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News of Otsego County

meg kennedy

Special Administration Meeting Scheduled For Nov. 30

Special Admin Meeting

Scheduled For Nov. 30

Democratic Prospect To Succeed

Oberacker To Be Interviewed Then

COOPERSTOWN – A special Administration Committee meeting has been scheduled for 9 a.m. Monday, Nov. 30, to interview the Democrat-backed prospect to succeed state Sen.-elect Peter Oberacker in the county board’s District 6, Admin Chairman Meg Kennedy, C-Hartwick said today.

The meeting will not be Dec. 2, as previously reported.

The Democrats have already identified a prospect in District 6 (Maryland, Worcester, Westford and Decatur), according to Democratic County Chairman Clark Oliver.  He said the candidate is a woman, but he hasn’t identified her yet.

Kennedy Extends An Olive Branch Across The Aisle

CASALE: DEMOCRATS DIDN’T PLAN

Kennedy Extends

An Olive Branch

Across The Aisle

She Schedules Admin Meeting

To Vet D-6 Democrat Prospect

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Meg Kennedy

COOPERSTOWN – To calm troubled political waters, county Rep. Meg Kennedy, C-Hartwick, has scheduled an Administration Committee meeting for Dec. 2 to give the Democratic prospect to succeed state Sen.-elect Peter Oberacker a hearing before that day’s county board meeting.

“I felt this was the right thing to do,” she said a few minutes ago.  “I always try to do what’s fair, and I think this is fair.”

Oneonta Farmers Market Moves To Winter Home In Foothills

TRY NEW VENUE TOMORROW (SATURDAY)

Oneonta Farmers Market

Inside Foothills For Winter

Geoff Doyle, Foothills Operations Manager, discusses the layout of the Oneonta Farmers Market, which opens in the atrium this weekend, with Meg Kennedy, market president, and Tanya Moyer, treasurer. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

ONEONTA – This Saturday, the Oneonta Farmers Market will find their new winter home inside atrium of Foothills.

“The walkway space we usually use for the winter market was too close for social distancing and improperly ventilated,” said Meg Kennedy, market president and owner of ARK Floral. “It wasn’t a safe space with the pandemic going on.”

County Board Retreats From Threatened Cuts To Promotion Agency

JULY MEETING HELD TODAY

County Board Retreats

From Threatened Cuts

To Promotion Agency

County Board Vice Chairman Meg Kennedy, C-Hartwick, argues for protecting the “three pillars” of the county’s economy to the degree it can be.  At left is Board Chair David Bliss, R-Cooperstown/Town of Middlefield.  (From today’s Zoom meeting.)

By JIM KEVLIN ׇ• Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Andrew Stammel proposed the resolution to make larger cuts to Destination Marketing of Otsego County. 

COOPERSTOWN – After tabling the measure two weeks ago, the county Board of Representatives today rallied behind Destination Marketing of Otsego County, with nine reps rejecting a resolution to reduce funding for its promotional arm from 15 percent to 24 percent.

Rep. Andrew Stammel, D-Town of Oneonta, proposed the larger cut for DMCOC, saying, “With the present state of the industry” – tourism – “we’re not going to be doing as much in this atmosphere.”  Michele Farwell, D-Morris, second the motion.

Let US Decide How To Reopen, Oberacker Says

HERE’S TEXT OF DEBATED RESOLUTION

Let US Decide

How To Reopen,

Oberacker Says

He Votes Nay But, After Lively Debate,

Republicans, Democrats Come Together

The county board held its second monthly meeting via Zoom this morning, and how to end Governor Cuomo’s PAUSE was the topic of lively debate.

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

County Rep. Peter Oberacker, who is also running for state Senate, said the county should prepared a reopening plan itself and present it to the state, rather than the other way around.

COOPERSTOWN – Otsego County shouldn’t be waiting for Governor Cuomo’s permission to reopen as the coronavirus threat wanes, says county Rep. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus.

Oberacker, who is also running for state Senate, was the sole “nay” vote as a resolution asking the governor to reopen the county “safely and as soon as possible” passed the Board of Representatives today by a 13-1 vote.

