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oneonta history

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Oneonta History Exhibit 08-01-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUGUST 1

Oneonta History Exhibit

14-19eventspage

ARCHITECTURE EXHIBIT – 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. New exhibit ‘Building Blocks of a City: 100 Years of Architecture in Oneonta’ opens to public highlighting significant buildings, structures that represent the development, transformation of the city. Greater Oneonta Historical Society, 183 Main St., Oneonta. Visit www.oneontahistory.org/index.htm for info.

HOMETOWN History June 13, 2020

HOMETOWN History

June 13, 2020

135 Years Ago

Preparations for the laying of the cornerstone of the new state armory next Thursday indicate that, should fair weather prevail, there will be an immense crowd in Oneonta. The parade in the afternoon will be the grandest ever seen in the Susquehanna valley, comprising as it will two or three richly uniformed commanderies, a score or more of blue lodges, several military companies and the Albany cadets besides the Oneonta fire department, and the post of the Grand Army of the Republic. The governor and staff, the secretary of state and staff, and the grand master of masons of the state, and the grand lodge, in carriages, will also form part of the parade.

June 1885

110 Years Ago

Clyde S. Tripp, a conductor on the D. & H., was fatally injured while working in the Oneonta yards early Wednesday morning. The accident occurred just below the Fonda Avenue crossing. He was standing on the rear running board of a switch engine, which was backing toward a string of cars, when the tender crashed into a box car and he was struck by the lever, which punctured his abdomen. When picked up it was found that his left leg and arm were broken, and that he had received fatal abdominal injuries. He was taken to the Fox Memorial Hospital, where he died about ten o’clock. The deceased was 30 years of age and a son of Mr. and Mrs. David Tripp of this city. He is survived by his wife, a daughter of five years, one brother, and his parents. He was a member of the United Presbyterian Church. Interment will be at the Plains.

June 1910

90 Years Ago

With interest gaining momentum each week and with its factory already three weeks behind on its orders, officials of the Linn Trailer Company are adding a few experienced machinists, blacksmiths, and toolmakers to the list of employees. It is now expected that within a week the production of the plant will have been more than doubled. As one of Oneonta’s youngest industries, and as an organization producing an article of established merit in a field which has seen little development in more than a score of years of use, the Linn Company’s patented design stands out.
Eugene Lee Ward, who may be appointed sales manager for the company, recently made a road trip with a demonstrator trailer towed by a Chevrolet Coupe and met with unusual success in interesting dealers and securing orders well exceeding the production capacity of the factory.

June 1930

70 Years Ago

Two new library alcoves dedicated Sunday afternoon at Hartwick College, will serve as a source for Otsego and Central New York State historians. The Traver Alcove contains the library of the father of Hartwick institutions, Johann Christopher Hartwick. Even though a good portion of the texts are written in German and Latin, they contain an accurate picture of life in the early 1800s. Many of Hartwick’s own original texts are included in the library. Several are written in the form of a diary thus accurately outlining his contacts with the settlers and prominent people of the area. The Traver Alcove is given in loving memory of Dr. John G. and Mrs. Ettie Traver, faithful servants of Hartwick Seminary from 1886 to 1941, by former students and friends. For many years Dr. Traver served as a teacher at the Seminary and as headmaster. An alcove dedicated to Richard H. Franchot and his brother Charles, given by descendants, will house a collection of writings and volumes of this area. The alcove is to be known as the Franchot Alcove of Otsego History. Charles P. Franchot presented a small round trunk once owned and used by his grandfather Charles when he enrolled at Hartwick Seminary in 1830. Both Richard and Charles Franchot attended Hartwick Seminary between 1830 and 1832.

June 1950

50 Years Ago

A five-member County Narcotic Guidance Council was appointed by the Board of Representatives at its June meeting on Wednesday of last week in response to a request made by Representative Stuart P. Taugher of Cooperstown. Appointed to the Council were Lewis Sturgess, a Unadilla druggist, the Rev. Robert Heffner, a member of the campus ministry at Hartwick College in Oneonta, Oneonta post-master Samuel J. Bertuzzi, who was named Chair of the Council, Dr. Joseph Lunn, an associate physician at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, and George S. Kepner, Jr., a Cooperstown attorney. Each
member will serve three years.

June 1970

40 Years Ago

The asphalt, gravel and curbs taken from Oneonta’s Main Street are to be melted down and recycled for use as fill and patching material for potholes around the city. Asphalt removed by the Cerasaro Construction Co. in the Main Street reconstruction project is being hauled away to Neawha Park. A machine purchased by the city for $12,000 to $15,000 is used to melt and remix the old paving asphalt. Asphalt recovered from River Street earlier added to the Main Street asphalt will provide sufficient recycled fill and patch material to last 25 years, city engineer Richard Olton says. New asphalt costs about $35 a ton whereas the recycled asphalt about $2 a ton as remix for patch work.

June 1980

20 Years Ago

Classified advertisement: Program Coordinator (full-time) – Seeking motivated self-starter to implement the Leatherstocking Promise ACT for Youth Program. Work with various audiences including youth, parents, volunteers and media to enhance and build youth programs. B.S. in Social Work, Human Ecology, Social Sciences, Health Services, Education, or related field and two years of experience. Transportation required. Deadline June 23, 2000.

Bassett Healthcare’s Mobile Mammography Program will host three mammography and osteoporosis screening sessions in June. On Monday, June 19 and Tuesday, June 20, the van will stop at Bassett Healthcare Oneonta. Women who would like to have a mammogram or an osteoporosis screening test at this time may call 1-888-416-3409 to schedule an appointment. Free or reduced cost mammograms are available through the New York State Breast Health Partnership to income eligible, underserved, or uninsured women.

June 2000

10 Years Ago

Damaschke Field is alive again.  The Oneonta Outlaws hosted the Mohawk Valley Diamond Dawgs at Damaschke Field on Tuesday, June 8, for their inaugural Opening Night at Damaschke Field.

June 11, 2010

HOMETOWN History May 29, 2020

HOMETOWN History

May 29, 2020

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A few nights ago a fair damsel who was coming out of one of our churches was approached by a young man who requested the pleasure of seeing “her home.” The young lady replied,” “No, sir; if you want to go home with me you must go with me to church, sit with me during the exercises and thus show yourself worthy of my company!”
Sensible girl, that! If others would follow her example, the young men who loaf around the streets until service is nearly over and then station themselves near the church door, and when the ladies appear ask to go home with them, would soon become more familiar with the inside of the churches than at present.

May 1885

130 Years Ago

The street railway company has made arrangements to handle two thousand passengers on Decoration Day between West End and Wilber Park. The observation car will run only from the Windsor Hotel to the park; all other cars will run through as usual. Cars will leave the West End every half hour and the Windsor Hotel and Wilber Park every fifteen minutes.
The graduates of the Oneonta Normal School are from the first able to command very comfortable salaries.
Two members of the class of 1890 have already secured excellent positions. F.H. Lane, whose thesis is titled “The Jesuits,” goes to Babylon, Long Island at a salary of $1,000 per year, while one of the lady graduates has been secured by the Normal College of the City of New York where she will be teacher in the model department.

May 1890

125 Years Ago

Patrons who attended the sell-out performance of McIntyre & Heath’s “The Ham Tree,” a musical comedy, on Monday evening at the Oneonta Theatre, were unanimous in their verdict that it was the best of Manager George Roberts’ excellent shows. It was no place for a philosopher who wanted to do any serious work. But, for any human being who likes to laugh, it was the inner shrine. If there are any funnier comedians in the world than McIntyre & Heath they had better be locked up, or they might face a charge of manslaughter for tickling people to death.
The songs were good, the dancing clever, the show girls pretty, the costumes clean and bright and not a line in the show that would make a Quaker blush. The situations in which the busted down minstrels found themselves were the product of a mastermind and the dialogue of the two minstrels were put over in a way that would make imitators look awfully sick. Theatre lovers are grateful to Mr. Roberts for his nerve in securing an attraction like this for a city of this size.

May 1895

90 Years Ago

Professor Robert D. McKenzie of the University of Washington maintains that Nordic supremacy is not caused by racial differences, but rather by differences in culture and training. A good many people might disagree with him. However, the dissenters from McKenzie’s view might be persuaded differently by reading newspaper accounts of the marathon race at Amsterdam in the Netherlands. The marathon race is generally regarded as calling for distinctly Nordic strength and endurance. However, the race was won by a brown-skinned Algerian, with a dark-skinned Chilean second and two yellow-skinned Japanese fourth and sixth, while the white race had to be content with third and fifth places. The winner was trained as a dispatch runner for French troops – a fact that supports the professor’s theory that almost any race, with the same training as whites, can do what whites can.

May 1930

30 Years Ago

Pepsi is trading soda for vodka, McDonald’s is bringing
the golden arches across the iron curtain, and Thomas Scholet, an Oneonta businessman believes any size company can make a Soviet business connection. “Soviet Business Connections” is the name of the umbrella organization Scholet set up to facilitate commercial, cultural and recreational exchange between the super powers. Scholet himself is doing business with the Soviets, having recently entered into a joint venture with a Moscow-based organization called Soviet International Tourist Services. Scholet and his partners put together here in the U.S. to travel to the Soviet Union and the Moscow office organizes groups in the Soviet Union to tour in America. Scholet plans to lead 150 business travelers to the Soviet Union this year.

