After deadly Israeli raid in Jenin, fears of major escalation in West Bank      Ukraine live briefing: Power outages hit Ukraine after strikes; U.S. to send newer Abrams tanks     Business empire of Asia’s richest man hit by sell-off after fraud report     After deadly Israeli raid in Jenin, fears of major escalation in West Bank      Ukraine live briefing: Power outages hit Ukraine after strikes; U.S. to send newer Abrams tanks     Business empire of Asia’s richest man hit by sell-off after fraud report     China, speeding through phases of covid, gets on with living with virus     Marshall Islands, feeling neglected by the U.S., enjoys new leverage     Trudeau appoints first representative for fighting Islamophobia     After deadly Israeli raid in Jenin, fears of major escalation in West Bank      Ukraine live briefing: Power outages hit Ukraine after strikes; U.S. to send newer Abrams tanks     Business empire of Asia’s richest man hit by sell-off after fraud report     After deadly Israeli raid in Jenin, fears of major escalation in West Bank      Ukraine live briefing: Power outages hit Ukraine after strikes; U.S. to send newer Abrams tanks     Business empire of Asia’s richest man hit by sell-off after fraud report     China, speeding through phases of covid, gets on with living with virus     Marshall Islands, feeling neglected by the U.S., enjoys new leverage     Trudeau appoints first representative for fighting Islamophobia     
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News of Otsego County

Columns

News from the Noteworthy: Measuring Results, Assessing Goals a Good Place to Start
News from the Noteworthy

Measuring Results, Assessing
Goals a Good Place to Start

In determining the effectiveness of charitable nonprofits, it is critically important not to evaluate the delivery of services, but rather measure the results that those services are aiming to achieve. It sounds pretty straightforward, but the diverse nature of charitable nonprofits and their missions can complicate things. For example, a foundation can measure results by the amount of money it raises or distributes. A homeless program can define results by how many homeless people attain safe, affordable housing. But it gets trickier when programs provide emergency services, because the results are harder to measure over periods of time. More and more, donors and contractors are looking at how nonprofits measure results before making contributions or authorizing grants.

STERNBERG: The China Syndrome
LIFE IN THE TIME OF COVID

The China Syndrome

As I stated in last week’s column, it’s déjà vu all over again. Now the problem is new strains of COVID, which are beginning to take over in many countries including the United States. But more importantly is the rapid spread of multiple COVID sub-variants in China.

Initially in response to COVID, the Chinese government came up with a zero tolerance policy. Whole cities were locked down. China developed its own vaccines, called Sinovac and Sinopharm. These are attenuated viral vaccines. These are classic type of vaccines like the Sabin vaccine for polio. This is different from the mRNA vaccines that are used in the United States, Europe and much of the remaining world. They are not nearly as effective as the mRNA vaccines but reach World Health Organization qualifications to be declared effective.

Virtuosity in Festive Style From Fenimore Chamber Orchestra

Virtuosity in Festive Style From
Fenimore Chamber Orchestra

By T. STEPHEN WAGER
COOPERSTOWN – In its third appearance at Christ Church, Fenimore Chamber Orchestra offered a brilliant beginning to the holiday season with “Festive Strings.” Before the December 3 concert began, Thomas Wolf—founder and chair of the orchestra’s governing board—paid a touching tribute to all those present who have helped in the success of the orchestra. The concert itself began with one of the most daunting and demanding works for a string orchestra that Mozart ever composed.

The Divertimento in D Major, K 136 absolutely requires nothing less than a virtuoso ensemble and was dispatched with breathtaking ease. The andante middle section treated the audience to a warm and relaxed breath before a return to the almost impossible to execute Presto (and I do mean Presto) that Mozart demands. It is more than evident that an esprit de corps exists in Fenimore Chamber Orchestra from the conductor through to all members of the orchestra.

BERKSON: Ringing in the New Year: From Aunt Edna to Richfield Springs
Life Sketches by Terry Berkson

Ringing in the New Year: From
Aunt Edna to Richfield Springs

Aunt Edna’s New Year’s drink of choice was a highball using Mr. Boston’s rye, Canada Dry ginger ale and a piece of orange peel.

