving to God as a Nation.”

December 6, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

More than 700 farmers of Otsego County with their wives and families attended the annual Farm Bureau meeting at the Oneonta Theatre last Thursday. Perhaps the most startling talk of the meeting was that given by Dr. Ruby Green Smith, assistant state leader of Home Economics agents. She declared that wives of farmers of today are “modern slaves.” Her statement was based on a survey of 1,427 farmers’ homes in New York. “Their working day ends,” said Dr. Smith, “16 to 18 hours after it begins. They are the only individuals who earn an income but do not receive it. The hired girl on the farm has become nearly extinct. But nevertheless, the housewife and helpmeet of the farmer is expected to do all the housework, and provide for the temporal needs of the household, and to aid in the caring for poultry, dairy cattle and the garden. While modern implements are provided for the farm work, ordinary household conveniences found in city households are lacking. The city housewife has running water. Many farm wives must carry water from a well.

December 10, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Marine Private First Class Bennett O. Potter, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett O. Potter of Cooperstown, R.D. 5, has recently returned to the United States after 29 months overseas. He has been reclassified and reassigned at a Marine Corps base in this country, and was granted a furlough. A member of the First Marine Division, Pvt. Potter last saw action at Pelelieu, Palau Islands, Pacific. His unit was awarded the Presidential Citation. He is a graduate of Cooperstown High School and joined the Marines in January 1942.

December 6, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

A Cooperstown engineer’s invention is now on the Moon as part of the scientific laboratory left behind by the Apollo XII astronauts. A flexural pivot, a type of frictionless oscillating bearing, invented by Henry Troeger of this village plays a vital role in the operation of the seismometer left by astronauts to measure shock waves from the lunar surface.
The pivot is part of a gimbal system that supports the seismometer and allows it to regain a level position after a shock has been registered. Mr. Troeger joined Bendix in 1941 and is currently the Manager for Advance Design for Utica’s Bendix Fluid Power Division. He resides with his family on Lake Road near Cooperstown.

December 3, 1969

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 28, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 28, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

From the Boston Recorder – Mr. Willis – Although my circumstances do not allow me to do much in the way of spreading the glorious Gospel, yet, taking the hint from the plan for doing good by having a “Missionary Field” on one’s farm, I reserved a spot, nine feet square in the corner of my garden, which is all the land I cultivate, and on the afternoon of election day, planted it with water melons. By the sale of these, I am able to enclose three dollars, which it is my wish should be appropriated to the Jerusalem Mission. And whether I am able to contribute any more, or not, I am resolved, while I live, to pray for the peace of Jerusalem. A Friend to the Missions.

November 29, 2019

175 YEARS AGO

Dr. Wieting’s Lectures – We have been much interested and edified during the past week by attending a course of Lectures on the Anatomy and Physiology of the human body, in connection with the laws of Life and Health, the causes of disease and the means of preventing it, illustrated with a large French Manikin, six feet high, representing to life nearly 2,000 parts of the human body. This wonderful machine, the first completion of whose model is said to have consumed a quarter of a century at hard labor, makes palpable before the eye of the admiring spectator every portion of the Human Form; and a few hours only are required to impart a more perfect knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology in general, than could be possibly obtained from the severest study, even at Medical Colleges, of months, if not years. The attendance of our inhabitants, embracing both sexes, has been large, and we hazard nothing in saying that all have been highly instructed in regard to their own existence and exceedingly gratified with the manner of Dr. Wieting, who united affability and humor with the most profound observations connected with his subject. Never were 12 and a half cents more profitably expended than in attending one of these lectures.

November 25, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Your Reading for 1870 – This is the time of year when publishers of newspapers and magazines are actively canvassing for new subscribers. The competition is so great that care and discrimination are needed to determine which to accept, which to reject – to separate the wheat from the chaff. To meet various wants and needs, especially in large family circles, a choice assortment of publications is desirable. There are many families, however, who do not feel able to take more than one newspaper. To all such The Freeman’s Journal is especially valuable as a local and general newspaper and as giving a choice selection of the best miscellaneous reading the country affords, interesting and instructive alike to young and old. The amount of reading matter it has given has largely exceeded that of any other paper published in this county.

December 2, 1969

125 YEARS AGO

Local: The heavyweights of the Oneonta Normal School proved rather too much for our Y.M.C.A. boys at the game of football played last week. The Minstrel entertainment given by home talent on Friday evening for the benefit of the Orphanage was witnessed by a good-sized audience, and gave entire satisfaction. The jokes were new, and the singing, tumbling and the farce all drew forth merited applause. The Orphanage received $18.10 of the net proceeds.
It will soon be time to lay out plans for next summer. The Cuban Giants have written to know whether they will be wanted for three games at Cooperstown.