“Why can’t we go to our governor and tell him:  We understand it.  We need to open. Here’s our plan to move forward,” said Oberacker in an interview after the meeting. “Let’s put together a structured plan to reopen Otsego County.”

The resolution the county representatives passed was less specific.

Let Counties Like Otsego Be 1st To Normalize

ADMIN COMMITTEE ASKS:

Let Counties

Like Otsego Be

1st To Normalize

Full Board May Act May 7

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Meg Kennedy

COOPERSTOWN – The county board will be asked to ally itself with similar counties – Schoharie, Delaware and Chenango, for instance – to be first in line to phase out of the coronavirus shutdown, county Rep. Meg Kennedy, R-Hartwick/Milford/New Lisbon, said this evening.

When it met earlier this month, Kennedy said, the county board’s Administration Committee, which she chairs, unanimously approved a resolution, which is still being drafted, asking Governor Cuomo to combine counties with like qualities – rural, with low COVID-19 infestations – in deciding which areas enter the “new normal” first.

Cuomo Medicaid Plan May Cost County $1.9M

Cuomo Medicaid Plan

May Cost County $1.9M

Reps Resolution Urges Governor

To Keep Zero Cap On Local Share

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Bliss
Kennedy

COOPERSTOWN – Governor Cuomo’s plan to close the state’s $6 billion budget gap includes passing more Medicaid costs on to the counties, county Rep. Meg Kennedy, R-Hartwick/Milford/New Lisbon, told her colleagues at their March meeting this morning.

It could cost Otsego County a maximum of $1.9 million, she said, having been briefed as a member of the state Association of Counties board of directors.

That would require an “immediate 15-20 percent property tax hike in the county,” board chairman David Bliss, R-Cooperstown/Town of Middlefield, observed.

KENNEDY: #KeepTheCap! NYS Must Pay Fair Share

VIEW FROM 197 MAIN

#KeepTheCap! NYS

Must Pay Fair Share

By MEG KENNEDY • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

#KeepTheCap! This is a rallying cry for local government officials from around the state. What cap? The New York State 0% growth Medicaid Tax Cap that has been in place since 2012.

It goes hand in hand with another cap – the 2% cap on property tax levies that has been in place for NYS municipalities since roughly the same time.

County Rep. Meg Kennedy represents the towns of Hartwick, Milford and New Lisbon on the Otsego County board.  She is the first Otsego County representative named to the state Association of Counties board of directors.

They were instituted to work in tandem to decrease the pressure on local governments – to keep property taxes from increasing to meet the rising cost of providing Medicaid services to residents in all of the counties and New York City. The state would cover a portion of the increases and local governments would work harder to create efficiencies across the rest of their budgets.

For a decade this has worked, but the caps are in danger of diverging in this year’s state budget process. The Executive Budget reveals a strategy whereby the cap on the state side is removed and the cap on the local side stays the same, at the same time that $150 million of Medicaid costs are transferred to the counties and NYC.

The numbers that result are bringing together counties from across the state to send a unified message – Keep the Cap!

Earlier this month, county board Chair Dave Bliss and I spent the day in Albany. We were joined by dozens of county Officials and the staff of the state Association of Counties (@nyscounties).

We attended a meeting with the chairs of the Senate and Assembly Committees on Local Government. The message was clear. The message was urgent. Keep the Cap!

We have shown good faith on our end of the tax cap – bringing in budgets under 2% growth in the tax levy. Please work with us to avoid the fiscal stress this move will bring to local budgets.

There is no way the math works for us – without the help of NYS to share the costs associated with Medicaid at or near current levels, we cannot stay under 2% growth without making drastic cuts to non-mandated services. Even with cuts to such services, we would struggle.

We met with our local representatives in their offices in the Legislative Office Bldg and the Capitol. Assemblymen John Salka, Brian Miller and Chris Tague and Sen. Jim Seward expressed concern over the proposals and commitment to fight to #KeepTheCap. At the local level, this is a non-partisan issue. Everyone agrees that removing the cap on Medicaid spending would create fiscal stress in county budgets.

