News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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bound volumes

BOUND VOLUMES March 26, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

March 26, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Married on the Ninth Inst. at Washington City by the Rev. Mr. Hawley, Samuel Lawrence Governeur, Esq. of New York to Miss Maria Hester Monroe, youngest daughter of the President of the United States.
Editor: To Patrons – This number completes half a year since the resumption of our editorial duties; and we should be unmindful of our obligations to the public, were we to refrain from expressing our thanks for the patronage this paper has received. There are but few country journals in the state, whose circulation is more extensive; and this evidence of approbation, is deemed sufficient to increase our exertions to make the paper more useful and respectable.

March 27, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Anti-Rent actions in Delaware County – On Monday last, Sheriff Steele and C.E. Parker went to Andes to serve some Chancery Subpoenas and a summons. On their return, near Fish Lake, they were stopped by some fourteen disguised and armed men. It being evening and somewhat dark, they were forced to return to Andes, where they were detained till near night the next day. While in confinement at Andes, Steele succeeded in sending a special message to Delhi, who arrived at about 12 o’clock. The Sheriff then summoned almost every man in Delhi, who went with him to Andes, armed and prepared for a conflict. When we got there no Indians were to be found – their friends having sent an express from Delhi, to inform them the Sheriff was coming prepared for action. Yesterday, the Sheriff with his posse, returned through Bovina, and arrested one person, who is indicted for having been disguised, &c. Today, with a posse of about 400 men, armed, he went to Kortright, and sold on an execution where he had been prevented from selling before by the appearance of some 75 or 80 Indians. Steele has selected about 50 men and is preparing to start
to make arrests this evening.

March 24, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Hospital Notice – Patients must make application before admittance at the Hospital – either in person or by letter. In no case are patients admitted without previous application, unless in the event of very sudden attacks, or accidents, when immediate help is needed. All applications should be made to Dr. Lathrop, or Miss Cooper, and accompanied by a letter from a physician of good character. There will be two vacancies in the men’s ward very soon, owing to the dismissal of convalescent patients. Rags for carpeting, will be gratefully received. The female patients are preparing them both for use at the hospital, and also for the new Orphan House. Susan Fenimore Cooper S.F.C.

March 24, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Charles R. Burch went to New York last week to consult occulists and had a successful operation performed upon his eyes. He was accompanied by T.C. Turner.  Mr. Burch is expected home in a few days.
A gentleman interested in bringing out “Mikado,” the entertainment, says: “Ladies should come prepared to take off their hats.” There are some very desirable seats left unsold for Thursday night, and not all are sold for Friday night.
Monday was the first really spring-like day of the season – sunshine and shower, light snow squalls at times, and a south wind melting the snow on the ground; in the evening the chirp of the robins.
James P. Kinney of this village has the contract for putting the hedge around the hospital building lot. The plants used will be from the celebrated Chautauqua Nursery of Portland, New York.
The Rev. Sherman Coolidge, missionary to the Shoshone reservation in Wyoming, who is a full-blooded Indian, will conduct a religious service in Christ Church Wednesday at 8 o’clock. The public is cordially invited to attend.

March 28, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

Mrs. Hyde Sued on Defamation Charge – Action for defamation of character was begun in this village on Saturday of last week, when summonses were served on Mrs. W.T. Hyde, owner of the Glimmerglen Farms and county agent for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The amounts sought as damages in these actions were not made public. The actions were brought by four employees of the Hyde properties and Glimmerglen Farms as a result of accusations made in connection with the disappearance of one fur-lined man’s overcoat, and one ladies’ leather overcoat. As far as known the missing property has not been recovered, although state troopers have been investigating the case. The plaintiffs are Charles Jennings, who is in charge of the poultry house at Glimmerglen Farms; Floyd Green, a stableman; Silas Marsh, a chauffeur, and Eugene Frank a greenhouse man.

March 24, 1920

50 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown Central School’s Girls Volleyball Team has won the Center State Conference championship. The Redskin girls beat Hamilton in the semi-finals 15-10, and 15-12 and then came back to upend Clinton 15-4, and 15-12. That finished the season for an unblemished 7-0 record. Members of the team are: Mary Chamberlin, Mary O’Leary, Margaret Towne, Cathy Towne, Elizabeth Blessin, Eileen Miller, Janet Phillips, Jeanne Warner and Laura Karkowski.

March 25, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

The $250,000 Doubleday Field renovation project is going “swimmingly,” according to the Chairman of the Doubleday Field Advisory Committee Chairman, Stuart Taugher. Taugher was recently elected to the Cooperstown Village Board. Drainage work on the field has been completed and workers are pouring the concrete for the restroom floors. Work on electrical service and plumbing will commence next week. Taugher added that the project is of such a nature that meetings of the Doubleday Field Advisory Board will be held at 5 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month.

March 26, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

Springbrook will soon welcome twenty-four children with disabilities from as far away as Wisconsin, while saving $890,000 annually. Springbrook receives fourteen million, seven hundred thousand dollars from state bonds, more than paid for by the savings, and can begin a twenty million dollar expansion that includes duplexes for the twenty-four residences, infrastructure, six classrooms and an expanded gymnasium.

March 25, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES March 19, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

March 19, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement: Academy and Boarding School for Young Misses – The Rev. Mr. Molther, respectfully informs the Ladies and Gentlemen of Cooperstown and its vicinity, that after New Year’s Day, 1820, he intends to establish in this Village, an Academy and Boarding School for Young Misses. Aided by his eldest daughters, he proposes to give instruction in the following branches of learning: Reading, English Grammar, Writing, Orthography (or correct spelling put to practice), Arithmetic, Geography, Use of the Globes, Composition, History, Vocal and Instrumental Music on the Piano, the French language taught grammatically, Knitting and Plain and Artificial Needlework. Days of tuition from Monday to Friday inclusive. The terms of tuition, as well as of boarding, will be regulated by the customary terms of other teachers and boarding institutions of this neighborhood. A few Young Gentlemen, between the age of six and thirteen years, may be admitted at school for the time being. Once a week, a catechetical in the principles of religion, will be given, without entering upon controversial tenets.

March 20, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

A Terrible Operation – The Lowell  Advertiser speaks of a terrible surgical operation at the Massachusetts General Hospital performed by Doctor Warren – No less than the complete removal from the head of nearly one-half of the upper jaw; that is from the mouth to the ear. The skin and flesh of the cheek were first turned up over the eye and then the separation was effected by saws and the use of the chisel and mallet. The whole occupied an hour and a half, and the unfortunate patient bore it with firmness. He is an elderly man (not robust) from the eastern part of Maine. A brother is one of the wealthiest and worthiest merchants. The disease is cancer. Dr. Warren is of the opinion that, though cancer may remain in the head, the sufferer will live several years longer than he otherwise would.

March 17, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Attempting Jail Break – The Otsego County Jail is notorious for its insecurity. Of the three criminal cells, but one remains unbroken. Into this least insecure room, the Sheriff locked the two persons – John Kilpatrick and Geo. E. Hewitt – sentenced by Judge Sturges to one year each in the State Prison. But, knowing the reputation of the jail, and having seen its weak points for the past two months, Sheriff Franklin made an early inspection on Friday morning last, when ascertained that by the aid of a small piece of iron and a portion of their bedstead these prisoners had (“Just for the fun of it!” they said) made a hole in the partition wall large enough to crawl through, had concealed the dirt and bricks under their bed, and the hole with a portion of their bedding, expecting the next night to work their way out. The Sheriff felt constrained to put irons on these industrious lovers of liberty, and justified in putting the county to the expense of a watchman for a few nights.

March 17, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Dr. D.E. Siver commenced the practice of Dentistry in Cooperstown thirty years ago last Monday. For a few years he also manufactured artificial teeth which interest he afterwards sold out. Cooperstown has always been noted for its superior dentistry.
We are glad to learn that the Gymnasium is very well patronized this spring by ladies and gentlemen.
On Wednesday evening of next week, Rev. B.P. Ripley will deliver his lecture “Concerning Girls” at Mt. Vision by invitation of the W.C.T.U. of that place.
The Presbyterian Sunday School has a sleigh ride Sunday afternoon.

March 21, 1895

75 YEARS AGO

After one of the most severe winters in years Spring is here. She came early on the morning of Tuesday, March 20. Spring found the snow, which had been piled high everywhere, practically gone and everything ready for fixing the lawns, housecleaning and the like. Farmers say there is no frost in the ground which ought to mean good crops. Winter sometimes plays a trick on Spring and runs back for a last blast after supposedly saying goodbye. Maybe it will be so this year.
Sgt. Ralph Reid Birdsall, who has been in the European War theatre for some time, has been spending a brief furlough with
his mother, Mrs. H.S. Leverich, at the Tunnicliff Inn. He was accompanied by Mrs. Birdsall who is now making her home with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John F. Thompson at New Canaan, Connecticut. Sgt. Birdsall left Friday of last week for Officer Candidate School. He spoke briefly at the meeting of the Cooperstown Rotary Club.

March 21, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

Mike Phillips, a senior at Cooperstown Central School, was voted the Outstanding Wrestler in the Eighth Annual New York State Intersectional Wrestling Tournament in Syracuse on Saturday night after he had captured the 215-pound class individual championship in leading Section III to its first-ever victory in the state tourney. Philips, the overpowering Cooperstown youngster was the darling of the crowd of 5,500 which turned out at the War Memorial for the tournament finals. The raw-boned strong-boy, who was a star tackle on the Cooperstown Central School football team, is being recruited as a football player by Cornell, Notre Dame and Syracuse universities.

