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News of Otsego County

food

DUNCAN: Quality Of Food Goes Back To Soil’s Quality
LETTER from R. SCOTT DUNCAN

Quality Of Food Goes

Back To Soil’s Quality

To the Editor:

Vitamins, minerals, and other supplements – there are numbers of people who say you should take vitamins.

Vitamin C for tissue repair, A for healthy skin, B for stress, E for women over 40, and a very popular one today – Vitamin D for overall health.

But the cost of the vitamins keeps getting higher and higher. A men’s multivitamin today will cost well over $50!

I was looking at the label on the jar and it said that a number of the ingredients are foods, from foods? Why not just eat the right foods? Well, they say foods are
not as nutritional us as they used to be.

I remember reading about one genetically modified grain that was created so it would grow faster. One of the reasons that it grows faster was that the roots are shorter. Well , the shorter roots do not go deep enough to absorb enough minerals, which in turn affects the brain function because of the lack of the minerals.

You can see why a lot of people think that you should eat organic, non-GMO foods. So I wonder why isn’t the food as good as it used to be?

A lot has to do with the soil. It’s been depleted and in many places contaminated.

There’s a graveyard for cars around here. Tons of cars lined up near a river. Every time I drive by I think how stupid to be so close to the river. The acid rain comes down on all the cars and carries all the pollutants into the river and into the farmland.

Man just ignores the cycles of nature, giving little respect to the natural process. They think science can do a better job. There is no balance between nature and science. You really don’t want to wait for nature to build the soil back up.

The way she takes care of things! Think about this: the COVID virus. It is keeping people inside, thereby reducing their impact on nature. Example: air pollution. The virus is killing lots of people, which reduces the population and also the stress on the environment.

Nature has her way of balance if we don’t play fair. Building up the quality of soil in Otsego County should be a pretty high priority on the list. Quality of soil equals quality of food equals quality of people.

I wonder what is being done to protect and enrich our local soil for, as they say, future generations?

R. SCOTT DUNCAN
Hartwick Forrest

6 Gifts Of Christmas

6 Gifts Of Christmas

Need Some Ideas? Just Look Around

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

While making gifts for family and friends, Sara O’Brien realized that she could not only bring a smile to someone at Christmas, but to her fellow cancer survivors.

“Tracy Abrams hasn’t been able to do fundraisers for her Wigs for Wishes charity because of the pandemic,” she said. “I took a few of the ornaments over to her, and she called me back that night and said they’d all sold.”

•TO HELP:

Wigs for Wishes ($5)

TO HELP: Sara O’Brien’s Rocky ornaments

They were in such high demand that she brought in Abrams, Gail Baden and granddaughter Susan Morell to help cut, glue and finish each handmade wooden ornament. “We’re making 160 of them,” she said.

The ornaments, which sell for a suggested donation of $5 each at Abrams Head to Toe salon, will help raise money to give free, custom wigs to women undergoing cancer treatments.
“Some people have donated more than $5,” said Abrams. “But we wanted to make them available to everyone.”

O’Brien’s handmade Rocky ornaments are just one of many local gifts you can pick up this Christmas, with many stores offering curbside pickup, online shopping or shipping to keep shoppers safe during the pandemic.

• TO DO:

“Half Truths” ($34.99)

Billed as this year’s big after-dinner party game by Nate Roberts, owner of Serenity Hobbies, “Half-Truths,” created by Richard Garfield (“Magic: The Gathering”) and “Jeopardy” champion Ken Jennings, asks players to place bets on which three of the six answers are truths, and which ones are lies.

“It follows the logic that everyone can play,” said Roberts. “Even grandma and the little kids, who might not have that trivia knowledge, because it’s multiple choice, so they can still guess.”

The game, which got started on Kickstarter, includes more than 500 questions, plenty to keep the party going. “It’s a party game that makes you feel smart,” he said. “And it’s a laugh riot.”

• TO WEAR

TO WEAR: Roxanne Marcello shows off Artisan’s Guild scarves

Poncho and scarves, Holy Myrrhbearers Monastery, The Artisan’s Guild, (Price Varies)

It’s rare that you get to see exactly where your garment came from, but with each hand-spun and hand-woven scarf and poncho, you get a photo of the Icelandic sheep who gave the wool.
“This poncho came from Fosco,” said Roxanne Marcellino. “All of these are made from the wool of sheep raised on the farm.”
In addition to the Holy Myrrhbearers garments, the Artisan’s Guild also offers handmade capes and children’s clothing, hand-knit scarves and hats, dyed silk scarves and other locally made crafts.

• TO READ

Richard Duncan, “Otsego County: Its Towns and Treasures” ($39.99)

TO READ: Tour Otsego County through the photos in Richard Duncan’s “Otsego County: Its Towns and Treasures.” Order at fenimoreart.org

Photographer Duncan wants you to see his “Otsego County: Its Towns and Treasures” book as a window to the world.