May 1990

20 Years Ago

Health insurance companies will have to settle claims faster and face higher penalties for failure to pay claims on time under the terms of legislation sponsored by State Senator James L. Seward. The measure passed unanimously on May 16. “We need to toughen the 1997 prompt payment laws because compliance isn’t what it should be,” Seward said. The legislation requires insurers to pay claims filed electronically within 30 days instead of 45. The bill also declares that failure to settle claims in a timely manner constitutes an unfair claims settlement practice,,, subjecting HMOs and insurers to additional penalties.
The bill requires that all health insurance contracts include a dispute resolution mechanism. “When a company agrees to cover medical procedures, it must pay policyholders and providers on time,” Seward said. The bill also prohibits HMOs and insurers from denying care that had been previously authorized. “I certainly hope the Assembly will support our effort to improve the claims settlement and payment process in New York on behalf of patients and providers,” Seward added.

May 2000

15 Years Ago

Jason West, the New Paltz Village Mayor who challenged New York law by attempting to marry gay couples will face trial, New York State’s highest court has ruled. Mayor West will face 24 misdemeanor counts of violating the state’s domestic relations law by marrying couples without marriage licenses last year. West’s defiance of a law that state officials say forbids gay marriage has made New Paltz a flashpoint in the national gay marriage debate. The New York State Court of Appeals refused West’s request to hear the case first, avoiding the usual process of hearing cases in town, county and state appellate courts before they are considered by the state’s highest court. West had sought a “leave application” because he argued the case was unique, novel and critical to the state. The Appellate Court issued its ruling following a teleconference.

May 2005

10 Years Ago

Oneonta native Jerry Jeff “Mr. Bojangles” Walker will be back in town in early August to visit his mother. And while here, he plans to play his first local concert in a half-dozen years Saturday, Aug. 14, at the by-then newly refurbished Oneonta Theatre.

May 28, 2010

HOMETOWN History May 15, 2020

HOMETOWN History

May 15, 2020

35 Years Ago

Mr. Arthur Platt writes us from Colliers: On the bottom lands ten rods south of what is known as Quick Sand bank, and thirty rods due west of Wm. Burnside’s premises (about half way between Colliers and the Junction), I discovered Saturday a thick deposit of charred wood, mingled with small fragments of bone which had evidently been burned. Whether they were human remains or not could not be determined. I set to work, and at a depth of fourteen inches beneath the bed of burned wood was found a collection of arrow heads, tightly pressed together, lying point upward. There were 118 perfect specimens though of very rude and ancient pattern; 112 of the number were uniform in appearance, and belong to a class that was generally used in battle. From the fact that so many were of this class, I am led to believe that they were deposited at the close of some treaty of peace. Two rude stone axes were also found.

May 1885

125 Years Ago

The Local News – About 200 dogs have been registered in the Town Clerk’s office in compliance with the provisions of the new state law.
Shooting at the rifle range on the Odell Brown farm began Wednesday.
Preparations are making for the fine new residence of George B. Baird at the corner of Chestnut and Church Streets. The dwelling will cost about $20,000.
The dynamo placed in Auburn prison for the first electrical execution is the machine formerly in use in the Oneonta electric light company’s plant. It is a Westinghouse machine, designed to supply 650 lights. The execution of the murderer Kemmler, who was to have died by electricity in Auburn prison this week, was stayed yesterday by virtue of a writ of habeas corpus issued by Judge Wallace of the United States Circuit Court on the application of Roger M. Sherman. The application on which the writ was granted and Kemmler’s life was spared, for a time, was made in order to determine whether the proposed killing by electricity is in violation of the Eighth and Fourteenth amendments of the Constitution of the United States.

May 1890

70 Years Ago

State Comptroller Frank C. Moore says that New York State is “determined to provide the new teachers required for its schools.” Moore spoke at ceremonies last Friday during which the cornerstone was laid for an $800,000 dormitory
and student union building at Oneonta State Teachers College.
Sheldon H. Close, president of the local Board of Visitors,
laid the cornerstone of the new building accepting the trowel
from Orlando B. Rowe, former president. Approximately 1,000 persons attended the ceremony. Construction began on August 9, 1949 and it is expected the building will be ready for occupancy by September 1, this year. Moore predicted that the enrollment at Oneonta would increase to about 1,000 in the next five years. Enrollment has increased from less than 400 in 1942 to more than 600 this year.

May 1950

65 Years Ago

Local government officials continually complain about the lack of tax revenues at their disposal and use this as an excuse for thrusting new responsibilities and financial burdens upon the state and federal governments. Yet they may be overlooking a traditional source of tax revenue. According to a spokesman for the National Association of Assessing Officers, “assessments have failed to keep pace with the rise of national wealth,” and “non-uniformity in assessments has increased as property values rise.”
If property assessments were made according to present market value, municipalities would have more tax revenues to use for building schools and roads instead of depending on the federal and state governments to do this.

May 1955

40 Years Ago

The Delaware & Hudson Railway Co. is considering expanding its freight service through northeastern Pennsylvania because of significant growth since the service began a year ago. Richard E. Long, D. & H. secretary, said that the carrier showed a profit in March and April, the first time in four years the line has operated in the black. Long credits the north-south corridor service that connect major southern points through the Potomac yards near Washington, D.C. with markets in New England and Canada. The D. & H. began service to Potomac Yard last year and since then volume has grown from 1,250 cars to 2,750 cars a month. “The line shows very significant growth, but we cannot go further unless we put on a second train,” Long noted. Only one train a day currently moves out from Potomac Yard. The D. & H. is awaiting a response from Conrail, the federally chartered rail system, on a proposed agreement to acquire the line, Long added.

May 1980

25 Years Ago

The death toll from the Ebola virus topped 100 Sunday and health workers said the epidemic may have started as long ago as December – three months earlier than previously thought. Medical workers scouring Kikwit, Zaire, a city of 600,000 where the outbreak was previously believed to have started in mid-March, found hospital records linking the virus to a household of 12 people, where seven people died in December last year. Tests confirmed that at least one of the victims had Ebola.

May 1995

10 Years Ago

Eleanor Kilmer, 83, a Hamden woman will celebrate 50 years as a 4-H leader next week. Over that time, more than 200 children have been members of the Country Cousins 4-H Club since it began in 1955, and many of those 4-H’s are related to one another. Kilmer credits Bill Ives, a neighbor, with the suggestion to start the Country Cousins 4-H Club. The original members included Kilmer’s five children and two of the Ives’ children. “We named it Country Cousins because most of them were cousins, no matter which way we went,” Kilmer said. Kilmer’s own family grew and three more of her own children became Country Cousins members along with 29 foster children whom Kilmer and her family took in over the years. Now there are three generations of Kilmer-kin with Country Cousins experience.

May 2010

HOMETOWN History May 1, 2020

HOMETOWN History

May 1, 2020

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – Lewis & Smith, liverymen, are about to supply a long felt want in Oneonta, and one that will prove a great public convenience, having purchased one of the Boston standard cabs, which is to be stationed at some convenient point on Main Street, where it can be secured to make trips to any part of the village at a fare varying from ten to twenty-five cents, according to distance. The cab will also do parcel carrying at the same reasonable rates. There seems no doubt that the enterprise will be heartily sustained, as it deserves to be.

May 1885

130 Years Ago

The Local News – About 200 dogs have been registered in the Town Clerk’s office in compliance with the provisions of the new state law.
Shooting at the rifle range on the Odell Brown farm began Wednesday.
Preparations are making for the fine new residence of George B. Baird at the corner of Chestnut and Church Streets. The dwelling will cost about $20,000.
The dynamo placed in Auburn prison for the first electrical execution is the machine formerly in use in the Oneonta electric light company’s plant. It is a Westinghouse machine, designed to supply 650 lights. The execution of the murderer Kemmler, who was to have died by electricity in Auburn prison this week, was stayed yesterday by virtue of a writ of habeas corpus issued by Judge Wallace of the United States Circuit Court on the application of Roger M. Sherman. The application on which the writ was granted and Kemmler’s life was spared, for a time, was made in order to determine whether the proposed killing by electricity is in violation of the Eighth and Fourteenth amendments of the Constitution of the United States.

May 1890

110 Years Ago

The requests of proprietors of the overall factory which contemplates locating in Oneonta were considered at a special meeting of the Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday. Briefly, what the company asks is a building, about 110 by 70 feet, two stories high, with basement, and with heating plant installed. Such a building the company would expect rent free for five years, and in return it would employ at least 100 hands and expects to make the number 200. At the end of the five years free rental, the company is asked to agree to five years additional rental, paying nine percent annually on the investment. It is proposed to organize a stock company and to erect such a building on the Meigs Case lot at the corner of Chestnut Street and Fonda Avenue. The building will cost $14,000, and citizens are expected to guarantee six per cent rental to the company erecting the building. It is hoped to have the building ready for occupancy in the fall.