November 29, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Royal Kretzinger, who lives on the Gay Hunter farm on Beaver Meadow Road found two of his ducks dead Friday morning. Their heads had been eaten by some animal and the bodies torn. Saturday, a rabbit was found, partially eaten. Mr. Kretzinger set a trap near the spot where he found the dead ducks and rabbit. On Monday he found the destroyer – instead of a fox or skunk that he had expected to find, instead there was an unusually large owl in the trap.

December 3, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Ens. Howard L. Snyder, USNR, is spending a leave at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Snyder at Whig Corners, having completed a month’s training on PBY boats following his
graduation October 17 at Pensacola, Florida when he was awarded his gold wings and the rank of Ensign. A graduate of Cooperstown High School in 1934, Ens. Snyder entered the service in
February 1942, receiving his preliminary training at Colgate University, followed by work at Chapel Hill, N.C. and Peru, Indiana.

November 29, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

James E. Dow, president of Ingalls, Connell and Dow Funeral Home in Cooperstown, has announced the addition of Peter Albin Deysenroth, licensed funeral director, to the staff. Deysenroth brings with him eight years of experience in the funeral profession from his home state of Connecticut. In 1987, he graduated as valedictorian of his class from Simmons School of Mortuary Science in Syracuse with a membership in Mu Sigma Alpha, the mortuary fraternity. He further received his Associates in Applied Science degree in Mortuary Science from Herkimer Community College where he graduated cum laude with membership in Phi Theta Kappa. Deysenroth is also active as a musician and plays pipe organ and piano for his church and others.

November 30, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a Letter to the Editor from Irwin Gooen: “Growing up in a home of immigrant parents, my English was good enough when I was in high school to earn me good grades in writing in
spite of splitting infinitives. When I served in the military, sharing space with other young men from around the country, I became more aware of how my companions spoke and got laughed at for my non-standard use of English – say when I wanted someone to turn off a light in the barracks and yelled – ‘Hey, make out the light!” Everyone started mimicking me – ‘Make out, make out!’ But people understood me and my English, which was good enough for me.”

November 27, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 14, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 14, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisements: Fresh Groceries – Among which are the following: Jamaica and St. Croix Rum; Molasses; Lump and Brown Sugars; Hyson and Hyson Skim Teas; Plug, Pigtail, Ladies Twist, and Paper Tobacco; Box, Drum and Keg Raisins; Shad, Mackerel, Herring and Codfish; Black and Scotch Snuff; Pepper, Allspice, Ginger, Starch, and Indigo; Pipes, Soap, Candles, Filberts, Almonds, Alabama and Pea Nuts, Spanish, New Orleans and American Segars; Alum and Pearlash. Also – Turks Island and Basket Salt; Powder and Shot; Bed Cords; Shovels; Corn Brooms; Shoe Brushes; Liquid and Paste Blacking; Penknives; Pocket Books, &c, &c. – All of which will be sold at reduced prices, for cash or approved credit. Philip Thurber, Ira A. Thurber.

November 22, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Ring-Bone and Spavin – Persons having Ring-Boned and Spavined Horses, would do well to call and purchase a bottle of the “Ring-Bone Specific,” prepared by the
subscriber, if they wish their Limping, Spavined, and Ring-Boned Horses cured. The following are a few of the many who have recently cured their Horses by the use of this medicine, viz: Daniel Marvin, Charles Kellogg, Robert Russell, Hassan Monroe, Philip Gano, and Ebenezer House. P.ROOF – Sold by J.H. Babcock, Fort Plain and by the merchants generally in Otsego County. Cooperstown, November 1844.

November 18, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Temporary Relief for Poor – The constant and large increase in the amount of money raised on the Town of Otsego for temporary relief of the poor very naturally attracts attention and calls out comment. The amount voted by the Board of Supervisors this year is $1,260; last year it was $1,000; in 1867, $900; in 1866, $800; in 1865, $600; in 1864, $500. What is the occasion and necessity of this great increase with little or no increase in population, and with ample work for all willing to labor at good wages? Where are the evidences of any increased suffering among the poor classes, or noticeable increase in their numbers? The several church societies in this village, and private individuals disburse no small amount in charity to the deserving poor each year and there is no disposition to see such suffer. As a general thing the most deserving are the least inclined to seek the aid to which they are best entitled. On the other hand is a class who spend a large proportion of their surplus earnings for whiskey, and expect the Town will carry them through the winter.