“I hope it stimulates memories,” he said. “Since there isn’t a whole lot we can do right now, we can look at pictures of places we used to go.”

The coffee-table book, his third, uses his own photos of the county, taken over two years, as well as photos from days past.

“I went to every historical society in the county and asked them to send me photos,” he said. “There’s a romantic bent to it, we have all of this precious land to take care of.”

The Utica-printed book is available at The Farmers’ and Fenimore museums, and through their website, and at the Green Toad Bookstore in Oneonta.

The photos range from a parade of elephants down Oneonta’s Main Street, to an early 1900s Decoration Day in Unadilla Flats.

“If you have the COVID blues,” he said. “Go for a drive with my book and try to find where I stood to take each picture.”

• TO EAT

TO EAT: Everyone loves treats from Bill Michael’s Fly Creek Cider Mill

Custom Gift Baskets, The Fly Creek Cider Mill, (Price Varies)

It’s easier to survive these dismal times if you’ve got the right kind of snacks.

That’s Bill Michaels’ approach at the Fly Creek Cider Mill, where he’s spent the last two weeks in his own version of Santa’s Workshop. “We do 60 percent of our online business during the holidays,” he said. “You can go online, fill your cart and we pack it up for you.”

Pick out some of the mill’s famous cheese, sauces and jellies, apple goodies and maybe some fudge, and Michaels will box it, tie it with a bow and mail it to the recipient of your choice. “This year, our corn salsa has been really popular,” he said.

But if you’re in a hurry, there are pre-made gift baskets ready to order, including a “Stay At Home Survival Kit” – with pancake mix, fudge, maple candy, apple crisp mix and more – or a “Celebrate Your Heroes” snack basket, with cheese, sausage and, most curiously, gummy frogs.

And he even throws in a few extras, including a catalog, a map of the Cooperstown Beverage Trail and an Otsego County Guide – for when the pandemic is over and they can come visit the mill for themselves.

• TO DRINK

TO DRINK: Mike Shaughnessy sets up local teas and coffees at The Green Earth

Tay’s Tea (from $4) and Roman Roaster Coffee (from $10) Green Earth Market

“Nini Ordoubadi is very particular about her tea,” said Mike Shaughnessy, manager, The Green Earth. “And she does it very well.”

Also from Delhi – and new to the Green Earth – is Roman Roaster Coffee, an artisanal, small-batch roaster owned by Andrea Ghersi, a former chef who moved to Delhi to open his business.

Both use sustainably sourced and fair trade ingredients in their blends.

“Buying local helps all of us stay in business,” said Shaughnessy.

Christmas Comes Early At Community Dinner

Christmas Comes Early

At Community Dinner

By the end of the first hour, over 120 people had attended the Community Dinner at Oneonta’s First United Methodist Church this afternoon, with more continuing to come in.  Visitors like Andrew Winters-Bell, left, could enjoy plates of ham, turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, coleslaw, sweet potatoes, Chobani yogurt and a wide selection of pies served by Carol Heller, Scott Lewis, Terri Fisher, Ambrose Santiago and other volunteers from St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Saturday’s Bread and First UM. The event, usually held on Christmas Day, was early the last couple years so it would not conflict with the church’s Sunday and Christmas services. “Next year, Christmas will be on a Wednesday,” said event coordinator Ann Steen.  “So we are excited that next year it will be back on the usual day.” (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAR. 28
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, MAR. 28

Spring Hike In The Mud

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MUD HIKE – 10 – 11:30 a.m. Take a walk around the farm, learn about mud, find animal tracks, make some of your own. Wear boots or bring a change of sock & shoes. Mohican Farm 7207 St. Hwy. 80, Cooperstown. Call 607-547-4488 or visit occainfo.org/calendar/get-the-kids-out-mud/

JUSTICE FILM SERIES – 5:30 p.m. Screening of “My County, My Country,” (2006) about the impact of the US invasion on Iraqis trying to pick up the pieces of their country. Includes vegetarian dinner at 6, screening begins at 7. Unitarian Universalist Society of Oneonta, 12 Ford Ave, Oneonta. Call 607-432-3491 or visit www.uuso.org

Full House For New Senior Meal Site

It’s A Full House At

New Senior Meal Site

Sheila Bernier and Terri Coy, servers with the Trinity Serving Group, prepare plates for Sandy Andrews, Tom Rathbone, and Nancy Wycoff, Milford, at the inaugural Senior Meal Site this morning at the Milford United Methodist Church. 40 seniors gathered for a roast pork lunch with sweet potatoes, spinach and chocolate chip cookies, followed by a brief address from state Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford. The lunch, part of a pilot program through the Office of the Aging, will be served the fourth Wednesday of every month. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Friends, Neighbors, Food At Oneonta Potluck Dinner

Friends, Neighbors, Food

At Oneonta Potluck Dinner

Above, Molly Swain, Oneonta puts out a dish of apples on the table at the inaugural Oneonta Potluck dinner held on Dietz Street Saturday afternoon. Friends and neighbors brought a dish to pass as they enjoyed conversation, warm weather and live music by Joe and Joann Chmielowski. The event was hosted by Destination Oneonta and hopes to become and annual event. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
6th Annual Harvest Dinner Hosts Friends, Food

