Pushing for peace in South Sudan, Pope Francis visits nation in shambles     What China wanted out of Blinken’s now postponed visit     Ukraine live briefing: E.U. leaders in Kyiv make no promises for membership; Germany moves to export tanks     Pushing for peace in South Sudan, Pope Francis visits nation in shambles     What China wanted out of Blinken’s now postponed visit     Ukraine live briefing: E.U. leaders in Kyiv make no promises for membership; Germany moves to export tanks     North Korea, family and soup: The inspiration for a 26-year odyssey      Hong Kong offers 500,000 free plane tickets to lure tourists back     Killing of top ISIS militant casts spotlight on group’s broad reach in Africa     Pushing for peace in South Sudan, Pope Francis visits nation in shambles     What China wanted out of Blinken’s now postponed visit     Ukraine live briefing: E.U. leaders in Kyiv make no promises for membership; Germany moves to export tanks     Pushing for peace in South Sudan, Pope Francis visits nation in shambles     What China wanted out of Blinken’s now postponed visit     Ukraine live briefing: E.U. leaders in Kyiv make no promises for membership; Germany moves to export tanks     North Korea, family and soup: The inspiration for a 26-year odyssey      Hong Kong offers 500,000 free plane tickets to lure tourists back     Killing of top ISIS militant casts spotlight on group’s broad reach in Africa     
SUBSCRIBE MY PROFILE
HOME | BREAKING NEWS | IN MEMORIAM | PEOPLE | OPINION |
 JOBS  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 HOMES  
 CARS  
 FUNERAL HOMES  
 GOODS & SERVICES

News of Otsego County

Zoe

Facing Breast Cancer, Zoe ‘Always Has Smile On Face’

Living Happy

Facing Breast Cancer, Zoe ‘Always Has Smile On Face’

By CHRYSTAL SAVAGE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Zoe plays happily with her canine pals, Sabrina and Bentley, at the farm where she was adopted. However, a cancer recurrence has been diagnosed, leaving her with an estimated 18 months to live. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

After a year and some happy months on the other side of neglect, 10-year-old German Shepherd Zoe has been diagnosed with breast cancer.

Zoe first captured the hearts of people across the region – and beyond – when rescued from her home on Nov. 15, 2019, after a UPS driver spotted a dog that appeared to “have had its leg blown off.”

After an X-ray showed “bones in her belly,” confirming Zoe had chewed off her own leg, it was later determined that it was not done out of hunger, but rather out of pain.

Zoe had a large – fortunately benign – mass on her left shoulder that was removed at Cornell University while she was receiving medical attention for her missing leg.

A local farmer, who wishes to remain anonymous, fostered Zoe right away before later adopting her, explaining he was lucky to get her as she was inquired about as far away as Texas in the continental United States and Israel globally.

Everyone Wants Fair Deal For Animal Shelter, County

EDITORIAL

Everyone Wants Fair Deal

For Animal Shelter, County

Drop The Threats, Negotiate An Agreement

Given successes like Zoe’s rescue (she’s seen here with SQSPCA Executive Director Stacie Haynes), the Susquehanna Animal Shelter has high community support, making it an ideal time, not to threaten unilateral action, but to negotiate support from the county board. (AllOTSEGO.com photo)

The issue’s been hanging out there for a while: What role should the Otsego County Board of Representatives play in funding the Susquehanna Animal Shelter?

Schoharie County’s contribution is $75,000 a year to its shelter. Delaware County splits $88,000 among two shelters. Until now, Otsego County has contributed nothing.

The county has been allocating $5,000 a year. It is not a donation, but a fee for services, which seems like the better way to go.

At its Nov. 26 public hearing on its 2020 county budget, county representatives were advised the Susquehanna SPCA, using cost-accounting data developed by a volunteer, Cooperstown’s Richard Sternberg, plans to “unilaterally” begin charging what it has determined its true costs are.

In a situation with a lot of moving parts, doing anything “unilaterally” is not the best way forward.

For one thing, everyone seems to agree abused animals have to be taken care of, and that county government should pay for costs incurred.

County Sheriff Richard J. Devlin Jr., whose department out of necessity, drops animals seized in cruelty cases at the Hartwick Seminary shelter, said “the welfare of animals is both our priorities.”

County Board Chairman Dave Bliss, R-Cooperstown/Town of Middlefield, also buys into the general concept. “The board wants to take care of its responsibilities,” he said in last week’s newspaper.