In an ideal world we promote prosperity and reduce the cost of Medicaid to each county by fostering economic development, the creation of jobs, expanding the tax base through increased investment and reducing the number of people who require assistance through upward mobility.

We can and should work toward that model.

In the short term, next year could bring unprecedented growth in the county’s share of the cost of Medicaid to our residents. New York is unique in having counties pay a share in this federal and state program. The cost of the program is set at state and federal levels. The 0% cap shields county government from the rising cost of the program that it neither controls nor designs. Keep the Cap! Protect local taxpayers.

 

 

If Not Allen Ruffles, Someone With SOME Of His Qualities

EDITORIAL

If Not Allen Ruffles,

Someone With SOME

Of His Qualities

County Judge John Lambert swears in Allen Ruffles as county treasurer on Jan. 1, 2018. Wife Amy holds the Bible. With them are their children, Mia and Cooper. (AllOTSEGO.com photo)

The question was, “Do you think THEY will let the county administrator do the job?” They, of course, being the county Board
of Representatives.

But the question misunderstands how the new county administrator job is envisioned.

Judging from discussions surrounding the new job’s creation, the county representatives aren’t looking for someone to tell them what to do. They’re looking for someone who will allow them to do what THEY want to do more efficiently.

The control of county government will remain in the hands of the 14 elected representatives, elected every two years from their districts, who are entrusted to act on their constituents’ behalf.\

Not such a bad idea.

For the past few weeks, a name has been circulating as a prospect for the county’s first administrator: Allen Ruffles, the Republican county treasurer who has just returned from a year-long assignment in East Africa with the New York State National Guard.

The position must first be advertised, candidates vetted and a vote taken. A better candidate may emerge. Regardless, he or she might benefit from at least a few Ruffles-like characteristics.

First, he had a varied background as a school teacher, insurance agent, banker (Key Bank’s former branch manager in Cooperstown), as well as a soldier, and the discipline that connotes. That should give him sympathy and understanding of a range of people.

Two, he’s a county native, with a family: wife Amy, daughter Mia and son Cooper, so he has a stake – a personal stake – in the middle- and long-term prosperity of the county. Being a native is not a requirement, but a candidate should have a plausible reason for coming here.

Third, he holds an elective office, so he would likely be sensitive to pressures county representatives feel, having to represent a varied voter base.

Fourth, he’s developed collegial relations with the county’s 20-some department heads, a group that – according to a survey county Rep. Meg Kennedy’s Intergovernmental Affairs Committee conducted – is most resistant to the idea of reporting to a single boss.

That’s understandable: Most of us would prefer less supervision to more, but things are going to change. Ideally, he will develop the department heads into a team, focused on meeting the board’s directives.

Fifth, he has led preparation of two county budgets, and participated in two more as deputy to former County Treasurer Dan Crowell. It’s going to be a central function of the county administrator. Short-term, anyhow, his able deputy, Andrew Crisman, would ensure good relations with the Treasurer’s Office.

Sixth, Ruffles is not just experienced, but agreeable. Hard and soft skills, in whichever candidate is successful, is most important to ensuring the success of the new position. Put another way, building confidence, credibility and trust with all constituencies – the board, the department heads and the public.

Seventh, the county board, meeting Feb. 5, set the administrator’s salary at $100,000, considerably less than the $150,000 recommended to entice an out-of-county professional – $100,000 though, would be a nice raise for the county treasurer as he learns the new job.

That’s a lot of pluses.

Asked Monday about the chatter, county Rep. Andrew Marietta, the ranking Democrat, said he’d heard county board Chairman David Bliss mention Ruffles’ name in a meeting. “If Allen applied, it would be great,” Marietta said. “But it’s not a done deal.”

“I think a lot of Allen,” said Kennedy, whose IGA committee is handling the recruitment. “But it would be shortsighted of us to stop looking. There’s a lot to be gained by examining different candidates as they come forward.”

For instance, another potential candidate, former Cooperstown mayor Jeff Katz, has been mentioned for the job, and brings an impressive, albeit different, skill set.

