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News of Otsego County

Butternut Valley Alliance

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Concert for Flag Day 06-13-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, JUNE 13

Concert for Flag Day

14-19eventspage

COMMUNITY CONCERT – 3 p.m. Oneonta Community Band returns with their first outdoor concert of the season. They will be performing patriotic tunes like the ‘Battle Hymn of the Republic,’ A Colonial Rhapsody’ and others, to celebrate Flag Day. Bring blankets, chairs and whatever else you need to be comfortable while you listen. The event will be held at the pavilion in Wilber Park in Oneonta. Visit www.facebook.com/oneontacommunity-concertband for more information.

‘Mysterious Tubes’ Explained
GOALS: SAVE LOCAL FARMLAND, CHESAPEAKE

‘Mysterious Tubes’ Explained

BVA’s Graham Stroh and daughter Asher, 8, examine a “riparian buffer” off Route 23 east of the Village of Morris. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

People entering Morris on Route 23 from Oneonta kept asking Bob Thomas, town historian and a Butternut Valley Alliance board member, “What are those tubes across from the cemetery?”

With his nudging, couple of weeks ago an enticingly titled Zoom presentation, “Mysterious Tubes Along Butternut Creek,” provided the answer to 27 participants, some landowners who may sign up to host mysterious tubes of their own, according to BVA Executive Director Graham Stroh.

The program’s been going on for a decade, according to Lydia Brinkley, Upper Susquehanna Coalition buffer coordinator, “riparian buffers,” that is.

If you’ve only noticed the mysterious tubes lately, it’s because there are more of them, part of the USC’s federally and state-funded efforts to clean up Otsego County’s streams, and thus contribute a bit to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, 250 miles south of Garrattsville.

“Riparian buffers are essentially wooded areas along creeks and rivers, for purposes of reducing erosion and stabilizing stream banks,” said Stroh, formerly an urban planner in Washington D.C. who moved back three years ago to manage the family’s property. (He was raised in New York City; his dad, Leslie, in Morris.)

The Butternut Valley, and with the collaboration of the Middlefield-based Soil & Water Conservation District, all of Otsego County’s streams, are part of a “huge, huge region,” said Stroh, where efforts are underway to clean up the tributaries to the Susquehanna River, which eventually runs into the challenged Chesapeake, where pollutants have been destroying the rich fishery for decades.

Fisher Cat Does So Well Here 6-Day Season Planned In Fall

Fisher Cat Does So Well Here

6-Day Season Planned In Fall

When they weren't peppering DEC Senior Wildlife Biologist Mike Clark with questions, more than 50 people sat rapt for more than an hour this evening in the New Lisbon Town Hall, listen to the saga of the fisher's return. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
When they weren’t peppering DEC Senior Wildlife Biologist Mike Clark with questions, more than 50 people sat rapt for more than an hour this evening in the New Lisbon Town Hall, listen to the saga of the fisher’s return. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By JIM KEVLIN • for www.AllOTSEGO.com

A pair of fisher cats were captured by a DEC camera during mating season, 2013, helping themselves to a beaver carcass in one of Clark's slides.
A pair of fisher cats were captured by a DEC camera during mating season, 2013, helping themselves to a beaver carcass in one of Clark’s slides.

GARRATTSVILLE – The fisher cat became so rare everywhere except the Adirondacks, no trapping of the weasel relative was allowed between the mid 1930s and late 1940s.

In the 1970s, 50 were transplanted to the Catskills. In the 40 years since, they have migrated to Otsego County and multiplied to the point that a six-day trapping season is contemplated this fall to keep the tough and wily predator population from growing out of control.

That was the story that DEC Senior Wildlife Biologist Mike Clark brought to the New Lisbon Town Hall this evening, where more than 50 people had gathered to hear him, many seeking confirmation that they had seen a fisher. Or was it a mink? many were wondering by evening’s end.

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