So the issue isn’t that the county pay for costs incurred. It’s simply how much (and, perhaps, to whom)?

The shelter’s annual operating budget is over $700,000. Last year, with the 103 starving animals seized on that Garrattsville farm and 56 Lhasa Apsos surrendered in Milford, Sternberg estimated the county received some $70,000 worth of services.

(Remember, that’s the year-to-year “operating budget,” separate from the $3 million that’s been raised to build a 21st-century animal shelter on Route 28 at Index. Two different pots of money.)

Averaged out with Sternberg’s guidance, SQSPCA Executive Director Stacie Haynes estimated the county’s annual cost at about $40,000 a year, some 5 percent of its total expenses. That includes caring for dogs dropped off by the sheriff’s department, or when a shelter team responds to a call through the county’s 911 system.

When County Treasurer Allen Ruffles returns in January from his National Guard deployment in Djibouti, he should review those figures and come to a common understanding about the value of the services provided.

Under the state Ag & Markets Law, law enforcement – locally, mostly the sheriff’s department – is required to respond to animal-abuse complaints. When deputies remove an animal, they have to take it someplace.

The Susquehanna Animal Shelter has been the preferred option, but it doesn’t have to be.

As Bliss explains it, if the county wanted to contract for services, it would be required to go out to bid, and other shelters – Oneonta’s Superheroes in Ripped Jeans, for instance – could bid, as could individual veterinary practices. Or the county could set up its own pound.

Clearly, acting “unilaterally” may have unintended consequences all around.

The Susquehanna Animal Shelter has a lot going for it.

Under Haynes, it’s been a first-rate operation, evident most recently in bringing the heart-rending case of Zoe, the
German shepherd discovered chained last month in the Town of Exeter with a chewed-off leg and large tumor in her shoulder. Zoe was seized, treated and is now in a new home in the Butternuts Valley.

Successes like this have raised the shelter’s profile, and pet owners are aware of and likely to use its services.

People – that includes members of the county board – want to back a winner, to support excellence, so Susquehanna SPCA, in its current incarnation, is in a position of strength.

Still, it’s determine to do what it believes in. As Haynes put it in last week’s paper, “We have a moral obligation to do what we do. We’re never going to stop doing what we’re doing.”

Admirable, but it weakens the shelter’s bargaining position. It takes the county board off the hook: It can be assured, regardless, our Zoes will be taken care of regardless.

So it only makes sense to cool off the rhetoric. Get the numbers. In an $11 million local tax levy in a $120 million budget, $40,000 is smidgeon. It’s there somewhere. Still, the county board shouldn’t just give away money because somebody asks for it. Fee for service is the way to go.

Demanding will get us nowhere. Let level-headed representatives on both sides sit down, figure out what’s fair and mutually agreeable.

Zoe Is Cancer Free

Zoe Cancer-Free,

Cornell Tests Find

Zoe has been declared cancer-free by the Cornell University Hospital for Animals.

COOPERSTOWN –  Zoe, the dog rescued from Exeter Center after she chewed off her own leg, has been declared cancer-free by veterinarians at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals, executive director Stacie Haynes reported just moments ago.

“According to the pathology report, the complete surgical excision is expected to be curative,” said Haynes. “They believed it was just a fatty mass, which is common in dogs her age. Zoe is cancer-free.”

Cases Like Zoe’s Common, PETA Headquarters Reports
LETTER from TERESA CHAGRIN

Cases Like Zoe’s Common,

PETA Headquarters Reports

To the Editor:

The horrific case of Zoe, an emaciated German shepherd who chewed off her front leg after being confined to a flimsy plastic carrier outdoors without any food or drinkable water, is a wake-up call to citizens to keep an eye out for “backyard dogs.”

Unfortunately, cases of extreme neglect like Zoe’s aren’t unusual. Dogs relegated to the backyard 24 hours a day are commonly deprived of even the most basic care. Growing puppies are often found with too-small collars imbedded in their necks because their owners never bothered to change them. Some dogs subsist – barely – on scraps and garbage. Many never see a vet, and suffer and die from injuries, parasites and diseases that could easily be prevented and treated.

Dogs are social animals who are happiest and safest living indoors, but with winter weather upon us, it is absolutely vital that at the very least, they be provided with proper shelter – dogs left outside may suffer frostbite and exposure or even die without it.

Most cities and counties require that animals be provided with adequate food, water, and shelter. If you see a dog going without these basic necessities, please report it to authorities, like the UPS driver who spotted Zoe. Her alleged abuser is being held accountable thanks to his intervention.

