News of Otsego County

Serving Otsego County, NY, through the combined reporting of Cooperstown's Freeman's Journal and the Hometown Oneonta newspapers.
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conservation

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Delicious Fall Benefit Dinners 09-18-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

Delicious Fall Benefit Dinners

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CHICKEN DINNER – 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Enjoy take-out for Brooks Chicken dinner for $12/dinner, with $1 processing fee. Pre-orders strongly encouraged by 9/10. Support local church. First Baptist Church of Cooperstown, 21 Elm St., Cooperstown. 607-547-9371 or visit www.facebook.com/ctownfirstbaptist/

FALL PORK DINNER – 5 p.m. Make a donation and enjoy a Roast Pork Dinner this fall. Reservations required, limited to 100 dinners. No reservation day of. Take Out Only. Middlefield Baptist Church, 121 Rezen Rd., Middlefield. 607-547-9093.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Voices Of The Game To Honor Hall of Fame Inductee Ted Simmons 07-25-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, JULY 25

Voices Of The Game To Honor

Hall of Fame Inductee Ted Simmons

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BASEBALL – Noon. Virtual Voices of the Game to honor Hall of Fame 2020 inductee Ted Simmons who played alongside hall of famers Paul Molitor and Robin Yount for the Milwaukee Brewers. Join them as they reminisce about the Brewers team and their journey to the Hall of Fame. Visit baseballhall.org/events/virtual-legends-of-the-game-Ted-Simmons?date=0 for details.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Pull Invasive Plants On Silver Lake 07-18-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, JULY 18

Pull Invasive Plants On Silver Lake

14-19eventspagePADDLE & PULL – 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Enjoy fun day on the lake to help pull up Water Chestnut & European Frog Bit from scenic lake. Canoes & Kayaks will be provided, outside craft not permitted. Registration required by 7/17. Silver Lake, Silver Lake Rd., New Berlin. 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/paddle-and-pull-silver-lake-2-2020-07-18/2020-07-18/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Paddle & Pull On Silver Lake 06-27-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for  SATURDAY, JUNE 27

Paddle & Pull On Silver Lake

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PADDLE & PULL – 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Enjoy fun day on the lake to help pull up Water Chestnut & European Frog Bit from scenic lake. Canoes & Kayaks will be provided, outside craft not permitted. Registration required by 6/26. Silver Lake, Silver Lake Rd., New Berlin. 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/paddle-and-pull-silver-lake-2/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: On Spring Bird Watching With The Audubon Society 06-17-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17

On Spring Bird Watching

With The Audubon Society

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WEBINAR – 4 – 5 p.m. Join the experts of Audubon Connecticut and Audubon New York to learn about what birds are nesting around us, what their behaviors are, how to identify them without disturbing them, how to become a citizen scientist by participating in the Breeding Bird Atlas. Visit www.facebook.com/DelawareOtsegoAudubonSociety/ for info.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Learn About Aquatic Invasive Species 06-10-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10

Learn About Aquatic Invasive Species

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CONSERVATION – Noon – 1 p.m. As summer warms up learn about aquatic invasive species with intern Sierra Stickney. Learn what to look for, what you can do to stop the spread. Zoom meeting with Otsego County Conservation Association. Registration required. Visit occainfo.org/calendar/spotlight-on-invasives-aquatic-invasives-to-watch-for/ for info.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Conservation Vs. Emerald Ash Borer 05-13-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAY 13

Conservation Vs. Emerald Ash Borer

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CONSERVATION – Noon – 1 p.m. Learn about the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive species threatening ash trees throughout the country, with Otsego County Conservation Association. Learn to identify ash trees, signs of an infestation, discuss what to do once discovered. Free, registration required. Visit occainfo.org/calendar/invasive-species-spotlight-hunting-the-emerald-ash-borer/ for info.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, AUGUST 18
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, AUGUST 18

Opening Reception

‘The Oneonta 49ers’

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EXHIBIT RECEPTION – 2 – 4 p.m. Celebrate exhibit “The Oneonta ‘49ers” about Oneonta storekeeper Collis Huntington who left to open a branch store and find his fortune in California, accompanied by 5 other Oneontans. Oneonta History Center, 183 Main St., Oneonta. 607-432-0960 or visit www.oneontahistory.org/upcomingevents.htm

ZAGATA: How Sequoias Were Saved Offers Lesson On Forest Fires

Column by Mike Zagata for December 7, 2018

How Sequoias
Were Saved Offers
Lesson On Forest Fires

Editor’s Note: Among his many credentials, Mike Zagata is currently director of organization development at the New York State Forest Owners Association.