November 25, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Mrs. George Clarke is to sail for Europe on Saturday, going direct to Genoa, and will spend the winter in the south of France. Her daughters remain at “Dower House” Pegg’s Point.
If satisfactory arrangements can be made a football game will be played here on Thanksgiving Day between the Y.M.C.A. team and one from Oneonta.
The Orphanage is in pressing need of financial aid to carry on its good work being done for a class of poor and unfortunate children. On Friday evening the citizens of Cooperstown and vicinity will be offered an opportunity to show their good will toward that deserving charity, and at the same time to enjoy a lively Minstrel Entertainment, which is to be given at Village Hall by several young men of Cooperstown. The tickets are 25, 35 and 50 cents each – for sale at the drug store of H.C. Church.

November 22, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

What has become of the Chamber of Commerce of Cooperstown, to which several scores of firms and individuals pledged to give their funds in order that “it might be maintained.” E.A. Stanford, the capable and efficient Secretary resigned his position effective October 1. Since then the Chamber of Commerce has been as dead as a door mouse, whatever that may be. There have been two meetings called since then by William Beattie, the temporary secretary. One of these disclosed that not even a quorum of the Board of Directors was interested enough to attend. The second meeting, held two or more weeks ago, disclosed that the board acted on the proposition to have a memorial for baseball placed at the birthplace of the national game in this village.

November 19, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The old Cooperstown High School building at the corner of Chestnut Street and Glen Avenue has been sold to Ralph Larsen, a Cazenovia developer who plans to demolish the structure and erect two twelve-unit apartment houses on the 2.9 acre site. The site has been on the market since the school was vacated last February and the students moved to the new Junior-Senior High School off Linden Avenue. Mr. Larsen, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruno Larsen of Cooperstown, indicated that he hoped to tear the building down this fall and start construction of the two apartment buildings in the spring. The complex will be named Cooper Lane Apartments.

November 26, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Bill Nelson’s seventh grade Social Studies class recently participated in a Colonial fashion show with costumes provided by the Glimmerglass Opera. Students donning the period attire were Aaron Mendelsohn, Martin Park, Charles Miller, Jennifer Jicha, Elena Mabie, Sarah Loveland, Christine Lane, Justin Yerdon, Justin Brooks, Jared Bowen, Ethan Buck, Jennifer Daley, Alexis Turner, Elaine Supp, Angie Erway, Christine Lane, Alan Linn, Athena Hall, Rachel Darling, Melissa Hayes, and Jessica Burgess.

November 23, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

When Cooperstown Rotarians sang “Bye, Bye Blackbird” at their Tuesday, November 17 meeting, Rotarian Margaret Savoie – a new Springbrook Home board member – remarked that her first tap-dancing routine, at age 7, was to that same tune. “I’d pay to see that,” a fellow club member said. “For Springbrook?” Margaret queried. Springbrook fundraiser Mike Stein put up $20, and the club sang “Blackbird” again, as Savoie performed her tap dance routine to the delight of her Rotary colleagues. Later in the meeting, Patricia Kennedy, Executive Director of the Springbrook Children’s Home, spoke about plans for a $5 million fund drive. Afterwards, Rotary Club President Bill Glockler, Treasurer Jake Majaika and Allocations Chairman Chad Welch presented Kennedy with a $1,000 check and announced that the club has committed to donating $5,000 over three years.

November 20, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 14, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 14, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Bank Directors – The following gentlemen were chosen Directors of the Central Bank at Cherry Valley: Joseph White, president, David Little, Elias Bramin, Barnabas Eldredge, Jabez D. Hammond, Levi Beardsley, William Campbell, James O. Morse, Peter Magher, Delos White, William Beekman, Henry Brown, and Thomas Fuller.

November 15, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

When we look back upon the terrible struggle through which the democracy of the Northern States have lately passed, who does not feel the deepest admiration of the sterling character of the electors of our country? Who will now doubt the permanence of our institutions and the incorruptibility of the great masses of our voters? They have been lately tried in a fiery crucible and they have come out purified and strengthened. At no time since the organization of our government, has so concerted and well-devised a plan been carried out by the Whig leaders, for the purchase of power in New York and Pennsylvania, which states it was well known would decide the Presidency of the Union. Never before have such enormous sums of money been raised by the Whigs, as during the late campaign. The Masses have come to the rescue – the triumph is all their own. Every reflecting American must feel a pride in the recent result in this State. Not more because the People have elevated able, upright and honorable statesmen to the first offices in the nation, but because it conclusively shows that money, no matter how well devised, cannot purchase the Presidency of the United States.

November 18, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Attention is called to the fact that the day of publication of this paper has been changed to Thursday. All communications and advertisements should be handed in not later than 10 a.m. of Wednesday – the earlier in the week the better.
Rev. C.L. Watt, a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University, has accepted a call to the Pastorship of the Universalist churches of this village and Fly Creek.
The salary of the Keeper of the County House should be raised to $1,000 a year. When the duties of the place are properly attended to, he will earn that amount. At present he is the poorest paid officer in the county. The position is an important one, which only a good and efficient man, such as we now have, should ever hold.

