BOUND VOLUMES: February 11, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

February 11, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

Interesting Memoranda: It is 328 years since John Cabot first discovered North America; 236 years since Sir Walter Raleigh more perfectly explored it; 240 years since the first permanent
colony was planted in Virginia; 208 years since the founding of New Amsterdam, now New York, was settled; 200 years since the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth; 44 years since the commencement of our national existence; and 31 years sincethe adoption of our present government.
Public Morality and Abuse: No public abuse should be cloaked, or it will infallibly produce others until the state is overrun with them. State corruption sprouts faster and takes a deeper root than the most prolific weeds. One rogue in office is not only a screen for another, but will help in a third for fear of a discovery. The three will draw in as many more, until everyone who may be suspected of honesty is dismissed.

February 12, 1821

175 YEARS AGO

Millerism: If anything is calculated to create doubts as to the propriety of universal toleration in matters of religious faith, it is the wild extravagances practiced under the influence of the mischievous delusion of Millerism. Mr. Ebenezer Walker of Belchertown recently died a raving maniac, made such by conversion to the Miller delusion. He was a recent convert to the faith, and up to the time of his conversion, was a staid, sober, industrious and worthy citizen. Last week, a brother of his, who lectures on Millerism, labored earnestly all one day with Mr. Walker to convince him that the “end was nigh.” They finally succeeded.
On Sunday, it became apparent that Mr. Walker’s reason was undermined. From that time up to his death, he was a furious maniac, seeking to destroy his own life and the lives of others. At one time he undertook to walk through the Village of Bondsville, near his residence, with nothing on but his shirt. At other times he would have mutilated his own person and once cast himself upon a heated stove and would have been reduced to a cinder but for the interference of friends. He burnt his money and notes to the amount of $400 a short time before his death.

February 14, 1846

150 Years Ago

Local: Boating is likely to be brisk on Otsego Lake next season. A new steamboat, capable of carrying 300 or more passengers, is being built in sections near Canandaigua and will be transported by rail and put together here. Mr. Boden is also intending to enlarge the “Mary B. in time for summer business. Regular trips will be made on the Lake in connection with the Cooperstown and Richfield Springs railroads.
The banks and bankers of Cooperstown are now loaning about one million dollars.

February 9, 1871

125 Years Ago

Local: Quite a number of ballots were thrown out at the village polls because of one defect or another. Some people cannot get used to the new system of voting.
Amusements: That jolly comedy “The Prodigal Father” will be presented at Bowne Opera House on Friday evening of this week. This is said to be by those who have witnessed it, a very fine comedy. The company appeared before crowded houses nightly for 14 weeks at the Broadway Theatre in New York. Professor O.S. Derrick will furnish an orchestra of eight members. Reserved seats may be reserved at Winegar’s Drug Store.

February 13, 1896

75 Years Ago

Frank C. Carpenter, vice-president and treasurer of The Freeman’s Journal Co., was elected President of the New York Press Association at the ninety-fourth annual convention of the organization held last week at the Hotel Syracuse in Syracuse, N.Y. As president, Mr. Carpenter will head the oldest and one of the most active state bodies of weekly newspaper publishers in the United States. The association has a membership of 350 weeklies and semi-weekly newspapers.

February 13, 1946

50 YEARS AGO

Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, with the cooperation of Paul S. Kerr, president of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, is pleased to announce that Leroy “Satchel” Paige, ageless patriarch of the pitching mound, was selected Tuesday by a special committee to be honored in the National Baseball Museum. Paige thus becomes the first player to receive special recognition for outstanding achievements in the Negro baseball leagues. Paige was the unanimous choice of a 10-member committee established last week to annually select one player from the Negro Leagues. Paige will be honored at an induction ceremony on August 9 in Cooperstown by Commissioner Kuhn. At the same time Commissioner Kuhn will induct seven men recently voted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame by the Committee on Veterans. (Ed. Note: Paige eventually received equal recognition as a bona fide member of Baseball’s Hall of Fame.)

February 10, 1971

25 YEARS AGO

As of last New Year’s Eve there has been a new addition to the Village of Milford – a sign erected by the Students against Drunk Driving chapter of Milford Central School. As many times as people hear the message – don’t drink and drive – it can never be enough. Too many people are killed and injured each year, many times not even being at fault, because someone else decided that he or she could handle a few drinks and still operate a motor vehicle. The SADD chapter in Milford, with guidance from Eileen Leach, their advisor, have attached their sign to the speed limit sign entering the village on Route 28 for northbound traffic to see.

February 11, 1996

10 YEARS AGO

Richard Pokorney, 86, a decorated WWII veteran of Patton’s Third Army, passed away peacefully on February 4, 2011. Pokorney was born September 19, 1924 in Astoria, Queens, the son of William and Anna Pokorney. His decorations from Army service in the 204 Combat Engineer Battalion Co. B included the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, a Service Good Conduct Medal, five citations and ribbons for the Battle of Normandy, the Ardennes (Battle of the Bulge), Central Europe, Northern France and the Rhineland. He received a Purple Heart for wounds received in the Battle for Metz. Upon his retirement, Richard settled in Roseboom and became an active member of the Cooperstown Farmers Market where patrons and vendors knew him affectionately as “Grandpa.”

February 10, 2011


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