SUBSCRIBE MY PROFILE
HOME | BREAKING NEWS | POLICE & FIRE | IN MEMORIAM | PEOPLE | OPINION | SPORTS
 JOBS  
 DINING & ENTERTAINMENT  
 HOMES  
 CARS  
 FUNERAL HOMES  
 GOODS & SERVICES

News of Otsego County

Induction

IF YOU GO: Take the trolley, pack sunscreen, water
The crowd walks up Susquehanna Avenue to a National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Induction at The Clark Sports Center in 2015. (File)

IF YOU GO: Take the trolley, pack sunscreen, water

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

If you are planning to attend the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Induction, here are some helpful hints:

• Bring water and an umbrella: Things can get hot on the field at The Clark Sports Center, where there is no natural shade and attendees might be under direct sun for more than two hours. This is just as likely on a Wednesday in September as a Sunday in July. So, bring something to drink, apply lots of sunscreen and think about a hat, umbrella or other form of shade. Of course, it could also be mid-60s and raining, so … bring an umbrella either way. If you don’t have VIP seating in one of the Hall designated areas up front, bring a chair or blanket, too. So many people leave their chairs after inductions, one local family organizes a collection of the chairs, followed by a yard sale to benefit the local school and its students. Speaking of the students, there will be lots of them selling concessions, too, either officially to raise money for their senior trips or along the roads to the Induction site, as budding entrepreneurs. So, bringing a couple of dollars for the kids is a good way to say hello to some locals and learn about Cooperstown.

Induction tribute will feature game’s best, Hall favorites
A feature at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum pays tribute to Hank Aaron, who died in January at age 86. (Charlie Vascellaro)

Induction tribute will feature game’s best, Hall favorites

By CHARLIE VASCELLARO • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Each year the Hall of Fame Induction ceremony begins with a roll call of members of the baseball community who have passed during the previous calendar year projected on a jumbotron video screen adjacent to the stage where the returning members of the Hall are seated.

This year’s “In Memoriam” recognition stings with a particular poignancy in a continued season of mourning both across the country and within the baseball community devastated by an unparalleled loss of 10 members of the Hall of Fame since the last Induction Ceremony in 2019.

Midweek Induction brings questions about attendance, coronavirus safety

Midweek Induction brings questions about
attendance, coronavirus safety

By GREG KLEIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

In the lull of the 2013 Hall of Fame Induction, when no living people were inducted and only about 2,000 die-hard fans attended on a rainy day, and some people speculated about the demise of the tradition, keen baseball observers knew the Yankees would be coming to Cooperstown eventually.
When large class after large class started popping big attendance figures for inductions the latter half of the last decade — topping out at 53,000 for Vladimir Guerrero, Trevor Hoffman, Chipper Jones, Alan Trammell, Jim Thome and Jack Morris in 2018 — keen baseball observers whispered, “just wait and see what the Yankee years bring.”

With induction delayed, HOF awards get Saturday spotlight

With induction delayed, HOF awards get Saturday spotlight

By CHARLIE VASCELLARO • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

While the Hall of Fame’s induction ceremony has been pushed back to Sept. 8, in order to accommodate the inclusion of fans in attendance on the lawn at the Clark Sports Center, the Hall’s annual Awards Presentation honoring baseball writers and broadcasters is scheduled for Saturday, July 24, as a television only event.

This year’s Ford C. Frick Award and Baseball Writer’s Association of America Career Excellence Award ceremony will include respective 2021 recipients, broadcaster Al Michaels and writer Dick Kaegel as well as 2020 honorees, Ken Harrelson and Nick Cafardo.

‘Do you Believe in Miracles?’
Perhaps best known for his indelible call of the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team’s stunning defeat of Russia in the 1980 winter Olympics, Al Michaels was already a seasoned and accomplished sports broadcaster at the time breaking into baseball with the Pacific Coast (minor) League’s Hawaii Islanders in 1968. The 45th winner of the Frick Award, Michaels assumed the lead broadcaster responsibilities for the Cincinnati Reds in 1971 and the San Francisco Giants in 1974.

Baseball Hall Of Fame Welcomes Class of ’19

HALL OF FAME INDUCTION 2019

Baseball Hall Of Fame

Welcomes Class Of ’19

55,000 Fans Attended, 2nd Largest

The 2019 inductees into the Baseball Hall of Fame – from left, Harold Baines, Lee Smith, Edgar Martinez, Michael Mussina, Mariano Rivera, and Brandy Halladay, accepting the plaque posthumously on behalf of her husband Roy Halladay – pose for a group photo on the stage following their Induction ceremony earlier today in the field next to the Clark Sports Center.  If your eyes were good, you may have even spotted Laurentino Cortizo, right, the President of Panama, who was in the crowd with fellow Panamanians to witness and celebrate their countryman Rivera’s induction.  The Hall announced this evening that 55,000 fans attended the ceremony, making it the second-largest, after the Cal Ripken Jr./Tony Gwynn weekend in 2007. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Rivera Only Inductee To Win 100% Backing

Big Yankee, Plus Halladay, 2 More

Could Draw Biggest Crowd, Katz Says

Rivera Only Inductee

To Win 100% Backing

BY LIBBY CUDMORE

COOPERSTOWN  – Jeff Katz thinks that this will be a record-breaking year in Cooperstown.“With Mariano Rivera getting in, I think it’s very likely we’ll break the all-time attendance record,” he said.