TERESA CHAGRIN
Animal Care & Control Issues Manager
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
Norfolk, Va.

$5K Raised For Zoe As Biopsy Results Await

$5K Raised For Zoe

As Biopsy Results Await

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to AllOTSEGO.com

Zoe takes a rest in her new Butternuts home.

COOPERSTOWN – At first glance, you wouldn’t know Zoe was a miracle.

“When I went to visit; she was jumping and playing like any normal dog,” said Stacie Haynes, Susquehanna SPCA executive director. “If you didn’t look at her leg, you wouldn’t think she was any different.”

Just two weeks ago, the 9-year-old German shepherd was found chained outside of 605 County Highway 22, just northwest of Exeter Center, without food or water, having chewed off her own leg in an attempt to reduce the pain from an 11-pound tumor on her shoulder.

In a high-risk surgery on Thursday, Nov. 21, veterinarians at Cornell University Hospital for Animals were able to remove the tumor and are awaiting the results of the biopsy.

“If it is cancerous, the vets believe she’s a good candidate for radiation or chemo,” said Haynes. “And people have donated more than $5,000, so we can afford her care.”

Surgeons also removed Zoe’s leg at the shoulder, but Haynes said the dog will learn to navigate just fine on three legs. She was shaved and given stitches, but now sports a Cornell t-shirt to keep her warm and prevent her from biting the stitches.

Dr. Christine Schneider of the Pittsfield Vet Clinic “has been taking care of her since we got her, and she’ll be able to go up and take out her stitches when the time comes.”

On Tuesday, Nov. 19, Zoe’s owner, Carl K. Prichard, 59, was charged with her abuse.

Though Haynes believed Zoe was intended to be a guard dog, but wouldn’t have been a very good one: Even after undergoing the ordeal, she’s been friendly, with “no standoffs or growling.”

Zoe On The Mend After An 11-Pound Tumor Is Removed

‘A THANKSGIVING MIRACLE’

Zoe On The Mend

After An 11-Pound

Tumor Is Removed

Dog Cared For At Butternuts Farm;

Biopsy Will Determine What’s Next

Media darling Zoe undergoes her first interview (with Peter Eliopoulos of WTEN, Albany) at the Susquehanna Animal Shelter this evening.  The stitches are visible on her left shoulder.   (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

SQSPCA Executive Director Stacie Haynes recounts the harrowing day Zoe spent at Cornell University Hospital for Animals.

HARTWICK SEMINARY – “A Thanksgiving Miracle” arrived at the Susquehanna Animal Shelter a few minutes ago.

That’s how Zoe, 9, the German shepherd who was found with a front leg chewed off in Exeter Center last week, was described by SQSPCA Executive Director Stacie Haynes  as the two arrived back from the Cornell University Hospital for Animals shortly before 6 p.m.

“She’s so nice,” said Haynes.  “It’s like incredible.”

At the hospital in Ithaca earlier today, veterinarians told Haynes that Zoe’s condition was “risky.”  A CT scan had shown the fatty mass in the dog’s left shoulder was so close to key arteries an operation might kill her.

“We might lose her,” the doctor told Haynes.

SQSPCA Reports: Zoe’s Surgery Successful

Susquehanna SPCA Reports

Zoe’s Surgery Successful

Zoe has successfully come out of surgery, Stacie Haynes, executive director, SQSPCA, reported. (Photo courtesy New York State Police)

COOPERSTOWN – Zoe, the dog rescued from Exeter with a missing leg, has safely come through a surgery to remove a benign mass and amputate what remained of her leg.

“She keeps shocking everyone with how strong she can be,” said Stacie Haynes, executive director, Susquehanna SPCA. “We cannot thank you all enough for the love and support you have shown this truly incredible dog.”

Surgeons at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Animal Hospital were able to fully remove the non-cancerous mass and successful amputate her leg. Zoe is still under sedation, and Haynes cautioned that the next 24 hours were critical, and vets would be watching her for a risk of bleeding.

“If we can get through the next 24 hours, things are looking good,” she said.

NEGLECTED, ZOE GETS OPERATIONS

DOG MAY HAVE CHEWED OFF LEG

NEGLECTED, ZOE

GETS OPERATIONS

By JAMES CUMMINGS • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Bandaged and sporting a pet cone, Zoe still face an operation Wednesday, Nov. 20, in Cornell’s veterinary hospital. (Photo courtesy New York State Police)

EXETER CENTER – Zoe may have a missing leg and a tumor, but successful fundraising sheds light on an otherwise dark story.