May 1910

90 Years Ago

Fire, said to have broken out on the farm of William Hungerford, behind Colliers, which swept over 1,000 acres of dry woodland yesterday afternoon, and which at a late hour threatened the city watershed, was reported under control at an early hour this morning. According to W.W. Watkins, superintendent of the city water works, he and his men were called in to aid in the fight shortly before 9 o’clock last night. Twenty men were stationed at this end of the blaze during the night, and patrols made rounds over the whole section, under the direction of H.A. Pearsall. One hundred Hartwick College students, released from their afternoon classes, together with members of the Oneonta and Cooperstown fire departments, and Colliers farmers fought the blaze on the hills behind the village through the daylight hours. The flames, running from the top of one pine to another, jumping creek beds and dirt roads, swung down to within a hundred yards of the village at one time. A valiant fight made by 40 Hartwick students equipped with five gallon hand pump tanks about 3:30 o’clock stopped the fire in that direction, but other sectors continued to burn in several directions before all were brought under control.

May 1930

70 Years Ago

A county-wide campaign to vaccinate all dogs against rabies will open on Monday of next week it has been announced by Supervisor James M. Mead of Oneonta, who is in charge of the Board of Supervisors rabies eradication program. There is no charge to dog owners for this service. Clinics will be set up at designated times and places throughout the county and it is hoped that the owners of Otsego County’s 7,000-odd dogs will take their pets for immunization shots. There will be 38 separate clinics from May 15 to 25, staffed by 13 county veterinarians. Cards will be sent to all dog-owners
in the county notifying them of clinics in their area. All clinics will be open from
7 to 9 p.m. on the days designated.

May 1950

50 Years Ago

With a flourish of bagpipe and drum, the Scout-O-Rama ’70 was opened by Ed Griffin, acting mayor of Oneonta. The scout show offered 50 different views of boys in action through the program of cub scouting, boy scouting and exploring. A stage show was also a highlight of the day on the SUCO Campus. The show was opened in SUCO’s physical education building with ceremonies presided over by the Hon. Walter Terry, Walton, Delaware County Judge and President of the Otschodela Council. Cub scouts and boy scouts from the three-county area displayed handicraft items, special projects, and their knowledge of various scouting skills. An uncountable procession of parents and the general public wandered about the show area learning more about what the scouting movement can do for youth. Highlights of the stage presentation included the Delaware Scottish Pipe Band, the Manhattan Transfers, a Rock Band from Cobleskill, Indian dancing by Troop 27, and the Rockhearts, a folk group from Troop 30.

May 1970

10 YEARS AGO

Ladies shopping for new clothes in Oneonta had something to be excited about as the newest store at the Southside Mall opened.  Maurice’s – “the leading small town specialty store and authority for the savvy, fashion-conscious customer with a 20-something attitude” – opened with a sneak peak Wednesday, April 21, and celebrated a grand opening and ribbon cutting on Friday, April 23.

April 2010

HOMETOWN HISTORY, 4-24-20

HOMETOWN History

April 24, 2020

150 Years Ago

News Items – The Buffalonians are taking 90 pound sturgeon. On April 4, a foot of snow fell at Scranton, Pennsylvania. There are over 250,000 Odd Fellows in the United States. Wyoming farmers plow with tame Buffalo. Rhode Island has abolished imprisonment for debt. Lotteries are not tolerated in Russia – not even for religious purposes. There are said to be 500,000 French Canadians in the United States. Steps are being taken in India to put a stop to the common custom of destroying female infants. Cincinnati has a curiosity in the shape of a Mulatto barber who has unmistakable red hair. The estimated number of members of the Masonic Order in the United States and British America is 468,455. Four young ladies were recently baptized in the Rum River at Aronka, Minnesota, when the thermometer marked ten degrees below zero. The New York Assembly has agreed to the Bill making eight hours a legal day’s work, except where by contract a different time is specified.

April 1870

125 Years Ago

Advertisement: JACK’s – Corner Main and Chestnut Streets Oneonta – Have you ever considered how much you can save by buying goods from us, notwithstanding the big advertisements of some of our competitors? We, in our “Little Store,” are MAKING PRICES to SUIT the TIMES. If our prices are right, you will be satisfied. COME and GET YOUR MONEY BACK. W.H. JACK.
Advertisement: M. GUNEY’S & SONS, ONEONTA – Having enlarged our store and increased our stock, we can now show the finest line of Dry Goods ever brought in this Section. WASH GOODS in PROFUSION; DRESS GOODS and SILK DEPARTMENT; CLOAK DEPARTMENT; CARPETS, RUGS and OILCLOTH; UPHOLSTERY DEPARMENT; TRIMMINGS
– Agents for Butterick’s Patterns.

April 1895

100 Years Ago

Reverend Dr. Edmund M. Mills, acting secretary for the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which opened Saturday at Des Moines, Iowa, stated tonight that the Conference would probably revise the ban on amusements, changing it from a mandatory act in the Book of Discipline to a “word of advice.” Memorials submitted to Dr. Mills from Conferences in all parts of the country showed that about one-third of the preachers want to eliminate all reference to dancing, theatres and card playing. In view of the fact that preachers do not put men and women on trial for these amusements, Dr. Mills will move the elimination of the following words in that part of the Book of Discipline dealing with the trial of a member for “Imprudent Conduct: Dancing, playing games of chance, attending theatres, horse races, circuses, dancing parties, patronizing dancing schools, or taking part in such other amusements as are obviously of misleading and questionable moral tendency.”

April 1920

80 Years Ago

A retired United States Marine Corps Officer told New York State Methodists that he had observed a “marked similarity” between the doctrines of Christianity and the work of Chinese Communists. Addressing ministers and lay delegates at the annual New York Conference of the Methodist Church, Major Evans Carlson spoke on “The Duty of Christian America in the Japanese-Chinese Conflict.” “The so-called Chinese Communists are practically Christians, though they do not profess the faith,” he said. “As a group they are humble in spirit and compassionate of their enemies.”

April 1940

60 Years Ago

The Oneonta Youth Council has grown up and will become 15 years old next Tuesday. Suitable anniversary observances have been arranged, according to Chairman E.C. Damaschke of the Oneonta Recreation Commission. The public is invited to join a sociability night at the Youth Center, on the top floor at the Y.M.C.A. on Tuesday night at which new officers will be elected and installed. On Thursday night there will be a dinner for Council members and the election of new officers. On Friday night the large game room will be the site of a Teen Age Record Hop with prizes and a birthday cake cut. On Saturday, there will be tournament play in games with prizes and dancing in the record hop room. The Youth Council was organized April 26, 1945, with James T. Catella as first president. Last night the top floor of the “Y” building was crowded with upwards of 200 young people.

April 1960

20 Years Ago

Laura Jean Oliva, a physician’s assistant in Oneonta, made her first medical relief trip to the Dominican Republic in 1996. Since then she has been back about five times each year, sometimes staying for as long as a month. Oliva offers exams, medications and vaccinations, as well as more specialized orthopedic care to residents in the southeastern part of the Dominican Republic, an agricultural area that produces sugar cane and tobacco. Eight months ago, Oliva started Esperanza Dominican Relief, a non-profit, nonsectarian, humanitarian organization – to provide her efforts with a formal structure and facilitate fund raising for a new clinic and laboratory. “After four years, I’m still working out of the back of my car,” Oliva said. Oliva is a 45-year- old Bronx native who stays in the Dominican with a host family and has two godchildren in the country.

April 2000

10 Years Ago

Armed with signs, songs and speakers, Tea Party patriots gathered in Norwich on Thursday in East Side Park across from the Chenango County Courthouse to rail at perceived governmental excesses and failures. Organized by Gilda Ward of Guilford, Charlie Ressiguie of Norwich and others, the Chenango County gathering, slated to run seven hours, drew scores of people at a time, some staying all day, others moving on. “Tea Party Patriots are tired of being ignored and controlled by their governments, both state and federal, Ressiguie said. “It’s come to the point where we’ve got to speak up.”

April 2010

HOMETOWN History April 17, 2020

HOMETOWN History

April 17, 2020

150 Years Ago

News Items – Ohio has 25 different female suffrage associations. Boston uses 7,646,020 gallons of milk annually. Nearly 700 Philadelphia girls were married to foreigners last year. Boston expects to
pay $1,400,000 for its public schools the coming year. A farmer in Schuyler County lately lost a colt from bleeding at the nose. The new five-cent pieces will be ready in a few days. Ole Bull’s famous violin is said to be over 400 years old. A worm, three feet long and half an inch in diameter, recently ate the stomach of an Iowa dog to pieces. A horticultural school for young ladies has been opened at Springfield Massachusetts. Tennessee has a Negro secret society known as “The United States Roses of Old John Brown.” Iowa has been compelled to discharge a “lady” teacher in one of its public schools for drunkenness.

April 1870

125 Years Ago

For Sale: Fine recorded Percheron stallions at bargain cash or credit. Chas. P. Bassett, Walton. A good two-year-old bull, R.J. Blair, Delhi. One span of grey work horses and new double harnesses. Horses weigh 2,100 pounds. Will sell cheap. Frank Welton, Unadilla. Five choice yearling heifers; also one dry cow. G.B. Harkness, Kortright Centre. One thoroughbred Jersey bull, two years old, solid color with good points from good stock. H.C. Munn, Mundale. One two-horse lumber wagon, nearly new; also one hand mill Mrs. M. Hitchcock, Franklin. One span of half-Clyde colts, 3 years old; one young horse, 7 years old, sound and true, A. Barnes, Meridale.