Mike Zagata

The fires burning in California are indeed tragic, but their severity could have been averted.
If politicians and environmentalists had bothered to research the ecology of the brushlands and forests in California, they would have discovered that they are fire dominated – in other words, they rely on being burned on a regular basis to be rejuvenated.
The Giant Sequoias are the classic example.
For decades preservationists put out naturally ignited fires in the Sequoia-dominated forest. Over time, scientists observed a decline in the number of young Sequoia trees as they were being replaced by true firs (Abies) and Douglas fir.
Why was this happening?

ZAGATA: Knowledge Workers? Great, But Traditional Industries Needed, Too

Column by Mike Zagata for November 23, 2018

Knowledge Workers? Great, But
Traditional Industries Needed, Too

Mike Zagata

As I began to read an article in last week’s edition, I felt a surge of excitement.
The author, an elected official, had just stated that her constituents elected her twice because they understand that protecting our environment and growing our economy are not mutually exclusive policies.
That is close to a statement in my recent book, “A Journey Toward Environmental Stewardship.”
My excitement, however, soon switched from positive to anger. Aside from the statement that methane leaks erase all the environmental benefit from switching fuel to natural gas (I found it intriguing the author admits there are benefits), the author goes on the say this is a scientific fact – according to what scientifically refereed journal?
Let’s take a harder look at that claim. If methane leaks erased all the environmental benefit from burning natural gas, then the amount leaked would have to equal the amount burned. That would cut the company’s profit in half. Do you really think a company, any company, would knowingly allow that to happen?
For policy matters of this magnitude, we can’t afford to rely upon the opinion of an advocate who opposes natural gas.
As I read further, I began to feel sympathy for the author and even more so for the people whom she had just called “redundant.” According to her and her reference to a Boston consulting group, the future of our economy is tied to “knowledge-based industry.”
According to her, heavy industry and manufacturing were indeed historically vital to our economy, but we no longer need them. Low-skilled jobs are becoming redundant – in other words, if you don’t have a college degree you’re no longer needed. Wow – and she got elected twice.
Let’s take a look at the facts. When Oneonta’s economy was strong, it benefited from the presence of heavy industry and manufacturing. Companies trained their employees so they would become “knowledge based” and able to perform their jobs.
Many of the companies had apprentice programs to train workers to become more skilled and they were able to advance and make a higher wage – they were “knowledge based” without the buzzword. That’s what built Oneonta.
The notion that we have to move entirely away from that model is nuts. We stand to benefit far more from an approach that nurtures what we had while embracing new types of companies – those that don’t actually build anything. (We sent those companies with their middle-class jobs to Mexico and other countries with poorly thought-out trade policies).
Off the top of my head, I was able to create the following list of companies that can be described as heavy industry/manufacturing: Lutz Feed, Focus Ventures, Brewery Ommegang, The Plains LLC, Northern Eagle, Custom Electronics, Corning, Astrocom, Ioxus, Amphenol, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, Brooks Bottling, Wightman Lumber, MAMCO, Covidian, Munson Building Supply, Cobleskill Stone, Oneonta Block Co., DOMO, Otsego Auto Crushers, Seward Sand & Gravel, Clark Companies, RJ Millworks, Eastman Associates, Butts Concrete, Unalam, Leatherstocking, P&R Truss, Medical Coaches and Otsego Ready Mix.
The list is not claimed to be complete and I apologize if your company isn’t listed. However, those companies employ about 2,500 people who don’t consider themselves to be redundant, feel very much “needed” and contribute to our economy. They also vote. Hopefully, Otsego Now will be successful in getting other companies looking for “knowledge-based”
employees to come here. We need them all.

Mike Zagata, a DEC commissioner in the Pataki Administration and former environmental executive with Fortune 500 companies, lives in Davenport.

KUZMINSKI: Can Human Ingenuity Save Us From Perils Of Our Successes?
Column by Adrian Kuzminski for November 16, 2018

Can Human Ingenuity Save Us
From Perils Of Our Successes?