March 18, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Paula Diperna, author and film producer from Cooperstown, recently spoke at the World Summit for Social Development.
The summit took up foreign assistance and jobs creation. “The summit focused on how best to use foreign assistance for the alleviation of poverty, as well as the need to consider unemployment as a global problem, particularly the phenomena of jobless economic growth. “There is a lot of concern that as productivity increases, workers are nevertheless permanently laid off. Thus, who is truly benefitting from the productivity increase? Also, many Americans would be surprised to learn that the United States ranks twenty-first, far below most developed countries in its foreign aid program taken as a percentage of GNP. Our foreign assistance is only about one percent of our federal budget.

March 19, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

In the largest turnout in memory and by a clear majority, Cooperstown voters Tuesday, March 16, elected Village Trustee Joseph J. Booan, Jr., a top BOCES administrator, as mayor. The tally was 431 votes for Republican Booan to 329 for Democrat Jeff Katz, the deputy mayor. But words of conciliation were heard from both men after a hard-fought campaign.

March 18, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES March 12, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

March 12, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

On the February 24, at 12 o’clock at night, Joseph Nelson, Nathaniel Brown, Philip Johnson, Lemuel Wood, John O’Brien, James Joyce, David Linus, James Martin, and John N. Baldwin, escaped from No. 12, in the Middle Hall of the State Prison
at Auburn, by breaking through the outside wall of the cell. It was done with bars of iron, and is said to have been the work of a week or ten days. Wood and O’Brien have been retaken and are again in prison.

March 13, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Poetry – “Woman” by Hannah More: “As some fair violet, loveliest of the glade sheds its mild fragrance in the lonely shade. Withdrawn its modest head from public sight, nor courts the sun, nor seeks the glare of light. Should some rude hand profanely dare intrude and bear its beauties from its native wood, exposed above its languid colors fly. Its form decays and all its odors die. So, woman born to dignify retreat, unknown to flourish and unseen be great, to give domestic life its sweetest charm. With softness polish, and with virtue warm, fearful of fame, unwilling to be known, should seek but heaven’s applauses and
her own. Should dread no blame but that which crimes impart, the censures of a self-condemning heart.”

March 10, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

A Masquerade Party will be held at Van Court’s Hall, Fly Creek, on Wednesday evening, March 16th, 1870. The proceeds are to be applied to the Universalist Society. A general invitation is given. Good music in attendance. By Order of Com.

Wanted: A live man to represent the Aetna Life Insurance Co. in Otsego County and vicinity. To a good business man, willing to work, a liberal and permanent contract will be given. Call on, or address James C. Mix, Manager, 12 South Salina Street, Syracuse, N.Y.

John Kilpatrick came into court on Wednesday morning and pled guilty to grand larceny. The Judge said that in
consideration of his age, and that this is the first crime with which he has been charged, and in the belief that the lighter punishment will have the effect to restrain him from the commission of crime in future, and to induce him to come to the place of his punishment determined to wipe out the stain which this offense has affixed to him, and become a good citizen and a comfort and blessing to his mother, the Court would inflict the lighter punishment – State Prison at Auburn for one year.

March 10, 1870

100 YEARS AGO

Before Judge Welch on Monday, March 22, a panel of jurors was drawn in the courthouse in Cooperstown to serve a term of court beginning March 22 with Judge Ulysses G. Welch presiding: L.F. Steere, Cooperstown, Clyde Bresee, Oneonta, Fred E. Hollister, Hartwick, Le McRorie, Westford, Frank Berry, Hartwick, Frank Mills, Rockdale, Rae Stanhouse, Hartwick, M.J. Multer, Cooperstown, L.N. Wood, Cooperstown; George Aspinwall, Cooperstown, Edward Yerdon, Cherry Valley, Henry Walters, Mt. Vision, Wardell Spraker, Cherry Valley, Homer Potter, Oneonta, John Hunter, New Berlin, H.E. Brooks, Edmeston, Lee Sargent, Otego, Clarence Goodale, Richfield Springs, George Aspinwall, Cooperstown, Wells Branigan, South Worcester, Robert Niles, Oneonta, Charles

March 10, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

Before a large and appreciative audience a cast of five talented players of the Cooperstown Academy presented a one-act play – “Who Gets the Car Tonight?” given Saturday night on the gymnasium stage as a feature of the annual Red Cross benefit entertainment. Neil Rudd took the part of Mrs. Jones. Bruce Dodd was Mr. Jones. Millard Wright was Paul Jones. Payton Pinkerton played Mary Jones and Tony Lind was Jack. Preceding the play, the Glee Club gave a delightful concert under the direction of Miss Lucy Cooke, instructor in Music. The Club sang with fine effect “Barcarole” by Offenbach; “Heav’n, Heav’n,” a Negro spiritual, and “Shortnin’ Bread,” Jacque Wolfe. A large sum was raised for the Red Cross Emergency War Fund.

March 14, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

The annual meeting of the Native Sons of Cooperstown will be held Thursday, March 19, at 7 o’clock at the Veterans Club according to Robert C. Tennant, the Native Sons president. A roast beef dinner will be served under the direction of Joseph M. Clancy, and entertainment will follow the meal. Male residents of Cooperstown and its immediate surrounding area, who are 50 years of age or older, or who have lived here for at least 50 years are invited to join the organization.

Sixty members and guests attended the annual Birthday Dinner of the Cooperstown Criterion Club, held March 4, in the Veterans Club rooms. A delicious baked ham dinner was prepared by Joseph M. Clancy and served by the Committee including Mrs. Clancy, chairman, Charlene Stevens, Janet Hurlbert, Juno Purvis, Rosa Dutcher and Elizabeth Peck.

March 11, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

The recently announced Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Upstate New York Men’s Second Team All-Star line-up includes Tim Osterhoudt, a Cooperstown Central School graduate and now a senior forward at Hartwick College. Osterhoudt finished his career at Hartwick with 1,308 points, good for tenth on the school top scorer’s chart.

An unusual exhibition of surreal images will open March 17 at Gallery 53 Artworks in a show of photographic works by Rose Mackiewicz and Timothy Sellers call “Reconstructions.” The exhibition is sponsored by Russ Smith, Garbologist. “It’s a rather dramatic exhibition,” noted Sydney Waller, Gallery 53’s director who has curated
more than 150 shows for the Arts Center since 1981.

March 12, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

Isabella Penola reigned champion when twenty-four spellers met at the eighth annual Regional Spelling Bee Saturday, March 6, at SUNY Oneonta’s Goodrich Theater. Her winning word was “sevruga,” a Caspian Sea sturgeon whose small gray roe is used for caviar. The daughter of John and Laura Penola, Isabella is home-schooled in Cooperstown. She qualifies for the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. in June. Sarah Siegel, a CCS student and daughter of Tim and Maureen Siegel, came in second. The word “homburg” stumped her.

March 13, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES March 5, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

March 5, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from the New York State Comptroller’s Report: Funds of the State excluding 970 thousand acres of land, yet unsold, and of the funds appropriated for the Common Schools, and for the promotion of literature: $3,500,754; Funds appropriated for the Common Schools: $1,229,076; Funds for the promotion of literature: 132,529; The yearly revenue of the state, exclusive of what is derivable from lotteries: $782,562.
Legislation: Mr. Ruggles reported a bill for the relief of David Anderson. Mr. Anderson was indicted at the Otsego Oyer and Terminer, in 1817, for stealing a trunk and contents from a stage in Cherry Valley. He was convicted and imprisoned. But, his innocence being afterward discovered, he was discharged

March 6, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Hudson River Navigation – The Steamboat Norwich, Captain Dodge from New York, arrived at Albany on Monday morning at 1 o’clock. She started at 8 on Saturday evening, and from Rhinebeck up, made her pathway through until then unbroken ice, by which she received some damage. On Tuesday, the river was clear of ice opposite Albany, and as far down as the eye could reach, so that an open navigation for the season was relied on. The Utica, which left New York on Tuesday at 5 p.m., arrived at Albany noon on Wednesday, and returned at 3 p.m. The mails now go by the steamboats. Only think of it – where were only sloops and shallops forty years ago upon the Hudson, steamboats are now almost countless. I learn that one is to traverse that noble river the ensuing season which measures 300 feet in length and capable of transporting 2,000 passengers.

March 3, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Larceny – On Saturday evening last, a young man named John Kilpatrick, about 19 years of age, who had for several months been in the employ of J.H. Story & Company as a clerk, and who was discharged in January, entered the store and succeeded in secreting himself in the upper part of the building. About 10 o‘clock, while a clerk and several associates were sitting in the store, they heard some suspicious noises outside in the rear of the building, and on examination found that Kirkpatrick was in the act of lowering a piece of carpeting from the room above to add to various other house furnishing articles he had already sent down in the same manner. Finding that he was detected, he made no effort to escape, and at first stated he was put up to the theft by other parties – and the nature of the goods he had taken confirms the suspicion that he told the truth in that respect, though he afterwards denied it. He was lodged in jail, and on his examination before Esquire Wilson on Monday, confessed the crime and was to answer at the next Sessions.

March 2, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

For The Ladies – In the Daughter’s Room: A girl ought to have a pretty dainty room, simply but cozily furnished, where she can spend an hour or two every day in peace and quiet, with her work, her books and her little personal interests and belongings. The girl herself should make the fittings for her room and take the care of it. She must be taught to sweep regularly, to keep the bed spread and pillow shams fresh and unwrinkled, to laundry the curtains just about once in so often, and to dust every day. To teach all this to her without making drudgery of it – give her a pretty room.

March 7, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

As temporary Chairman of the New York State Republican state convention, Elihu Root takes a firm stand against the Reds and Bolsheviks. “The right of free speech,” he said, “does not include the right to incite crime. Yet we must be careful not to overlook the distinction. Let there be fair hearing, and let no expression of mere difference of opinion, however radical or distasteful, be punished. One of the things the Republican Party has to do apparently,” Mr. Root added, “is to clear a lot of Bolsheviki, or sympathizers with Bolsheviki, out of the public offices of our government.”

