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News of Otsego County

soil health

DUNCAN: Quality Of Food Goes Back To Soil’s Quality
LETTER from R. SCOTT DUNCAN

Quality Of Food Goes

Back To Soil’s Quality

To the Editor:

Vitamins, minerals, and other supplements – there are numbers of people who say you should take vitamins.

Vitamin C for tissue repair, A for healthy skin, B for stress, E for women over 40, and a very popular one today – Vitamin D for overall health.

But the cost of the vitamins keeps getting higher and higher. A men’s multivitamin today will cost well over $50!

I was looking at the label on the jar and it said that a number of the ingredients are foods, from foods? Why not just eat the right foods? Well, they say foods are
not as nutritional us as they used to be.

I remember reading about one genetically modified grain that was created so it would grow faster. One of the reasons that it grows faster was that the roots are shorter. Well , the shorter roots do not go deep enough to absorb enough minerals, which in turn affects the brain function because of the lack of the minerals.

You can see why a lot of people think that you should eat organic, non-GMO foods. So I wonder why isn’t the food as good as it used to be?

A lot has to do with the soil. It’s been depleted and in many places contaminated.

There’s a graveyard for cars around here. Tons of cars lined up near a river. Every time I drive by I think how stupid to be so close to the river. The acid rain comes down on all the cars and carries all the pollutants into the river and into the farmland.

Man just ignores the cycles of nature, giving little respect to the natural process. They think science can do a better job. There is no balance between nature and science. You really don’t want to wait for nature to build the soil back up.

The way she takes care of things! Think about this: the COVID virus. It is keeping people inside, thereby reducing their impact on nature. Example: air pollution. The virus is killing lots of people, which reduces the population and also the stress on the environment.

Nature has her way of balance if we don’t play fair. Building up the quality of soil in Otsego County should be a pretty high priority on the list. Quality of soil equals quality of food equals quality of people.

I wonder what is being done to protect and enrich our local soil for, as they say, future generations?

R. SCOTT DUNCAN
Hartwick Forrest

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5

Poetry Reading

With Ishion Hutchinson

14-19eventspage

POETRY READING – 7 p.m. Reading by Jamaican poet Ishion Hutchinson. Author of 2 collections, “Far District” and “House of Lords and Commons.” Martha Daniel will open the event by reading her poem “On the Table.” Celebration room, Shineman Chapel Hall, Hartwick College, Oneonta. Info, email David Lubell at lubelld@hartwick.edu

EGG DECORATING – 6:30 p.m. Pysanky, Ukranian egg decorating workshop using traditional materials and designs to create a folk patterned easter egg. Material fee, $5. Registration required. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St., Oneonta. Info, hmloneonta.org/adult-programs/#crafts

ART DISCUSSION – 12:30-2:30 p.m. Join director of exhibitions Chris Rossi for this weeks Food for Thought discussion “50 Years, 50 Works, 50 Reasons. Maurice Sendak: The Memorial Exhibition.” Registration required. Cost, $25 members, $30 non-members. The Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. Info, www.fenimoreartmuseum.org/lectures or call (607) 547-1461

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, APRIL 1
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, APRIL 1

‘Empty Bowls’ Benefit Today

14-19eventspage

EMPTY BOWLS – Noon-2 p.m. Serving homemade soup in your choice of bowl crafted and donated by local potters. Cost, $15 to benefit the local food pantry. Christ Church Parish Hall on Fair Street, Cooperstown. Info, cooperstownchamber.org/calendar-of-events/#!event/2017/4/1/empty-bowls. To volunteer or donate call (607)547-2627

SOUTH AFRICAN BANQUET – 6-9 p.m. The Mali Education project presents a South African benefit bazaar, dinner and documentary fill titled “Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai,” about the founder of the Green belt Movement in Kenya and winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize. Tickets, $15 adults, $10 children over 5. Unitarian Universalist Society of Oneonta, 12 Ford Ave, Oneonta. Reservation, call (607)434-3303 or email cswolfgould@gmail.com. Info, uuso.org

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