“It’s going to be a county board decision,” Marietta said. Not a Republican or Democratic one.”

That’s exactly right. Still, thinking about someone like Ruffles helps focus on what qualities would help our county’s first top executive succeed.

Information Hearing Underway On 2% County Bed-Tax Increase

Information Hearing Underway

On 2% County Bed-Tax Increase

County Rep. Meg Kennedy, C-Hartwick, addresses a public information meeting on a proposed 2 percent hike in the county’s 4 percent bed tax underway at this hour in Hartwick Town Hall.  With her at the head table are, from left, county Reps. Rick Brockway, R-Laurens; Michele Farwell, R-Morris; chairman Dave Bliss, R-Cooperstown/Middlefield, and Keith McCarty, R-East Springfield.  The county board is considering petitioning the state Legislature for permission to increase the bed tax from 4 to 6 percent; each percent is expected to generate a half-million dollars in new revenues.  Kennedy organized the meeting after constituents raised concerns to her, particularly about the timing, since – with Derek Jeter expected to bring a large crowd to Hall of Fame Induction Weekend, many fans have already made reservations, which would have to be re-computed if the tax was put in place before the fall.  (James Cumming/AllOTSEGO.com)
They Love Meg, But Debate Bipartisanship

They Love Meg Kennedy,

But Debate Bipartisanship

After swearing them in Jan. 1, County Judge Brian D. Burns shakes hands with county board members individually. From left are Rick Brockway, Chairman Davis Bliss, Vice Chairman Meg Kennedy, Danny Lapin, Clark Oliver, Adrienne Martini (partly visible), Andrew Stammel, Ed Frazier and Keith McCarty. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Kennedy

COOPERSTOWN – When the 9-4 vote affirmed Meg Kennedy as the first woman vice chair of the Otsego County Board of Representatives, Andrew Marietta leaned over and said, “Meg, you know I support you.”

The Conservative for Hartwick, Milford and New Lisbon and the Democrat from Cooperstown and the Town of Otsego both shook hands and smiled.

But for the preceding few minutes Thursday, Jan. 2, at the Otsego County Board of Representatives’ organizational meetings, things were a bit more tense.

David Bliss, R-Cooperstown/Middlefield/Cherry Valley, had been unanimously reelected board chairman. Dan Wilber, R-Burlington, then nominated Kennedy – “our Citizen of the Year” – as vice chairman, and freshman Rick Brockway, R-Laurens, second it.

Bliss called the vote, but Michele Farwell, R-Morris, asked tentatively, “Is there discussion?”

What followed was a discussion about the future of bipartisanship, with Farwell noting that two years ago, when the county board was also split 7-7, now-retired Gary Koutnik, D-Oneonta, “was nominated, and he got unanimous support of the board. I thought that was a very positive show of bipartisanship.

“I’m just a little bit concerned we might be taking a step backward, and that would be unfortunate.”
Marietta, who as senior Democrat was the party’s leading prospect to succeed Koutnik, agreed. “Having that bipartisan approach contributed to how we worked well together,” he said. “… I think we lose some of the value of the past two years by not having that structure.”

Two Oneonta Democrats, Andrew Stammel and freshman Clark Oliver, speaking for the first time in an official capacity, concurred.

But another Oneonta Democrat, Adrienne Martini, said, “I also think it is nice to have some diversity in terms of who is the vice chair, and I think Meg brings that in terms of gender.”

In the end, Kennedy’s election was bipartisan.

Voting aye were Republicans Bliss, Wilber, Brockway, Unadilla’s Ed Frazier and East Springfield’s Keith McCarty. And Democrats Farwell, who paused for a moment before voting aye, Stammel and Martini.
Voting nay were Marietta, and the other three Oneonta reps, Oliver, Danny Lapin and newcomer Jill Basile.

Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, was absent with the flu.

After the vote, Bliss said, “I agree we’ve done some great work together lately as bipartisans. And I will endeavor to continue.”

He pointed out Kennedy, a Conservative, “is neither Republican or Democrat. And she’s proven her worth, and I know she will endeavor to be as bipartisan as possible.”