March 3, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

What will happen to jobs for women after the war? Will women be allowed to hold the skilled jobs they now have that were formerly held by men? In a recent talk on “Reconversion and New Avenues of Employment,” Sarah G. Blanding, Dean of the New York State College of Home Economics at Cornell University, said women’s most powerful weapon against the forces that would deny jobs for women is their numerical supremacy. For the first time in the country’s history, women outnumber men. This supremacy is powerful only if welded together and expressed through voting. Concerning new avenues of employment, Miss Blanding stated that women have a high degree of proficiency in occupations that require manual dexterity.

March 7, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

In Cooperstown: The next meeting of the Women’s Club of Cooperstown will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 11, at the new building of the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital. Following an hour tour of the new building, Dr. Rodman Carter will talk on “How Much Do You Know about Alaska?” Tea will be served by the food service department of the hospital.
The regular monthly meeting of the Leatherstocking Stamp Club will be held at the home of George G. Tillapaugh on Tuesday, March 10, at 8 p.m. All persons interested in stamp collecting are welcome to attend.

March 4, 1970

10 YEARS AGO

After searching for 15 years, the Richfield Springs Historical Society has home. “We’ve got a key,” said
Historical Society president Marjorie Walters, waving it before the 40 attendees Monday, March 1, at the society’s monthly meeting in the library’s Proctor Room. “I’m really, really happy. This is a great day”, she said.

March 4, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Feb. 27, 2018

BOUND VOLUMES

Feb. 27, 2018

200 YEARS AGO

Agitation in Virginia – Letters received from Richmond, Virginia, stating that a report circulated there, that a compromise would take place in Congress on the subject of Slavery, had excited a state of fermentation and acrimony never before witnessed in that place. The reported compromise was to embrace the admission of Missouri into the Union without restriction; and the passage of a law prohibiting the extension of Slavery west of the Mississippi, beyond Lat. 36 deg. 30 min. The agitation was so great that no person dared express an opinion contrary to that of the majority. An aged member of the Virginia legislature was so wrought upon by the subject, as to shed tears, and to say “Would to God we had war with England, France, Spain, or any other nation, which would unite the People, rather than a civil war with the Northern States, which must inevitably take place if any restriction is made on our right to hold Slaves, and to transport them where we please.”

February 23, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

The Special Court of Oyer and Terminer which was convened for the trial of prisoners confined in jail and others engaged in the late Anti-Rent disturbances adjourned on Tuesday last without the trial of any of the prisoners. As the excitement of the late disturbances dies away and the people examine and become acquainted with the causes which produced the outbreak, there is less feeling and sympathy expressed in favor of the tenants, that there was during the heat of the excitement. However much the people may wish to see a change in the existing relations between the landlords and tenants, still they are opposed to resorting to any forcible or unfair means to remedy the difficulty complained of, and will unite in bringing to punishment all who are engaged in violating the laws of the land.

February 24, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Three Generations of Booksellers –
The recent expiration of the partnership of Ivison, Phinney, Blakeman & Co., New York, (when Mr. H.F. Phinney of this village
retired) completed about 80 years of the Phinneys with the publishing and bookselling business. This is one of the rare instances in this land of change of so long a continuance of one family in the same business.
Married – In Cooperstown, February 16, 1870, at the residence of the bride’s father, by Rev. C.C. Smith, Mr. Moses H. Lippitt to Miss Sarah M., daughter of John Hinds, all of Cooperstown.
Died – In Brooklyn, New York, February 14, 1870, Delos D., only son of George W. and Cornelia H. Pier, aged two years, seven months and 7 days.

February 24, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Probably the largest religious meeting ever held in Cooperstown, was that which assembled in the Baptist Church last Sunday
evening, to listen to Rev. Mr. Davidson, there being present not less than 850 persons.
The question has frequently been asked, “Of what denomination is Mr. Davidson?” The reply is: “He is a Congregationalist.
Those persons who have charge of the churches, public halls, and school in Cooperstown should feel impressed with the fact that on them rests responsibility for the keeping of such places at a proper temperature and well ventilated. It not infrequently happens that over-heated and impure air invites the absence rather than the attendance of people not compelled to be present. It too seldom occurs that these public rooms are thoroughly ventilated after crowded audiences have occupied them.

February 28, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

At the opening of the County Court Monday afternoon, the business was the matter of naturalization. Sixteen were admitted to American citizenship: Alfred Richard Carr, Springfield Center (England); Omar Felix Chatauvert, Prattsvelle (Canada); David Douglas Laurie, Oneonta (Denmark); Armand J. Vallie Oneonta (Scotland); Peter Petersen, Oneonta (Denmark); Salvatore Galtano Puccio, Oneonta (Italy); Luigi Bachetta, Otego, Italy; Pietro Alotta, Cooperstown (Italy); Thomas Anthony Morris, Oneonta (Greece); Harry George Lambros, Oneonta (Greece); Angelo Banard, East Worcester (Italy); Joseph Kominski, Richfield Springs (Germany); Antonio Defiori, Oneonta (Italy); and Sisto Sardiello, Oneonta (Italy).

February 25, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

The Board of Village Trustees will submit a proposition at the Charter Election in Cooperstown on Tuesday, March 13, a proposition providing for the purchase of a parcel of land long needed as a desirable part of Doubleday Field. If approved, the result will be the squaring of the right field corner where a jog has existed since the historic field was established. The Trustees have been granted a sixty-day option upon the plot which is 98 feet and six inches long and from 52 to 54 feet wide, at a price of $800, by the owners, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde A. Davis and Bertha May Russell. This is the first time the property has been obtainable. The “jog” has interfered with games brought here by the Major Leagues and also prevents the laying out of a full-sized football field, thus hampering games of the Cooperstown Central School and other local teams.

February 28, 1945

25 YEARS AGO

If the behavior of the students attending Cooperstown Elementary School was better than usual last week, it may have been the result of a special week of activities the school was involved in. Last week was “Caring and Sharing Week” for the 720 Kindergarten through fifth graders at the elementary school. The week’s theme was “Let it begin with me” and focused on conflict resolution. Activities focused on the steps of problem-solving, anger control, respect for others, and fostering friendship. Christine McBrearty-Hulse, school guidance counselor and the week’s organizer said, “everyone would like to see the good will exhibited during the week continue throughout the rest of the school year.”

February 22, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

The new New York Collegiate Baseball League’s Cooperstown Hawkeyes have a natural geographic rival waiting, in Oneonta. The Oneonta Outlaws will call Damaschke Field home while the Hawkeyes defend Doubleday Field. The geographic proximity is expected to fuel a natural rivalry that should benefit both teams. The Hawkeyes management team led by franchise owner Tom Hickey includes consultant Ted Peters, assistant manager David Pearlman, and marketing director Schuyler Pindar.

February 25, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Feb. 20, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Feb. 20, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpt from the Augusta, Georgia Chronicle, February 1, 1820 reprinted with the following introduction: “A Horrible Punishment” Who can read it and believe that such horrible cruelties are practiced in this land of freedom and civilization! The heart sickens at the recital! ‘Oh Slavery! Thou art the curse of heaven!” Execution – on Friday last, two Negro men, named Ephraim and Sam, were executed in conformity to their sentence for the murder of their master, Mr. Thomas Hancock, of Edgefield District, South Carolina. Sam was burnt and Ephraim hung, and his head severed from his body and publicly exposed. The burning of malefactors is a punishment only resorted to when absolute necessity demands a signal example. It must be a horrid and appalling sight to see a human being consigned to the flames. The circumstances attending the crime for which these miserable beings have suffered, were of a nature so aggravated, as imperiously demanded the terrible punishment which has been inflicted upon them.

February 21, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Letters from Washington mention that President Tyler had withdrawn from the Senate the name of Chancellor Walworth for the vacant seat on the bench of the U.S. Supreme Court, occasioned by the death of Judge Thompson of this State, and sent in that of Chief Justice Nelson, whose nomination it was confidently believed would be confirmed by the Senate. We had not supposed that objection to Judge Nelson would be taken from any quarter whatever, and was therefore surprised to find the Whig letter writers from Washington attempting to deprecate him in the public mind. His character is too elevated and his motives of action too pure, to be stained by the aspersions of political opponents at the Capitol or elsewhere.

February 17, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Local: Efforts have been made to divide different counties and to remove county seats at about every legislature for the past 25 years. In some cases, strong and vigorous efforts, backed up by ample resources, have been made, and yet in all that time not a single county in the State has been divided. In but one case has a county seat been changed. An attempt to divide old Otsego, or to remove the county seat, would signally fail.

Advertisement: The Best – The Davis Sewing Machine now on exhibition and trial in the parlor of the Empire House, wins friends rapidly among all persons who have had experience with machines. Every family needs a sewing machine. In a large family, it pays for itself in a single year. The interest on $60 can be earned in a single week. Ladies are invited to call and examine this machine.

February 17, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Local: The Opera “Mikado,” by Gilbert and Sullivan, will be given in Cooperstown on March 28, 29 and 30
under the personal direction of Mr. and Mrs. Harry F. Dixie of New York in the interest of the Phinney Hose Co.
A strong cast and chorus of 40 voices has been secured. The elaborate Japanese costumes come direct from the city.
Someone started a report that the floor of the Presbyterian Church settled last week from the large congregations gathered there. The trustees have thoroughly investigated the matter and assert that there is no foundation whatever for the report. The floor of the church rests upon the most solid foundation.

