News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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Nov. 14 2019

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 14, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 14, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Advertisements: Fresh Groceries – Among which are the following: Jamaica and St. Croix Rum; Molasses; Lump and Brown Sugars; Hyson and Hyson Skim Teas; Plug, Pigtail, Ladies Twist, and Paper Tobacco; Box, Drum and Keg Raisins; Shad, Mackerel, Herring and Codfish; Black and Scotch Snuff; Pepper, Allspice, Ginger, Starch, and Indigo; Pipes, Soap, Candles, Filberts, Almonds, Alabama and Pea Nuts, Spanish, New Orleans and American Segars; Alum and Pearlash. Also – Turks Island and Basket Salt; Powder and Shot; Bed Cords; Shovels; Corn Brooms; Shoe Brushes; Liquid and Paste Blacking; Penknives; Pocket Books, &c, &c. – All of which will be sold at reduced prices, for cash or approved credit. Philip Thurber, Ira A. Thurber.

November 22, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

Ring-Bone and Spavin – Persons having Ring-Boned and Spavined Horses, would do well to call and purchase a bottle of the “Ring-Bone Specific,” prepared by the
subscriber, if they wish their Limping, Spavined, and Ring-Boned Horses cured. The following are a few of the many who have recently cured their Horses by the use of this medicine, viz: Daniel Marvin, Charles Kellogg, Robert Russell, Hassan Monroe, Philip Gano, and Ebenezer House. P.ROOF – Sold by J.H. Babcock, Fort Plain and by the merchants generally in Otsego County. Cooperstown, November 1844.

November 18, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Temporary Relief for Poor – The constant and large increase in the amount of money raised on the Town of Otsego for temporary relief of the poor very naturally attracts attention and calls out comment. The amount voted by the Board of Supervisors this year is $1,260; last year it was $1,000; in 1867, $900; in 1866, $800; in 1865, $600; in 1864, $500. What is the occasion and necessity of this great increase with little or no increase in population, and with ample work for all willing to labor at good wages? Where are the evidences of any increased suffering among the poor classes, or noticeable increase in their numbers? The several church societies in this village, and private individuals disburse no small amount in charity to the deserving poor each year and there is no disposition to see such suffer. As a general thing the most deserving are the least inclined to seek the aid to which they are best entitled. On the other hand is a class who spend a large proportion of their surplus earnings for whiskey, and expect the Town will carry them through the winter.

November 25, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

Local: Mrs. George Clarke is to sail for Europe on Saturday, going direct to Genoa, and will spend the winter in the south of France. Her daughters remain at “Dower House” Pegg’s Point.
If satisfactory arrangements can be made a football game will be played here on Thanksgiving Day between the Y.M.C.A. team and one from Oneonta.
The Orphanage is in pressing need of financial aid to carry on its good work being done for a class of poor and unfortunate children. On Friday evening the citizens of Cooperstown and vicinity will be offered an opportunity to show their good will toward that deserving charity, and at the same time to enjoy a lively Minstrel Entertainment, which is to be given at Village Hall by several young men of Cooperstown. The tickets are 25, 35 and 50 cents each – for sale at the drug store of H.C. Church.

November 22, 1894

100 YEARS AGO

What has become of the Chamber of Commerce of Cooperstown, to which several scores of firms and individuals pledged to give their funds in order that “it might be maintained.” E.A. Stanford, the capable and efficient Secretary resigned his position effective October 1. Since then the Chamber of Commerce has been as dead as a door mouse, whatever that may be. There have been two meetings called since then by William Beattie, the temporary secretary. One of these disclosed that not even a quorum of the Board of Directors was interested enough to attend. The second meeting, held two or more weeks ago, disclosed that the board acted on the proposition to have a memorial for baseball placed at the birthplace of the national game in this village.

November 19, 1919

50 YEARS AGO

The old Cooperstown High School building at the corner of Chestnut Street and Glen Avenue has been sold to Ralph Larsen, a Cazenovia developer who plans to demolish the structure and erect two twelve-unit apartment houses on the 2.9 acre site. The site has been on the market since the school was vacated last February and the students moved to the new Junior-Senior High School off Linden Avenue. Mr. Larsen, who is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruno Larsen of Cooperstown, indicated that he hoped to tear the building down this fall and start construction of the two apartment buildings in the spring. The complex will be named Cooper Lane Apartments.

November 26, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

Bill Nelson’s seventh grade Social Studies class recently participated in a Colonial fashion show with costumes provided by the Glimmerglass Opera. Students donning the period attire were Aaron Mendelsohn, Martin Park, Charles Miller, Jennifer Jicha, Elena Mabie, Sarah Loveland, Christine Lane, Justin Yerdon, Justin Brooks, Jared Bowen, Ethan Buck, Jennifer Daley, Alexis Turner, Elaine Supp, Angie Erway, Christine Lane, Alan Linn, Athena Hall, Rachel Darling, Melissa Hayes, and Jessica Burgess.

November 23, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

When Cooperstown Rotarians sang “Bye, Bye Blackbird” at their Tuesday, November 17 meeting, Rotarian Margaret Savoie – a new Springbrook Home board member – remarked that her first tap-dancing routine, at age 7, was to that same tune. “I’d pay to see that,” a fellow club member said. “For Springbrook?” Margaret queried. Springbrook fundraiser Mike Stein put up $20, and the club sang “Blackbird” again, as Savoie performed her tap dance routine to the delight of her Rotary colleagues. Later in the meeting, Patricia Kennedy, Executive Director of the Springbrook Children’s Home, spoke about plans for a $5 million fund drive. Afterwards, Rotary Club President Bill Glockler, Treasurer Jake Majaika and Allocations Chairman Chad Welch presented Kennedy with a $1,000 check and announced that the club has committed to donating $5,000 over three years.