Still, Farwell regretted the Democratic loss of the vice chairman post. In an interview, she also noted that Koutnik, an environmentalist, was replaced by Brockway, “a climate-change denier,” on the board’s Solid Waste & Environmental Concerns Committee. And that Oliver was only named to one committee, Human Services.

“I wasn’t expecting a return to partisanship,” Farwell said. “I hear over and over that they want functional government, and not party nonsense like they see in Washington. I feel some trust has been lost.”

In an interview, Bliss said Marietta had expressed interest, “and I would have had no problem with Andrew as vice chair. Andrew was great. Meg was the better candidate.” The climate-denier statement surprised him. He said that Oliver was also named to Performance Review & Goal Setting, a special committee that is about to be elevated to full-committee status.

“Bipartisanship, by my definition, is the best person, the best candidate, the best idea,” the chairman said.

Throughout the debate, speakers were at pains to separate the issue of bipartisanship from Kennedy herself.

“I think Meg – representative Kennedy – will do a great job, and she has my respect and esteem,” said Farwell. Marietta said, “I think Meg will do a tremendous job.” And Stammel, turning to her during his remarks, said, “Meg, I think you will obviously do a great job.”

In the just completed term, Kennedy had chaired the two most time-consuming committees, Intergovernmental Affairs and Administration (ways and means), which won approval for a county administrator form of government and the establishment of the county Energy Task Force.

Partisanship Debated As Board Reorganizes

CLICK FOR VIDEO OF COUNTY BOARD

Partisanship Debated

As Board Reorganizes

Also, Assemblyman Salka Addresses County Reps
Assemblyman John Salka, R-Brookfield, briefs the Otsego County Board of Representatives at its reorganizational meeting Thursday, Jan. 2, on the upcoming legislative session. Also at the meeting, the county reps elected Meg Kennedy, R-Hartwick, as vice chairman, spurring some debate about partisanship because the role wasn’t filled by a Democrat. (VIdeo by Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

 

ROSS: Could ‘Citizen Of Year’ Be County Administrator?
LETTER from SHEILA ROSS

Could ‘Citizen Of Year’

Be County Administrator?

To the Editor:

Where will you find a person who would know all about all 24 departments in the Otsego County system?

The department heads will be giving the manager the information that he or she needs.  The department heads know the laws, state mandates and the ins and outs that apply to their departments.

We have a county treasurer and deputy that do a great job with the budget.

I see that the board is putting out the cost will be $150,000 for the manager. I bet this person will have a deputy and secretary so it could be over $200,000.  The manager is just another layer of government.

Think about it: If the board gave one of the board members a raise, but not $150,000, and the job of working with all the department heads and taking information they need back to the full board, it would be less cost to taxpayers.

Look at the City of Oneonta.  It is on a third manager in a short period of time. The county is much larger, with a lot more different departments and covers many more miles than the city does.

The unfunded mandates are going to keep coming from New York State and this board will have to deal with where all the money comes from for the unfunded mandates.

SHEILA ROSS

Fly Creek

Sheila Ross is retired Otsego County Republican elections commissioner

 

County Board Elects Kennedy Vice Chair

‘OUR CITIZEN’

ELEVATED TO

VICE CHAIRMAN

REELECTED BOARD CHAIR, BLISS

NAMES 3 NEW COMMITTEE CHAIRS

County Judge Brian Burns this morning administers the oath of office to the 2020-21 Otsego County Board of Representatives. From left are Andrew Marietta, Fly Creek; Dan Wilber, Burlington; Michele Farwell, Gilbertsville; Rick Brockway, Laurens; Dave Bliss, Middlefield; Meg Kennedy, Hartwick; Danny Lapin, Clark Oliver, Jill Basile and Adrienne Martini, all of Oneonta; Ed Frazier, Unadilla; Andrew Stammel, Town of Oneonta, and Keith McCarty, East Springfield. Click image to view full size.  (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By LIBBY CUDMORE & JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.COM

Meg Kennedy presides as temporary chairman at this morning’s organizational meeting.

