SUBSCRIBE MY PROFILE
HOME | BREAKING NEWS | POLICE & FIRE | IN MEMORIAM | PEOPLE | OPINION | SPORTS
 JOBS  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 HOMES  
 CARS  
 FUNERAL HOMES  
 GOODS & SERVICES

News of Otsego County

consolidation

Unatego Prepares Project, But Won’t Rush Consolidation

Unatego Prepares Project,
But Won’t Rush Consolidation

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

The proposed baseball field at Unatego Central School in Otego is seen in this artist’s rendition.

Unatego Central School’s proposed $27.6 million capital improvement plan comes at the perfect time to keep the needed school upgrades from raising taxes on district voters, according to Superintendent Dave Richards.

“We have an opportunity with our debt where we have some debt falling off, so we can replace it with new debt without any increase of the tax levy,” Richards said.

State building aid funding will pay for 87.5% of the project, Richards said.

“If we don’t do a project, then we lose that revenue, too,” Richards said.

Leftover EXCEL funds and about $1.3 million in capital reserves will pay for the remainder of the project, Richards said.

The project would be the first is about a decade for UCS, and the first since the district embarked on a long-term plan to turn three campuses into one.

However, the project will not complete the consolidation and will instead focus on needed improvements at the district’s two remaining campuses, the elementary school at 265 Main St. in the town of Unadilla, and the middle/high school at 2641 state Route 7, in the town of Otego.

Eventually, the elementary school will be closed and all students will attend school at the Otego campus, Richards said.

COLONE: ‘Reimagine Upstate’ Will Lead To Single Oneonta
LETTER from ALBERT COLONE

‘Reimagine Upstate’ Will

Lead To Single Oneonta

A couple of weeks ago, Hometown Oneonta and The Freeman’s Journal published my opinion piece, once again trying to promote the idea of consolidating the city and town of Oneonta. I submitted it to try and generate some meaningful debate on the issue. Surprisingly, the only subsequent reference I’ve seen was an unsigned comment in another paper. How can
this be?

Whoever submitted that comment, thank you for the notation “will someone gently remind Al Colone” that his longtime advocacy for merging was riding a “dead horse.” The word “gently” has become increasingly important as I’ve aged.

On the importance of consolidation, it was not only something which should have been done 10 years ago as the writer notes; it was seriously discussed some 50 years ago. Too bad, had it happened we would have been a much better Oneonta than what we have now.

The writer suggested the biggest hindrance against merging was in the notion the city has been looking to absorb the town to share the town’s prosperity. What prosperity?

The town’s once proud retail sector is and has been gradually evaporating, starting long before the virus; a prosperous Oneonta would have had Southside water 10 years ago, as well East End sewer; while they both have substandard housing, the towns’ neighborhood deterioration is far worse than that of the city and; the median household income of both are consistent with the poverty levels within Appalachia! What prosperity?

But the main reason for my letter was in trying to urge local leaders to move on consolidation before the state does it for us through a plan to “Re-imagine Upstate” and other issue “re-imagining; like our Upstate Education Systems!” It’s going to happen; neither the state nor federal Governments will be able to financially sustain the current over-kill of local governments.

We’ll likely see more County and regional consolidation. Townships are truly nonessential; they are inefficient! They don’t lead and are virtually obsolete. Upstate governance would function much better without them, positively supporting the quest for real prosperity.
I hope this letter has brought greater clarity to my views on the matter! Good wishes!!

ALBERT COLONE
Resident
City of Oneon

Don’t Fear The Facts

allotsego.com EDITORIAL

Don’t Fear The Facts

At 7 p.m. this evening, the Oneonta Town Board will be asked to approve spending $12,500, which will enable the release of a $50,000 state grant to study whether consolidation of the town and city into a single “Greater Oneonta” makes sense.

The study, to be conducted by the Center for Governmental Research, Rochester, would study legislative changes made in 2012 to encourage municipalities to merge when it makes sense to do so.

It is not a vote for merger.  It is a vote to get the facts.  The facts may show it makes sense for the town and city to remain independent.  Or it may show that property taxes would drop and opportunities increase if a single larger municipality is created.

As Oneonta Common Council did last night, the Oneonta Town Board tonight should vote to spend the $12,500.

It’s about the facts.  No more.  The facts should be nothing to fear.

Common Council Backs Merger Study; Town Board Asked To Do So Tonight

Common Council Backs Merger Study;

Town Board Asked To Do So Tonight

"Numbers don't lie, and we must get good data," businessman Al Cleinman declares at last night's Common Council meeting, where a $12,500 allocation was approved to match a $50,000 state grant to study the benefits of consolidation of the city and town of Oneonta.  The Town Board meets at 7 tonight in the West Oneonta Town Hall,  and there's a similar resolution on the agency.  "I hope the town will wake up and see this," said Cleinman.  (
“Numbers don’t lie, and we must get good data,” businessman Al Cleinman declares at last night’s Common Council meeting, where a $12,500 allocation was approved to match a $50,000 state grant to study the benefits of consolidation of the city and town of Oneonta. The Town Board meets at 7 tonight in the West Oneonta Town Hall, and there’s a similar resolution on the agenda. “I hope the town will wake up and see this,” said Cleinman.  The study would be done by the Center for Governmental Research, Rochester.  (Ian Austin/allotsego.com)

 

Common Council To Consider Billboard Ban, Merger Study

Common Council To Consider

Billboard Ban, Merger Study

Oneonta City Hall
Oneonta City Hall

ONEONTA – Two controversies – unhappiness over internally illuminated billboards and a proposed joint town-city study of consolidation – will be addressed when Common Council meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

  • One motion, proposed by Council member Mike Lynch, calls for a one-year moratorium on the billboards. DC Marketing has erected two along I-88, one near the Lettis Highway exit, the other next to the Hampton Inn. Other entities are now considering additional billboards.

The motion expresses concern about “a negative impact on the viewscape and quality of life for the citizens …, as well as a negative economic impact on specific other business interests in the city and surrounding area.”

  • A second motion proposing contributing $12,500 toward a $50,000 study by the Center for Governmental Research in Rochester into the potential pluses and minuses of a merger of the city and town of Oneonta. The decision would be contingent on the town contributing its $25. The remaining half would be paid by state CFA grant.
Oneonta Town, City Councils To Look Into Collaborations

Oneonta Town, City Councils

To Look Into Collaborations

•

ONEONTA – The Oneonta Town Board and Oneonta Common Council will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 15, to consider a comprehensive two-municipality town-sewer master plan, GO-EDC, the economic-development facilitation group, announced this afternoon.

The joint meeting will also review the recommendations in the 2008 Center for Government Research study, “Opportunities to Use Shared Services & Consolidation Strategies to Improve Efficiency, Effectiveness and Equity in Local Government,” which used Greater Oneonta as a model.

Thirdly, the meeting will consider a town-city agreement to form a Sports,Tourism & Recreation Agency to explore related economic-development strategies for the community.

The Mohawk Valley Economic Development Council’s executive director, Steve Smith, and staff, as well as GO-EDC founders, Albert Colone and Bill Shue, will present information regarding the three options.

REVIEW GO-EDC PRESS RELEASE ON UPCOMING MEETING

 

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103