November 20, 2009

BOUND VOLUMES Nov. 14, 2019

BOUND VOLUMES

Nov. 14, 2019

200 YEARS AGO

Bank Directors – The following gentlemen were chosen Directors of the Central Bank at Cherry Valley: Joseph White, president, David Little, Elias Bramin, Barnabas Eldredge, Jabez D. Hammond, Levi Beardsley, William Campbell, James O. Morse, Peter Magher, Delos White, William Beekman, Henry Brown, and Thomas Fuller.

November 15, 1819

175 YEARS AGO

When we look back upon the terrible struggle through which the democracy of the Northern States have lately passed, who does not feel the deepest admiration of the sterling character of the electors of our country? Who will now doubt the permanence of our institutions and the incorruptibility of the great masses of our voters? They have been lately tried in a fiery crucible and they have come out purified and strengthened. At no time since the organization of our government, has so concerted and well-devised a plan been carried out by the Whig leaders, for the purchase of power in New York and Pennsylvania, which states it was well known would decide the Presidency of the Union. Never before have such enormous sums of money been raised by the Whigs, as during the late campaign. The Masses have come to the rescue – the triumph is all their own. Every reflecting American must feel a pride in the recent result in this State. Not more because the People have elevated able, upright and honorable statesmen to the first offices in the nation, but because it conclusively shows that money, no matter how well devised, cannot purchase the Presidency of the United States.

November 18, 1844

150 YEARS AGO

Attention is called to the fact that the day of publication of this paper has been changed to Thursday. All communications and advertisements should be handed in not later than 10 a.m. of Wednesday – the earlier in the week the better.
Rev. C.L. Watt, a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University, has accepted a call to the Pastorship of the Universalist churches of this village and Fly Creek.
The salary of the Keeper of the County House should be raised to $1,000 a year. When the duties of the place are properly attended to, he will earn that amount. At present he is the poorest paid officer in the county. The position is an important one, which only a good and efficient man, such as we now have, should ever hold.

November 18, 1869

125 YEARS AGO

A New Pastor – At a meeting at the Presbyterian Church of the congregation, it was unanimously decided to extend a call to The Rev. Robert I. McBride of Mount Vernon, to become pastor of the church. He has had three years’
experience in the ministry, chiefly missionary work in New York City and among the “mountain whites” of Virginia.
We did not witness the panoramic farce of “A Trip to the City” given in Village Hall last Saturday evening – in regard to the merits of which there were different opinions expressed, some favorable in part or whole, others quite the reverse. Complaints were made by the company giving the performance that the stage is not deep enough for convenience in acting.
Y.M.C.A. – The “Week of Prayer” is being observed at the rooms of the Association, the services beginning at 8 o’clock. On Thursday evening they will be held in the Baptist Church, when Rev. W.B. Thorp of Binghamton will deliver an address.

November 15, 1894

75 YEARS AGO

Pfc. Donald C. Reed, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Reed of Cooperstown has been awarded the Purple Heart and Oak Leaf Cluster for having been wounded in action a second time on October 15. Sergeant Reed received his basic training at Camp Croft, South Carolina. He was home on furlough in January 1944 and then returned to Fort Meade, George Meade. He went overseas in February and joined the Fifth Army in Italy. He was first wounded in June. He then rejoined his company and took part in the invasion of Southern France. He was serving with the Seventh Army when last wounded. He is now being treated in a hospital in Italy.

November 15, 1944

50 YEARS AGO

Richard A. White, instructor in Mathematics at Cooperstown Central School, has been named varsity
basketball coach at the school, filling the vacancy caused
by the resignation during the summer of John H. “Pete” Clark, Jr. Mr. White was moved up from the Junior
Varsity coaching job which he has held since 1965.
Mr. White played on the Binghamton North High School varsity basketball team while a student there, and on the Paul Smith’s College varsity team for two years. Don Howard, the Eighth Grade Social Studies teacher at CCS succeeds Mr. White as Junior Varsity coach.

November 19, 1969

25 YEARS AGO

A host of village merchants gathered at the Tunnicliff Inn Monday night to listen as the goals and aspirations of a proposed Cooperstown Merchants Association (CMA) were laid on the table. Vin Russo, owner of Mickey’s Place on Main Street, outlined the mission statement and the program ideas that were drawn up by the committee. Russo stated that the main goal of a CMA is to bring people into Cooperstown so that they might leave their money behind.

November 16, 1994

10 YEARS AGO

In 71 years in the meadow between Brooklyn and Susquehanna avenues, the Clark family’s fallow deer have never been attacked by predators, according to Jane Forbes Clark, whose great-uncle Ambrose brought the herd back from Europe in 1938. That changed in recent weeks as a dozen of the animals were bitten in the neck, possibly by a coyote, and either died or had to be put down. “We are going to put up a bigger fence and hope that does it,” said Miss Clark. “We’ll keep fingers crossed,” she added.
Cameras installed along the perimeter fence taped a large coyote inside the pen. There are a handful of spots where the coyote could have entered. Miss Clark said her great-uncle saw fallow deer herds in Europe, “thought they were pretty and wanted to see them from the house.” The house was the 40-room Iroquois Mansion located behind stone walls before it was demolished in 1983.

November 13, 2009

 

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