By press time, 36 people had donated $1,800 since Friday morning, Nov. 15, to help cover the hospital costs for the 9-year-old German shepherd that was placed under a veterinarians’ care after a UPS driver noticed she was missing a leg and called state police.

After bone fragments were discovered in her stomach, veterinarians determined that it was likely the dog had eaten its own leg.

Monday, Nov. 17, troopers charged Carl K. Prichard, 59, of 605 County Highway 22, northwest of Exeter Center, with failure to provide proper sustenance, a misdemeanor.

“We’ve had cases of neglect, but never something so horrendous,” said Stacie Haynes, Susquehanna Animal Shelter executive director. “This animal was suffering so greatly and was ignored … It’s really sad.”

The dog was found chained to the ground and living in a plastic pet carrier with no food and a frozen water bowl.

“She’s got a lot of problems,” said Haynes – scarred ears, a heart murmur and anemia. Additionally, the presence of a large mass on her shoulder, which veterinarians believe to be a fatty mass, presents complications with treatment.

“They’re concerned about the mass on her shoulder … best case scenario, surgery could remove it,” said Haynes.

The dog was scheduled to undergo an operation Wednesday, Nov. 19, at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals.

But given the dog’s age and condition, it’s “high risk,” Haynes said, adding, “It will be a very intense process.”

To cover the initial estimated treatment cost of $5,000, Haynes solicited donations through sqspca.org,
the shelter’s website.

She also reached out to Staffworks President and shelter benefactress Anita Vitullo, and is confident enough will be raised, even if costs increase. “I will not be surprised if the cost goes over $5,000,” she said.

Should Zoe recover, adopters have lined up, with as many as 10 individuals interested in the dog.

“We already have so many people reaching out who are interested in adopting her,” says Haynes, but the dog’s condition will require someone with experience. “We think the best plan of action is to ask people with this kind of experience. Someone who has had a dog who has three legs. We’ll try and whittle it down that way.”

Unable to cover the vets’ bills, Prichard, Zoe’s owner, surrendered the animal, then turned himself in to state police at Richfield Springs.

In addition to the misdemeanor, he is facing a violation for failing to provide appropriate shelter for dogs left outdoors. He is set to appear Dec. 4 in Exeter Town Court.

District Attorney John Muehl, who is also a member of Otsego County’s new animal cruelty task force, “PETS,” will be reviewing the case. “I haven’t had an animal chew its own leg off,” he said.

Despite Zoe’s dire situation, Haynes remains hopeful. “Where we live there’s much love for animals and we’re very fortunate,” she said.

Exeter Man Arrested In Dog Cruelty Case
Zoe Allegedly Chained Outside With No Food, Frozen Water

Exeter Man Charged In

Neglect, Abuse Of Dog

Zoe

EXETER – Four days after the Susquehanna SPCA rescued Zoe, a dog in such distress that she is believed to have chewed off her own leg, her owner was arrested and charged with abuse and failure to provide shelter.

Carl K. Pritchard, Exeter, was charged with a misdemeanor of over-driving, torturing and injuring animals; failure to provide proper sustenance and a violation for failing to provide appropriate shelter for dogs left outdoors.

“The dog was chained to the ground with a plastic pet carrier that had hay at the bottom,” said Trooper Aga Dembinska, public relations, Troop C. “There was no food bowl and a frozen-over water bowl.”

Rescued Dog’s Leg Appears Blown Off

ANIMAL-CRUELTY PROBE LAUNCHED

Dog Rescued

With Missing Leg

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Zoe, a German shepherd, was rescued from Burlington Flats.

BURLINGTON FLATS – The Susquehanna SPCA rescued a senior German shepherd Zoe who was found injured and in an inadequate shelter at a home in Burlington Flats.

“A passerby noticed this dog tied outside and that her leg looked like it had been blown off,” said Stacie Haynes, executive director.

With the help of Otsego County 911, State Police, and Anita Vitullo of Staffworks, the shelter saved Zoe. She is currently being treated at the Oneonta Veterinary Hospital.

“Her fight to survive has just begun because her missing leg is only one of many concerning medical ailments she is facing,” Haynes wrote on the shelter’s Facebook page. “The team is going to do everything we can to ease Zoe’s pain and show her compassion and a more peaceful life that she deserves.”

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103