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News of Otsego County

oneonta history

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 13, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 13, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The first locomotive explosion that ever occurred on the Albany & Susquehanna railroad occurred on Tuesday afternoon about one-half mile east of Schenevus, a few rods east of what is known as DeLong’s swamp. The result was disastrous, the engine being blown to pieces and completely wrecked, killing the engineer and badly injuring the fireman, beside tearing up the track and doing other damage. The train was a wildcat of some 12 or 15 gondolas, Shepard Edick, conductor, James Gleason, engineer, and Abisha E. Loucks, fireman. The engine was No. 159 – one of the huge moguls, the cab of which rests over the boiler. The train was moving at a speed not to exceed 12 miles an hour. Those nearest the scene describe the report as terrific. Houses in Schenevus village, half a mile away, were shaken as if by an earthquake.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 6, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 6, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The wretches who flaunted the red flag and hurled dynamite with fatal effect in Chicago Tuesday evening are not to be confounded with the honest workingmen there, or anywhere else, who seek to better their condition by agitation within the law. They were anarchists – cranks whose proper place is the lunatic asylum. Your anarchist is against all order, all existing institutions – the law, the schools, religion and the Ten Commandments. If this does not qualify him for the insane asylum then his proper place is the state prison. The country has tried ridicule long enough. It is time the anarchist was summarily wiped out. It will not be a difficult matter. Anarchism is a foreign plant with very little hold in American soil. Were it not for dynamite it might be left to die of itself. But unfortunately, that invention makes even one anarchist formidable.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: April 29, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

April 29, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

110 Years Ago

Since spring is here interest revives in the national game, and at Gildersleeve’s and other centers of baseball interest there is talk in plenty of what’s doing and speculation as to what later will be done. A worthwhile team in Oneonta in 1911 is assured. At Elm Park considerable improvements to the grounds have already been made. Though the diamond itself has always been pretty good, the outfield has been rough and uneven – a condition which it is now proposed to remedy. The field has accordingly been ploughed, and later will be leveled and rolled, making a park surpassed by few in the state for ball purposes. There is need too of a new and larger grandstand, but it is not likely to be built this year. “Bobby” Vaughn, whom everybody in Oneonta recalls as a Stamford boy and the manager of its club two years ago, is doing good stick work this season with Montreal. Vaughn is under contract to the New York Americans, but is farmed out to Montreal. His
many friends expect to see him “breaking in” with the big leagues.

April 1911

HOMETOWN HISTORY: April 22, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

April 22, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Richard Rice, a character generally known throughout the counties of central New York as “Dicky” Rice, died at Mt. Vision on Sunday, at the residence of Mr. Harrison, after about a week’s illness. For a period of about 30 or 40 years Mr. Rice has been a familiar figure throughout this section of the state as astride his trusted charger, he has wandered aimlessly about, volunteering adjuration and scriptural advice to all with whom he came in contact. Mr. Rice was known to be a harmless, inoffensive old man with a shattered intellect, and he usually found a resting place in any house where night overtook him. He had a great penchant for Bible study and could quote from the Bible by the hour from a singularly retentive memory. Mr. Rice was born in the northern part of the county in 1802. He studied medicine with Martin Gardner at Portlandville in 1838, practiced for awhile, was taken sick and became mentally unsound, and has since been a wanderer. His horse, his companion for the past 18 years, has been taken in charge by the poor officer of Laurens.

April 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: April 15, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

April 15, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – Wm. McCrum has bought the house and lot on Centre Street at the head of Dietz Street from Wm. Peck. Mr. McCrum owns a plot of several acres north of Centre Street and it is his intention to open a street through it, thereby throwing upon the market about 20 building lots, some of them most desirable. The new street will start from Centre Street, a few rods east of Dietz Street, running directly through the center of Mr. McCrum’s property.
A change in the school law requiring one-half of the public monies to be divided among the districts equally causes the amount to be distributed much larger in the rural counties this year than formerly. As a result, every school district which furnished a public school the required number of weeks received for that purpose this year $66. The balance of the school money is apportioned according to the school census and attendance, as formerly.

April 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: April 8, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

April 8, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – On Tuesday evening, George Ingalls of this village displayed a collection of gold coins, consisting of twenty-six one-dollar pieces, four five-dollar pieces, and one twenty-dollar piece, all bright and new.
What was particularly interesting was that the money was paid Mr. Ingalls for his services during the first year of the rebellion and which he has retained ever since.
The committee appointed to arrange a law-and-order league hope at an early day to make public their plan of operation. Since the movement was inaugurated, drunkenness has entirely disappeared from our streets on Sundays, and the dealers evince a disposition to observe the letter of the law – the bars being all closed on the Sabbath. It will be much better for all concerned if no further step is necessary.

