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technology

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

Boston Brass Jazz Band In Concert

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CONCERT – 7:30 p.m. Boston Brass treats audience to one-of-a-kind musical experience featuring classical, burning jazz standards. Tickets, $25 general admission. First United Methodist Church, 66 Chestnut St.,Oneonta. 607-433-7252 or visit oneontaconcertassociation.org

KITE FESTIVAL – 6 p.m. Build your own kite then see if it can fly without wind at indoor kite fly event. All ages welcome, cost $3. Old School Gymn Genesee St., Cherry Valley. 607-264-3080 or visit www.facebook.com/cherryvalleyartworks/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22

Discover History

Of Brookwood Point

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HISTORY TOUR – 6 p.m. Learn about Brookwood Point from Native American era to the founding of Cooperstown, to present day with Ed Rowley. Brookwood Point, 6000 St. Hwy. 80, Cooperstown. Call 607-547-2236 or visit otsegolandtrust.org/the-news/programs-a-events/417-brookwood-point-history-and-garden-tours

LECTURE SERIES – 6:30 – 8 p.m. Learn about new technologies to reduce heating costs, greenhouse gas emissions with Otsego County Conservation Association. Community Room, Clark Sports Center, Cooperstown. 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/be-informed-lecture-series-heat-smart-otsego/

ZAGATA: Face-To-Face Is Better. But If You Communicate Electronically…

Column by Mike Zagata for July 20, 2018

Face-To-Face Is Better.

But If You Communicate Electronically…

Mike Zagata

When thinking about the joys and pitfalls of communicating electronically, I’m reminded of these words from a John Denver song: “She sang to me in silence with her eyes”. How beautiful is that!
Those of us who began communicating before the advent of e-mail and texting with our cell phones understand what’s behind those words. The “millennials” may, through no fault of their own, lack an appreciation for what’s behind John’s words.
I really didn’t think about how easy it is to miscommunicate with e-mail and texts until a close friend sent me a guided missile via a text message. I had inadvertently done something to offend him and he was letting me know it.
Once the incoming missile hand landed, my immediate reaction was to launch one back in his direction. Texting works well when the waters are calm and you’re communication about things where you agree. It does not, however, work very well for resolving differences.
The truth is that trying to resolve differences via texting is a recipe for failure and usually makes matters worse. The same is true for e-mail. Success is much more likely if you meet in person or, at a minimum, have a phone conversation to resolve differences.
What John Denver was saying in those lovely words is that, by being able to see her, he was able to read her expressions, her body language and maybe even the inflections in her voice had she spoken.
Texting and e-mail are sterile in that regard. All we get to “see” are the words and, as we all know, they are subject to interpretation. If things have been going well recently with the author of those words, we are more apt to look at them in a positive light.
If there is tension between the author and the reader, those same words can instill anger. The party on the other end has no way of knowing which way they have been interpreted until he or she receives either a warm response or a guided missile.
While on the topic of cell phones, let’s look at how they have affected the norm for what is courteous and what is rude. If I’m sitting with someone and having a conversation, is it polite to answer my cell phone?
If you say it is, then is it more polite to answer it and tell the person I’ll call them back or engage in a conversation with the caller? What about if it’s a call you’ve been expecting? You may know that, but the person sitting next to you may not. That could lead to one of those incoming missiles
landing in your e-mail or
text box.
The means by which we communicate are rapidly changing and the social mores associated with those means are having difficulty keeping pace. A good rule of thumb might be to consider how you would react and act accordingly.
If you do inadvertently offend someone, all you can do is hope they will take the time when it happens to let you know in person. If not, it is likely to fester and then show up later as an incoming missile as a text or e-mail.
As baby-boomer struggling with these changes, I would like to apologize if I have inadvertently offended you.

Mike Zagata, a DEC commissioner in the Pataki Administration and former environmental executive with Fortune 500 companies, lives in West Davenport.

EDITORIAL: While Security Challenges Grow, So Does High-Tech

Editorial, May 31, 2018

While Security Challenges

Grow, So Does High-Tech

Community Bank’s security camera in Southside Oneonta captures a suspect, left, who looks a lot like images captures after two “skims” in Pennsylvania.

