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News of Otsego County

Tom Heitz column

BOUND VOLUMES: February 18, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

February 18, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

Perjury – A fellow by the name of Herrrington was indicted and tried at the Court of General Sessions held in this Village (Cooperstown) on February 8, 1821, on the charge of Perjury, for having sworn in a vote for Governor at the last election, without possessing any freehold estate. He was convicted and sentenced to seven years hard labor in the State Prison. Thus, one man at least, has paid dear for the attempt to make Mr. Tompkins Governor.

February 19, 1821

HOMETOWN HISTORY: February 18, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

February 18, 2021

150 Years Ago

Learn All You Can – Never omit an opportunity to learn all you can. Sir Walter Scott said that even in a stagecoach he always found somebody that could tell him something that he did not know. Conversation is frequently more useful than books for purposes of knowledge. It is therefore a mistake to be morose and silent among persons whom you think to be ignorant, for a little sociability on your part will draw them out, and they will impart wisdom, and will be able to teach you something, no matter how ordinary their employment. Indeed, some of the most sagacious remarks are made by persons of this description respecting their particular pursuit. Hugh Miller, the Scotch geologist, owes not a little of his fame to observations made when he was a journeyman stone mason, and working in a quarry. Socrates well said that there was but one good, which is knowledge, and one evil, which is ignorance. If there is a moment’s leisure, spend it over a good book or in instructive talking with the first you meet.

February 1871

HOMETOWN HISTORY: February 11, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

February 11, 2021

150 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity: It is fortunate for people desiring to locate in Oneonta that plenty of desirable building lots are in market at reasonable prices. Buyers can take their choice as to streets and localities. E.R Ford, T.D. & H. Watkins. S. Huntington, S. Wood, C.L. Michael. H. Wilcox, J.H. Peters, H. Baker and S. Parish all have good lots ready for purchasers, many of them finely located. All of these men are ready to sell lots for cash or on time, and we hear of sales every week, most of them for immediate occupation. This is the true policy for the speedy growth of the village.
It is now the universal rule with newspapers that the name of an author should accompany his communications. It is required as a guarantee of good faith, and not for a public or needless use
of the name.

February 1871

BOUND VOLUMES: February 11, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

February 11, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

Interesting Memoranda: It is 328 years since John Cabot first discovered North America; 236 years since Sir Walter Raleigh more perfectly explored it; 240 years since the first permanent
colony was planted in Virginia; 208 years since the founding of New Amsterdam, now New York, was settled; 200 years since the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth; 44 years since the commencement of our national existence; and 31 years sincethe adoption of our present government.
Public Morality and Abuse: No public abuse should be cloaked, or it will infallibly produce others until the state is overrun with them. State corruption sprouts faster and takes a deeper root than the most prolific weeds. One rogue in office is not only a screen for another, but will help in a third for fear of a discovery. The three will draw in as many more, until everyone who may be suspected of honesty is dismissed.

February 12, 1821

HOMETOWN HISTORY: February 4, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

February 4, 2021

150 Years Ago

Home and Vicinity – Donnati’s Great Comet will be again visible in the year 3858. Those who wish to see it may cut out this paragraph for reference. (Ed: 1,837 years hence as of 2021)
H.P. Skinner has done another good thing. This he has placed a large and attractive street lamp in front of his store door. Call in for he won’t skin[er] you on a deal.
Morris Brothers pay more for freight every week than all the other merchants in town – and everybody seems to be doing a good business. They frequently pay $1,500 and $2,000 a week.
Mr. Wallace, a gentleman in attendance at the Teachers’ Association last week, is the “school teacher” who E.P. Weston in a 50 mile walk at Cooperstown last fall. We are glad he is satisfied with teaching and not ambitious for pedestrian honors.
Sleep – Every man must sleep according to his temperament. Eight hours is the average. If he requires a little more or a little less he will find it out for himself.