Adrian Kuzminski

It’s a widespread article of faith that “economic growth” is essential to future prosperity. That’s hardly surprising, since the modern world has been brought into being in less than 200 years by an unprecedented wave of economic growth.
If we go back 200 years – to 1818 – we see there were no automobiles, no airplanes, no railroads, no antibiotics, no anesthesia, no electricity, no central heating, no telecommunications, no refrigerators or appliances, no computers, no internet, no a lot of things.
Life was, comparatively speaking, nasty, brutal, and short.

In 1818 there were about a billion people on the planet. The overwhelming majority were farmers, peasants and artisans, with a thin veneer of landlords, officials, merchants, professionals and entrepreneurs.
Energy came through physical effort, or from water and wind power. Most consumer goods were made on the homestead or in the nearest town. People lived sustainably, whether they liked it or not, dependent as they were on renewable resources and the rhythm of the seasons.
Fossil fuels changed all that. They made explosive economic growth possible. Coal and oil and gas turned out to be much more potent sources of energy than muscle, water or wind.
The energy density of fossil fuels is orders of magnitude greater than muscle power. Try pushing your car when the engine doesn’t work! Further, fossil-fuel-based fertilizers dramatically expanded agriculture and helped support much larger populations.
Fossil fuels also made possible the chief instruments of the industrial revolution – large-scale machines, beginning with railway locomotives and steamships and the steel mills to build them, and on to tractors, bulldozers, motor vehicles, paved roads, power plants, the electric grid, airplanes, appliances and the whole range of modern products and infrastructure.
A famous study, called “Limits to Growth,” published in the 1972 by a team of MIT researchers led by Dennis Meadows, focused on the global resource consumption required for the production of goods and services.
It projected that the depletion of natural resources and the finite capacity of the planet to absorb emissions and other pollutants would force society by the 21st century to divert more and more capital to make up the difference, eventually bringing economic growth as we’ve known it to a halt.

Poet William Blake (1757-1827) was decrying the Industrial Revolution’s “dark, satanic mills” almost from the beginning.

A 30th anniversary edition of the work, in 2002, found its projections confirmed. Since then, the challenges of resource depletion and environmental degradation have only intensified. Economic growth has become increasingly expensive and uncertain.
The steep decline in energy return on energy invested is a good example of the limits to growth, and that’s true of many other resources as well, from fisheries to arable land to clean water.
Around World War II, the return of investment in an oil well was on the order of about 100 to one. It cost about a dollar’s worth of energy to extract $100 worth of energy. That’s $99 of more or less free energy. Today that ratio is down to about 15 to 1, and declining.

Another measure of economic limitation is what economists call the externalities of production, where the costs are born not by the producing enterprise, but by the public or the environment. Industrial pollution – such as General Electric’s release of PCBs polluting the Hudson river – is a classic economic externality. The widespread use of pesticides, which has seriously reduced amphibian, insect, and bird populations, is another of many examples.
Similarly, the climate costs of greenhouse gas emissions – storm damage, wildfires, flooding, loss of property values, stress on agriculture, and the rest – are not priced into the energy economy, but are disproportionately borne by the individuals who suffer them.
The only growth that seems to escape these limits is mental rather than physical – growth of the imagination, of the digital technology of cyberspace, of the production and exchange of ideas, images, and stories and the values they represent.

Many believe that this human ingenuity will also find a way to deal with the undesirable consequences of traditional economic growth. Maybe. So far that remains a hope, not a fact. In the meantime, the obstacles to conventional economic growth continue to increase.
Many ecologists say that we need a sustainable, steady-state economy, not an economy predicated on a belief in endless economic growth. A steady-state economy presumably would wax and wane with the cycles of renewable resources upon which we ultimately have to depend. How that might work, we have yet to figure out.
In that event, we would not have to go back to 1818. Since we have the advantage of all the knowledge and technology accumulated since then, we can hope for efficiencies that would give us more energy than we could find back then.
If the limits to growth are as real as they seem to be, we may have little choice but to relearn how to live within the ecological budget of our physical home, of our planet.

Adrian Kuzminski, a retired Hartwick College philosophy professor and moderator of Sustainable Otsego, lives in Fly Creek.

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