November 18, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

A New Pastor – At a meeting at the Presbyterian Church of the congregation, it was unanimously decided to extend a call to The Rev. Robert I. McBride of Mount Vernon, to become pastor of the church. He has had three years’
experience in the ministry, chiefly missionary work in New York City and among the “mountain whites” of Virginia.
We did not witness the panoramic farce of “A Trip to the City” given in Village Hall last Saturday evening – in regard to the merits of which there were different opinions expressed, some favorable in part or whole, others quite the reverse. Complaints were made by the company giving the performance that the stage is not deep enough for convenience in acting.
Y.M.C.A. – The “Week of Prayer” is being observed at the rooms of the Association, the services beginning at 8 o’clock. On Thursday evening they will be held in the Baptist Church, when Rev. W.B. Thorp of Binghamton will deliver an address.

November 15, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Pfc. Donald C. Reed, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Reed of Cooperstown has been awarded the Purple Heart and Oak Leaf Cluster for having been wounded in action a second time on October 15. Sergeant Reed received his basic training at Camp Croft, South Carolina. He was home on furlough in January 1944 and then returned to Fort Meade, George Meade. He went overseas in February and joined the Fifth Army in Italy. He was first wounded in June. He then rejoined his company and took part in the invasion of Southern France. He was serving with the Seventh Army when last wounded. He is now being treated in a hospital in Italy.

November 15, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Richard A. White, instructor in Mathematics at Cooperstown Central School, has been named varsity
basketball coach at the school, filling the vacancy caused
by the resignation during the summer of John H. “Pete” Clark, Jr. Mr. White was moved up from the Junior
Varsity coaching job which he has held since 1965.
Mr. White played on the Binghamton North High School varsity basketball team while a student there, and on the Paul Smith’s College varsity team for two years. Don Howard, the Eighth Grade Social Studies teacher at CCS succeeds Mr. White as Junior Varsity coach.

November 19, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

A host of village merchants gathered at the Tunnicliff Inn Monday night to listen as the goals and aspirations of a proposed Cooperstown Merchants Association (CMA) were laid on the table. Vin Russo, owner of Mickey’s Place on Main Street, outlined the mission statement and the program ideas that were drawn up by the committee. Russo stated that the main goal of a CMA is to bring people into Cooperstown so that they might leave their money behind.

November 16, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

In 71 years in the meadow between Brooklyn and Susquehanna avenues, the Clark family’s fallow deer have never been attacked by predators, according to Jane Forbes Clark, whose great-uncle Ambrose brought the herd back from Europe in 1938. That changed in recent weeks as a dozen of the animals were bitten in the neck, possibly by a coyote, and either died or had to be put down. “We are going to put up a bigger fence and hope that does it,” said Miss Clark. “We’ll keep fingers crossed,” she added.
Cameras installed along the perimeter fence taped a large coyote inside the pen. There are a handful of spots where the coyote could have entered. Miss Clark said her great-uncle saw fallow deer herds in Europe, “thought they were pretty and wanted to see them from the house.” The house was the 40-room Iroquois Mansion located behind stone walls before it was demolished in 1983.

November 13, 2009

 

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 7, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 7, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

The Editor of the Catskill Recorder, in speaking of the late Agricultural exhibition in this county, commends our citizens for having taken the lead in a march so important to the interests of the state, and says, “the President’s address, the report of the viewing committee, and “The Epitome of Agriculture,” were well-worthy the occasion, as the occasion was well-worthy of them.” He also compliments us upon the improved appearance of this paper, and hopes, that “although we may differ politically, yet in all measures for the advancement of the general interests of society, we may be allied.” To this we respond Amen. The post occupied by the editor of a public journal, is at all times important, and more particularly so, when the public mind seems fitted to judge candidly and impartially upon subjects intimately connected with the prosperity and happiness of the country. It shall always be our study to render as much service as lies in our power, to aid the cause of virtue and support the government which protects our life, liberty and property. And, we are not at all apprehensive, in discharging this duty, that we shall war with an editor so intelligent and respectable as Mr. Croswell, whose paper not only exhibits judgment and a refined taste, but very considerable talent.

November 8, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Election Results – Otsego County: Democratic Majorities – Burlington, 140; Butternuts, 9; Exeter, 25; Edmeston, 52; Hartwick, 22; Laurens, 20; Milford, 50; Maryland, 42; Middlefield, 142; New Lisbon, 152; Oneonta, 138; Otego, 29; Otsego, 175; Pittsfield, 57; Plainfield, 31; Springfield, 86; Unadilla, 210; Westford, 2; Worcester, 42. Total: 1,494 less 172 gives Polk’s overall majority: 1,322, a gain of 508 on the vote of 1840, the majority then being 724. Otsego has done her part in pushing the column to Victory!