February 21, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

Republican members of the House of Representatives have been doing little else but investigating the Democratic Administration since they took over the legislative part of the government last May 19 when the extra session convened. Conduct of the victorious war, why America startled the world by its overnight shipping achievements, and anything else that it was thought might furnish political capital was eagerly seized upon by an investigative committee. The Democrats now propose to bring these committees to book and force them to confess officially how much of Uncle Sam’s money has been spent in chasing the elusive rumors. An investigation of the Shipping Board and the War Department from May 19 to July 1, 1919 makes it plain that these two committees alone have spent at least $150,000 in those six weeks. It is estimated that when all of the receipts are gathered the cost to the American public to satisfy Republican curiosity will closely approach $1 million dollars.

February 18, 1920

50 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown Central School’s basketball team defeated Richfield Springs 54 to 48, February 6 in a Center State Conference game at Richfield Springs. Brothers Cliff and Carter Coleman took control of the backboards grabbing 27 caroms between them. Carter Coleman joined Chris Shockley as Cooperstown’s top scorers of the evening with sixteen points each. The win moved Cooperstown into second place in the Eastern Division of the Center State Conference.
The many friends of Charles A. “Skip” Coleman III, of Cooperstown, will be glad to know that he is continuing his basketball career even while serving in the U.S. Air Force at Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine. On his Wing team, Skip has been averaging 38 points per game, and as a member of the “Bombers,” the air base team, he is averaging 28 points per game. Skip graduated from Cooperstown Central School in 1968.

February 18, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

The Cooperstown High School boys’ hoop team closed out a 9 wins, 10 loss season with an 89-66 victory against Mohawk but will not be engaging in post-season action. Cooperstown Coach Dick White played all 12 members of his team in the game but it was the six active senior members who shined as they combined for most of the 89 points. Center Reid Nagelschmidt led the senior offensive barrage with 29 points and finished his varsity career with 1,065 points.

February 15, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

St. Mary’s “Our Lady of the Lake” Roman Catholic Church was packed to honor all aspects of Stu Taugher’s life. His five daughters were pallbearers and participated in the service. Mayor Carol B. Waller praised his dedication of time to the village as mayor, as a village trustee and county representative – “something we give freely, something we cannot get back.”

February 18, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Feb. 12, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Feb. 12, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpt from a Letter to the Editor dated Albany, February 9, 1820, signed Daniel D. Tompkins: “I occasionally get a glance at your paper, which I am glad to find conducted with a stability and moderation in regard to the political contentions which agitate the state, highly credible to your judgment. Faction has reared its head, and the party in
opposition to the state administration, appear determined by “hook or by crook,” to destroy all confidence not only in the ability of those at the helm of government, but in the integrity of their intentions. The important measures of the administration are not attacked, and for the most obvious reason, because any attempt to prove them injurious to the best interest of the state, would, with thinking men most effectually serve to exhibit their importance and usefulness. Invective and denunciation are therefore resorted to, in the hope that old party distinctions may be roused from their slumbers, and thus the judgment of the electors be controlled by their passions. But, I trust sober reason will not be discarded in making up an opinion on the question as to whether Mr. Clinton’s administration has proved beneficial or injurious to the state.”

February 14, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Winter Weather: The storm which commenced on Tuesday, seems to have extended itself in all directions, so as to derange the mails. Our accounts ordinarily from Washington would have been to Tuesday last, but now only reach to Saturday, February 1. We were three successive days without mail from Utica.

February 10, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Local – The Firemen of this Village have fitted up and furnished their Hall in a neat and substantial manner. With a portable furnace below in the engine room, the machines are kept in good working order and the Hall comfortable. Their Ball, to come off on February 17, is to pay off indebtedness incurred in making the above arrangements.
The present lot of paper used in printing the Journal is considered in this office the best ever made at the “Otsego Mills” – for the past year run by Mr. John Worthington of Cooperstown. Under his administration great improvements have been made in machinery and manufacturing.

February 10, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Local – Favorable action will probably be taken at the coming Town Meeting to establish two district polling places in future – one at Cooperstown and one at Fly Creek. Lester Lettis and his son Fred have bought out Thomas Chapman’s livery business and will take possession this Friday. The former will remain with the Singer Company and the latter will have charge of the livery.
Edward S. Clark has added to his Fenimore flock
fourteen fine Cheviot sheep, purchased of the well-known local dealer, Geo. Lough of Hartwick.
The Great Storm of 1895 – Following several weeks of clear, cold weather, a fall of snow commenced last Thursday evening and continued through the night, adding a foot or more to the previous supply. During Saturday night, about six inches more of snow fell. Of course, roads in all directions were blocked and but few sleighs were seen
upon our streets.

February 7 and 14

75 YEARS AGO

Colored lights and sculptured snow figures, a huge ship, sail and all, and lots of snow formed the background of Knox School’s twenty-fourth annual Mid-Winter Carnival. This year the students presented the operetta “H.M.S.
Pinafore” by Gilbert and Sullivan on the school skating rink. An audience of about 150 parents and friends of the girls, as well as many Cooperstown residents enjoyed the graceful and finished performance of the skaters and the coronation of the Carnival Queen, Barbara Heinz, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Her attendants were Meriwether Wright and Nancy Ferris. Betty Jane Cronk of Hamilton, New York read the story of the operetta as it progressed.

February 14, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

Prompt and efficient action by members of the Cooperstown Fire Department averted what could have been a major disaster in the village early Tuesday morning after a car smashed into a tractor-tanker laden with 6,200 gallons of gasoline. The tanker, driven by Milton Pitcher, 39, of Selkirk, was backing from Chestnut Street into Hunt’s Gulf Service Station at the corner of Elm Street about 2 a.m. when a car driven by Robert A. LaDuke, 30, of this village, slammed into the mid-section of the right side of the gasoline truck. The car caught fire on impact as gasoline in lines leading from the tanks apparently trickled through valves broken by the crash and onto the hot engine
of the passenger vehicle. Mr. LaDuke escaped from the wreckage with only a cut on his forehead. Mr. Pitcher rushed to the former St. John Grocery next door to the service station and alerted Mrs. Mildred St. John who has an apartment in the building. She turned in the fire alarm which sounded at 2:10 a.m. Firemen under the command of Chief Malcolm L. Root rushed to the scene with three pumpers and an emergency truck. Within three to four minutes after the alarm went off, firemen had discharged a huge blanket of foam to quell the flames.

February 11, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Sydney Waller, a driving force in the Otsego County art world, is giving up her 14-year-old creation, Gallery 53 Artworks, to take a position as Director of Development and Public Affairs for the New York State Historical Association. “I will be involved in being an advocate for their wonderful programs and facilities, Waller said. “I will be involved with public relations and publicity, and I also hope to
expand and enhance appreciation and support for their incredible entities in the local, regional and statewide areas.”

February 12, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

2010 Winter Carnival Contest Winners – Carnival Court: King: Luke Folts; Queen: Elizabeth Szwejbka; Court: Carly Busse, Lauren Harris, Natalie Wrubleski, Edmund Donley, Jeremiah Ford and Scott Millea. Snow Sculpting: First Place: Cooperstown Graduate Program, Class of 2011; Second Place: Andrew and Erin Rock. Cheesecake Contest: First Place: Linda Smirk, Cooperstown B & B; Second Place: Elizabeth Dunn. X-Country Ski Race: First Female – Emily Stein (22:03); First Male – Gary Toombs (13:55).

February 11, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES: Feb. 6, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Feb. 6, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Court of Sessions – The following convictions were had in the Court of Sessions, held in this village the past week: John Gardner, indicted for Grand Larceny – sentenced to confinement at hard labor in the State’s Prison, five years; John Havens, indicted as an accessory before the fact for larceny – sentenced to imprisonment in the State’s Prison, four years; Benson Nichols, indicted for assault and battery – sentenced to two months in the County Jail; Reuben Saunders, indicted for Larceny – sentenced to imprisonment in the County Jail, three months; Charity Saunders, indicted as an accessory of Petit Larceny, after the fact, sentenced to imprisonment in the County Jail for one month.

February 7, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Contemporary Editor’s Note: The proceedings of an Anti-Rent meeting, held at Westville, in this County, on January 2, 1845, have been left with us for publication and are rejected because they contain libelous matter in commenting upon the acts and motives of an individual. At the same time that we decline inserting them, it is proper to add, that several of those who participated in the meeting, whom we know personally to be respectable citizens of neighboring towns, have assured us that they utterly repudiate the idea of “oppugnation” to the laws, and look upon the recent “Indian” outrages upon civil officers as offences requiring a rigid administration of justice. They seek correctives of what they regard as existing evils by constitutional means, and will never sanction violence of any sort for redress of supposed grievances in the operation of laws.

February 3, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Summary of News – The ordination of Rev. C.C. Smith, Pastor of the Baptist Church of this village, will take place on February 10 – sermon by Rev. F. Dodge, D.D., President of Madison University, and ordination in the evening.

The people of Worcester have resolved to build a new District School House. There is not a town in the county where new school houses are not needed – though the necessity is more marked in some towns than in others. Among the wealthy farmers of Otsego there are not a few liberal-minded men, and they should direct their attention earnestly to this important matter

The farmers of this and surrounding towns are about to experience a still further benefit from the construction of the Cooperstown railroad. Plaster, so much in use by most of them, is to be brought here in large quantities over the road, and sold at a price which will make it an object for them to buy it here instead of going to the Central railroad for it. Thus, we receive compensation for the increased taxes caused by the building of the roads.

February 3, 1870

100 YEARS AGO

Amusement at the Village Theatre – Like a slave in the market place sold to the highest bidder, Mary MacNeill, heroine of “The Woman Thou Gavest Me” by Hall Caine, passes through the most terrible experiences that could fall to the lot of a woman. Yet, she overcomes them and wins a measure of happiness. In the cast are such well known players as Katherine MacDonald, Theodore Roberts, Jack Holt, Milton Sills, Katherine Griffith, Fritzi Brunette, and others. Fatty Arbuckle in “Back Stage” will also be offered. Ed. Note: The “Village Theatre” was located in a space at 22 Main Street in the building donated by Robert Sterling Clark which now serves as the home of Village Offices and the Cooperstown Library.