6th Annual Harvest Dinner

Hosts Friends, Food

With evening temperatures in the 80’s, it felt more like summer than fall, lending itself to the large crowds attending the 6th Annual Harvest Dinner this evening in Cooperstown. Food, family and friends came out to dine with their neighbors in a celebration of harvest bounty and community. Above, Daphne Money, Cooperstown, Todd Snelson, Oneonta, and others partake of the bounty that stretched between Fair Street and River Street.(Ian Austin/ AllOTSEGO.com)

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HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUG. 26
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUG. 26

On Being Positive

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BE POSITIVE FESTIVAL – 10 a.m.-10 p.m. The first annual festival for all ages. Activities include speakers, volunteer opportunities, workshops, art, music, food, and dancing in locations in Downtown Cooperstown. Call (607)638-5538 or visit www.facebook.com/BePositiveFestival/

DANCE – 7-10 p.m. Everyone is invited to the multi-cultural and multi-generational dance capping off the BePositive Festival with music by local bands. The Farmers Market, Cooperstown. Call (607)638-5538 or visit www.facebook.com/BePositiveFestival/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, DEC. 3
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, DEC. 3

Run Of The Ugly Sweaters

At 3 p.m. In Cooperstown

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To Learn How You Can Help Area Families This Holiday Season CLICK HERE.

UGLY SWEATER RUN – There’s still time to take in the Ugly Sweater Run:  It departs at 3 p.m. from Pioneer Park in downtown Cooperstown.  (The listing incorrectly reported 1:30 p.m.)  Info, clarksportscenter.com/events/rockin-around-cooperstown-ugly-sweater-run-walk/index.php

CONCERT – 7 p.m. Juice Newton performs her greatest hits. Foothills Performing Arts Center, 24 Market St. Oneonta. Info, foothillspac.org  List to “Angel in the Morning.”

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR – 9 a.m.-4 p.m. featuring quality, handmade crafts by local and regional crafters. Free admission. Hunt Union Ballroom, SUNY Oneonta, 108 Ravine pkwy, Oneonta.

PTA HOLIDAY BREAKFAST/MARKET – 8 a.m.-Noon Cooperstown Elementary School,  21 Walnut St, Cooperstown. Info, www.cooperstowncs.org

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, NOV. 26
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, NOV. 26

Unique Holiday Wreaths

At CAA’s Adorn-A-Door

Horse hair, seed pearls and porcelain curlers adorn the wreath outside the wig-maker's shop in Colonial Williamsburg. (Susan Reimer/Baltimore Sun)

SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY!

To Learn How You Can Help Area Families This Holiday Season CLICK HERE.

ADORN-A-DOOR – 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Silent Auction of Decorated Wreaths. Cooperstown Art Association, 22 Main St., Cooperstown. To learn more CLICK HERE.

CONCERT – 7:30 p.m. “Front Country” performs live at the Otesaga Resort Hotel, 60 Lake St., Cooperstown. Info, (607)547-1812, info@cooperstownconcertseries.org, cooperstownconcertseries.org/front.html

VIKING DINNER – 7-10 p.m. Oneonta Teen Center, 4 Academy St., Oneonta.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for MONDAY, NOV. 21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for MONDAY, NOV. 21

SUNY Oneonta Festival

Celebrates Global Cultures

globalmovementfestival

To Learn How You Can Help Area Families This Holiday Season CLICK HERE.

GLOBAL MOVEMENT FESTIVAL – 6:45 p.m. promoting cross-cultural understanding, tolerance, and global connectedness through the education and presentation of music, dance, poetry, art, food, and culture. Suggested $3 donation benefits Ninash Foundation. Hunt Union Ballroom, SUNY Oneonta, 108 Ravine pkwy, Oneonta. Info, www.facebook.com/globalmovementfestival/

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2

Thinking about the Future

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DINNER – 6:30 p.m. “The Future of Food: A Dinner & Conversation with the Local Youth Food Movement.” Cost: $40. Farmers Museum, 5775 NY-80, Cooperstown. Info, farmersmuseum.org/origins

 

MEETING – 4:30 p.m. SUNY Oneonta College Council meeting. Open to public. rm. 209, Physical Science Building, SUNY Oneonta, 108 Ravine pkwy. Oneonta. Info, http://www.oneonta.edu/general/collegecouncil.asp

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, NOV. 1
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, NOV. 1

Learn How your Car can

Beat Old Man Winter

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SEMINAR – 6 p.m. “Knowledge is Power” car care seminar. Soda Jerk’s Diner at Action Lube, 458 Chestnut St., Oneonta. Reservations required. Info, HERE  or call (607)433-1226

KNITTING GROUP – 1:30-3:30 p.m. Village Library, 22 Main St., Cooperstown.

 

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