November 11, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Thanksgiving Hospital – Second Annual Report (Excerpted): At the close of last year’s report, the hope was expressed that the year 1869 would not pass without an effort being made to pay off at least a small portion of the mortgage; also that the beginning of an endowment fund should be made, were it only a very small sum. These hopes have been more than fulfilled. The entire mortgage of $1,554 with interest to the amount of $146.68, has been paid. The beginning of an endowment fund amounting to $2,050, has also been made. Improvements on the house and grounds to the amount of $506 have been completed. A dumb-waiter, very ingenious in its contrivance, has been introduced, passing upward from the basement to the third floor. Apple trees, plum trees, pear trees, currant and raspberry buses have been set out. A neat plank walk has been laid from the porch to the street.

November 5, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

An enthusiastic meeting of forty or more service men and women was held on Friday night of last week in the Village Club, for the purpose of officially forming the Cooperstown Post of the American Legion, composed entirely of men and women who served the United States in an active capacity during the World War. Dr. George W. Augustin, Otsego County Chairman of the Legion, and representative of the Oneonta Post, together with Dr. F.J. McMenamin, also of Oneonta, addressed the gathering and pointed out the importance of former soldiers and sailors sticking together in the years to come. One important result of this might be, he said, the granting of an additional bonus for servicemen by Congress, which would amount in some instances to about $200 depending on length of service. He was loudly cheered.

November 12, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

In Cooperstown: The Cooperstown Central School basketball squad is hampered by a lack of playing shoes, which cannot be obtained because of a war shortage. Coach Lester G. Bursey therefore is making an appeal to former high school players to turn in their old shoes to the team and thereby aid the cause.

November 8, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The cornerstone of Otsego County’s new office building will be laid Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Supervisor Guy E. Rathbun of Morris, chairman of the Otsego County Building Committee announced plans for the dedication and cornerstone laying ceremony at the final session of the Board of Supervisors. The Board of Supervisors goes out of business December 31 as Otsego County’s legislative body. The following day, the 27-member Board will be replaced by a 14-member Board of Representatives elected a week ago. Eight of the 27 members of the Board of Supervisors, seven Republicans and one Democrat, were named to the new Board of Representatives.

November 12, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Losing a game in the last seconds is always tough. But, if you are a senior, and it’s your last game, it may seem even tougher. Those were the circumstances that the Cooperstown football team, with 15 seniors, dealt with on Saturday afternoon when they lost to host Oriskany 22 to 16 on a 20-yard touchdown pass with nine seconds left in the game. Seniors playing their last game for Cooperstown were Howard Graham, Buddy Lippitt, Mason Sanford, Chris Wells, Fred Koffer, Brian Ough, Tavish Rathbone, Frank Wilsey, Brad Ainslie, Roger Bennett, Dakin Campbell, Josh Maher, Roger Sprague, Jim Clyne and Sean Hill.

November 2, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Brenda Wedderspoon-Gray was honored with receipt of the 2009 Patrick C. Fetterman Award for service to youth from Jane Forbes Clark, President of the Clark Foundation at a luncheon at the Otesaga Hotel on November 2. Wedderspoon-Gray is Aquatics Director at the Clark Sports Center.
Christopher Talevi, Roanoke, Virginia, grandson of Vera and Bruno Talevi, Cooperstown, has achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. Christopher raised $2,500 to build a 10 by 12 foot shed for his city’s recreation department. It took 400 man-hours. Christopher’s father Steven Talevi and his uncle Robert Talevi are also Eagle Scouts.

Bassett Hospital’s Hartwick Clinic for dermatology, pain management, plastic surgery and advanced skincare opened October 19 in a low-slung building on Route 28 that originally served as home to the Corvette Hall of Fame.

November 6, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 31, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 31, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Petticoat Government has rarely been established over nations. Queen Elizabeth exercised it but she was always considered more like a man than a woman. Besides, she governed men under a constitution which men made for their own use and benefit, and she was therefore a kind of usurper in her place. As it has always been difficult for men to contend seriously with women, we advise the ministry and the borough-mongers and let the Spinsters take the business in hand. What the peculiar features of the new constitution shall be, we pretend not to conjecture. Probably one provision of it will be, that the girls shall in future go a courting, and the lads stay at home and be wooed. And we should not be surprised if the old-fashioned mode of travelling on saddles and pillions should be revived, and the poor man be forced to ride behind. Whatever it may be it will be something laughable, that these modern Eves should produce a revolution in a country that has so long withstood the exertions and machinations of so many Burdetts, Hunts, Cartwrights, and Ruta Baga Merchants.

