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News of Otsego County

reopening

DiNapoli: Sales tax revenue had huge jump for second quarter of 2021

DiNapoli: Sales tax revenue had huge jump for second quarter of 2021

Sales tax revenue for local governments in New York state rose by 49.2% in the second quarter (April to June 2021) compared to the same period last year, a dramatic increase from last year’s weak collections during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli.

Sales tax collections during this period grew by just over $1.6 billion and even surpassed collections reported during the second quarter of 2019, before the onset of the pandemic.

“The strength of these collections, along with federal aid, will give local governments statewide the chance to improve their fiscal stability, but it will take time to recover from the strain caused by the COVID-19 pandemic,” DiNapoli said in a media release. “While this is good news, local leaders are advised to budget carefully. If this pandemic has taught us anything, it’s to always plan for unpredictable circumstances.”

The size of the increase largely reflects extremely weak collections in the April to June period of 2020. However, even compared to pre-pandemic collections for the same period in 2019, statewide collections in 2021 were up 8.7% or $396 million.

The Dog Charmer: July 29, 2021

The Dog Charmer

July 29, 2021

How to cure dog
separation anxiety

Dear Tom,

She came to us at 12 weeks at the start of pandemic lockdown. Well, I know it’s my fault for taking her everywhere with me, for putting her in her crate at night and staying until she settles, etc.
With three adults in the household, she focuses on me ALL the time. If I go out without her she’s a mess till I return. How can I help her to stay alone for a few hours without losing her mind?
Sadie is an 18-month-old Havanese.

Marty DeLaney

Tom Shelby,
The Dog Charmer
Cooperstown author answers pet owners questions on training their dogs. E-mail your questions to dogsrshelby@msn.com

Dear Marty,

You’re so right in referring to Sadie as a pandemic puppy! You are not alone. I was writing and telling people at the beginning of the pandemic, “Get out and get the puppy used to being alone.” My guess is that 40 to 50% of the (hopefully) “post pandemic” questions I’ve been getting have to do with separation anxiety.

The first thing I’d suggest is that you start making Sadie less dependent on you by asking the two other adults in the house to help. If they feed her for a couple of weeks instead of you, and take her out for occasional walks, it will broaden her worldly view. You’ll always be her sun amongst many stars, but by decreasing her neediness for you will make her more confident, which is exactly what you want and a good start. It would be great if the other two adults in the house called her from time to time and when she arrived, she got a treat. Sadie will appreciate it too.

Henceforth when you leave the house, de-emotionalize leaving and coming!

If you appear sorry to go or overly excited to return, you’re emphasizing the separation. Your goal is to make Sadie happy to see you go because that’s the only time she gets fantastic treats, like a hollow marrow bone with chicken or ham wedged in the middle of the bone.

Remove it when you get home! The best toys only happen when you’re not home. Then there’s exercise.

I’ve been saying it for many years, “A tired dog is a well behaved dog. In my book, Dog Training Diaries, aside from my crazy experiences and stories, the dos and don’ts of separation anxiety and aggression are given a great deal of attention.

Good luck!

The Dog Charmer

Cooperstown & Around and City of the Hills: July 22, 2021

Cooperstown & Around and City of the Hills

Milford fundraiser rescheduled for Saturday at park

A community fundraiser for Milford Central School graduate Caleb Radulewicz, who was in a serious car accident in Ohio last month, was rescheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, July 24, in Milford’s Wilbur Park.
There will be a raffle, free activities and food available from Big Al’s. Raffle winners will be announced at 2 p.m.


Railroad announces reopening event

The Leatherstocking Historical Railway Society has announced a resumption of service beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 7.
There will be a special train robbery reenactment on that date, as well as again during several weekends in August and September.
Go to Cooperstowntrain.com for event dates and other information.

Clark gym becomes summer basketball gathering spot

Clark gym becomes summer
basketball gathering spot

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Clark Sports Center Assistant Athletic Director Scott Whiteman, center, watches as Meghan Niles, left, and Piper Seamon do a basketball drill Thursday, July 8. Watching in the background are Cooperstown girls basketball coach Mike Niles and Gabby Woeppel. (Greg Klein/AllOTSEGO.com)

MIDDLEFIELD — As summer began and COVID regulations eased, Clark Sports Center Assistant Athletic Director Scott Whiteman started getting more activity on his phone. It was the basketball athletes checking on open gym status.

“We couldn’t practice the last week of school, because it was finals,” said Piper Seamon, a 2020 Cooperstown Central School graduate and college basketball player at Hamilton College in Clinton.