April 1895

100 Years Ago

The New York Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church today adopted a resolution endorsing a proposal to amend church discipline by striking out specific prohibition of playing cards, dancing and theatre-going. This action was taken after a spirited debate, and after the Conference had reconsidered its previous decision to take no action at this time. “If I were a devil, I would slap myself on the back over the action of the Conference,” declared the Rev. J.J. Dean, one of the oldest members who led the opposition forces. A proposed amendment to prohibit only “voluptuous dancing” was drowned in laughter. Resolutions were also adopted protesting against further increases in overhead church organization and multiplication of officials, urging greater freedom for pastors and demanding that trained laymen do the work of church business organization instead of clergymen.

April 1920

80 Years Ago

Despite protests from pet-lovers, a Senate-House Committee has approved an experimental bombing of 70 goats to ascertain the killing power of the secret “super explosive” which Lester P. Barlow, Baltimore inventor, says he has perfected. The test will be conducted at the Army’s Aberdeen, Maryland proving grounds unless it is blocked by court action. A Maryland law forbids experiments on animals except “when justified by the public interest.” Senator Morris Sheppard (D-Tex), a committee member, said he thought the test was justified “in the interest of national defense.” Barlow’s explosive is made from liquid oxygen and carbon. Barlow told members of Congress that his explosive is capable of killing every living thing within a thousand-foot radius.

April 1940

40 Years Ago

Local U.S. census takers are paid almost a dollar less per completed form than their big city counterparts, Dan Daniels, Director of the Utica Census Office, said Wednesday. The 13 Oneonta area census takers are paid 70 cents less per census form than employees in New York City, he said. The census takers are also paid for mileage. Census
takers in the Oneonta area have started calling on people who have had trouble completing their census forms. The whole process should take about six weeks, Daniels said. “About 20 percent of the population did not return the forms. Each census taker has 550 households to check,” Daniels said. “Since wages are generally higher in large cities, the census department offers more pay to attract workers there,” he explained. At least two Oneonta-area census workers have said privately that they should be paid the same wage for the same work. “The forms are just as long here as they are anywhere else. I think this is regional discrimination,” one census taker said.

April 1980

20 Years Ago

Oneonta Police Reports – Investigations
continue into two burglaries committed earlier in April. More than $500 in merchandise was stolen from an apartment on Myrtle Avenue in the early morning of April 4. A burglary on Cliff Street on April 6 involved the taking of a Hewlett-Packard computer, monitor, printer and keyboard valued at $1,000. On April 9, someone entered a vehicle parked in the Dietz Street municipal lot and stole $450 in clothing, a $40 gym bag, a Panasonic compact disc player and two Nokia cellular phones. On April 12, the Planned Parenthood of Delaware and Otsego counties received two threatening crank calls stating “You’re going to burn” between 1:40 and 1:45 p.m.
On Thursday, April 20, as part of its celebration of National Poetry Month, “Word Thursdays” will feature Thomas Travisano, an Oneonta writer. Travisano and several young poets will read after the open reading which begins at 7 p.m. “Word Thursdays” takes place at the Delaware County Historical Society, three miles north of Delhi on State Route 10. Travisano, a professor of English at Hartwick College is co-founder and first president of the Elizabeth Bishop Society.

April 2000

10 Years Ago

The Kansas City soccer community hopes that its new Major League Soccer stadium, scheduled to open next year, will be the next home for at least some of the National Soccer Hall of Fame’s exhibits that were once displayed in the Oneonta facility.
The Soccer Hall closed its museum in Oneonta in September as it sought to overcome financial difficulties. The museum’s collections were last available to the public during a final, free admission weekend in March. On February 1, Soccer Hall officials signed a management contract with the Otsego County Development Corporation, a private non-profit group, to transition the 62-acre Oneonta site to new ownership.

April 2010

HOMETOWN History April 10, 2020

HOMETOWN History

April 10, 2020

50 Years Ago

The changes taking place on the surface of our Earth with which the hand of man has nothing to do are very remarkable.

The Islands of Jersey and Guernsey are slowly sinking. People anxious to see them need not be in a hurry, but their places will, perhaps someday, be marked with lightships anchored to what is now fertile soil. Meanwhile, new islands rise in another hemisphere and Chile and Sweden are being slowly elevated to attain a height no man can guess.

To these changes man contributes nothing, but he has a hand in effecting changes which, it is speculated, may alter the features of an entire continent. We have read something lately of the desire of the British government to preserve the forests of India. Deprived of them India would soon become a desert like Sahara. But should Sahara become covered with forests, what would be the consequence to Europe?

April 1870

125 Years Ago

In an address before the New York East Conference at Stamford, Connecticut, Chancellor Day of Syracuse University heartily favored college athletics and particularly football, which, he said, trained young men to sound judgment, lightning activity, and made physiques with which to work out the mental ambitions.

The scare over serious injury Dr. Day said, was absurd, in view of the fact that out of 140,000 students in our universities, only four or five had been seriously injured at football. Bicycling, rowing, and other athletics might be abolished with as good reason as football.

The bill has become a law which requires that every public school building shall be provided with a United States flag and flagstaff.

April 1895

100 Years Ago

“House That Jack Built” Instructive – Trainman’s Hall was well-filled last Saturday night with the wives of D. & H. conductors, trainmen, engineers and firemen when the motion picture “The House That Jack Built,” was presented by J.E. Long, Superintendent of Safety on the D. & H. The picture was for the purpose of emphasizing “Safety First.” After witnessing it one is impressed with the many helpful hints along this line that the film conveys. The “House That Jack Built” should have a wide showing.

Have You Seen Breeze’s Smile? An excellent likeness of smiling Henry T. Breeze, the well-known worker, who
appears in the window of the City Drug Store, attracting considerable attention. The photo is captioned: “Current Events” Oneonta New York “Breeze Blows up Main Street.”

April 1920

60 Years Ago

Eight “Fine-O-Meters” have been installed in Oneonta. The “Fine-O-Meter” is a device for paying for parking violations. The new parking tickets, red in color, are actually envelopes. Now, when a motorist gets a ticket he can slip his fine money into the ticket-envelope and place it in the fine-o-meters. Collection of the fines will be made daily and turned over to the City Court. City Judge Ronald E. Rowley, who has championed this method of paying fines since he was inaugurated last January, said “the method is more convenient for the violator.” The new ticket urges violators to pay the fines within five days. Two “Fine-O-Meters” are located in the municipal parking lot. Others are installed in front of the Oneonta post office, the Woolworth’s store, Hoffman’s dry cleaners, the Army and Navy store, near Brown Park and Huntington Library.

April 1960

40 Years Ago

The sound is deafening. Huge diesel presses pop railroad wheels from their axles with a piercing metallic scream. “It takes about 9,000 tons of pressure to get one of those wheels off, D&H Shop Supervisor Edward Burns shouts over the din. For the railroad buff, a visit to the Delaware & Hudson Railroad’s repair shop in the Oneonta yard is like going back stage at a play. The illusion is gone. But, some of the awe remains. The Oneonta yards, the major railroad car shops, for the entire line, repair about 1,200 cars annually. Last month, the railroad completed the refurbishing of 80 freight cars under a $240,000 New York State grant. The grant meant that some 16 otherwise slated for layoffs kept their jobs.

April 1980

20 Years Ago

In his introduction, the moderator described Christian Evangelist Josh McDowell as “a white Bill Cosby,” and a “hundred percent daddy.” The 60-year-old McDowell opened his speech by talking about his family. He’s
been married 29 years and is a father of four, including a 19-year-old blonde-haired daughter who is a student at Auburn University in Alabama. He recalled warning one of her dates against considering sex or anything that might be construed as such. “I said, ‘Don’t you ever think of touching my daughter or I will become your worst nightmare,’” the evangelist told an audience estimated at 3,200 assembled Monday night at the Alumni Field House at the State University College at Oneonta. Then, using two students from the audience, McDowell got to the heart of his message – the importance of truth, love, honesty, righteousness, and purity. “These morals,” he said, “must be adhered to absolutely. The very personal character and nature of God is truth. Lying is wrong because God is truth,” he said. About 80 local churches combined to sponsor McDowell’s appearance. Perhaps the size of the crowd served as the strongest testament to the power of McDowell’s message, said Treadwell resident Julie Shea, one of the organizers. “McDowell helps young people and adults understand there is an absolute truth and it’s not moral relativism anymore,” Shea said.

April 2000

10 Years Ago

Even while growing up on a farm just over the Delaware County line, Meg Hungerford was always “playing bank.” “I always knew what I wanted to do,” she said Monday, April 5, the day before Common Council was expected to appoint her permanently to the job of city chamberlain. “I get excited to go through numbers and have them come out right in the end,” said Hungerford. After a retirement, two new hires and two resignations, City Hall must be equally excited about having its top financial position filled with a candidate who has been proving what she can do since her provisional appointment last September.

April 2010

HOMETOWN History April 3, 2020

HOMETOWN History

April 3, 2020

150 Years Ago

Death of Bees – During the past few weeks, mortality among the bees about Portlandville has been very great. One gentleman having 48 hives has lost 43 out of the number, and others have lost in nearly the same proportion. The cause is attributed to a scarcity of the store laid up last season, which may be true, and if true, makes neglect on the part of the owners the more culpable.
Chicago is receiving California quail, salmon, asparagus, cauliflower, green peas, and mounting trout, by express from the Pacific Coast.
The edition of The London Times is now printed upon presses that take in the paper in a continuous roll.