October 25, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

A Word of Caution – The Whigs are full of tricks and will resort to any means to prop up their failing cause. Even here in the country, we hear of their maneuvers and attempts at bargaining for votes. It is said that they propose in some cases to vote the Liberty Ticket if Democrats will pledge themselves to do so; in others not to vote at all, or “pair off” with a Democrat; and to vote for Mr. Wright in exchange for a Clay Electoral vote. All this shows a destitution of political principle in the proposer, and warrants the belief that such arrangements would not be regarded by him if made. Our advice then is that Democrats should frown upon every attempt at bargains made by a Whig, and vote as his principles indicate to be his duty to his country. Act honestly, openly, manfully, in exercising the electoral franchise, despising trick and bargain, and Democracy is certain to prevail.

October 28, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Poor Gas – There is a very general complaint among gas consumers in this village, and not without just cause. The price is high, and the gas poor with so little illuminating power for a few nights past that men in a business like ours find it inadequate. The stores are also poorly lighted. At times the smoke from the gas has blackened the walls and annoyed those forced to breathe it. The dry goods merchants say it has damaged fine goods. The consumers have been imposed upon long enough and have borne it patiently until patience has ceased to be a virtue. Scolding in the newspapers will not remedy it. Our citizens feel that they must have better gas from the same source or go back to the use of kerosene, or organize a new gas company. The citizens might also authorize the village Trustees to put up works and run them for the public benefit. If necessary, let a meeting of citizens be called.

October 22, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Mohican Club – At the annual meeting held at the club rooms on Monday evening, the following officers were chosen: G.M. Jarvis, president; Charles T. Brewer, vice-president; L.E. Walrath, secretary; C.W. G. Ross, treasurer; C.T. Brewer, C.R. Burch, M.C. Bundy and S.M. Shaw, trustees.

October 25, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

One of the largest real estate deals in Cooperstown for several months past was consummated on Monday when William Smalley, proprietor of the Village Theatre, became the owner and proprietor of Carr’s Hotel, on Main Street, one of the oldest buildings, and a distinct landmark in the Village of Cooperstown. The consideration was not made public. Mr. Smalley took possession immediately. Smalley then sold the west portion of the hotel, the main structure, to James J. Byrd Jr. The hotel’s annex portion will be torn down next spring and replaced with a handsome new brick business block containing a motion picture theatre with a seating capacity of 1,000. Another portion of the new building will be devoted to a retail business house.

October 22, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Literacy tests for new voters will be given in the Cooperstown Central School building Tuesday, October 31 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and on Election Day, November 7 from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. All new voters must show evidence of literacy to the Election Board. The Regents preliminary certificate or any other higher certificate will be accepted. All people who completed the work of the sixth grade or its equivalent will be issued a Certificate of Literacy without examinations. All others will be required to take the test.

October 25, 1944

25 YEARS AGO

Four friends needed quick cash for a restaurant meal, and so decided to stop at an ATM in downtown Brooklyn over the weekend. They ended up thwarting a robbery. Dr. Eric Knight, 29, Bassett Hospital chief resident of internal medicine was with his fiancée, Susan Lasher, owner of Global Traders in Cooperstown, and Katherine Marks, a teacher. They were visiting Brooklyn resident, Elizabeth Cooper, 27. As Cooper was extracting funds from the machine in a bank lobby Enrique Maldonado, 44, of the Bronx attempted to grab the money from Cooper’s hand who then latched on to his arm to resist. Dr. Knight saw the struggle and intervened to help Cooper. As the struggle ensued two bystanders came to the rescue and a police cruiser was flagged down. Maldonado was arrested and charged with robbery and assault.

October 26, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 17, 2018

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 17, 2018

200 YEARS AGO

Communications – The Synod of Albany, at its last sessions in Cherry Valley, divided the Presbytery of Oneida, and formed from it a new Presbytery, to be denominated the “Presbytery of Otsego,” which by order of the Synod, is to hold its first meeting at the Presbyterian Meeting-House, in Cooperstown, on the first Tuesday of November next, at 11 o’clock a.m.
Advertisement – New Grocery. The subscriber respectfully informs the public that he has this day opened a new Grocery Store, the west part of the building opposite Mr. Bradford’s card factory, where he offers for sale a general assortment of groceries all of which are of the first quality, and will be disposed of on the most moderate terms for cash. Tavern keepers and others are invited to call. Jonathan Fitch.

October 18, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Democrats of Otsego County! Are you ready for the great contest on November 5? Do you know your exact strength in your respective towns? If not, go to work forthwith, and organize in such a manner as to secure the positive attendance at the polls at an early hour of the day of every Democratic voter. The stake is well worth the labor, and besides, patriotism, love of country, impel to duty in this respect. Let us roll up our majority so as to secure the State Banner! Much is expected of Old Democratic Otsego – let us hold on to our good name, and more than gratify our political friends in other parts of the State. Every man upon duty, and the work is done. Otsego is the Banner County!