I used to keep my Aunt Edna company on New Year’s Eve because her husband, Dave, always drove a taxi on that night. He’d sacrifice being home with his wife because in New York City the tips would be especially good and he would make a lot of needed money. My aunt would tune the television to Guy Lombardo (I secretly called him Guy Lumbago), whose band was playing at the Waldorf Astoria in Manhattan. At 12 years old I thought the program was corny and would have welcomed some of Alan Fried’s Rock And Roll on the radio. Near 12 o’clock, my aunt would mix us a highball using Mr. Boston’s rye, Canada Dry ginger ale and a piece of orange peel, which she’d rub around the rim of the glass. I’d only get a capful of the Mr. Boston.

NOTEWORTHY: Resolution: Inclusion To Foster Growth, Build Community
News from the Noteworthy

Resolution: Inclusion To Foster
Growth, Build Community

Another year has passed by—and with it, another year of celebrating our milestones. The staff at Springbrook have shown what can be done in a decade as we celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Tom Golisano Center for Autism.

Our donors have also demonstrated what can be done in this time, meeting the needs of the people we support by giving generously time and again, not only on Giving Tuesday or during the holiday season, but every day. Advocating for the needs of others has always been the mission of Springbrook. We have done this by facilitating growth, supporting the whole person, and meeting every one of the persons we support when and where they need us. Over 90 years, we have continued to fulfill our vision of an equitable and inclusive future. Now, as we take time to celebrate the holidays and the upcoming new year, I ask everyone to think about incorporate inclusion into their home and community.

KATZ: Where Are You From?
Column by Jeff Katz

Where Are You From?

If you’re from White Plains or Scarsdale and someone asks you, “Where are you from?” you’d likely answer “Westchester County.” If you’re from Hauppauge or Port Jefferson and the same question is posed, you’d probably say “Suffolk County.” But if you live in Otsego County, what do you say?

Due to the prominence of Oneonta (regionally) and Cooperstown (nationally and internationally), we all tend to answer, “Where are you from?” using either Oneonta or Cooperstown as our reference point. Yet we all know every village and town in Otsego County has its own unique and special history. Why not start answering “Otsego County?”

Otsego County often feels disconnected. The distance between Cherry Valley and Unadilla is large, geographically and psychically. Edmeston doesn’t feel any shared sense of place with Worcester. Cooperstown and Oneonta are, as stated, dominant in name recognition.

STERNBERG: Déjà Vu All Over Again
Life in the Time of Covid

Déjà Vu All Over Again

It’s the end of the year and it’s time to reflect where we are regarding many issues. With this column principally about COVID or other viral illnesses, today we will limit ourselves to that. I really regret having to be the Grinch.

The title of today’s column is a very famous statement credited to the great American philosopher Lawrence Peter Berra, who is also credited with many similar statements which appear to be malapropisms until you look carefully at them. “Déjà vu all over again” is one of those statements as it applies to COVID. Things have repeated themselves more than once.

First, anyone who tells you with any certainty that they know what will happen next, has a bridge to sell you. When I look back at this year it looks pretty much the same as the end of 2021 and the end of 2020. We would like to think we are beating the disease, but we aren’t.

News from the Noteworthy: Celebrate Safely, Responsibly This Holiday Season
News from the Noteworthy

Celebrate Safely, Responsibly
This Holiday Season

The celebration season has begun! It is time for festivities, holy days, gatherings, traditions, family, parties, events and maybe a little football. With that, I wish a great big happy holidays to all who are reading this. I also hope for each of you a safe and joyful season. If you follow LEAF at all on Facebook (please do!), you will see that our theme for the month is, “Celebrate Safely!” We have been sharing tips and suggestions for making sure that everyone has a good time and gets home without incident.

Here are the highlights for hosting an event:

Let’s start with this: It is always okay to celebrate without alcohol! We are fully aware that our culture nearly demands that alcohol be present at any gathering. However, gatherings without alcohol tend to be less expensive (and who’s not trying to save a buck these days?) and less prone to a spirits-infused incident. It’s a win-win, so it is worth consideration.

Reflections on Amazing Work by Caregivers, Recent Highlights
Bassett At 100

Reflections on Amazing Work
by Caregivers, Recent Highlights

Dear Friends, Neighbors and Colleagues,
The holiday season is an excellent time for reflection. We look back on our blessings at Thanksgiving, look forward with resolutions to the New Year, and spend quality time with those most important to us. I’d like to do a little reflecting on Bassett Healthcare Network in this month’s column—starting with our people.