COOPERSTOWN – The Otsego County Board of Representatives, 9-4, with one absence, today elected Meg Kennedy, C-Hartwick/Milford/New Lisbon, as vice chairman.

David Bliss, R-Cooperstown/ Middlefield/Cherry Valley, was elected chairman for a second two-year term.

Dan Wilber, R-Burlington, nominated “our Citizen of the Year” for the post, a reference to Kennedy receiving that designation last week from Hometown Oneonta, The Freeman’s Journal  and wwwAll.OTSEGO.com.

Voting nay were Democrats Andrew Marietta, Cooperstown/Fly Creek, and three Oneonta reps, Danny Lapin and two freshmen, Jill Basile and Clark Oliver.

As Did Garretson, So Does Kennedy

EDITORIAL

As Did Garretson,

So Does Kennedy

Kindred Spirits In Problem-Solving

Back in 2006, our first Citizen of the Year, Cherry Valley Tom Garretson, showed the same coolness in problem-solving as this year’s honoree.

In a way, our Citizen of the Year designation – it will continue, of course – has come full circle.

Interviewing Meg Kennedy, this year’s designee, brought to mind Tom Garretson, the first designee, in 2006.

Throughout that stormy year, when the Cherry Valley area was torn between those who feared 24 industrial-sized windmills would degrade the town’s environment and ambience, and those who saw a boon in new tax revenues, Tom always kept his cool.

And there was a lot at stake, municipally and personally: His father-in-law, who he had succeeded that Jan. 1 as town supervisor, strongly favored the wind project.

At meeting after stormy meeting, Garretson kept order, listened intently and – as
Kennedy would have observed – not only listened, but heard.

In the end, he came down against the turbines, and led the enactment of a law to hinder them. Reunion Power of Vermont finally gave up.

What changed Tom’s mind in the end wasn’t the arguments, but it was a trip he took to Fenner, a flat, indistinct town south of Utica, where a windmill farm was already functioning.

Garretson – a farmer, as is Meg Kennedy – came back with renewed enthusiasm for his adopted hometown – the Garretsons had come from New Jersey in the 1950s; the Kennedys from Long Island a decade or so later.

Compared to Fenner, he concluded, Cherry Valley simply had too much to offer – too much to preserve. Stunning scenery, among the richest and most textured local histories in the nation, a comfortable lifestyle, a farming community enrichened by the Glimmerglass Opera’s world-class culture.

He listened, he heard, he explored, he made the right decision.

This year’s designee, the county representative from Hartwick, Milford and New Lisbon, arguably made the best decision in coming up with a first step in professionalizing Otsego County’s $120 million government – a county administrator whose mandate is to implement the will of 14 representatives who, in effect, are our neighbors.

That what’s always been a controversial discussion obtained the support of 11 of her 14 colleagues is astonishing. And this was done with no table pounding or arm-twisting, but by calm consensus building.

She described what we’re labelling “the Kennedy Method.”

You listen. You HEAR. You ask, what’s fair? Then you decide. (One other step: You collect information.) “I have to get it proved to me,” she said.

Thinking as far back to the days when mom Margaret expected her to herd her nine younger siblings, she concluded, “I could always coalesce a group.”

Up to this point, it seemed impossible that the Energy Task Force effort she’s chairing would go anywhere. Now, there’s reason to be much more optimistic about a consensus result, targeted by the end of 2020.

While Kennedy made it happen, as important, the chairman of the Otsego County Board of Representatives for only one term, David Bliss, allowed it to happen. That’s another unappreciated aspect of his polite, level-headed and increasingly steady leadership.

He saw her potential. He saw her willingness to work. He saw a kindred spirit and let it fly. (Nor was he absent, attending most of Kennedy’s Intergovernmental Affairs Committee and joining IGA members in casting key votes.)

As with Tom Garretson, Meg Kennedy isn’t seeking to change Otsego County – nor is Dave Bliss, for that matter. The idea is, incrementally, to make things better, to create enough jobs to fill our needs; to solve problems one by one, not all right this minute; to make our communities more consistently vibrant in a quickly changing world.

Happy New Year.

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