October 21, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Orphan House of the Holy Savior – A committee of gentlemen belonging to the Episcopal Church in the new Diocese of Albany, have recently purchased the old Masters’ Farm on the eastern shore of the Lake, two miles from this village, for the purpose of opening a charitable institution under the title of “The Orphan House of the Holy Savior” – a home and industrial school for orphans, half orphans and destitute children. The institution is one of general benevolence, open to all destitute children in this part of the state. Its object is to bring up these children in accordance with Christian principles, to lives of usefulness and respectability. They will be taught to earn an honest livelihood for themselves and thus be prepared to become worthy members of society. The farm consists of 88 acres of land with a front on the lake.

October 5, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

An “Inquirer” asks: “What is the game called “bottle pool?” It is played on a pool table – being a billiard table with six pockets – with three balls, a leather bottle and a cue. It has the main features of billiards, is more fun, and yet requires considerable skill to be played successfully. Mr. S.S. Edick is perhaps the most expert player of the game belonging to the Mohican Club.
The first snow of the season fell Sunday, October 15, 2019, melting as fast as it came. That night the mercury dropped to the freezing point.
A sewer is to be laid through Glen Avenue extending from Railroad to Chestnut Street. And so our village improvements gradually progress.

October 18, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

Suitable recognition of Cooperstown as the birthplace of baseball and erection of a monument has been suggested by to the National Baseball Commission by four Ilion, New York fans, three of them big-leaguers of by-gone days. The plan will be the biggest piece of national advertising for this village that has ever been known. The four men who started the ball rolling are Hardie Richardson, one of Detroit’s star players of years ago; Mike Fogarty, another old leaguer; George E. Oliver, the Ilion Cricket Champion; and Patrick F. Fitzpatrick, also of Ilion. In a letter to Sam Crane, well known sports writer of the Hearst newspapers, the four men wrote: “Enclosed you will find express order for $1, being a payment of 25 cents each by the undersigned who are acting upon a suggestion that a memorial of baseball be established at Cooperstown, N.Y. where the game originated. (Ed. Note: Baseball historians have since established that the modern game has multiple geographic, cultural, and human roots which coalesced over decades beginning as early as the 1600s to emerge in the mid-19th century as the game we now know as baseball).

October 15, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The Cardiff Giant, the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people, will observe his 100th birthday on Thursday, October 16, this week. The giant, a prominent exhibit on the grounds of The Farmers’ Museum here for the past 21 years was the subject of a talk by Dr. Louis C. Jones, Director of the New York State Historical Association, at the regular weekly luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club at the Hotel Otesaga on Tuesday. It was just 100 years ago on October 16, 1869 that workmen, who had been called in to dig a well on Stub Newell’s farm near Cardiff, New York, uncovered the giant gypsum marble stone figure that weighs 2,990 pounds and measures 10 feet 4.5 inches in length. (Ed. Note: The Cardiff Giant hoax, conceived in 1867-1868 by George Hull, a disgruntled cigar merchant, created a sensation, attracted international attention, and although debunked, enriched both George Hull and his co-conspirator Stub Newell).

October 5, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

In a dairy world dominated by men, Jennifer Huntington stands out in the crowd. This highly experienced dairy professional exemplifies the increasing role that women are assuming in the dairy industry. In addition to serving as herdsperson for her father at Cooperstown Holstein Corporation Farm just south of Cooperstown, she also sits on the Board of Directors for the Otsego County Cooperative Extension. Besides maintaining the health and performance of an all-Holstein herd of more than 500 animals, she also applies new techniques to get the best possible return from the dairy operation. “Deep down, I always wanted to be in dairy farming,” she said. I enjoy working with cattle and being outside.”

October 19, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

After coming off the second perfect season this decade, the CCS Redskins football team head into the Class C sectionals against Saquoit 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, at Lambert Field.
The team’s 6-0 record, accomplished at home with a 26-0 victory Saturday the 10th against the Herkimer Magicians, bookends the decade of CCS athletic history: The 2001 team likewise had a perfect season, winning eight victories in all before being derailed in sectional competition.
This year as then, “we knew we had a lot of potential,” said Head Coach Steve Pugliese, who also coached during the 2001 undefeated season, and played on coach Ted Kantorowski’s perfect 1970 team.

October 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Oct. 10, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Oct. 10, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisements: Evening School – Israel Day, will open an Evening School, the Monday evening after the Fair, at his school room in which will be taught Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and English Grammar.
Medical Meeting – Notice is given that an Annual Meeting of the Otsego Medical Society, will be held at the House of Joseph Griffin, in Cooperstown, on Monday, the 18th day of October next at one o’clock p.m. T. Pomeroy, Secretary.
Caution to Trespassers – As many persons have been in the habit of committing trespasses on the estate of the late William Cooper, I offer a reward of double the penalty prescribed by law, to anyone who will give me information of such trespass, and furnish sufficient evidence of the fact. William Cooper.