February 4, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

U.S. Navy Specialist First Class seaman Francis T. Bellhouse, who spent several summers in Cooperstown with his family while employed as a jockey by Mr. F. Ambrose Clark, is reported as a survivor following the sinking of his ship, the newly commissioned USS Cooper on December 27, 1944 off Leyte when it was attacked by Japanese forces. Bellhouse and other survivors of the USS Cooper were in the sea waters off Leyte for 17 hours dodging bullets from strafing Japanese fighters before rescue help arrived. Bellhouse credits Commander Mel A. Peterson, his ship’s Captain, for keeping the surviving sailors alive until rescuing seaplanes arrived to pick them up. Directed by Captain Peterson, Bellhouse and his shipmates remained together treading water and resting periodically in a small raft, a floating life net and a rubber boat.

February 7, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

More than 250 people attended the opening program of the New York State Historical Association’s Winter Sunday Lecture Series at Fenimore House on February 1. Leonard DePaur, conductor and arranger, spoke to an enthusiastic audience on “Black Folk Song – A History of Survival.” His research in the field of black folk music has been extensive. He augmented his talk with tapes of African tribal music and early American Negro music. The second program in the Winter Series will be a talk by Clay
Lancaster, an architectural historian on “Architectural Follies in America.”

February 4, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Lonnie Bunch, noted curator and author, will speak on cultural diversity in American museums at the Cooperstown Graduate Program as part of the observance of Black History month. Bunch is the assistant director for curatorial affairs of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C. Graduate program Director Gretchen Sorin noted, “The Graduate Program is a wonderful community resource, and throughout the year we will be bringing exciting speakers here. We are looking to share these programs with the public so that others have an opportunity to hear these historians.”

February 1, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

Helen E. “Lizzie” Kiser died Sunday morning, January 31, 2010 at Bassett Hospital shortly after telling her family that she was ready to “leave this Earth to be with the angels.” She was 85. Helen was born January 7, 1925, in Brooklyn, one of five children of Rudolph and Helena (Radke) Platt. On December 31, 1944, she married Arthur H. Kisrr, Sr., and shortly thereafter they moved to and made their home in the Cooperstown-Milford area. Helen was an accomplished seamstress and worked for many years doing tailoring at the Smart Shop in Cooperstown. She was an avid quilter and had many friends in local quilting and sewing circles.

February 5, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 30, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 30, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpt from an essay on “Education of the Indians” – Although partial advances may be made, under the  present system, to civilize the Indians, I am of an opinion, that, until there is a radical change in the system, any efforts which may be made, must fall short of complete success. They must be brought gradually under our authority and laws, or they will insensibly waste away in vice and misery. It is impossible with their customs that they should exist as independent communities, in the midst of civilized society. They are not in fact an independent people – I speak of those surrounded by our population – nor ought they to be so considered. They should be taken under our guardianship; and our opinion, and not theirs, ought to prevail in measures intended for their civilization and happiness. A system less vigorous may protract, but cannot arrest their fate.

January 31, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Meeting of Hop Growers – A meeting of the Hop Growers of this county was held in this village on January 23, pursuant to notice, and an Association of that interest formed – John W. Tunnicliff of Richfield, President, and G.W. Ernst of Cooperstown, Secretary. An invitation was extended to all persons engaged in Hop growing, to call upon the Secretary and join the Association, which adjourned to meet again at William Lewis’s Tavern in the place on the first Monday in June next at 1 o’clock p.m. G.W. Ryckman, of New York, was appointed Corresponding Agent of the Association for Foreign Countries, with a view to ascertain the prospect of a market, and was also recommended for support as Inspector for Hops for the City of New York.

January 27, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Local – Old Mrs. Bice, for many years one of the tenants of “Bull’s Head,” died there on the fifteenth. She had always been a hardworking woman and was supposed to be quite poor. She had received aid from individuals and $40 from the Town during the past three winters. But after her death near $300 in gold and silver was found secreted in her room. It is suspected that a small tin box, which she always kept by her, and which could not be found, contained other treasures. Her effects were taken in charge of the Overseer of the Poor.

January 27, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

The Literary Association – Those who attended the regular weekly meeting of this Society last Saturday evening felt that they were well-rewarded, as the paper read on “Dentistry” by Dr. E.I. Pitcher was one full of interest, showing that the ancients had a practical knowledge of dentistry, which in these days is brought to great perfection. Those who would enjoy good, general health, will not avoid the dentist’s chair when circumstances seem to call them there.
There are a number of persons in this village sick with the grip. Most of them are children. They are first taken with a sore throat or partial congestion of the lungs. All need to be on guard against taking cold. If you think a physician is needed, send for one before night.

January 31, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

Plans for the new fireproof theatre to be erected on the site of a portion of Carr’s Hotel by William Smalley, proprietor of the Village Theatre, were received by this enterprising picture exhibitor on Monday. The plans were prepared by J.C. Cummins of Norwich, a specialist in theatre architecture. The blue prints of this new building show a modern and up-to-date theatre of which any city ten times the size of Cooperstown would be proud. The main floor of the theatre would have a seating capacity of about 1,000, in addition to which there are to be loges and boxes at each side of a stage on which a road show can be easily accommodated. The stage would be twice the size of the stage in the Village Theatre.

January 28, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

Local: Among the Flying Fortress pilots graduated recently from the Army Air Force station at Hendricks Field, Sebring, Florida, is Second Lieutenant Arthur T. Peevers, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Peevers, of River Street, Cooperstown. Lieutenant Peevers, a graduate of Cooperstown High School and a former cadet at Syracuse University, entered the service in 1942, receiving his wings and commission last September at Columbus Army Air Base in Mississippi.
The operators at the Cooperstown telephone central office attended a sleigh ride on Wednesday night of last week. Following the ride they enjoyed a delicious chicken dinner at the home of Mrs. Harry Winnie at Fly Creek. Guests at the ride and dinner were Mrs. Edwin Tipple, formerly of the local office, and Miss Glennis Talbot of the Richfield Springs Exchange.

January 31, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

The George H. and Minnie Marsh White Foundation of this village has been dissolved, effective last December 31, 1969 after more than a quarter century as a moving force in the field of religious, scientific, educational and charitable activities. John McKnight Brown, president of the Foundation, said that during its 27-year lifetime, the Foundation had made a total of 238 grants amounting to nearly three-quarters of a million dollars. The Foundation was established in 1943 by the late Mrs. Minnie Marsh White, whose husband, the late George H. White, was a former president of the First National Bank of Cooperstown. Mr. White had died in 1936. One of the Foundation’s unique activities was the support it gave to the Native Sons of Cooperstown which was founded by Mr. White in 1935. Unaffected by the dissolution of the Foundation is the $100,000 George H. and Minnie Marsh White Scholarship Fund, a trust set up under the terms of Mrs. White’s will from which scholarship grants are made only to graduates of Cooperstown Central School.

January 28, 1970

10 YEARS AGO

Beginning with the edition you hold in your hands, The Freeman’s Journal is shifting its publication day from Fridays to Thursdays. That means it will be available on newsstands Wednesday afternoons and should arrive in local subscribers’ mailboxes on Thursdays. Our hope is this change will allow you to better plan your weekend activities.

January 28, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 23, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 23, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Editorial – Notwithstanding the business talents of Congress, they do not appear to progress very rapidly. Not a single important object of the session has been brought into consideration, other than creating a multitude of enquiries in relation to the expenditure of public moneys. True, there is need enough of investigation upon this subject, because, unless they retrench somewhere, the deficit of five millions, mentioned by the secretary of the treasury, must be put upon the shoulders of the people, and in these times, they would prove restive under the burden.

January 24, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Great Voyage – The Magnolia arrived yesterday with 3,900 pounds of whale and sperm oil. She has been out 25 months and brings a clear profit to her owners of $12,000 or $15,000. Captain Simmons and several of her crew are Vermonters. It takes the Green Mountain boys to grapple with the leviathans of the deep.
Letters addressed to the following persons are among those remaining in the Cooperstown Post Office at the conclusion of December 1844: E.C. Adams, Oliver Burdick, Mrs. M.A. Cooper, Lorenzo D.
Davies, Mrs. Emily Elson, E.E. Ferrey, Elizabeth Green, Ira Hyde, Edwin Johnson,  N.C. Knapp, Mary Lovejoy, Amos W. Mathewson, Hurane Olmsted, Benjamin Pitcher, Hannah E. Rider, W. D. Stocker, Stephen Thorn, Dr. Van Alstine, Isaac Walrath.

January 20, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Ed Note: So-called Minstrel Shows (viewed today as shamefully racist in every respect) were comprised of white performers disguised as African-Americans. Such were common, public entertainments in the post-Civil War era and featured both professional and amateur actors. The following advertisement is typical of the professional, touring genre: “The Band of the Period” at Bowne Hall, Cooperstown, Thursday Evening January 20, 1870 – The Original and Only Happy – Cal Wagner’s Minstrels and Brass Band, with an entire change of programme (not yet copied by “The Great I Am”) – New Songs, New Acts – In Fact Everything New. Peasley and Fitzgerald in their Silver Stature Clog; Happy Cal with his Wonderful Elephant; The Great Burlesque of The Cardiff Giant – The Best Bill of the Season. Admission 35 cents; Reserved Seats 50 cents. Doors Open at 7 p.m. Happy Cal Wagner, Proprietor and Manager. Geo. McDonald, Agent.”