April 1870

125 Years Ago

Records of a Week – The Yale faculty has ordered Harry Moffat Wilson to leave the college for refusing to be vaccinated. He is a freshman from Newburgh, New York. His father is opposed to vaccination.
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rendered its decision on the income tax law. By a majority of five to three the court declares unconstitutional so much of the law as taxes incomes from rents and state, municipal and county bonds. By an even division, four to four, it fails to affirm or deny the constitutionality of what remains in the law. The first effect of this decision will be to cut down by at least one-third, the estimated revenue of $30,000,000 which the Treasury Department expected to receive from the income tax law during the first year of its operation.

April 1895

80 Years Ago

Oneonta Sports Chatter – After opening the baseball season at Utica, on the afternoon of May 9, the Oneonta Indians will play the Braves at Neahwa Park the following day. The Indians will be at home for 63 games, including two or three holiday dates. “Jumping Joe” Polcha, tall substitute center for the Troy Basketball Celtics, will be farmed by Albany to Gloversville. Polcha hit over .500 with two fast semi-pro leagues. Carl Delberta wired us yesterday that he came through his bout with Melio Theodorescu without a scratch. Delberta was a “last-minute” substitute for the Cocoa Kid and scored a unanimous 10-round decision over the Rumanian welter-weight champion. The National Boxing Association has ranked Arturo Godoy as the number one Heavyweight contender for Joe Louis’s title. But, personally, it’s about time for the boys along “Jacob’s Beach to check their fountain pens for a spell and seek a “white hope” capable of giving the “Brown Bomber” and the customers a fair run for their money.

April 1940

60 Years Ago

The United States bolted past a new frontier in space Friday by firing the first-known weather-eye satellite into orbit. It photographed the Earth and its cloud cover from 450 miles up and televised back the images. A triumphant space agency rushed the pictures to President Eisenhower who exclaimed “I think it’s a marvelous development.” NASA Chief Dr. T. Keith Glennan brought Eisenhower a four-picture sequence showing an 800-mile-square area comprising the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

April 1960

40 Years Ago

West Oneonta – Danny Forbes is ten pounds lighter this morning – and he’s glad. The ten pounds he lost yesterday comprised the weight of a metal head brace that he wore for more than two months to help heal a broken neck. The five-year-old son of David and Kathy Forbes of Route 23, West Oneonta, had the brace removed Monday afternoon, his mother said. Mrs. Forbes said Danny’s first words when he woke Monday morning were “Look Ma, my brace is all off.” He was able to come home tonight,” his mother said. Danny suffered a broken vertebra on January 27 in a sledding accident on a hill behind his home. The brace was installed by two physicians, Bruce Harris, a neurologist at Bassett Hospital, and William Hopper of Fox Hospital. Danny now wears a foam-filled neck collar.

April 1980

20 Years Ago

Construction to replace the Rose Avenue Bridge in the City of Oneonta could begin by the end of April. The concrete and steel structure which crosses Glenwood Creek on Rose Avenue at the intersection of Hudson Street was closed by the city on March 3 after a significant section of its top deck broke off and fell into the water. Work on a replacement, estimated to cost close to $90,000 is hoped to begin soon. The city is expected to award a construction contract on April 18 Oneonta City Engineer Joseph Bernier said. Meanwhile, nearby businesses have suffered as normal through traffic has been diverted. Even though local traffic is permitted past a barricade at the top of Rose Avenue, the barriers have discouraged customers from patronizing Coddington’s Florist at 12 Rose Avenue, said Kathryn Kroll, owner of the business. “I am truly affected by this,” Kroll said. The Oneonta Tennis Club and Otsego Iron and Metal are also affected by the bridge closing signs.

April 2000

10 Years Ago

The mission of the Oneonta Mural Project is “To realize a vision for original and professional murals that promotes community and economic growth.” The project, founded in 1999, is under the umbrella of the Upper Catskill Community Council on the Arts and was adopted by the City of Oneonta Beautification Committee. Now, 10 years later, at least 13 interior and exterior public murals have been painted in the Oneonta area by various artists and students. Why murals? Because public art communicates ideas.

April 2010

HOMETOWN History March 25, 2020

HOMETOWN History

March 25, 2020

150 Years Ago

The Technologist – The second number of this journal has reached us and is fully up to the promises held out by the first. It contains a very fine full page engraving on tinted paper, giving the details of the East River Bridge Caisson. Other articles of great interest serve to render this number valuable, both to the practical man and to the general reader. Amongst them may be mentioned the “Manufacture of Porcelain,” “Recent Improvements in Distillation,” Street Railways,” “Ocean Lines of Telegraph,” “The Paris System of Drainage,” “Influence of Occupation on Health,” “The History of the Lucifer Match,” “Isemetrical Projection,” “The Science of Little Things” &c. Those desiring to examine a copy of this journal should send twenty cents to the Industrial Publishing Company, 176 Broadway, New York

March 1870

100 Years Ago

Miss Evangeline C. Booth, Commander of the Salvation Army in the United States. With the $14 million fund generously contributed by the country to the Salvation Army last May all but exhausted through the Army’s unparalleled year of activities and service throughout
the country, Commander Miss Booth is now marshalling her forces for the organization’s second nation-wide Home Service Appeal to be held May 10 to 20. “Never before in the history of the organization in this country, has the Salvation Army been able to accomplish so much for the poor, the distressed, the sick, the unfortunate and the erring,” Miss Booth states. “All this is because of the magnificent way America has supported our efforts. We are deeply grateful for God and country for the opportunities of Christian and humanitarian service that have been afforded us the last few months.”

March 1920

80 Years Ago

One of Ithaca College’s outstanding athletes, Louis “Ducky” Pond of 32 West Broadway, Oneonta, is among the first seniors at the college to obtain a position and has accepted the post of Supervisor of Physical Education at Mineville, High School for 1940-1941. He will receive a B.S. in Physical Education from Ithaca College in June. As Catcher on the varsity baseball team he is expected to be in the lineup regularly this spring. He also starred on the football eleven for two seasons at halfback. A member of Sigma Delta Psi, national physical education fraternity, he is a 1934 graduate of Kellogg High School and spent his freshman year at Colgate University.
A huge “spot” on the sun played hob with communications today. The east to west disruption of telegraph and short wave radio service was the worst in 30 years. The American Telephone and Telegraph Co. said it was the worst case of traffic impairment its engineers could recall. Cable communications between Europe and the New York and Associated Press office broke suddenly at 10:30 a.m. One channel was restored at 1:50 p.m. and a second at 3:07 p.m.

March 1940

60 Years Ago

For eight long minutes, he had $1,406 on his person, police said. He had it until police took it from him along with the gun he’d used to take the money from a local loan company.
It was Oneonta’s first armed robbery in more than 25 years, said police. Arthur A. Wanamaker, 33, a farmer from Middlefield, Cooperstown, RD 2, is charged with entering the Upstate Loan Co. on Main Street late yesterday afternoon and taking $1,406 at gunpoint. Wannamaker was apprehended minutes later in Huntington Park between the library and the Oneonta Building and Loan Company by Patrolmen George Donlin and H.P. Wenck. At the time of his arrest, Wanamaker had the $1,406 stuffed into his sweater and a nine-shot 22-caliber pistol loaded with 22 rifle bullets. The pistol was concealed beneath the coat Wanamaker carried in his hand. The robbery was first reported by telephone to police at 4:25 p.m. by Ralph Nielsen, collection manager for the loan company. A call was sent out on the police radio.

March 1960

40 Years Ago

Hartwick – Cyrus Budine, 14, of Hartwick, was listed in serious condition at Bassett Hospital Thursday night, more than 24 hours after he was struck by a car that killed his 12 year-old brother and a 10-year-old girl, also of Hartwick. Budine suffered head injuries when a car driven by Olive Bush, 59, of Hartwick struck a group of eight children walking in the street about 8:15 p.m. Wednesday on the way home from the town library. Deceased after the Hartwick accident are Christopher Budine, 12 year-old son of Cyrus and Joyce Budine of 206 North Street in Hartwick and 10-year-old Sarah Storey, daughter of Rev. George and June Storey of 48 North Street in Hartwick. No ticket was issued by investigating state police from Oneonta.
Two Oneonta youths were also struck by cars in unrelated incidents in the past 48 hours. Both were listed in satisfactory condition at Fox Hospital Thursday night. Joseph Harkenreader, age 9, and Robert Brienza, age 8, both of Oneonta were sharing a hospital room Thursday night while being treated for broken legs. Brienza was struck by a car at the corner of Ford and Center Street on his way to school Thursday morning. Harkenreader was hit by a car driven by Iva F. Burdick of Cozy Avenue. Tickets were not issued in either case.

March 1980

20 Years Ago

Four graduates of the State University at Oneonta will return to Campus on March 30 to share their experience and expertise with current students in a workshop titled “Careers in the Earth Sciences.” The workshop is designed to help current students make informed career decisions. Darwin Roosa, a 1972 graduate with a degree in science education will discuss “Careers in the Public Sector for Earth Scientists.” Roosa is a “Citizen Participation Specialist” with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation in Albany. Bill Soukup will present “Careers in Environmental Consulting.” A 1976 Geology graduate, he works for Brown & Caldwell, an environmental and engineering consulting firm. Windsor High School Earth Science teacher Irving Soden, a 1970 graduate with a degree in geography, will address teaching as a profession in his presentation titled “So You Want to Be a Teacher.”