October 11, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Notices – We are requested to mention that Dr. King will lecture at the Presbyterian Church in Fly Creek on Monday evening , the subject being the effect of alcohol on the human stomach.
Cassius M. Clay and Gerrit Smith are to hold a personal disputation at Syracuse, at a time to be fixed on, on the question whether Henry Clay or James G. Bibney is best qualified to the votes of abolitionists. The former is the challenger, which has been accepted at his convenience by the latter.
At a house warming in Warren, Herkimer County, where 70 farmers and mechanics were present, with 36 yoke of oxen, a vote was taken on the Presidential question, which stood 60 for Polk and 10 for Clay.

October 14, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

The New District School opens splendidly as to the number of scholars in attendance. The first day, notwithstanding the rain, 140 were there; the second day 175; on Wednesday nearly 200. The scholars are classified into three general departments. Most of them appear to be under thirteen years of age. They represent all walks in village life. The more advanced scholars occupy the large room in the second story of the building. Two recitation rooms are under the immediate charge of the Principal, Mr. Howe, assisted by Miss Gaylord and Miss Ball. The intermediate department is taught by Miss Reynolds and the Primary by Mrs. Brower. Mr. Howe is a Massachusetts man and a graduate of Albany Normal School. Miss Gaylord is from Ilion, a graduate of the Normal School at Oswego. Miss Ball is “to the Manor born” and one of the best lady teachers we ever had in Cooperstown. Miss Reynolds is from Middlefield, and has had considerable experience in teaching. Mrs. Brower is from Exeter and is a successful teacher of young children. The ship is afloat, well officered. Bon Voyage.

October 8, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Mohican Club – The attendance of members on Friday evening last was unusually large, there being considerable interest felt in the matched games played. In four-ball billiards, 200 points, Charles Page and C.T. Huyck played against Dr. Butler and S.J. Conkling; the former making 200 points and the latter 179, a reasonably close game. In the game of bottle pool, best two and three, 31 points, S.M. Shaw (editor of The Freeman’s Journal) and L.N. Wood played against C.W.G. Ross and C.M. Alison, the former getting the first game, the latter the second and third, the last one by a single shot when they had five to make against four. On Friday evening next at 8 o’clock Dr. Butler and Mr. Page will play a matched game, three ball billiards for 100 points. Mr. Jarvis will umpire.

October 11, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

The first of the series of square dances which will be held every other Friday night during the winter season at the Alfred Corning Clark gymnasium took place on Friday of last week under the direction of Gene Gowing of New York City. A fine time was enjoyed by all and good music was furnished by Mrs. Anita Coleman and Mrs. Florence Sheridan.
Pvt. Murdock Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Hall of this village arrived home Sunday to spend a 21-day sick leave. Pvt. Hall was in the Framington General Hospital at Framington, Massachusetts for several weeks following his return from Europe where he received an eye injury in Normandy.
The Presbyterian Rummage Sale will be held Saturday, October 14, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Chapel on Pioneer Street.

October 11, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown Rotary Club entertained seven Japanese business and professional men at its regular weekly luncheon meeting at the Cooper Inn. The group is headed by Dr. Hiroji Mukasa, a psychiatrist who operates a mental clinic in Nakatsu City on the southern island of Kyushu, and is in this country for two months. The visitors arrived in Cooperstown Tuesday morning and were taken on a tour of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum by Howard C. Talbot, Jr., its treasurer and a past president of the Rotary Club.

October 8, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The winning and the shutouts keep coming for the Cooperstown girls’ soccer team. Over the past week, the Redskins have won three games, outscoring their opponents by a 11-0 margin while extending their winning streak to 12 games. “We had some close ones this week, but we came out okay,” said Cooperstown coach Lisa Cherubin. The Redskins defeated Waterville 2-0 in overtime on Saturday for another Center State Conference win. Saturday’s win gave Cooperstown an overall record of 12-2 and 12-0 in league competition.

October 12, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Gawkers gathered and shutterbugs snapped photos of the two-day-long scene at Main and Railroad in Cooperstown where crews struggled with a crane and a 30-tire flatbed trailer to load and move the 60-ton 1942 ALCO Locomotive that has been parked in the Delaware-Otsego Corporation’s parking lot for 20 years. The railroad relic is headed to a new home in western Maryland. The engine has been purchased with plans to restore it to running order by Bill Miller Equipment Sales of Eckhart Mines, Maryland, one of the largest Caterpillar Equipment dealers in the world. Efforts to uproot a small tree growing out of the smokestack were unsuccessful.

October 9, 2009

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103