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News of Otsego County

conservation

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Chop and Cheese with OCCA 08-25-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 25

Chop and Cheese with OCCA

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CHOP & CHEESE – 6 – 8 p.m. Come help eradicate a patch of invasive Japanese Knotweed from the farm. Bring your own gardening tools, limited supply available. Afterwards enjoy light refreshments in the garden with the Otsego County Conservation Association. This is the last Chop and Cheese of the season. Mohican Farm, 7207 St. Hwy. 80, Cooperstown. 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/chop-cheese-the-big-finish/

Lions, Rotary, other partners host annual river cleanup day

Lions, Rotary, other partners
host annual river cleanup day

COOPERSTOWN — The fourth Susquehanna River Cleanup took place Saturday, July 17.

Community involvement in this project has continued to grow with more than 35 people volunteering this year. The Cooperstown Lions Club, Cooperstown Rotary Club, Rotary E-club of Global Trekkers, OCCA and Otsego 2000 as well as some individuals all made financial contributions to assist with building three new improved rafts.

The Susquehanna River Cleanup project came about because John Rowley and Maureen Rowley would walk the riverside trail between Mill and Main streets in Cooperstown on a regular basis.

They were dismayed by the amount of debris and garbage in that section of the river, including a large cattle-feeding trough.

Growing tired of seeing this, John proposed a clean-up project to the Cooperstown Lions Club, where he is a member and past president. Lions Club International Foundation had made environmental projects one of the club’s new initiatives.

The Cooperstown Lions Club embraced the project and set out to team with other organizations that would assist and guide the Lions with the project.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Fun performance at Hyde Hall 06-25-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, JUNE 25

Fun performance at Hyde Hall

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SUMMER CONCERT SERIES – 7:30 p.m. Enjoy fun performance of ‘The Ships Captain’ about the hijinks of 2 sisters, their guardian, and a mysterious suitor. This singspiel from 1817 includes parodies of famous pieces from Mozart, Beethoven, and popular German folk songs.Cost, $20/adult. Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Rd., Cooperstown. 607-547-5098 or visit hydehall.org

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Discuss Conservation With Audubon Society 04-24-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, APRIL 24

Discuss Conservation

With Audubon Society

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AUDUBON SOCIETY – 10 a.m. – Noon. Get your questions in Q&A session with the Delaware-Otsego Audubon society board members. Topics on everything from the society in general to birding to effects of lead ammunition. Presented as part of OCCA’s online Earth Festival. 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/earth-festival/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Explore The Galaxy Online 04-23-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, APRIL 23

Explore The Galaxy Online

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PLANETARIUM – 7 p.m. Explore the universe, learn whats new in the field of astronomy in fun virtual planetarium show with the SUNY staff and Nebula society students. Free, registration on Eventbrite required. Presented by the A.J. Read Science Discovery Center, SUNY Oneonta. 607-436-2011 or visit www.eventbrite.com/o/science-discovery-center-and-planetarium-14332374215

OCCA To Adjust With Virtual Earth Festival

OCCA To Adjust With

Virtual Earth Festival

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Earth Festival will again be affected by the coronavirus pandemic, but this year the Otsego County Conservation Assocation is better prepared to replace its annual events with a virtual presentation from Thursday, April 22 to Saturday, April 24.

“In March (2020), I think we were all thinking, ‘let’s not cancel, yet,’ it will all blow over,” OCCA Program Director Jeff O’Handley said. “It seems crazy to think about looking back. We had no idea what to expect.”

To salvage an Earth Festival last year, OCCA kept some events going with social distancing, stressed its normal recycling efforts via dropoffs and refocused on the fly, O’Handley said. This year’s event has been much more focused to allow the group to use the virtual tools that have sprung up during the coronavirus pandemic. “You can’t do things like you used to do them,” he said. “It has been a puzzle to figure things out and you just hope you are providing people with some strong programming.”

‘Mysterious Tubes’ Explained
GOALS: SAVE LOCAL FARMLAND, CHESAPEAKE

‘Mysterious Tubes’ Explained

BVA’s Graham Stroh and daughter Asher, 8, examine a “riparian buffer” off Route 23 east of the Village of Morris. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

People entering Morris on Route 23 from Oneonta kept asking Bob Thomas, town historian and a Butternut Valley Alliance board member, “What are those tubes across from the cemetery?”