“So, I was texting Scott a week before I got home, ‘Are you open? Can I work out?’”

In the off seasons of many sports, athletes go back to their college campuses to work with old trainers or scrimmage with young recruits. Around Otsego County, elite basketball players congregate at the Clark.

After COVID delay, Cooperstown teacher plans overseas trip for 2022

After COVID delay, Cooperstown
teacher plans overseas trip for 2022

By PATRICK DEWEY • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Cooperstown Central School students gather for a group picture in front of Schonbrunn Palace in Vienna during a 2016 overseas trip with history teacher Jennifer Pindar.

For more than 15 years Cooperstown High School history teacher Jennifer Pindar has loved leading student groups on educational trips abroad, a tradition she will continue after the coronavirus pandemic canceled last year’s trip.

In 2022, Pindar will lead a student trip to London, Belgium and Amsterdam. The destinations were agreed on in consultation with educational travel company World Strides. Along with Pindar, students will be accompanied by tour guides from World Strides and parents and teachers who agree to chaperone. The school is not involved in this trip.

The itinerary includes Buckingham Palace, Big Ben and other attractions. Students will also take excursions around Brussels and Bruges in Belgium. In Amsterdam, highlights will include visits to the Anne Frank House and the Van Gogh Museum.

VASCELLARO: Baseball has come a long way since the pandemic shut it down

The Baseball Lifer

Baseball has come a long way
since the pandemic shut it down

CHARLIE VASCELLARO

Major League Baseball sure has come a long way.

Consider where we were this time last year, at what would usually constitute Major League Baseball’s “Mid-Summer Classic” All-Star Game break, the abbreviated 2020 season had yet to begin.

Delayed for three-and-half months by the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 season did not begin until July 23, cancelling the All-Star Game for the first time since 1945, when the game was called on account of wartime travel restrictions.

A shadowy 60-game season was played without fans in attendance, replaced by cardboard cutout photographs and piped in crowd noise reminiscent of a television sitcom laugh track.

Except it wasn’t funny and it wasn’t much fun.

But the game plodded on all the way through the post season. The Los Angeles Dodgers finally won the World Series after capturing eight straight National League West division titles.

City of the Hills: July 8, 2021

City of the Hills

Concert series to begin Thursday at Neahwa Park

A summer concert series will begin Thursday, July 8, in Neahwa Park in Oneonta.
The series will feature performances every Thursday between 7 and 8 p.m.
The first event will feature the Driftwoods.


Common Council accepts grain grant

Oneonta’s Common Council passed a motion Tuesday, July 6, to accept a state grant of $180,000 for the Hartwick College Grain Innovation Center. The city’s plan is for the center to become part of the eventual Lofts on Dietz Street.
The council met in person at City Hall for the first time since March 2020, at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. Meetings had been taking place via Zoom and were broadcast on YouTube. However, the July change in state COVID laws opened the meetings up again.

Hometown 4th: Oneonta to revive holiday celebration

Hometown 4th: Oneonta to revive holiday celebration

By PATRICK DEWEY • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

ONEONTA — The Hometown 4th Festival will return to Oneonta’s Neahwa Park to celebrate the July Fourth holiday next weekend, with a theme of honoring essential workers.

The goal is to honor the workers, including grocery store staff, teachers, police officers, firefighters and healthcare workers, who took risks for the community good during the coronavirus pandemic, according to festival officials.

“We wanted to do everything we could to let them know that the First Night Board and the whole community appreciates them,” First Night Board Chair Carol Mandigo said.

The celebration will kick off at 7:30 p.m., Friday, July 2, in Neahwa Park, with a free concert by country artist Michael Christopher.

At noon, Sunday, July 4, the parade will line up at Foothills Performing Arts Center on Market Street.