February 1871

BOUND VOLUMES: February 4, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

February 4, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

Joseph Findlay Smith of Baltimore and Adolph Lacost of New York, commanders of the schooners Plattsburgh and Science, captured in April last, on the African coast, by the U.S. ship Cyane, Capt. Trenchard, and convicted before the Circuit Court of the United States, held in Boston last November, of violations of the laws prohibiting the slave trade, were sentenced on January 26 to five years imprisonment and to pay a fine of $3,000 each.
Napoleon Bonaparte, having been born on February 5, 1768, will be 53 years of age this day. True, to us Americans, it is not a matter of much moment – yet there can be no harm in the bare mention of it.

February 5, 1821

BOUND VOLUMES: January 28, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

January 28, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

“Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost.” The exemplification of this moral is perpetually occurring on the most common objects of daily attention. The very paper on which I am now writing, affords me an example. A little while ago it was clipped off from an old garment, a useless rag. Betty would have swept it to the door. But the industrious rag man took it up and gave it to the paper-maker who returned to me the in a new form, no less pleasing than useful. My gentle friends, in obedience to the Great Master, gather up the fragments which remain; the little piece of cloth which falls from your scissors, may become the means of carrying the light of the knowledge of the Glory of God to far distant and benighted lands.

January 29, 1821

HOMETOWN HISTORY: January 28, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

January 28, 2021

150 Years Ago

In the Village of Oneonta during the year 1870 the mortality was as follows: Total number of deaths: 9; of which 5 were women, 1 man, 2 boys and 1 girl. Ages: Under 1 year and under: 2; between 1 and 5 years: 1; 15 and 20 years: 1; 30 and 40 years: 5. Diseases: Bronchitis: 1; Cancer: 1; Consumption 1; Dysentery 1; Hemorrhage of Lungs 2; Killed by Cars (Railroad) 1; Scarintina 1. Deaths to population: Eight-tenths of one percent.
In reference to the Musical Convention held at Schenevus recently, Miss Emma Gates of Oneonta had probably the fullest and best cultivated soprano voice of any of the female singers present. Her delineation is broad and fluent, her execution full of delicacy, and her rendition of impassioned music – “vehement.”

January 1871

HOMETOWN HISTORY: January 21, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

January 21, 2021

150 Years Ago

Local: The coal bill of Bissell & Yager, for the month ending January 1, amounted to nearly $5,000.
H. Sessions fell from a scaffold on his house a few days since, from which he received quite severe injuries.
E.R. Sabin, T.N. Derby and George Bond have each drawn a silver watch from prize candy packages.
We learn that L.J. Emmons and E.G. Bixby contemplate moving to Kansas during the Spring or Summer.
S.M. Ballard has sold one-half interest in the Susquehanna House to A.C. Lewis of Cooperstown, the firm hereafter to be Ballard & Lewis.
The Round House is now completed. The work was inspected Tuesday and accepted by the company. Men are now working on the water tank. In a few days everything will be in readiness
for engines to take water while standing in the stalls.

January 1871

BOUND VOLUMES: January 21, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

January 21, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

Letter to the Overseer of the State Prison at Auburn Village from Utica – “Dear Sir: I have been informed that there is a young woman in prison for which her father offers the sum of $3,000 to the person who will marry her. If that be the case, I want you to see her father and have him write to me as soon as possible. If he writes to him direct, his letter is to be left at Cazenovia Village Post Office as I shall be there by the 25th. I was lately from Vermont on my journey to Illinois. I have had bad luck and got out of money and heard them speak of this girl, and I concluded I would marry her, if that was the truth. I wish to have you write as soon as possible. Direct your letter to Cyrus Crumb – this from me to the State Prison at Auburn Village.”

January 15, 1821

BOUND VOLUMES: January 7, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

January 7, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

The Florida Treaty – The Treaty ceding Florida to the United States has been officially communicated to Mr. Rush, the American Minister in London. Don Manuel de Barros, who is attached to the Spanish Legation to the United States, is arriving at the House of the Spanish Consul at Bordeaux, with the Treaty for the Cession of the Floridas which had been ratified by the Cortes. A letter from Bordeaux, received at Paris on November 7, says he will embark immediately in the ship Rapid of New York for Philadelphia.