With his nudging, couple of weeks ago an enticingly titled Zoom presentation, “Mysterious Tubes Along Butternut Creek,” provided the answer to 27 participants, some landowners who may sign up to host mysterious tubes of their own, according to BVA Executive Director Graham Stroh.

The program’s been going on for a decade, according to Lydia Brinkley, Upper Susquehanna Coalition buffer coordinator, “riparian buffers,” that is.

If you’ve only noticed the mysterious tubes lately, it’s because there are more of them, part of the USC’s federally and state-funded efforts to clean up Otsego County’s streams, and thus contribute a bit to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, 250 miles south of Garrattsville.

“Riparian buffers are essentially wooded areas along creeks and rivers, for purposes of reducing erosion and stabilizing stream banks,” said Stroh, formerly an urban planner in Washington D.C. who moved back three years ago to manage the family’s property. (He was raised in New York City; his dad, Leslie, in Morris.)

The Butternut Valley, and with the collaboration of the Middlefield-based Soil & Water Conservation District, all of Otsego County’s streams, are part of a “huge, huge region,” said Stroh, where efforts are underway to clean up the tributaries to the Susquehanna River, which eventually runs into the challenged Chesapeake, where pollutants have been destroying the rich fishery for decades.

No Kidding, Watch Out For Bears

EDITORIAL

No Kidding, Watch Out For Bears

No kidding. This black bear took down a fence in a Pierstown yard over the weekend.

After Vince and Lynne Krogh Casale’s sighting (and videographing) of a black bear on Bedbug Hill Road Tuesday, March 23, a reader sent along this photo of a black bear (see photo) rampaging in a yard in the Pierstown area, on the other side of the hill, both in Town of Otsego on the west side.

More bears in Otsego County is a new reality, Josh Choquette, the DEC’s new bear expert, based in its Stamford office, reported in last week’s edition.

Development in the Catskills is pushing bears north and, also, new growth in Otsego County’s abandoned farms is providing newly arriving bears with plenty to eat.

THE OTHER FENIMORE COOPER

THE OTHER FENIMORE COOPER

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Susan Fenimore Cooper’s “Rural Hours” (1850) was known to Henry David Thoreau and praised by Charles Darwin.

After reading “Rural Hours,” Charles Darwin, of all people, mentioned Susan Fenimore Cooper in a letter to Asa Gray, perhaps the most important American botanist of the 19th Century.

Struck by her understanding of the “battle” between Old and New World weeds, he asked, “Who is she?”

Nowadays, we know the “weeds” she was writing about were “invasive species,” a burning environ-mental issue in Glimmerglass’ environs even today, 125 years after James Fenimore Cooper’s daughter’s death, as we worry about the zebra mussel, the water chestnut and, heavens, the European frog bit.

If Charles Darwin knew her, “How do I know about Henry David Thoreau and not about this woman?” Professor Johnson asked herself when she first happened on “Rural Hours.” It was in the 1990s. She was a graduate student immersed in the Transcendentalists while seeking her masters and doctorate at Claremont Graduate University in California.

With a planned focus on Shakespeare or the British Modernists, “I was taken by surprise when I got scooped up in environmental writing, about the human relationship to the natural world,” she said.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Composers Discuss Conservation With Hanford Mills Museum 03-25-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, MARCH 25

‘Ashokan Farewell’ Composers

Featured At Hanford Mills Talk

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CONSERVATION – 7 p.m. Join the museum for discussion with Jay Ungar and Molly Mason, traditional musicians and co-founders of the Ashokan Center whose composition “Ashokan Farewell,” became the musical hallmark of Ken Burn’s “The Civil War” on PBS. Presented by the Hanford Mills Museum, East Meredith. 607-278-5744 or visit www.hanfordmills.org/interactions/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Environmentalism Of Susan Fenimore Cooper 03-13-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, MARCH 13

Environmentalism Of

Susan Fenimore Cooper

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ART LECTURE – 2 p.m. Discuss naturalist author Susan Fenimore Cooper and her work ‘Rural Hours’ with leading scholar Rochelle L. Johnson and what her contributions mean in the era of climate change. Free, registration required for Zoom conference. Dontions of $10 or more requested. Presented by Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown. 607-547-1400 or visit www.fenimoreartmuseum.org

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