This Week—June 17, 2021

THIS WEEK’S NEWSPAPERS

The Freeman’s Journal • Hometown Oneonta

June 17, 2021

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

Moana, right, played by Yana King, gets caught by the crab Tamatoa, played by Claire Smith, with Dalilah Synan as the left claw and Taryn Brockway as the right claw, in a scene from ‘Moana Jr.’ Student actors practice during a dress rehearsal of Moana Jr., produced by Orpheus Theatre’s Starstruck Players at Foothills Performing Arts Center in Oneonta on Monday, June 14. The show, which opens Friday, June 18, will be the first live performance by Orpheus in more than a year because of the coronavirus pandemic. (Michael Forster Rothbart/AllOTSEGO.com)

FRONT PAGE

Hall: Wednesday induction was best option

Jobs and houses: Herzig: For city to thrive, the two houses intersect

Chestnut Crossing developers host neighborhood Q&A

Cooperstown & Around and City of the Hills

Inside The Paper

Primary Elections to be held

At ribbon cutting, Distillery touted as cultivated business venture

Mayor Ellen Tillapaugh, left, and Eugene Marra cut the ceremonial ribbon in front of Cooperstown Distillery. (Kevin Limiti/AllOTSEGO.com)

Student News

Perspectives

The Old Badger: The joy of the old pavilion still make people smile

Corrections

LETTERS

Editors Policy

COLUMNS

BERKSON: ‘Impetuous 30s’ led to Richfield Springs farm

DIROSA: An update arrives from the top of the hill

History Columns

Bound Volumes: June 17, 2021

Hometown History: June 17, 2021

OBITUARIES

William L. Ross Sr.

Kobey John King

Summer Dreams

Curtain’s up again on live theatre in the region

Concert series to resume at Lakefront

Best Bets

Staff Dining Picks

Pandemic recovery period makes for some awkward encounters

Pandemic recovery period
makes for some awkward encounters

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

GREG KLEIN

In May, I watched baseball and softball games across the county.

I saw a cross section of residents, from at least four local communities, most of whom I had not seen for at least 18 months, because of the coronavirus pandemic. Some people I had not seen for much longer, because I had been away from sports.

This is probably the least controversial statement I will ever make on the editorial page, and I will let my Southern voice make for effect: it is good to see all y’all.

One of the things the coronavirus pandemic has taken away from us is community. I can understand why it was hard on parishioners when churches were on remote services, because community is a big part of religious groups’ virtues.

The same could be said for sports and arts in the community. I know for us there are plenty of people we mostly see during soccer seasons and have now seen little of for two springs and a fall.

Occasionally we bump into people at the store, or I see a solo family member at a newspaper-related event, but it hasn’t been the same.

Glimmerglass Plans 4 Shows On Lawn

Glimmerglass Plans 4 Shows On Lawn

Opera will be back on Otsego Lake’s shores this summer.

The Glimmerglass Festival announced today it will build an outdoor stage on the festival grounds, where it will present four operas.

The 2021 season will run July 15 through Aug. 17 with performances of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute,” Verdi’s “Il Trovatore,” Offenbach’s “Songbird” (La Périchole), and the world premiere of “The Passion of Mary Cardwell Dawson,” a new play with music about the founder of the National Negro Opera Company.

“We have re-imagined the Glimmerglass experience for the 2021 season,” said Francesca Zambello, Festival artistic & general director. “While this move outdoors is primarily for the health and safety of our company members, audience members and community, it is in harmony with what people love about Glimmerglass – innovative art and performances in a beautiful location.”

MORKAL-WILLIAMS: College Campuses Opening Again. Are We Sure It’s A Good Idea?
LETTER from SAM MORKAL-WILLIAMS

College Campuses Opening Again.

Are We Sure It’s A Good Idea?

To the Editor:

This week, Hartwick College began moving students onto campus. SUNY Oneonta will begin the same process on the 22nd.

I am sure that many area residents are wondering the same thing that I am: Why are we opening campuses at all?

Last semester at SUNY Oneonta can be called nothing but a failure, (although the “Retrospective on Fall 2020” on www.oneonta.edu, through a showcase of passive voice and pivoting, says not
everything went poorly!)

Hartwick fared much better, but is easier to manage due to a smaller student population that is almost entirely residential. The two schools were just one patch in a diverse quilt of successes and failures in campus management across the country.

Nobody was sure whether to open campuses in the fall as the country braced for an imminent winter of suffering through increased cases and deaths.

SUNY Over Hurdle On Reopening Plan

Reprinted From This Week’s
Hometown Oneonta, Freeman’s Journal

SUNY Over Hurdle

On Reopening Plan

Enough Agree On 20% In-Person Classes

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

David Lincoln
Dennis Craig

The stumbling block is gone, it seems.

Enough faculty members have volunteered to teach 20 percent of the in-person, “dual modality” classes called for in SUNY Oneonta’s plan to reopen on Feb. 1, 2021, according to David Lincoln, president of the local chapter of the United University Professions (UUP).

“That’s correct,” said SUNY Oneonta President Dennis Craig when asked about Lincoln’s statement.

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