Ten years ago, we might have said, if high-tech can’t solve security problems, its future is limited. Today, high-tech is the King Kong that dominates everyone, and is likely to do so for the foreseeable future.
That doesn’t mean security problems have gone away. If anything, they are more daunting and they are inescapable.

A case in point happened here in Otsego County Saturday, May 19, when a “skimmer” was discovered on an ATM at the Community Bank drive-thru on Southside Oneonta. This device was placed by someone with mischief in mind over that slot on an ATM machine where you slide your credit or debit card.
The “skimmer” will read the information on the magnetic strip on your card, and a little micro-video camera will send it to the person who put the “skimmer” in place, who can then use the data to access your credit information or to make purchases fraudulently.
It turns out, the “skimmer” was placed late on the evening before. The ATM itself diagnosed something was wrong, alerted the repair technician and turned itself off. When the technician arrived the next morning, he quickly figured out what had happened and alerted state police at Troop C, Sidney.
As it happened, the security camera caught an image of the man who placed the “skimmer,” and he looks very much like the man who placed one at another Community Bank branch in Scranton, Pa., in early February, and at a nearby PNC Bank branch in Kingston, nearby Scranton, about the same time.
The photos have been widely circulated, first in the Scranton Times; last week in Hometown Oneonta and The Freeman’s Journal. And no one’s called with an identity yet, so it’s possible that the suspect’s wearing a disguise.
The baseball hat helps. He’s wearing thick-rimmed glasses, and it looks like he may have a false nose.
If you Google “skimmer” devices, you’ll find they look pretty slick. It seems like they actually fit over the ATM slot and unless a customer doesn’t look closely, he or she wouldn’t be able to tell the difference.

This kind of thing – and the FBI’s “router alert” issued on Memorial Day advising computer users to restart their machines to side-track Russian trackers – has to concern everyone about the dangers of participating in our brave new technological world?
In reality, high-tech is ubiquitous. There’s no opting out.

A skimmer, foreground, fits right over a real ATM, background.

As it happens, though, Community Bank – and the banking community, generally, no doubt – has been preparing for this and all sorts of other mischief.
One of community’s vice presidents, Hal Wentworth, quickly issued a statement advising customers of something called “Visa’s zero-liability policy” in cases of fraud or unauthorized use of accounts. When this sort of thing happens, it seems, the credit-card company’s customers are protected.
Wentworth asked anyone who suspects a data breach to alert the bank. The investigator, Capt. Scott Heggelke, said no one has come forward, so it looks like customers are in the clear.

Meanwhile, if any other problems occur, or if anyone thinks they recognize our friend with the baseball cap, call state police at 607-432-4844 and perhaps at least this specific situation will be resolved.
Even so, King-Kong will remain.

Delany Ruston Screens Her Film ‘Screenagers’ At OHS

Delany Ruston Screens Her

Film ‘Screenagers’ At OHS

Documentary film maker Delany Ruston talks to parents and teachers who gathered in the OHS Beldin Auditorium this evening for a free screening of her film “ScreenAgers: Growing Up In The Digital”. The documentary deals with how her personal struggles with her teenage daughter are part of a much larger problem of addiction in young people today and how we can take action to correct it in our families. In a talk following the film, Ruston stressed the importance of boundaries like limited time per day and not having screens in the bedroom. She also spoke about success with short, weekly conversations tech talks with her family that help create mindfulness by discussing what is effective vs. not effective about technology. For more ideas and frequently asked questions you can visit screenagersmovie.com. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, JAN. 5
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, JAN. 5

Meet Area Professionals

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NETWORKING – 6-7:30 p.m. Monthly networking mixer with the Young Professionals Network. B-side Ballroom, 1 Clinton Plaza Dr., Oneonta. Info, www.facebook.com/YoungProfessionalsNetworkYPN/

SKYPE CLASS – 1-4 p.m. Huntington Memorial Library, 62 Chestnut St, Oneonta. Info, hmloneonta.org

COLLEGE PLANNING – 6-7:30 p.m. For Juniors, Auditorium, Cooperstown Central School, 39 Linden Ave., Cooperstown. Info, www.cooperstowncs.org

FOMA MEETING – 7-8 p.m. Cooperstown High School Faculty Room, 39 Linden Ave., Cooperstown. Info, www.cooperstowncs.org

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