January 20, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Hops – There has been considerable activity in this place and Oneonta during the past week. It is estimated that the agents of shippers have bought not less than 800 bales of Otsego County prime to choice hops and 6.5 to 11 cents, according to quality. We still incline to the opinion that really choice hops are likely to advance two or three cents a pound in the spring, especially if there is a general revival of business in this country, when more beer will be manufactured.

January 24, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

As Cooperstown church bells rang in celebration of the advent of constitutional national prohibition, Otsego County sustained one of the severest blizzards in a number of years. A three-days snow, starting on Friday of last week culminated in the force of the blizzard being received Saturday night and Sunday morning, with a 50-mile per hour gale blowing nearly all day Sunday. Traffic suffered most during this period, not only on the trolley and steam lines, but in the rural districts as well. The Fly Creek Valley, the original home of snowdrifts, was almost impassable in most places until Monday. The state road from Cooperstown to Index was in the same predicament. Forces of men were at work Monday morning endeavoring to eat their way through the snow drifts which in some instances almost reached the height of the cars of the Southern New York lines. Lake roads and roads in Middlefield likewise were impassable.

January 21, 1920

75 YEARS AGO

Japanese soldiers in the jungles fell in considerable numbers before the rifle fire of Pfc. Claude Graham, aged 26, an infantryman from East Springfield. Private Graham, the son of Mrs. Reuben Roberts of East Springfield, was a rifleman in the 24th Infantry Division. In the Hollandia campaign he earned the Combat Infantryman Badge, awarded for exemplary conduct in action against the enemy. “The most satisfying thing to me in combat,” he declared in an interview, “was shooting snipers.
We never feared the Japs, because we could see them, because we figured that the superior fire power of our M1 rifles gave us the edge over any one visible. It was the invisible ones that bothered us, and the snipers mostly were invisible. So, when we located a sniper and brought him down, we always felt that we’d accomplished something.
Despite their cleverness at concealing themselves, we located plenty of them, too.” Private Graham’s infantry regiment took hundreds of prisoners, a feat regarded as unusual since Japanese determined to fight to the death, are difficult to capture. He added, however, that he had seen a number of instances of “hara-kiri” in which Japanese soldiers preferred to kill themselves with bayonets and hand grenades, rather than surrender.

January 17, 1945

25 YEARS AGO

Tom Heitz, formerly librarian for the National Baseball Hall of Fame since 1983, has hired legal counsel to negotiate a separation settlement in the wake of his termination on January 2. Heitz is represented by Robert Abrams, the former New York State Attorney General. No reason has been given by the Hall for his departure. When asked if Heitz was fired, William Guilfoile, Vice President of the Hall of Fame declined to comment. Abrams also declined to comment stating, “I believe it would be imprudent to comment on anything at this point.”
Ed. Note: With the help of Robert Abrams I did reach a satisfactory settlement with the Hall of Fame. I remain a Life Member of the Hall where I am welcomed as an occasional visitor in the museum or researcher in the library. The baseball library, its staff and its extensive collections are in the excellent care and direction of my successor Jim Gates, whose now 25-year tenure has brought the library to the first rank of sports-related libraries in the country, if not indeed the world.

January 18, 1995

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 16, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 16, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisement: Cloth Found, in Milford, in the road between the Village of Cooperstown and Oak’s Creek, on the 6th Inst., a roll of homemade WOOLEN CLOTH. The owner can have the same by applying to the Subscriber, or to B. Fitch, in Cooperstown, on proving property and paying charges. Simeon J. Clinton
Advertisement: Look to It! The subscriber having closed his business in this place, and will leave here on Monday, the 24th inst., it becomes necessary that those indebted to him should settle their Notes and the accounts before that time. Those that neglect this will be sued immediately. A.B. Shankland.

January 17, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

The writings of Dr. Scoresby, a scientific gentleman of England who recently traveled in America, are summarized: “There are certain general national characteristics of the native born American. Among these are pride, perhaps vain-glory, of the Americans in their country and institutions. This was naturally excited by the vast and inexhaustible resources of their country, and by their political constitution and civil institutions, under or in connection with which the masses feel such independency of action and realize such general respectability of condition. There is no country in the world in which the masses of the population are so raised above servile degradation – so independent of the control of the rich – so generally respectable in their condition, as in the northern continent of America. However, it would be but right to anticipate some future inquiry as to whether these are the pure results of a superior constitution, or whether they are results yielded by the riches of the country and the enterprise and talent of the people, in spite of an inferior form of government.”

January 20, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Circuit Court – William Wheeler, indicted for arson in the Third Degree, for burning the barn of Hiram Barton in May, 1869, containing 26 head of cattle, and a large quantity of personal property was tried. The evidence was entirely circumstantial, but the chain of circumstances was so complete that the jury found the prisoner guilty, and the Court sentenced him to six and one-half years hard labor in State Prison – seven years being the limit of the law. The prisoner said he was about 30 years of age, a native of Hartwick and by occupation a farmer. District Attorney for the People; Lynes & Bowen for prisoner.

January 20, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Obituary – Hiram Reed of this Town was born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1816, and died at his home in Pierstown on January 14 in the seventy-ninth year of his age, after a brief illness. He did not marry until he was about sixty years of age. He has left a wife and four children in poor circumstances. Mr. Reed was a very industrious and hard-working man, who had earned the small farm on which he lived and about $1,500 in cash. The latter he loaned to a man who
formerly lived here, without security, and lost it – a misfortune which caused him further severe trouble and hardship. But he fought life’s battle like a brave man, and died respected by his circle of relatives and neighbors.

January 17, 1895

100 YEARS AGO

Purely Personal – Louis A. Pratt, formerly of Central Bridge, and recently of Milford arrived last week to take charge of his new property, the Pioneer Hotel, which he purchased from John Cronauer. Mr. Pratt is making ready to open the hotel about February 1. A great deal of renovation has been planned.
Mrs. William T. Hyde of Cooperstown, the County Agent for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, was in Oneonta Friday accompanied by Dr. H.W. Tillson, the veterinary surgeon. During the afternoon, both attended the auction sale of horses at the stables of H.W. Sheldon. Mrs. Hyde said that the horses disposed of were quite uniformly in good condition and that there was little to correct.

January 14, 1920

50 YEARS AGO

Homemade cake with coffee will be the feature of the “dessert bridge” gathering sponsored by the Woman’s Club of Cooperstown on January 23, according to Mrs. F.H. Gardiner and Mrs. Ed Stevens, co-chairs of the food committee. This will be served at the tables at 8 p.m. Tickets for the Helen Hale Scholarship Fund benefit are available at Augurs Bookstore or from any of the following: Mrs. Harry Shepard, Mrs. Donal Wertheim, Mrs. Henry Troeger, Mrs. Frederick McGown, Mrs. Lyle Roberts, Mrs. Ann McDonough, Mrs. Wayne Willis, Mrs. Ed Stevens, Mrs. George Tillapaugh, Mrs. Bruce Buckley, Mrs. Raymond Sprague, or at the door. Tickets are $1. A telephone call to any member of the committee will reserve a table for you. The public is invited – both male and female.
In response to problems now facing our youth, the Cooperstown Parent-Teachers Association will sponsor a program on “The Problems of Drug Addiction” Wednesday evening at the high school at 8 p.m. in the cafeteria. Two narcotics educators, Miss Mary Dobeck and Walter Silver, both Associates in the Bureau of Professional Education, Narcotics Ad
diction Control Commission for the NYS Department of Health will offer a community action program to attack the problem.

January 14, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Four Route 28 parcels and one downtown property have been acquired by the Clark Family Real Estate Investment Partnership through Charisma Partners II Realty Corporation. Edward Stack of the Clark Foundation said that the parcels include Newberry’s on Main Street in Cooperstown as well as properties with a trailer and a house near the Pepper Mill on Route 28, the parcel on which sits the Odbert car dealership and the space next to Wilber National Bank, formerly the Sperry car dealership. “The property is the gateway to Cooperstown and it is very important that the gateway be protected,” Stack said. All of the properties were acquired as long-term investments. “There are no plans to change them. They are still on the tax roll and they will be paying taxes on them,” Stack added. There had been reports that previous owners, the Bettiol Corporation, had planned to build a McDonald’s restaurant and convenience store on one of the Route 28 sites.

January 11, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

The Buffalo-based Tops Friendly Markets is bidding to buy bankrupt P&C’s remaining stores, although no decision on the fate of the Hartwick Seminary outlet has yet been revealed.
A Jan. 8 Tops’ press release announced that Penn Traffic, P&C’s parent company, had accepted its bid to acquire 79 stores and was awaiting U.S. Bankruptcy Court approval.
Employees at the local store say they’ve been told P&C will close the location Feb. 15 if no decision is forthcoming by then.

January 15, 2000

BOUND VOLUMES: Jan. 9, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES:

Jan. 9, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a report to the New York State Legislature regarding progress in the construction of the canal system: “The middle section of the Western Canal, including a lateral canal to Salina, and comprising a distance of more than 96 miles, has been completed. On October 23 last, the Commissioners navigated it from Utica to Rome, and found their most sanguine expectations realized in the celerity, economy, and excellence of the execution; and on November 24, the Champlain Canal was also in a navigable condition. In less than two years and five months 120 miles of artificial navigation have been finished, and thus the physical as well as financial practicability of uniting the waters of the western and northern lakes with the Atlantic ocean has been established without a doubt or cavil. The efforts of direct hostility to the system of internal improvements, will in future be feeble. Honest and well-disposed men, who have hitherto retained doubts, have yielded them to the unparalleled success of this measure.”