January 8, 1821

HOMETOWN HISTORY: January 7, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

January 7, 2021

150 Years Ago

Local: Most of the wells in this village are dry. Housewives therefore grumble.
Charley Freiot has just received a large and splendid assortment of stereoscopic views.
N.I. Ford wishes to say that he will sell his house and lot on Centre Street. It is centrally located and will be sold cheap.
More than 70 houses have been built, enlarged and repaired in our village this past year. We hope to herald more than double that number the coming year.
George Bixby has sold his house and lot on Dietz Street near the bridge to H.J. Cummings of Burlington, at $2,000. Mr. C. will come here to reside in Spring. Mr. Thompson, who recently purchased the old M.E. Church, was busy last week moving it on the lot purchase of Bixby. Mr. T. will arrange the building for two families.

January 1871

HOMETOWN HISTORY: December 31, 2020

HOMETOWN HISTORY

December 31, 2020

125 Years Ago

Congressman D.F. Wilber of Oneonta did not vote for the Dingley Tariff Bill. Neither did he vote against it. Mr. Wilber’s position on the bill was explained by him as follows: “I represent a district which is strongly protective in its tariff views and I myself am a radical protectionist. As such I could not bring myself around to support the Dingley measure. It is a bill for revenue rather than protection. I cannot endorse a 15 percent increase of Wilson-Gorman duties throughout all the schedules except those devoted to wool and wood and their manufactures. The basis of such action is wrong. I favored a Bill framed along McKinley lines. What I want is a thoroughly protective measure on the lines of the McKinley measure of 1890. Any Democrat who favors tariff duties for revenue only might have voted for the Dingley Bill without violating his principles. I cannot compromise my protective views with Mr. Cleveland to that extent.”

January 1896

80 Years Ago

An Oneonta boy died a hero Friday afternoon of last week in a futile attempt to save the life of a seven-year-old playmate who had plunged into icy Neahwa park pond. Victims of the first tragic accident to occur at the park pond in 12 years were Charles Wood, aged 11, son of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Wood, and Darwin Johnston, aged 7, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Johnston of West Harpersfield. Dr. Norman Getman, Otsego County coroner, pronounced both boys dead at 4:50 p.m.

January 1941

25 Years Ago

Citing economic reasons and low ridership, Pine Hill-Adirondack Trailways has decided to eliminate its weekday bus route traveling from Utica, through Cooperstown, to Oneonta on January 10. Weekend runs will continue, however. Paul Provost, vice-president for the Kingston-based company, commented, “It’s a lack of passengers. There are less than six passengers a day on that portion. The majority are between New York City and Oneonta, obviously. Somedays we are leaving Oneonta with two or three people. This is strictly an economic move. Trailways receives a state subsidy of $2.7 million and was asking for an additional $500,000 according to Michael Fleischer a NYSDOT spokesperson. “Adirondack wanted additional state subsidies because the ridership was fairly low,” said Diane Carlton, Director of the Planning Department for Otsego County. The ridership averages are based on total annual numbers which rise during the tourist season.
“I see a lot more people getting off the buses in the summer,” Carlton said.

January 1996

10 Years Ago

In ceremonies at the Otsego County Courthouse, State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, was sworn in for a 13th term, and Otsego County Sheriff Richard J. Devlin, Jr. was sworn for his second term. In remarks, Seward noted a lack of “stable and responsible leadership” in Albany in recent years. “I love New York,” he said, “but our state is crumbling.” Drue Quackenbush, an Oneonta High School student, sang the National Anthem and led the audience in “America the beautiful” at the end. Also sworn in was Judge Brian Burns who warned of growing problems with heroin drug addiction.
“Stay-at-home moms are being arrested for selling it and for using it,” said the judge.