Our caregivers are the greatest blessings of the year and our best hope for the future. Over the past year, Bassett Healthcare Network has received many distinguished acknowledgements for the amazing work of our caregivers in many disciplines. Here are some highlights:

NOTEWORTHY: Exploring a Working Example of Applied Idealism
News from the Noteworthy

Exploring a Working
Example of Applied Idealism

The Unadilla Community Farm in West Edmeston, established in 2014, is a nonprofit whose mission is providing space for the teaching and practice of sustainable skills in agriculture, natural building, and food equity.

The farm was an abandoned corn field, now transformed into an edible food forest. It grows 200 varieties of annual and perennial products, using sustainable techniques. It uses a diversity of conservation practices, such as rainwater collection, multi-story and alley cropping, no-till management, wildlife habitat planting, heavy mulching, on-site composting, crop rotation, and high tunnels.

STERNBERG: Fauci Recollected as Humble, Inclusive
Column by Dr. Richard Sternberg

Fauci Recollected
as Humble, Inclusive

Dr. Anthony Fauci retires from federal service this month, leaving the National Institute of Health where he has worked for 54 years, the last 38 as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

He has been an advisor to seven presidents. Until the COVID crisis, he was known primarily for his work on HIV/AIDS. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2008 by president George W. Bush, with whom he worked very closely on a global program to combat HIV/AIDS, known as PREPFAR, and The United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, which has saved an estimated 21 million lives (and for which, in my opinion, both should receive the Nobel Peace Prize). The senior President Bush called Dr. Fauci a hero during a 1988 presidential debate.

The Dog Charmer: Leash Aggression, Zoomies and Finding Your Dog’s ‘Off’ or ‘Pause’ Buttons
The Dog Charmer

Leash Aggression, Zoomies
and Finding Your Dog’s
‘Off’ or ‘Pause’ Buttons

Dear Tom:
How best do we introduce our daughter’s new pup into our home when we already have two adult French bulldogs, Stella (10) and Louie (3), one of whom defaults to an aggressive posture (Louie) when we are out and about on walks? We previously tried to introduce our dog to another family member’s dog which resulted in our dog attacking and injuring the other. What is the best strategy to make this work? Thank you!

Cooperstown Residents

HAWTHORNE HILL: Of Leaves, and Finding Solice in Today’s World
Hawthorne Hill by Richard DeRosa

Of Leaves, and Finding
Solace in Today’s World

Things are pretty much settled in for the winter up here on the hill. A few odds and ends remain to be attended to come spring. No matter, never possible to fit everything in. Putting a place to bed bears a striking resemblance to getting something like an essay written. One never quite hits it square on the nose, but there comes a time to either send it in as-is or slip it into the file for another day. Perhaps it is true that nothing is ever finished. That is equally true of the noble goals upon which this country is founded. A work in progress always in need of some tweaking.

News from the Noteworthy: FSA Works To Help Individuals, Families Meet Basic Needs
News from the Noteworthy

FSA Works To Help Individuals,
Families Meet Basic Needs

Family Service Association, located at 277 Chestnut Street in heart of Oneonta, is sometimes referred to as the “Area’s Best Secret.” FSA is a privately funded human services agency, with an annual budget of just under $300,000.00. The agency is staffed by three full-time employees, volunteers and college interns. Most popular for our Clothing Room, FSA offers a host of other programs to help people and families in need of assistance.

The Clothing Room is open to the public and set up like a thrift store, but all items are free. Donations are accepted from community members, stores or other organizations, and neatly displayed for “shoppers” to take at no cost. FSA’s Clothing Programs also provide specific items to individuals for employment, school or health needs.

STERNBERG: Why I Am Masking Up Again (and it’s Not Just COVID)
Column by Richard Sternberg

Why I Am Masking Up Again
(and it’s Not Just COVID)

It would be a safe thing to say that I was one of the strongest advocates in Central New York for masking up, having vaccinations up to date—it should be two original, at least the most recent vaccine for the Omicron variants and having been boostered for last year—avoiding crowded indoor spaces, and generally keeping your distance from other people whenever possible. When I now go to the Clark Sports Center, very few people are wearing their masks. I personally felt comfortable with this policy as relates to COVID and there have been a few times when I forgot to bring a mask with me. I try to wear a mask around my neck, pulling it up over my nose and mouth when somebody is near physically, but frequently I forget to do so. That changes now, regrettably and disappointingly.

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