January 10, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

Selected state popular vote results from the Presidential Election of 1844 in which James K. Polk defeated Henry Clay, 1,385,260 to 1,299,706, a majority of 85,554. New York State: Polk 237,588; Clay 232,408 (Polk’s majority: 5,180); New Jersey: Clay 38,318; Polk 37,495 (Clay’s majority: 823); Mississippi: Polk 25,126; Clay 19,206 (Polk’s majority 5,920); South Carolina: Polk 50,000; Clay 3,054 (Polk’s majority: 46,946; Kentucky: Clay 61,255; Polk 51,988; (Clay’s majority 9,267); Georgia: Polk 44,154; Clay 42,115; (Polk’s majority 2,039); Alabama: Polk 36,022; Clay 24,875; (Polk’s majority 11,147;
Ohio: Clay 155,113; Polk 149,059;
(Clay’s majority 6,054).

January 13, 1855

150 YEARS AGO

The Otsego County Board of Supervisors are now in session in this village to consider plans and specifications for building a new jail and Sheriff’s residence. On all hands it is admitted that the present jail is a disgrace to the County of Otsego – that it is a source of constant large expense – that its insecure condition has a demoralizing effect. It has been repeatedly condemned by Grand Juries and Boards of Supervisors – and the building of a new jail is recommended by all the newspapers in the county. As a matter of wise economy, the jail should be built now, to be paid for say one-fifth at a time in five years.

January 13, 1870

125 YEARS AGO

Death of Susan Fenimore Cooper, the eldest daughter of James Fenimore Cooper – We would that the writing of the obituary of this highly noted and gifted woman were done by someone better qualified for the service – one who might speak somewhat in poetic language of the fact that she entered upon the year 1894 by seeing and cheerfully and pleasantly conversing with the few friends who that day called upon her – that upon the last Sunday afternoon of the year she was able to join the little family circle at dinner, appearing unusually well; that she read family prayers before retiring to her room; and then at the dawn of the closing day of the year she peacefully fell upon sleep.

January 3, 1895

75 YEARS AGO

Lieutenant General James H. Doolittle, commanding general of the Eighth Air Force, recently awarded the Bronze Star medal to Major Kenneth W. Root, Jr., of Cooperstown. Major Root is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth W. Root, Sr. Major Root serves as the base engineering officer for the Eighth Air Force Liberator Station in England. During his absence, his wife,
Mrs. Helen Root, is residing in Mansfield, Louisiana, but is currently visiting her parents here. Major Root was graduated from Cooperstown High School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was formerly employed by the Central New York Power Company as a results and test engineer. Major Root entered the service in February, 1941 as a Private in the field artillery and was commissioned as an engineering officer on March 8, 1942.

January 10, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

The Department of Psychiatry at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital will observe its fifteenth anniversary this year with a growing emphasis on mental health care. Dr. Harvey Gurian, psychiatrist-in-chief at Bassett, has issued a report on the operation of the department since its creation in 1955. According to Dr. Gurian, Otsego County has had one of the more stable psychiatry programs that have been developed for a rural area. In addition to Dr. Gurian, the staff includes Dr. Hugh R. Williams, associate psychiatrist (Child Psychiatry); Dr. William J. Nape, Assistant Psychiatrist; and
Dr. Charles W. Lamb, Chief Psychologist. In addition, the department has the
services of Dr. Robert F. Savadove, Assistant Resident in Psychiatry, and Dr. George Ainslie who is interning. “The philosophy behind the department’s development has been to increase service gradually as personnel becomes available,” Dr. Gurian states. “Closer liaison with various community agencies such as the Department of Social Services, the schools and the courts will be developed.”

January 14, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Bassett Healthcare’s Birthing Center rang in the New Year, welcoming Cherry Valley’s newest resident – Brandon Scott Yeardon. The 7-pound, 4-ounce bundle of joy was the first baby arriving at Bassett and in Otsego County at 3:43 a.m. on the morning of January 1. Michael and Jennifer Yeardon are the parents. Bassett’s Birthing Center’s “First Baby of the Year Basket” included a handmade quilt by RN Debbie Blue. RN Libby Akulin made the label for the quilt. Also included was a Carter’s Baby Sleeper from Ellsworth and Sill; a Onesie, a knit hat, and OshKosh socks from Cooperstown Kid Company; health care needs from Church and Scott Pharmacy; a stuffed animal from the Bassett volunteers a floral arrangement from Colonial Florists and baby cream from Straws and Sweets.

January 8, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

Letter to the Editor from Thomas J. Hickey, Owner of the Cooperstown Hawkeyes: “On behalf of Cooperstown’s new baseball team, I would like to thank all those who have supported our efforts to bring a high quality baseball experience to Doubleday Field. Our very successful “Name the Team Contest” concluded recently. Out of 80 entries Cooperstown’s David Pearlman submitted the winning entry – the “Cooperstown Hawkeyes.”

January 8, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES Jan. 2, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

Jan. 2, 2020

200 YEARS AGO

From the Editor John H. Prentiss: Since we resumed the publication of this paper, the subscription list has increased more than four hundred, and not a day passes but adds more or less respectable names to it. This fact is mentioned, because we are certain it will be highly gratifying to many gentlemen in the county, who have manifested a warm interest in the prosperity of the establishment.

January 3, 1820

175 YEARS AGO

With this, the first number of our paper for the year 1845, are tendered to its numerous readers the compliments of the Season. We have a long while held converse with them, and of course the acquaintance has strengthened our attachment to their interests, which it will be our pleasure to further and promote to the best of our ability so long as the present interesting relations between us shall exist. The condition of things throughout our widespread country, with the exception of here and there a scudding cloud of disaffection to good order in the observance of the laws, is such as to afford gratification to all, and can safely be counted upon as harbingers of good to the Great Republic. May the propriety of conduct, and good citizenship, characterize us all throughout our lives.

January 6, 1845

150 YEARS AGO

Prominent Points Emphasized in the New York State Governor’s Annual Message: The state’s debt has been decreased over four millions during the past year and is now less than thirty-five million. A great reform is demanded in the management of the State Prisons and the prompt action of the legislature is needed. Our Common School system commands the hearty sympathy and support of the people, and may be further perfected. What the Governor so feelingly urges in regard to the condition of the insane poor of the Stare, will command attention and sympathy. It is recommended that the Excise Laws be made general in their application and that there be a return to the old system of granting licenses by local Boards.

January 6, 1870

100 YEARS AGO

The contest between Herkimer High School and Cooperstown High School Basket-Ball teams at the gymnasium on Friday evening last resulted in favor of the home team by the close score of 22-21. A large audience witnessed the struggle. Many took part in the dancing afterward. Music was furnished by Reisman’s orchestra. Games are scheduled for this Tuesday and Friday evenings – Independents vs. All-College for Tuesday and high schools on Friday.
What Pine is worth – The Otsego farmer must plant white, red and Scotch pine. His profit will be in the growth which will accrue year-by-year. An acre of pines at 40 years of age planted six by six feet will be worth $900 on the stump. What better legacy could a father leave his children than a block of pine forest?

December 31, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

Aviation cadet Harold V. Clark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harris G. Clark, Sr., of Cooperstown, RD2, a recent graduate of the Army Air Force bombardier school at Kirtland Field, Albuquerque, New Mexico, has been appointed a flight officer and awarded the “Silver Wings” of the aerial bombardier. Flight Officer Clark is a graduate of Cooperstown High School, class of 1942, where as an undergraduate he served as captain of the basketball team and played baseball. In civilian life he was employed as an apprentice carpenter. His brother, also serving in the Air Corps, holds the rank of First Lieutenant. Prior to his successful completion of 18 weeks of flight and combat training in high level precision bombing and navigation at Kirtland Field, Flight Officer Clark was stationed at the Santa Ana California Army Air Base.

January 3, 1945

50 YEARS AGO

The number of working wives is on the increase in Otsego County. No less than 46.3 percent of the married women in the local area leave their homes each day and head for their outside jobs in offices, stores, factories, schools, hospitals and the like. In 1960, the figures show, only 35.1 percent did so. In Otsego County there has been an increase since 1960 in the proportion of females – married and single – who are holding down jobs. The 1960 census listed a total of 6,997 at work, equal to 34.7 percent of the female population over age 14. It has now reached approximately 40.6 percent.
The Fourth Annual Cooperstown Winter Carnival will open with a gala parade through the center of town to the skating rink where a skating exhibition will take place and a Queen will be crowned. Then, it’s on to the Teen Dance, the Western Square Dance, or the Bavarian Beer Party. To round the evening off, a Night Owl’s breakfast will be served at Sherry’s Restaurant. Saturday events will include an art show, a fishing contest, sled and ski races, golf tournament, Klondike derby, snowmobile races, and a squash tournament. Highlight of the afternoon will be the Gymkhanna on ice. The traditional Susquehanna Ball will be followed by a Nite Owl’s Breakfast at Hickory Grove.

January 7, 1970

25 YEARS AGO

Plans for a tourist excursion train from Milford to Cooperstown are foundering but the Leatherstocking Railway Historical Society isn’t giving up just yet. The society’s grant request for $700,000 to begin work on the tourist train line was denied. “We’re still working with Assemblyman Bill Magee and Sen. James Seward,” Bruce Hodges, the group’s president said. “We have also contacted Congressman Sherwood Boehlert and are looking into other funding or some other way to pay for this project’s future,” Hodges said. According to Hodges the excursion train would run on tracks now owned by the Delaware-Otsego Corporation and is projected to bring in $8 million per year with 100,000 tourist riders on board while creating 50 jobs in the area.

January 4, 1995

10 YEARS AGO

William Durland Preston, a long-time and well-respected sign painter, died Saturday evening, December 26, 2009, surrounded by family at his Fly Creek home. He was 73. Bill was born October 31, 1936, at Bassett Hospital. For many years, Bill was one of the area’s finest sign painters, a passion he pursued for more than 40 years.