January 2011

BOUND VOLUMES: December 31, 2020

BOUND VOLUMES

December 31, 2020

150 YEARS AGO

Quarantine – The experience of the past year has furnished additional evidence of the security afforded to the public health by the proper administration of quarantine laws.
Out of 365 vessels which arrived in the port of New York from ports infected with Yellow Fever, 107 had cases of this disease on board either in the port of departure, or on their passage, or were found on their arrival here to have some of their crew or passengers sick with it. The total number of cases was 170, out of which 112 died.
Twenty-six cases from vessels under quarantine were admitted to the West Bank Hospital, only six of which proved fatal. Thirty vessels have been detained at quarantine on account of small pox, having an aggregate of over 18,000 persons on board from among whom 66 patients, sick with this disease, were sent to the hospital on Blackwell’s Island.
These statistics of disease show the dangers to which we are exposed through our foreign commerce.

January 5, 1871

100 YEARS AGO

Cooperstown has acquired two institutions during the year 1920 which will be recognized by everyone as acquisitions of importance. The opening here in September of the Knox School was the event of the most importance. The purchase of Doubleday Field, the birthplace of baseball, was a Chamber of Commerce accomplishment. It was a Chamber of Commerce project and too much praise cannot be given the committee which had charge of the matter. This project is still a field for much work.

January 5, 1921

75 Years Ago

In Cooperstown – Patrons at Smalley’s Theatre were thrilled with pictures of the National Museum of Baseball and Hall of Fame, which appeared on the regular Paramount Pictures News Reel.
Attorney Theodore P. Feury has purchased of Mrs. Nola G. Warren, her house and lot on Susquehanna Ave. and takes immediate possession.
David J. McGown, a student at Yale University, is at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Hamilton McGown at their home on Pine Blvd. for the holiday vacation.

January 2, 1946

50 YEARS AGO

Donald Scott Tabor, 20, of Cooperstown was killed and Mary Jean Hopkins, his fiancée, was injured early New Year’s morning at 3:45 a.m. when their car rammed a concrete and steel bridge abutment over Red Creek in Bowerstown. Mr. Tabor, an employee of the Victory Supermarket for the last five years, was planning to enter the armed forces on January 14.

January 6, 1971

25 YEARS AGO

A total of 165 students from this area are included in the annual edition of “Who’s Who — Among American High School Students – 1994-1995.” From Cooperstown High School: Garrett Ellsworth, Lauren Groff, Melissa P. Hazzard, Cassandra A. Linn, Reid Nagelschmidt, Lisa N. Senchyshyn, Meghan L. Gallery, Timothy W. Hayes, Erica Hollister, Karen A. Muehl, Alexis Olson, and Laurie Warner.

January 7, 1996

10 YEARS AGO

Three Otsego County people died of heroin overdoses in 2010. “There are hundreds of thousands of dollars of heroin here in Otsego County,” Judge Brian R. Burns told a full house in the Otsego County Courthouse on New Year’s Day, shortly after he was sworn in for a second ten-year term. “I can’t emphasize enough how much that’s changed,” he continued. “Heroin was simply not a problem. It’s going to be the biggest problem in the next ten years.”

January 6, 2011

HOMETOWN HISTORY: December 24, 2020

HOMETOWN HISTORY

December 24, 2020

150 Years Ago

Home and Vicinity – The walks in some parts of our village have been made very slippery by boys sliding and skating on them. A bad practice!
Now is a good time to provide yourself a nice scarf or warm overcoat. Anything of this kind can be bought cheaper in Oneonta than any other place short of Albany.
All ye who are troubled with mice should call at the store of Moody and Vosburgh, and purchase a “Novelty Mouse-Trap.” The construction of this trap is such that it would be fun to sit up nights and watch the little pantry robbers as they slide in under the gate.
Miss Mary Burton lost a valuable gold watch from her chain last Thursday evening. The loss was first discovered while in attendance at Washburne’s show. Search was made that night in the street from Mr. Burton’s residence to the Hall with lanterns, but without success.

December 1870

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