SUBSCRIBE MY PROFILE
HOME | BREAKING NEWS | POLICE & FIRE | IN MEMORIAM | PEOPLE | OPINION | SPORTS
 JOBS  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 HOMES  
 CARS  
 FUNERAL HOMES  
 GOODS & SERVICES

News of Otsego County

Steve Londner

LONDNER: Let’s Be Civilized Land, Edit Plaque
LETTER from STEVE LONDNER

Let’s Be Civilized Land, Edit Plaque

To the Editor:

It’s been nearly 50 years since Oneonta’s Neahwa Park actually fronted the Susquehanna
River, as still claimed in the plaque there that commemorates Sullivan’s 1779 Expedition. And it was 60 years earlier, in 1912, that the plaque was written and commissioned.

Time passes. Things change. Language matters. And history does seem to want to repeat itself.
As detailed in his article, “Massacre & Retribution: The 1779-80 Sullivan Expedition,” historian and author Ron Soodalter presents this violent punitive campaign as taking place within an escalating cycle of action and reaction. Sadly, the recent suggestion that the plaque’s language be examined and some sort of modern interpretive/corrective action be considered seems to be following a similar pattern.

In recent years, far too many of us have been hunkering down ever deeper within our silos and echo chambers, listening only to opinions and positions we agree with, with increasing intolerance for all others. That was bad enough, but now the silos are sprouting gunports.

Can’t we discuss anything even a little controversial with respect anymore? With reference to the plaque’s language, isn’t it about time we made good on the promise of this becoming a civilized land?

STEVE LONDNER
Oneonta

80 New Trees Planted Near Oneonta High School

80 New Trees Planted

Near Oneonta High School

Volunteers Steve Londner and Dave Hutchison work together planting a sapling in conjunction with the Department of Environmental Conservation’s “Trees for Tributaries” initiative which planted 80 small trees and shrubs along the S-curve near Oneonta Hugh School this morning. Founded in 2007, the goal of the program is to plant young trees and shrubs along stream corridors to prevent erosion, increase flood water retention, improve wildlife and stream habitat, and protect water quality A small group worked digging holes and planting80 young trees and shrubs that included Sycamore, Birch, Elderberry, and Dogwood.  At right, Laura Grant, Upper Susquehanna Coalition, demonstrates how to place a protective sleeve over the trees to protect it from animals. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103