March 2000

10 Years Ago

Famed cartoonist Don Sherwood, who would slip caricatures of his Oneonta buddies into “Dan Flagg” and his other strips, has passed away March 6, 2010, at the Levine & Dickson Hospice House, Huntersville, N.C., where his
wife, Dolly and their son, Jason, both live. He was 79.

March 26. 201

HOMETOWN History March 20, 2020

HOMETOWN History

March 20, 2020

150 Years Ago

Shooting Affray – Nobody Killed: A disgraceful affair occurred in Shafer’s Store at Pepacton last Saturday evening. It appears that two men, James Frazier and Ad. Shafer, proprietor of the store, got into some dispute which brought on a war of words, when Frazier struck Shafer on the nose with some instrument which proved hard enough to break the said nose, and necessitate the sending for a medical man, who reconstructed it in the best possible manner. We are informed that revolvers were drawn by both parties and shots were fired, but by the exercise of their dodging powers the combatants were not hit. Frazier was in this village (Andes) last Monday with a small wound above his eye, which was caused by a blow from his antagonist. It is a disgrace that these young husbands should disgrace themselves in the manner stated. They should lay their revolvers to one side until a more honorable calling requires their use.

March 1870

125 Years Ago

The President Home Again – President Cleveland came back to Washington this afternoon after eleven days of recreation on the water. There was a glow of health upon his cheeks which was not there when he left Washington on March 5, the day after Congress had adjourned. St. Clair, the White House steward had provided a large express
wagon to carry away the game, and the Presidential baggage.
Enough game was brought back to send hampers to all the Cabinet officers in town, to Mr. Thurber, and to the homes of the President’s companions, not to speak of a plentiful supply for the White House table. Most of the sport was had in Pimlico Sound, and the President bagged a fair share.

March 1895

100 Years Ago

At a recent public hearing in Albany, relative to the proposed bill abolishing the death penalty in this state, there was not a single voice raised in opposition thereto. Of those favoring it there were two classes – humanitarians who were for the bill on what sometimes are called sentimental reasons, who exploited the sacredness of human life and declared that the Commonwealth had no right under any circumstances to violate its sanctities. Another hard-headed sort, mainly practitioners of law, who held for abolition of the extreme penalty on the quite different ground that it made convictions difficult, and often through sentiment, permitted the guilty to escape. In an earlier age punishment was considered primarily an act of revenge. A more modern conception of so-called punitive measures is that its primary purpose is the reformation of the wrongdoer. Another argument in favor of abolition is that the law, like everything else, is fallible.

March 1920

80 Years Ago

Opinion – It is true that our manner of meeting the economic troubles of the past decade – and fortunately, those of this country have been largely economic, does indicate that perhaps we are lacking in the virility which has made our nation great – that perhaps the character that looks to religion and reflects the Golden Rule has faded from the standards which once imbued us as a people. But it is  equally true that in most people these qualities essential to a great nation have only been lulled asleep – that again awakened, Americans will exhibit once more the resolution, resourcefulness, and character which our way of life exemplified for all the world. Our need is a moral reawakening – and that we must have.
Personals: Clifford Jordan of Morris visited in this city yesterday. Miss Myrtle I. Buckley of 17 Watkins Avenue will leave today to spend Easter with relatives in Hartford, Connecticut. Mrs. Maria Polli and daughter of Grand Gorge were Monday business callers in Oneonta.

March 1940

60 Years Ago

Civil Defense Alert Drill Scheduled for May: CONELRAD Alert Drill and initial tactical warning will signal a Civil Defense test operation beginning at 2 p.m. on May 3 and ending at 2:30 p.m. on May 5. All Civil Defense control centers and headquarters will be activated for the period of the federal exercise on a 4-hour basis to ensure continuous communication, analysis of attack weapon phenomena and prompt reporting of this data and/or bomb strikes to appropriate higher and lower headquarters, and for processing and interpretation of radiation reports. A mandatory public participation drill is scheduled to be held May 3 in each of the Civil Defense jurisdictions of New York State, as directed in a letter of instructions to Robert Simmons, Director. A “take-cover” signal will sound at 2:15 p.m. and extend a period of 15 minutes. At 2:30 p.m. the alert signal will be sounded and the public informed to resume normal activities.

March 1960

40 Years Ago

Workshops on understanding themselves were the first choices of men and women attending the “Every-Woman’s Fair” Saturday in the First United Methodist Church, Oneonta. More than 100 men and women participated in one or more workshops in spite of blowing, drifting snow that hampered travel. Workshops on “Enhancing Self-Esteem,” led by Suzanne Clarke, “On Becoming Your Own Woman,” led by Anita May Thacker, and “Women Alone” led by Mary Ann Keenan drew the most participants. Other workshops that drew many sign-ups were “Natural Childbirth – A Holistic Perspective” led by Kathleen Grandison, M.D., “Menopause” led by Sandy Cohen and Norma Lee Havens, “Why Do They Stay?” led by Aid to Battered Women, “Assertiveness Training” led by Joan Slepian, “Shiatsu Massage” led by Sue Yates, and “Women and Therapy” led by Joan Slepian and Sandy Cohen.

March 1980

10 Years Ago

Food needs of area residents were the main course at a meeting organized by the Hunger Task Force. About 30 volunteers, clergy, food pantry representatives and other agency representatives met in the Great Hall of St. James Episcopal Church on Elm Street to identify existing programs, gaps and other resources to increase supplies and access to food. Services and resources are changing as needs grow because of the economy, organizers said. Janice Hinkley, a member of the Hunger Task Force that is affiliated with St. Mary’s Church, said the church’s food pantry helped about 6,000 people last year.

March 2010

HOMETOWN History March 13, 2020

HOMETOWN History

March 13, 2020

150 Years Ago

The Inebriate Asylum – A portion of this humbug institution, created and kept up at the expense of the State for the benefit of Binghamton, was burned a few days since – loss estimated at $75,000. The Legislature is already being called upon for an appropriation to repair the damage. The Binghamton Leader publishes a list of items of expenditures for the past three years, which foot up at $409,880.79. Receipts from patients amount to $86,517.95. The balance against the Institution is $323,362.84.

Shooting Affray – We understand that a difficulty occurred between two men at Pepacton on Saturday in which pistols were used, each firing two or three shots without much damage. It is said there was a woman in the case. We are not informed of the particulars or names of the parties.

March 1870

125 Years Ago

Got a Whale off Nahant – A whale about 75 feet long, evidently an old one, was killed off Nahant yesterday by a picked crew of experienced men made up in Nahant. Deeply embedded in the whale’s back was a harpoon, badly rusted, with the inscription, “Hiram K. Swain, Nantucket 1858,” still legible.

New Illuminating Gas Discovered – An illuminating gas to vie with electricity and to completely eclipse the present coal gas is said to be about to come into use. It is also said that gas bills will then be only at the rate of five cents a thousand cubic feet. The new gas is acetylene, made by a simple process. Professor P.L. Wilson discovered it in his laboratory in Spray, North Carolina. The chemists in the big gas companies in New York and Boston are looking into the gas a means of increasing the power of coal now used. In liquid form it burns in lamps. No wicks are necessary as the liquid turns to gas and ignites as soon as it rises in the tube.

March 1895

100 Years Ago

The Fairchild Camera – The current number of “The Aerial Age Weekly” has an interesting illustrated article describing the Fairchild Automatic Film Camera authored by Major Herbert E. Ives, who had charge of the photographic branch of the air service during the war. This camera, the invention of Sherman M. Fairchild of Oneonta, has many novel features. Ives sates: “When you compare its performance with that of other between-the-lens shutters, it shows the new shutter to be quite in a class by itself for speed and efficiency.” The article includes a photograph of a section of the City of Washington, D.C. photographed from the air during the government’s test of the camera and which demonstrates the accuracy of its work. The camera was designed to photograph the enemies’ lines to obtain military information such as the position of batteries and ammunition dumps, changes in trench systems, troop movements, etc. Had the war continued longer, the Fairchild camera would doubtless have been of great service to the government.

March 1920

80 Years Ago

Just as the telephone did not do away with the telegraph, and radio did not do away with the telephone, television will not do away with radio. But, it can aid these other great benefits by extending man’s horizons and contributing to his material comforts, Patrick H. Crafton of Schenectady told the Kiwanis Club at the Hotel Oneonta yesterday noon. Mr. Crafton described television as the result of thousands of experiments and discoveries in a dozen fields of chemistry, physics and mathematics. He described the work done by Dr. E.F.W. Alexanderson, General Electric engineer and said that many Schenectady residents were among the first in the world to witness television when a demonstration was held in Proctor’s Theatre there in May, 1930. Since that time unlimited improvements have been made. Mr. Crafton pointed out that nearly all sporting events are adapted to television and said that women will be able to view the season’s new hats and gowns paraded on live models, see cooking demonstrations and all kinds of products and appliances.

