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News of Otsego County

history column

Bound Volumes: August 4, 2022

Bound Volumes

August 4, 2022

135 YEARS AGO
We had occasion to step into the telephone office with a friend on Sunday last, when to our surprise we found counselor Brooks in charge. He was busily engaged in pulling out some stops and shoving in others, occasionally shouting “Hello!” and trying to hold a conversation with some party who must have thought that lightning had played mischief with the wires near Cooperstown. It was very warm in the office, and the new operator sweat like a man hoeing corn. He explained by saying: “Brady has stepped out for a few minutes and left me in charge.” After another ineffectual effort to find out “what the other fellow wanted,” he discontinued operations by shouting back: “If you are not drunk at that end of the line, just hold on about five minutes longer, and your wants will receive attention.”

August 5, 1887

Bound Volumes: July 21, 2022

Bound Volumes

July 21, 2022

209 YEARS AGO
British Monsters – Excerpt of a letter from Captain Cooper to Charles K. Mallory, Esq. Lieut. Gov. of Virginia — “I was in Hampton with my troop; that place having been evacuated in the morning by the British.
My blood ran cold at what I saw and heard. The few distressed inhabitants running up in every direction to congratulate us; tears were shedding in every corner — the infamous scoundrels, monsters, destroyed everything but the houses, and (my pen is almost unwilling to describe it) the women were ravished by the abandoned ruffians. Great God! My dear friend, can you figure to yourself our Hampton females seized and treated with violence by those monsters, and not a solitary American arm present to avenge their wrongs! But enough — I can no more of this.”

July 17, 1813

Bound Volumes: 05-12-22

Bound Volumes

May 12, 2022

212 YEARS AGO
Poem – What art thou, Death; that we should fear the shadow of a shade? What’s in thy name that meets the ear of which to be afraid? Thou art not care, thou art not pain, but thou art rest and peace: ‘Tis thou canst make our terrors vain, and bid our torments cease. Misfortune’s sting, affliction’s throes, distraction’s poisonous breath; the world itself and all its woes are swallowed up in death.

May 12, 1810

Bound Volumes: 04-28-22

Bound Volumes

April 28, 2022

162 YEARS AGO
Fine Horses – There are more fine horses, especially matched teams, now in Cooperstown than we ever saw here at any one time before. The farmers of Otsego are turning their attention more to the raising of fine horses than formerly. It is a business that pays better than the growing of hops – at present rates!
The weather – Snow squalls and cold weather ‘about these days.’ Where is the man who got up Phinney’s Almanac for 1860?

April 27, 1860

Bound Volumes 03-31-22

BOUND VOLUMES

212 YEARS AGO
Just received and for sale at the Otsego Bookstore – The “Alcoran of Mahomet” (Ed. Note: a version of the Koran) Price in 1 vol. 2 dollars; in 2 ditto, bound in calf and neatly gilt, with a copious preliminary discourse, and abounding with large explanatory notes, 750 cents. Likewise Spelling Books, Murray’s Grammar, American Selection, American Reader, Art of Reading, American Preceptor, Dwight’s Geography, &c., &c., &c.

March 31, 1810

Bound Volumes 1-13-22

Bound Volumes

160 YEARS AGO
It is well known that a year ago the village of Cooperstown suffered to the extent of perhaps $20,000 on account of the prevalence of small pox — which was first contracted by one of our citizens in New York City. It nearly destroyed one trade for the entire winter; and put the county and the village to a large expense. To the mild type of the disease and the active precautions taken by the authorities may be attributed the fact that but few deaths occurred. It is to be hoped that the legislative members from this county will do what they can to aid the passage of some law which will place the sanitary affairs of our great seaport town (New York City) in better hands and under an improved system.
January 10, 1862

BOUND VOLUMES: January 28, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

January 28, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

“Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost.” The exemplification of this moral is perpetually occurring on the most common objects of daily attention. The very paper on which I am now writing, affords me an example. A little while ago it was clipped off from an old garment, a useless rag. Betty would have swept it to the door. But the industrious rag man took it up and gave it to the paper-maker who returned to me the in a new form, no less pleasing than useful. My gentle friends, in obedience to the Great Master, gather up the fragments which remain; the little piece of cloth which falls from your scissors, may become the means of carrying the light of the knowledge of the Glory of God to far distant and benighted lands.

January 29, 1821

HOMETOWN HISTORY: January 28, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

January 28, 2021

150 Years Ago

In the Village of Oneonta during the year 1870 the mortality was as follows: Total number of deaths: 9; of which 5 were women, 1 man, 2 boys and 1 girl. Ages: Under 1 year and under: 2; between 1 and 5 years: 1; 15 and 20 years: 1; 30 and 40 years: 5. Diseases: Bronchitis: 1; Cancer: 1; Consumption 1; Dysentery 1; Hemorrhage of Lungs 2; Killed by Cars (Railroad) 1; Scarintina 1. Deaths to population: Eight-tenths of one percent.
In reference to the Musical Convention held at Schenevus recently, Miss Emma Gates of Oneonta had probably the fullest and best cultivated soprano voice of any of the female singers present. Her delineation is broad and fluent, her execution full of delicacy, and her rendition of impassioned music – “vehement.”

January 1871

HOMETOWN HISTORY: January 21, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

January 21, 2021

150 Years Ago

Local: The coal bill of Bissell & Yager, for the month ending January 1, amounted to nearly $5,000.
H. Sessions fell from a scaffold on his house a few days since, from which he received quite severe injuries.
E.R. Sabin, T.N. Derby and George Bond have each drawn a silver watch from prize candy packages.
We learn that L.J. Emmons and E.G. Bixby contemplate moving to Kansas during the Spring or Summer.
S.M. Ballard has sold one-half interest in the Susquehanna House to A.C. Lewis of Cooperstown, the firm hereafter to be Ballard & Lewis.
The Round House is now completed. The work was inspected Tuesday and accepted by the company. Men are now working on the water tank. In a few days everything will be in readiness
for engines to take water while standing in the stalls.

January 1871

BOUND VOLUMES: January 21, 2021

BOUND VOLUMES

January 21, 2021

200 YEARS AGO

Letter to the Overseer of the State Prison at Auburn Village from Utica – “Dear Sir: I have been informed that there is a young woman in prison for which her father offers the sum of $3,000 to the person who will marry her. If that be the case, I want you to see her father and have him write to me as soon as possible. If he writes to him direct, his letter is to be left at Cazenovia Village Post Office as I shall be there by the 25th. I was lately from Vermont on my journey to Illinois. I have had bad luck and got out of money and heard them speak of this girl, and I concluded I would marry her, if that was the truth. I wish to have you write as soon as possible. Direct your letter to Cyrus Crumb – this from me to the State Prison at Auburn Village.”

January 15, 1821

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