January 1, 2010

BOUND VOLUMES: Dec. 19, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Dec. 19, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Excerpts from a letter from the pen of John Jay, then a former Attorney General of New York State, since retired: “Little can be added to what has been said and written on the subject of Slavery. I concur in the opinion that it ought not to be introduced, nor permitted, in any of the new States, and that it ought to be gradually diminished and finally abolished in all of them. To me the constitutional authority of the Congress, to prohibit the migration and importation of Slaves, into any of the States, does not appear questionable. The first article of the Constitution specifies the legislative powers committed to the Congress. The ninth section of that article has these words; “The migration or importation of such persons as any of the now existing states shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808; but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation not exceeding ten dollars for each person.” It will, I presume be admitted, that slaves were the persons intended. The word slaves was avoided, probably on account of the existing toleration of slavery, and its discordancy with the principles of the Revolution, and from a consciousness of its being repugnant to the
following position in the Declaration of Independence.
“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights – that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

December 20, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Honor to whom Honor is due – A Ball, given in honor of James K. Polk, commemorating the joyful event of his election to the Presidency and the triumph of Democratic Principles came off at Middlefield Centre on Friday, November 29, and in a manner creditably to all concerned. The Ball Room was beautifully decorated with Democratic Banners, Devices and Mottos, together with the pictures and portraits of the several Presidents of the United Sates, among which a full-length portrait of the President-Elect attracted particular attention. Such a galaxy of wit and beauty from Middlefield, Springfield and Cooperstown never before assembled in this place; which, together with the exhilarating music, rendered it a scene of peculiar enjoyment. The rooms were thronged with young democrats more than usually gallant, and it was only regretted, not that the company was so numerous, but that the place was not more commodious. The sumptuous entertainment prepared by Mr. Wickwire was characterized by his usual hospitality. A Looker-on. Middlefield, December 3, 1844.

December 16, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Local: Judge Nelson is now at his home in this village, and is in most excellent health. Hard work at Washington seems to agree with him.
We are requested by some of our best citizens again to call the attention of the Trustees of this village to the rowdyism and street fights which so frequently occur in and near the Main Street of this village, and to urge them to appoint at least for a brief period, an efficient and active Police, that will put a prompt and effectual stop to this growing evil.

December 23, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Editorial: “The curse of the retail credit business,” said a dealer here the other day, “is seen more and more. If it does not bankrupt those who pursue it, their profits are cut down to a low figure, or others are charged too much to make up the losses. It is demoralizing and ought to be abandoned.” Very true. But, that is not the whole story, briefly told. It drives away not a few cash customers, who insist that they are entitled to better terms than those who get a credit of six to twelve months. It leads to extravagance in many families – it is too easy to say “charge it,” and often so hard to pay later on. Many an upright man has been driven to suicide, to drunkenness, or some other crime, by being run into debt unnecessarily and heedlessly by his family.

December 20, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Despite the highest population of all states New York is coming into its own as one of the greatest deer-producing regions in the nation. Such was indicated by the still incomplete tabulation of the 1944 take which soared to a new record of 26,305 deer, of which nearly 19,000 were taken in the nineteen Southern Tier and Western counties where damage to agriculture has become serious. With unusually poor hunting conditions this year, 3,756 bucks were taken, a drop from 1943 when 4,515 bucks were reported. In the Catskills, Sullivan County exceeded the previous year’s take of 667 deer by nearly 100.

December 20, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

For the third season, the Mt. Otsego Ski Area in Pierstown has been leased from Lester Hanson of Cooperstown by Harry Peplinski, Theodore Lamb and Robert Pierro. The Cooperstown Ski Club has been making improvements on the hill. They have expanded the main hill on the top. The club has also been working on the lighting for night skiing. The ski area will be open weekends and on school holidays. There are 200 acres of slopes and trails, a T-bar and three rope tows, a ski shop, ski school and snack bar. A ski patrol, under the direction of George Ehrmann, is on duty.

December 17, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

The untimely death of a senior at Cooperstown Central School has wrought grief among students and faculty alike. Carey Ann Thayer, 18, died suddenly at her home Monday morning. “We got word today,” said Middle School Principal David Pearlman Monday evening, “about what happened that a senior girl had died. I was called out of class at about 1 p.m. and I went into a meeting with Doug Bradshaw, Barry Gould,” members of the crisis team. The senior class had just returned from its senior trip to New York City to see a play, getting back at 2 a.m. Sunday. “We were all shocked,” Pearlman added, “especially in light of the senior trip. She’s with friends one day, and a few days later you hear that she’s gone.”

December 14, 1994

BOUND VOLUMES Dec. 12, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Dec. 12, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Greensburgh, Kentucky – Peter Kingensmith of Hempfield County has returned to his friends after an absence of 37 years, 9 of which he was a captive of the Seneca Indians. He was captured when eight years old, by a party of Senecas,
who massacred his father, mother and aunt. His existence was recently and accidentally discovered in Canada. He has five children and has a farm on the shores of Lake Erie, to which he intends to return. He speaks good English and says he lives in a neighborhood of English people.

December 13, 1812

175 YEARS AGO

Good Loco Foco Times! Mr. Elijah French, of Hartwick, in this county has made the past season from the milk of twelve cows 2,425 pounds of butter, and this to without extra feed. The butter sold for 14 cents cash, yielding $339.50. Mr. F. feels secure against “hard times” and Whig panics, believing that diligence in any pursuit, with good management, will insure a fair reward for enterprise and labor, particularly under a democratic administration of government, which seeks stability in all things.

December 9, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Local – Mr. George Clarke stated to gentlemen of the Agricultural Society living in this village, at the annual meeting on Tuesday last, that as soon as the transfer of Fair Ground property shall be made, and the Society gives up possession to him, the Trustees of this village will be at liberty to open a street through the same; and that, even at an earlier date they may with his free consent proceed to run Fair Street through the Cooper Grounds property – an improvement and convenience very much desired by our citizens.
Court: Aaron Cross, Agent vs. John D. Waldron – Action to recover for a mowing machine claimed to have been sold to defendant. The testimony showed that if on trial the machine suited, defendant was to pay for it; on using the machine it broke down, and defendant refused to take it. The jury found for the defendant, and reversed judgment of $40 given by the Justice in the court below. E. Countryman for the Plaintiff and Lynes and Bowen for Defendant.

December 16, 1869

100 YEARS AGO

Purely Personal: Philadelphia papers last week
announced the resignation of Captain Charles P. Wharton as Coach of the University of Pennsylvania football team, after 26 years of service. Captain Wharton is well-known in Cooperstown, having been one of the most popular officers at the late U.S. Aviation Hospital here. Captain Wharton is noted for having evolved the Pennsylvania system of defense in football, which has often been declared second to none.
Mrs. James Pepper, who teaches the fourth grade pupils was unable to attend to her school duties Friday on account of illness. Mrs. Donald Root substituted for her.
J. Harry Cook and Ben Reisman were in Detroit last week, returning with a shipment of new Dodge cars for the local agency.
Rowan D. Spraker and Franck C. Carpenter spent a few days in New York on business last week.
Miss Pearl Matson spent last Wednesday to Friday in Albany attending a Western Union Conference.

December 10, 1919

75 YEARS AGO

The body of Mrs. Minnie U. (Marsh) White was found in the fourth floor of her home on Pine Boulevard on Monday afternoon by her chauffeur, Joseph O’Malley who had been in her employ thirty years. Mr. O’Malley became suspicious when he had not seen Mrs. White for some time. Coroner Harry V. Frink of Richfield Springs gave a verdict of death by suicide. Mrs. White’s health had been failing for the past several months. Her household and friends had noticed increasing signs of despondency when her health failed to improve. Mrs. White was born in the Town of Middlefield on July 23, 1872 and was the daughter of John and Emma (Smith) Marsh. She came to Cooperstown with her family at
the age of five and resided at Carr’s Hotel for several years. They then moved to number 8 Eagle Street where the family
remained for many years. She was graduated from the Coop-erstown High School in the class of 1887 at the age of 15.

December 13, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Second Lieutenant Terrance C. Graves, 22, a 1963 graduate of Edmeston Central School, has been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, posthumously, for saving the lives of Marine comrades in Viet Nam. The nation’s highest award for valor was presented to his family in Washington, D.C. by Vice President Spiro T. Agnew.
His father, a former Navy officer was until 1963 the supervising principal at Edmeston Central School. Lt. Graves was killed February 16, 1968 while on a long-range
reconnaissance mission. After Lt. Graves’ eight-man patrol ambushed seven enemy soldiers the unit was counterattacked by a large force. Lt. Graves then called for air support and artillery fire. After tending to his wounded men Lt. Graves launched an assault against surviving enemy soldiers before coming under heavy attack a second time. Although wounded himself, Lt. Graves called for rescue aircraft. However, the helicopter in which he was rescued was
hit by intensive ground fire and crashed, killing all aboard.

December 10, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

For more than a hundred years Cooperstown has been home to a facility called the Alfred Corning Clark Gymnasium. That will change after the holidays, according to A.C.C. Gym Director J. Bart Morrison. The new name will be The Clark Sports Center. “It’s because there is a belief that it is time to modernize the name of the organization and arrive at something with more of an illustration of our breadth and scope,” Morrison stated.

December 7, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

Three people suggested the name “Hawkeyes” for Cooperstown’s prospective baseball team. But, Dave Pearlman of Leatherstocking Street suggested it first. So the Pearlman family will enjoy a free pass next summer when the New York Collegiate Baseball League team comes to Doubleday Field, according to franchise owner Tom Hickey of Fly Creek. Other suggested names included “Leatherstockings,” Barrelmakers,” “Mohicans,” “Ghosts,” “Trappers” and “Phinneys.” “The name Hawkeyes,” said Hickey, “is consistent with Cooperstown history and the association with James Fenimore Cooper and his books.”

December 11, 2009

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