March 1940

60 Years Ago

Housewife Loses Grocery Money – Seeks its Return. “It may be extra money to the finder, but it is grocery money to us,” Mrs. Harold Grube said when reporting the loss of her purse “just about the time school got out,” between Bishop’s Drug Store and the Grand Union on Main Street. Mrs. Grube said it contained all of her grocery money, and had plenty of identification in the form of a Social Security Card, credit cards and other items. Mrs. Grube resides at 372 Main Street. Phone: GE2 -1256.

March 1960

20 Years Ago

Oneonta High School Second Quarter Honor Roll – Twelfth Grade High Honor: Kathryn Browner, Joy Forsythe,
Willa Friedman, Lindsay LaRose, Jami Mileski, Brian Murphy, Kristen Perry, Rachel Pollak. Marlies Roberts, Benjamin Scheim and Jennifer Woodam. Eleventh Grade High Honor: Jeremy Beck, Matthew Brown, Zahra Eagle, Kira Syvertsen, Nicole Thomas and Phillip Zimmerman. Tenth Grade High Honor: Claire Blechman, Elizabeth Brown, Michelle Cooper, Cheryl Downie, Alec Macaulay, Jenna Marmet, Liam Murray, Melissa Pigeon, Joseph Sandoli. Ninth Grade High Honor: Daniel DeThomas, Amanda Geisler, Isaiah Ilowit, Carlena Johnson, Katrina Kollgaard, Emily Maskin, Andrew Perry, Meghan Stetson, Joseph Tannenbaum, Allison Thomas, Parisa Zohoori.

March 2000

10 Years Ago

Andrew McIntosh aims to destroy doors on gay closets and he started with his own. Last year, as a newly appointed lacrosse team captain at SUNY Oneonta, McIntosh said he wrestled with suicidal thoughts until he decided to talk about being a gay man. First, he told a close friend from high school and his sister. Since then, he has told his coach, Dan Mahar, and his fellow lacrosse team captains. On February 5, McIntosh told his teammates, the same day Outsports.com, an on-line gay sports community published his article, “College lacrosse player comes out to his team.” McIntosh who is from Putnam Valley said, “Being honest is very important to me. I wanted them to hear it from me and not from anyone else,” he said. Coach Mahar said he is proud to say there has been no hint of negativity from players. “The guys see Andrew as Andrew,” said Mahar.
“It really didn’t faze anybody,” Tom Kelly, a SUNY Oneonta junior said after practice.

March 2010

HOMETOWN History Feb. 28, 2020

HOMETOWN History

Feb. 28, 2020

150 Years Ago

(Excerpts from the following advertisement): Constitutional Recognition of Almighty God and the Christian Religion – Call for a National Convention: The Constitution of the United States makes no acknowledgement of Almighty God, the author of national existence; nor of Jesus Christ, who is the Ruler of Nations; nor of the Bible, which is the fountain of law and good morals as well as of religion. This has from the beginning been a matter of deep regret. It may have been an oversight, but it was, and it is, both an error and an evil. It does not reflect the views of the great majority of people upon these great matters. It dishonors God. It is inconsistent with the character of nearly all our State Constitutions, and with all the precedents of our early history. The National Association which has been formed for the purpose of securing such an amendment to the Constitution of the United States as will remedy this great defect and indicate that we are a Christian nation, invites all American citizens who favor such an amendment, without distinction of party or creed, to meet in convention at Pittsburgh, on Thursday, the Third Day of March, next, at 2 o’clock p.m. William Strong, President of National Association.

February 1870

125 Years Ago

At a meeting of the Veterans Association of Delaware and Otsego Counties at the Wilson House in Oneonta, New York, on February 18, 1895, at 1 p.m., on motion, it was ordered that the members of the “Women’s Relief Corps” throughout both counties be added to said organization.
It was also resolved that this organization include all veterans, sons of veterans, daughters of veterans, and their families within the counties of Otsego and Delaware; further that the first meeting of this organization shall be convened on June 20 and 21 at Wilber Park in Oneonta.

February 1895

100 Years Ago

At the opening of the County Court Monday afternoon, the business was the matter of naturalization. Sixteen were admitted to American citizenship: Alfred Richard Carr, Springfield Center (England); Omar Felix Chatauvert, Prattsvelle (Canada); David Douglas Laurie, Oneonta (Denmark); Armamd J. Vallie, Oneonta (Scotland); Peter Petersen, Oneonta (Denmark); Salvatore Galtano Puccio, Oneonta (Italy); Luigi Bachetta, Otego, Italy; Pietro Alotta, Cooperstown (Italy); Thomas Anthony Morris, Oneonta (Greece); Harry George Lambros, Oneonta (Greece); Angelo Banard, East Worcester (Italy); Joseph Kominski, Richfield Springs (Germany); Antonio Defiori, Oneonta (Italy); and Sisto Sardiello, Oneonta (Italy).

February 24, 1920

60 Years Ago

Atomic fallout, bomb shelters, air raid drills, two weeks of canned goods in the cellar? These are the phrases on the lips of many New Yorkers as Gov. Nelson Rockefeller pushes his “fallout shelter plan.” Most of those questioned about the “fallout shelter plan” seem to “pooh-pooh” the possibility of enemy attack. “Why worry about it? If it does come and I’ve been in a shelter for two weeks all the food and supplies will be contaminated anyway,” one person said when interviewed. “I’ve got more important things to do with my money,” said another, referring to that part of the plan that presumes homeowners would construct the shelters at their own expense. “After the landscaping I’ve done at my home, I’d be crazy to dig up my lawn.” A check with John Milsome, a British exchange teacher currently at Chestnut Street School, said “England is not undergoing this panicky feeling. There seems to be a different
attitude toward war. The average Englishman doesn’t believe there’s going to be a war. I was quite shocked when I came to America, Mr. Milsome said. “There were air raid drills here and we haven’t had any in England since the war. If I were an American,” Mr. Milsome said, “I’d oppose this construction of fall-out shelters.”

February 1960

40 Years Ago

The United States made “major errors in judgment” by selling computers which the Soviet Union used to help make army truck and other military equipment, William J. Perry, a senior Defense Department official said. Perry, the Pentagon’s research chief, said government officials have known for three years that U.S. supplied computers were used in the Kama River manufacturing plant to build trucks for the Soviet Army. Some of the trucks are now known to have been used in the Soviet move into Afghanistan. “Many people in a number of administrations believed that the political benefits were worth the risks of technology transfer,” Perry said. “As important as the drain of actual American technology,” he added, “is the flow of intellectual property – the knowledge of how to build and maintain computers and sophisticated electronic systems.”

February 1980

20 Years Ago

Rev. Roy Chamberlain will represent our region at the upcoming Global People’s Assembly in April to be convened at Apia on the island Samoa, April 2-8. At the turn of the millennium, the Global People’s Assembly is looking to usher in a new world order and set concrete goals for changing a human world that is increasingly dominated by corporations,” Chamberlain said. Toward that end Chamberlain will be advocating for specific proposals, including: Increase the use of electronic person-to-person communication; Check human population growth; Recognize and develop ways to control global climate change; Stop industrialized nations from engaging in high-tech warfare; and encourage people to grow their own food without genetic engineering.

February 2000

10 Years Ago

States of Emergency were declared in the city of Oneonta and across Chenango County because of Thursday snowstorm which dropped about 20 inches of snow across the area. Travel advisories were issued for both Delaware and Otsego counties. Within the City of Oneonta the state of emergency meant that city roads and streets would be closed to all but emergency traffic from 10 p.m. Thursday until 6 a.m. Friday morning.

February 2010

HOMETOWN History Feb. 21, 2020

HOMETOWN History

Feb. 21, 2020

150 Years Ago

Humorous – A Case of Denied Non-Committal: Old Lady – “Can you tell me, my good man, where I can find Mr. Jones?” Pat: “Sure Ma’am, I expect it would be at his house you would find him.” Lady: “Does he live anywhere in the street here?” Pat: “Sure, no indeed, it’s not for the likes of him to be living in the street at all.” Lady: “You stupid fellow! I mean what number does his family stop at?” Pat: “Now Ma’am, you have me. He has six boys and four girls already, but whether he means to stop at that number, I know not.” Lady: “Oh, you blockhead.” Exit old lady in a tremor of indignation. (Editor’s note: The name “Pat” is code for an uneducated, droll person of Irish lineage).

February 1870

125 Years Ago

The Census Office has issued a bulletin showing the principal results of the investigation of farm and house proprietorship and indebtedness. It shows that there are 12,690,152 families in the United States – and of these families, 52.20 percent rent their farms or homes while 47.80 percent own them. Of the owning families 29.97
percent own properties subject to an encumbrance while 72.03 percent own free of an encumbrance. There are 420 cities and towns which have a population of 8,000 to 100,000, and in these cities and towns, 64.04 percent of the home-owning families rent and 35.95 percent own their homes. Of the home-owning families, 34.11 percent own with an encumbrance and 65.89 percent own without encumbrance. In cities having a population of 100,000 or greater, of which there are 28, 77.17 percent of home owners
rent and 22.83 percent own their dwellings, of which 37.80 percent have an encumbrance while 62.20 percent occupy their homes free of encumbrance.

