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News of Otsego County

Washington Post

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Crime A Worry, But ‘Quality Of Life’ Of Greater Concern

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Crime A Worry,
But ‘Quality Of Life’
Of Greater Concern

I revisited (social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling’s 1982 article, “Broken Windows,” in the Atlantic) because I was trying to solve a mystery. On a recent reporting trip to New York City to ask bankers, policy analysts and real estate brokers about the city’s economic future, I kept hearing that crime was a major risk.

…When I probed, I found that they talked less about violent crime than disorder. Homeless encampments were flourishing, panhandling had become more aggressive, and minor crimes like public urination or open drug use were not just more visible, but making the papers.

The summer had brought looting and riots close to home as well. Moreover, many of them saw this as a result of the city’s deliberate decision to ignore the “quality of life” offenses that broken windows had emphasized.

Megan McArdle
Washington Post, March15, 2021

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Don’t Scare, Bankrupt Voters, Or Undermine U.S. Economy
FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Don’t Scare, Bankrupt Voters,

Or Undermine U.S. Economy

During the past few days, President Biden has signaled flexibility on the size of a minimum-wage increase, skepticism about $50,000 in student-loan forgiveness and openness to negotiation on his immigration reform plan.

Progressive moans of protest have been muted but audible. Some young activists questioned Biden’s “courage.” Criticism from Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) was less personal but still pointed: “Our job is to deliver for the American people. Period.”

It is that “period” that more moderate Democrats such as Sens. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) dispute. In essence, they are saying: Our job is to deliver for the American people in ways that don’t unduly frighten moderate voters, break the bank, undermine the economy or come back to bite us.

MICHAEL GERSON
Washington Post

Russians Play On Divisions, Post’s Timberg Tells Crowd

Russians Play On Divisions,

Post’s Timberg Tells Crowd

Russians meddlers in the 2016 U.S. elections played up racial, ethnic and other divisions among Americans, recirculating articles from major newspapers that highlighted those issues, the Washington Post’s Craig Timberg, who summers near Cherry Valley, told an SRO crowd this evening in Cooperstown Village Hall.  A Pulitzer Prize winner, Timberg said many details about the Russian’s interference and its extent are still unclear to reporters – 20 at the Washington Post – who are working on the story full time.  Here he fields a question from Patty MacLeish of Cooperstown.  Timberg, son-in-law of Ed and Joan Badgley of Cooperstown, spoke on the topic, “Russian Disinformation: Will it Happen Again?”  The talk was sponsored by the Friends of the Village Library.  (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Pulitzer-Winning Journalist Explores: Will Russian Meddling Happen Again?

Pulitzer-Winning Journalist Explores:

Will Russian Meddling Happen Again?

Craig Timberg

COOPERSTOWN – Craig Timberg, a Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist for the Washington Post, will be speaking on “Russian Disinformation: Will it Happen Again?” at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 13, at the Village Meeting Room, sponsored by the Friends of the Village Library.  The lecture is free.

Timberg, who lately has been reporting on Russian interference in the 2016 election, has been with the Washington Post since 1998 as reporter, editor and foreign correspondent. Drawing from his experiences as Africa correspondent he co-authored the book “Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally Overcome it.”

He is a son-in-law of Ed and Joan Badgley of Cooperstown.

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