Rivera, a career Yankees pitcher, was the first to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously by the 425 ballots cast by the Baseball Writers Association of America.

“A high-profile Yankee is always big, and he’s the first guy from that great team to get in. I think it will be a big tip-off from what we can expect for Derek Jeter in 2020,” Katz said.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

Exhibit By Watercolor Society,

Art Assocaitions Luck Of The Draw

14-19eventspage

RECEPTION – 5 – 7 p.m. Opening exhibit by Central New York Watercolor Society and Luck of the Draw exhibit, buy tickets, enter to win artwork, final drawing 10/21. Cooperstown Art Association. 607-547-9777 or visit www.cooperstownart.com

RELEASE PARTY – 7 p.m. Celebrate first ever issue of The Green Zine, a collection of art & writing from local artists published by The Green Toad Book Store. Grab a copy, eat, drink, celebrate. Roots Brewing Company, 175 Main St., Oneonta. 607-433-8898 or visit www.facebook.com/TheGreenToadBookstore/

Rector Inducted At Christ Church
Cooperstown To Close Streets Friday, Saturday

Cooperstown To Close Streets Friday, Saturday

COOPERSTOWN – The village Police Chief Mike Covert announced the following street closures during Hall of Fame Weekend:

• Doubleday Field Parking Lot, 3 a.m. Friday through 9 p.m. Saturday.  Any vehicles in the lot after 3 p.m. will be towed at owner’s expense.

• Main Street between Chestnut and Fair, 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday and 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday.

• Pioneer Street, from Lake to Church, 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday, ad 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday

Baseball Authors To Sign Books At Willis Monie’s

Baseball Authors To Sign Books At Willis Monie’s

COOPERSTOWN – Two authors will be autographing their books on Induction Weekend at Willis Monie Books, 139 Main St.
• Dennis Corcoran, “Induction Day At Cooperstown,” 3:30-5:30 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, and 8:30-10:30 a.m. Sunday.
• Chris Donnelly, “How the Yankees Explain New York,” 1-5 p.m. Saturday, and 10:11:30 a.m. Sunday.

Hall of Fame’s Yesteryears Recalled

Hall of Fame’s Yesteryears Recalled

Laughter erupted when Catherine Walker recalled, a little disparagingly, the "red coats" Hall staffers used to wear.  Be careful, they were my idea, said former Hall director Howard Talbot, second from left.  The two, both of whom attended the 1930 Induction, joined Homer Osterhoudt, center, at a panel discuss in the Hall of Fame's BullpenTheater at 1 p.m. today, part of the 75th anniversary festivities.  (Jim Kevlin/allotsego.com)
Laughter erupted when Catherine Walker recalled, a little disparagingly, the “red coats” National Baseball Hall of Fame staffers used to wear. Be careful, they were my idea, said former Hall director Howard Talbot, second from left. The two, both of whom attended the 1939 Induction, joined Homer Osterhoudt, center, at a panel to discuss Inductions then and now in the Hall’s Bullpen Theater at 1 p.m. today, part of the 75th anniversary festivities.  At left is emcee Bruce Markusen; at right, retired Hall curator Ted Spencer (Jim Kevlin/allotsego.com)

By JIM KEVLIN • www.allotsego.com

Merritt Harvey of Hartwick hold up a photo of himself, then 5, with his mom and sisters in front of 22 Main on June 12, 1939, the first Induction day.  (Jim Kevlin/allotsego.com)
Merritt Harvey of Hartwick hold up a photo of himself, then 5, with his mom and sisters in front of 22 Main on June 12, 1939, the first Induction day. (Jim Kevlin/allotsego.com)

COOPERSTOWN – Yesterday was today’s topic, and things have changed.

“I shouldn’t say this,” said Ted Spencer, the National Baseball Hall of Fame’s retired curator, “but my first year here” – 1982 – “I tried everything on.”

How things have become more formal and security-conscious over the years was one theme that emerged from a panel Spencer rounded out this afternoon in the Hall’s Bullpen Theater. He joined three attendees at the original 1939 Induction: Homer Osterhoudt, Howard Talbot and Catherine Walker.

Osterhoudt, then 21, and later a 30-year mail carrier in the village, had worked on the construction crew of the just-completed Hall. Talbot, 14, was home from Manlius Military Academy. Walker, then 8 and later the mother of five, was on her father’s hand most of June 12, 1939.

Posts navigation

21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103