February 1895

80 Years Ago

Thankful for a day of sunshine and blue sky, Oneontans leaned on their snow shovels yesterday and took a collective deep breath, hoping the shovels could be put away for a while.
Sidewalks which had been out of sight for two days since the start of the 19-inch snowstorm Tuesday, had been shoveled bare, and in many places the entire length of a block. But the shovels had to stay out until driveways, backyard walk paths to garbage cans and clothes lines and porches could be cleared.
Anxious to earn a few more quarters and half dollars, men were still going about the city, stopping wherever they saw snow-blocked drives or walks, and offering to clean them. Traffic in the business section proceeded at about its normal pace, and parking was possible close to the curbs. Plows cleared thoroughfares through the city’s principal streets. Main routes of travel were open and all buses to and from the city made their runs except for the Margaretville route. Many back roads awaited the attention of snow plows.

February 1940

60 Years Ago

Luther G. Cook, former blind operator of the concession store in the D&H yards for over 30 years, died Friday at Jones Nursing Home. Mr. Cook was 80 years of age and resided at 21 Otsego Street. Mr. Cook was born September 19, 1879 in Jefferson, the son of Elijah and Electa (Woodbeck) Cook. He married Sarah Wilsey, August 10, 1929 in Charlottesville. Although blind, Mr. Cook operated the concession store in the D&H yards until his retirement two years ago. In his home he maintained a business of re-caning chairs. He had lived in Oneonta about 35 years. He is survived by four stepdaughters – Mrs. Harriet Truesdale and Mrs. Bessie VanBuren, both of Oneonta, Mrs. Ruth Roe, Torrington, Connecticut, and Mrs. Evelyn Hisson, Chenango Bridge; two step-sons, Raymond Clapper of Watervliet and Kenneth Clapper of Buffalo as well as several nieces and nephews.

February 1960

40 Years Ago

Senior Meals: The menu of the Otsego County Nutrition Program for the Aging the week of February 18 to 22 will be: Monday: “Holiday” No meal served. Tuesday: Orange-apricot juice, hamburger steak, casserole potatoes, peas, sauerkraut salad, whole wheat bread, tapioca pudding, coffee, tea, milk. Wednesday: Baked haddock squares, mashed potatoes, broccoli, jellied cranberry fruit salad, rye bread, birthday cake, coffee, tea, milk. Thursday: Baked ham with raisin sauce, escalloped potatoes, green beans, roll, half grapefruit, coffee, tea, milk. Friday: Tuna-noodle casserole, mixed vegetables, coleslaw with shredded carrot, white bread, cherry breeze, coffee, tea, milk. Reservations must be made with site manager a day in advance. Monday reservations must be made on Friday.
A new community senior citizens group is being formed in the Elm Park United Methodist Church. A covered dish dinner will be held at Noon, Friday, February 15, in the church. It is hoped that all interested senior citizens in the community and area will attend.

February 1980

20 Years Ago

Headline: “Mayor Giuliani answers “Quid Pro Quo” charges
by Democrats.” The New York Senate race between Hilary Rodham Clinton and Rudolph Giuliani was focused this week on campaign contributions for political favors. Democratic State Committee Chairwoman Judith Hope accused Giuliani of taking money from developers in exchange for allowing them to build over a community garden. During a news conference at Democratic State Committee headquarters in Manhattan Ms. Hope called for Giuliani to return $32,799 in campaign contributions from a company and its executives benefitting from the city’s decision to bulldoze and build on a community garden site in the East Village. BFC Construction is set to erect a 79-unit building on the site. “I’m saying there is a quid pro quo, or there certainly appears to be,” she said.

February 2000

10 Years Ago

Judge Robert A. Harlem Sr. will receive the Eugene A. Bettiol, Jr. Distinguished Citizen Award. The Otesaga, which turns 100 this year, will be recognized at the NBT Bank Distinguished Business. In announcing the selections
this week, chamber President & CEO Rob Robinson recognized not only the Otesaga longevity and central role in Cooperstown-area tourism, but noted the resort hotel “generously supports area charities and non-profit agencies, including Hospice, American Red Cross, Bassett Healthcare, Otsego County Food Bank, the Cooperstown Fire Department and EMS, among others.”

February 2010

HOMETOWN History Feb. 14, 2020

HOMETOWN History

Feb. 14, 2020

150 Years Ago

The Bible in Ohio Public Schools – The Judges of the Superior Court have rendered their decision in the case involving the question of the exclusion of the Bible from the public schools. The action was to discuss an injunction heretofore granted to restrain the operations of the School Board, declaring that the reading of the Bible and religious books should not be permitted in the schools. Judge Hagens held that the provisions of the Constitution recognize the religion of Christianity, and acknowledge that religion and morality are necessary to good government, and therefore the exclusion of all religious instruction from the public schools is contrary to the provision of the Bill of Rights. Judge Storer concurred in these views and the injunction was made perpetual.

February 1870

100 Years Ago

“Big Bertha,” with two Cleveland tractors manned by Fred E. Wells and Dick Bennett, another of R.J. Warren’s trusty men, plowed through the snow to Portlandville and return yesterday and opened the state road down close to the ice foundation, putting it in as fully good condition as the Otego road. While the crown is probably one or two feet above the macadam in places, light motor cars could easily make the trip, barring trouble to turning out when meeting other vehicles. One car made the trip through to Emmons after the trip up, while the road was in much better condition after the return trip. The road was much
improved for horse-drawn vehicles, the track being widened and lowered to the hard and frozen snow. At least three
motor cars came through over the Otego road. C.A. Nichols came in from his farm, while Mr. Bennett and Mr. Foote came all the way from Otego and experienced no serious trouble. Use of this or the Portlandville road, while passable, is not recommended to the drivers of motor cars unless quite familiar with winter motoring and prepared to contend with snow.

February 1920

80 Years Ago

Snow Hill, Maryland – Five state troopers overtook a crowd estimated at 1,000 at nearby Stockton, Maryland and rescued two Negro women who had been dragged from the Worcester County jail several hours earlier. The women had been taken into custody Tuesday afternoon for “investigation” in connection with the Sunday night slaying of Harvey W. Pilchard, a Stockton farmer and the wounding of his wife Annie. The mob was dispersed by five troopers but one state officer was badly injured. The crowd of men broke into the Worcester County jail through a window late Tuesday night, pulled out a cell block door with a rope and seized the two screaming Negro women as they cowered in the cell. The men talked to the girls and from them ascertained who had done the shooting. The crowd placed the women in automobiles and headed toward Stockton, home of the farmer and his wife, who was wounded seriously when three Negroes entered the home demanding money. The troopers rescued the two women there after a brief melee.

February 1940

60 Years Ago

A total of 41 students, the “scholastic cream” of Oneonta State University College of Education, have been named to the spring honors list, according to Dr. Howard D. Austin, associate dean of the college. Included in the group are three residents of Oneonta: Mrs. Janet S. Kniskern, Mrs. Dorothy J. Shedlock, and Miss Mary Ann Molinari. The listing of top honor students includes those who have maintained a cumulative average of 3.50 or above.
What to do with delinquent canines?  The problem has been referred to the Public Safety Board by the Oneonta Common Council. The ordinance reads: “No dog shall be allowed to run at large in any street, sidewalk, lane, or public places within the City of Oneonta without being properly muzzled, or under immediate care, custody and control of its owner or custodian.” “The ordinance is here in name only,” Mayor James Georgeson commented. According to the present law, it’s the Police Department’s job to enforce the “dog” ordinance.

February 1960

40 Years Ago

Twelve weathered stacks of $20 bills, part of the $200,000 given to legendary airline hijacker “D.B. Cooper” before he parachuted from an airliner more than eight years ago, were unveiled by the F.B.I. But, agents
said they still have no trace of Cooper.
The wads of money, bound by rubber bands, were found Sunday while Harold D. Ingram, his wife Patricia and their eight-year-old son, Brian, were preparing to build a picnic fire along the Columbia River, five miles northwest of the Interstate 5 bridge linking Portland and Vancouver, Washington.
Ingram said that the money was found
about 30 yards from the river’s edge under
a thin layer of sand.

February 1980

20 Years Ago

“Happy Birthday Marge” That phrase was abundant on Sunday as Marjory Hubler and 100 of her closest friends celebrated her 90th birthday at Elm Park Methodist Church. Parishioners held a potluck luncheon for Hubler and took turns telling jokes and stories about
Elm Park’s favorite grandma. Thank you, every one of you for being here on my birthday,” Hubler said. Hubler was born in 1910 and spent about the first half of her life in Pennsylvania. After her first husband died she remarried Graham “Grip” Hubler, who died six or seven years ago. Grip used to call his wife “Double Batch Marge” because whenever she baked cookies, pies or other treats she always made extra to give away, friends said.

February 2000

10 Years Ago

Walter Frederick Morrison, the man credited with inventing the Frisbee, has died. He was 90 years old. The manufacturing rights to the simple little toy originally named by Morrison as the “Pluto Platter, were licensed to a manufacturing firm in 1957 and later re-named the Frisbee. Sales have since surpassed 200 million. The Frisbee soon became a staple at beaches, college campuses and playgrounds and lately has spawned an official competition known as Ultimate Frisbee. There is also a licensed Frisbee Golf course that bears his name at Creekside Park in the Salt Lake City suburb of Holladay. “He was a nice guy. He helped a lot of people.

February 2010

 

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