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News of Otsego County

DAN SULLIVAN

Otsego County—a ‘Receiving Community?’
Column from Dan Sullivan

Otsego County—a ‘Receiving Community?’

The lexicon of climate change evolves as the climate crisis wears on. Terms like “greenhouse effect” and “global warming” are now considered old, even though they are not. Recently, two new terms (new to this writer) appeared during a Harvard University climate change webinar: “retreating communities” and “receiving communities.” Simply put, these terms refer to communities that are becoming undesirable or unlivable (“retreating”), and those that appear to be either less affected or even benefit from the changing conditions (“receiving”). More and more people, it seems, consider Central New York, which includes Otsego County, in the latter group.

Panel to Discuss NY Energy Plans

Panel to Discuss NY Energy Plans

On Sunday, October 16 from 3-4:30 p.m., Cooperstown’s Friends of the Village Library and Otsego 2000 will co-host a 90-minute panel discussion on how New York State’s energy plan will affect the community.

Topics will include the process for siting of renewable energy projects, the possible use of farmland and forest and how multiple use might be encouraged, and the present and future energy demands in our region and state and how those demands might be met.

Roots of suffrage topic of talk

Roots of suffrage topic of talk

Take a fascinating trip to the roots of America’s democracy and Women’s Suffrage on Friday, April 29, with “Haudenosaunee Culture, History and Influences in Upstate New York” at The Lake House in Richfield Springs.

The hour-long discussion features Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner, an expert on the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and its centuries-long influence on the United States, as well as Oneida Faithkeeper Diane Shenandoah and her son, musician Adah Shenandoah. Open to the public, the event runs from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Admission is free, although donations are encouraged.

“We’re on the eastern edge of the Confederacy,” said Town of Richfield Supervisor Dan Sullivan. “The significance isn’t so much where we are in terms of the border, but in terms of how the Confederacy had such a lasting impact on New York and influenced the Seneca Falls convention. It’s an important story.”

Richfield Springs Food Co-op — a gem

It once was Ruby’s and it’s still a gem

— a column from Ted Potrikus

Dan Sullivan – the Town of Richfield Supervisor and co-founder of the Richfield Springs Community Food Cooperative – invited me out last week for a tour of the store on the village’s West Main Street. I had been there only a few minutes talking with Kari James, the store’s full-time manager, when the proprietors of B. Blossom Catering came in with the morning delivery of vegan lunch plates to sell there that day. I knew right away what I was buying for lunch – a kale salad topped with jerk-flavored roasted tofu.

Dan and Kari looked at the dozen-or-so containers. “Hang on,” Dan said. “Let me count these. I’ve already had a lot of calls this morning to have one set aside.”

Fortunately for my lunch plans, not all of them had been spoken for. And Dan kept getting calls. Some for Town business (a surprise visit that afternoon from Rep. Antonio Delgado’s staff) and some for the Co-op. Customers, too – Co-op members get a 10 percent discount on their freshly-made coffee and plenty of them stopped in that morning for a cup and to say hello to Dan and Kari. And Dan peeked in an adjoining room to greet a half-dozen villagers who meet there each Monday for a game of mahjong.

They really weren’t interruptions at all – I had the chance to check out the locally-sourced, locally-grown, locally-made, and/or locally-packaged food and home goods. And the coffee – Dan gets it

Richfield Springs ready to build youth sports complex

Richfield Springs looks ahead to youth sports field complex

A rendering of plans for soccer, softball, baseball, and T-ball fields (along with some sledding) in the works for Richfield Springs

They have to wait until the end of ‘mud season’ to start, but Richfield Springs is eager to break ground in the Spring on new baseball, softball, and soccer fields that could be ready for action in time for Autumn’s soccer season.

Town of Richfield Supervisor Dan Sullivan said the Richfield Youth Sports Athletic Complex got its start when a dedicated group of volunteers began a bottle and can drive – “literally putting nickels together,” he said – and raised enough to take a look at 18.4 acres on the border of the village and town near Lake Street and Cemetery Road. With money in the bank and a site in mind, Mr. Sullivan worked with the group to write a grant through the state’s Consolidated Funding Application (CFA) process – leading to an award topping $160,000 for the project.

“This gives exercise opportunities for everyone,” Mr. Sullivan said. “There’s an issue with rural poverty, an issue of rural obesity. These fields will be easy to access and open for play and activity. We can’t wait to get going.”

Mr. Sullivan said he hopes to include a walking track around the fields and is even eying 16 acres at nearby Roundtop for more adult recreation options.

His plans for the Village and Town include a study of a extending a walking and bike trail from the sports complex to Baker’s Beach on Canadarago Lake and even the city of Little Falls.

“The Empire State Trail runs through Little Falls,” he said, noting the state had considered ‘branch trails’ until COVID stalled the plans. “We’d like to do some study and planning for the next round of CFA grants. I think it’d be a great opportunity.”

In Richfield, Spinning & Irish Music

In Richfield, Spinning & Irish Music

Deb Bruce was among spinners who demonstrated their skills this morning at the Richfield Springs Food Coop, to the rhythm of piped-in Irish music. Watching are Dan Sullivan, a food coop board member, and Ronda Morrison. Deb, who retired locally from Dartmouth, Mass., has been knitting with yarn she spins herself for a dozen years now. Ten years ago, she began raising her own sheep to provide the raw material. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

CANDIDATE 2015, DAN SULLIVAN

DAN SULLIVAN

COUNTY BOARD OF REPRESENTATIVES, DISTRICT 9

COMMUNITY OF RESIDENCE: Town of Richfield

EDUCATION: BA, Manhattan College; MS, St.John’s University; Certificate in Land Use Leadership, Pace University.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: 40 year teaching career in HS English; 32 year career as Cross-Country and Track & Field Coach, including 8 years as Division 1 NCAA Head Coach.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Town of Richfield Planning Board member; Vice-President, Keep Mohawk Valley Beautiful; Co-chair of Richfield Joint Comprehensive Plan Committee; Board of Directors, Richfield Area Chamber of Commerce; Vendor, Richfield Springs Farmers’ Market.

FAMILY: wife Teresa; four children (boys).

PHILOSOPHY OF GOVERNMENT: I believe in direct democracy wherever applicable and possible; thus, the local levels of government are the most important. Local government should inform the regional, State and National levels, not vice-versa. Participation is our duty as citizens.

MAJOR ISSUES FACING OTSEGO COUNTY:

One, County Government needs coherent policies and procedures in order to operate effectively and efficiently. The Board of Representatives needs to give the Department Directors what they need to make things run right across the board.

Two, Economic Development needs to spread throughout the County, and not merely flow to Oneonta and Cooperstown. Our Northern gateway, for example, is an area of great potential that is being overlooked. It’s in the County’s best interest to spread prosperity County-wide, and the Board of Representatives can play a key role here.

Three, There must be cooperation and unity among the Board of Representatives. With the right atmosphere and attitude of working together and not squabbling, we can serve our 62,000 constituents far better. I will work to build solid working relationships with all fellow Representatives.

MY QUALITIES: I am hard-working and energetic. I work to develop good relationships with all, not just political allies. I have successfully managed programs in education, athletics, and community organizations for decades. As a political Independent, I work with all sides to achieve common ground and consensus.

STATEMENT: Benjamin Franklin, after all the Continental Congress had signed the Declaration of Independence: “We must all now hang together, or we shall surely hang separately”. The same is true for Otsego.

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