April 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: March 25, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

March 18, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

M. & L. Westcott, who are about to begin the construction of a four-story brick block to contain four stores on Main Street near the fire building, have arranged to open a new street between the proposed block and the residence of Dr. Hamilton, to be called Hamilton Avenue. The street will run from Main to Front Street and will be paved. As an easy grade can be obtained from the freight depot, it will doubtless prove a popular thoroughfare for teamsters and others. (Ed. Note: The area once occupied by Hamilton Street is today a parking lot)

March 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: March 18, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

March 18, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A meeting for the purpose of taking steps toward organizing a village law and order league was held at the M.E. Church on Tuesday evening, at which there was a good attendance. Prof. N.N. Bull was chosen chairman and A.L. Kellogg secretary. Short addresses were made by the chairman and by Rev. Mssrs. Allen, Lee, Gleason, Richardson and others, the sentiment of the meeting being that the law governing the sale of intoxicants must hereafter be respected. The license laws were read for the information of those present. The following resolutions were unanimously passed – Resolved: that the pastors of the village churches prepare and distribute 2,000 copies of a circular containing the points of law regulating the sale of intoxicating drink; and Resolved: that the pastors and five committeemen named by them be authorized to organize a law and order league. The committee consists of Geo. Reynolds, N.H. Briggs, George Kirkland, A.A. Whitcomb, and T.W. Stevens.

March 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: March 11, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

March 11, 2021

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – Joe Lee, a very mild-mannered Chinaman, with his pig tail neatly coiled under his hat, was in town Tuesday with the intention of starting a laundry here. Upon looking the field over he was induced to visit Cooperstown, where they have no laundry. Joe Lee was chaperoned about town by Mr. G.W. Ingalls, who took a great fancy to the almond-eyed wanderer and bestowed upon him innumerable courtesies. Joe was a great curiosity to the small boys, who thronged about him and vainly endeavored to excite his ire by shouting “rats!” but Joe only broadened his smile at this and appeared to take it as a very good joke. He is, we believe, the first Chinaman ever in town.

March 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: March 4, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

March 4, 2021

100 Years Ago

Oneonta & Vicinity – General Manager C.S. Sims of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad, said today that the purpose of removal of the headquarters of the Susquehanna Division, now located at the Delaware & Hudson building at Steuben and Pearl streets in Albany, to Oneonta, is to bring the superintendent of the division and his men in closer touch with the work. It will necessitate the relocation of about 15 men, including the superintendent, J.C. Rosenstalk, who recently succeeded F.H. Wait, along with several clerks, train dispatchers and time keepers. The Susquehanna Division is devoted mostly to the freight business. Between 35 and 40 trains pass over the road each way every day, including the freight trains from the coal fields and those carrying merchandise, which connect with the Boston & Maine railroad at Mechanicville for New England. Most of the freight trains are made up at the freight yards in Oneonta.

March 1911

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Oneonta History Exhibit 08-01-20
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SATURDAY, AUGUST 1

Oneonta History Exhibit

14-19eventspage

ARCHITECTURE EXHIBIT – 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. New exhibit ‘Building Blocks of a City: 100 Years of Architecture in Oneonta’ opens to public highlighting significant buildings, structures that represent the development, transformation of the city. Greater Oneonta Historical Society, 183 Main St., Oneonta. Visit www.oneontahistory.org/index.htm for info.

HOMETOWN History June 13, 2020

HOMETOWN History

June 13, 2020

135 Years Ago

Preparations for the laying of the cornerstone of the new state armory next Thursday indicate that, should fair weather prevail, there will be an immense crowd in Oneonta. The parade in the afternoon will be the grandest ever seen in the Susquehanna valley, comprising as it will two or three richly uniformed commanderies, a score or more of blue lodges, several military companies and the Albany cadets besides the Oneonta fire department, and the post of the Grand Army of the Republic. The governor and staff, the secretary of state and staff, and the grand master of masons of the state, and the grand lodge, in carriages, will also form part of the parade.

June 1885

110 Years Ago

Clyde S. Tripp, a conductor on the D. & H., was fatally injured while working in the Oneonta yards early Wednesday morning. The accident occurred just below the Fonda Avenue crossing. He was standing on the rear running board of a switch engine, which was backing toward a string of cars, when the tender crashed into a box car and he was struck by the lever, which punctured his abdomen. When picked up it was found that his left leg and arm were broken, and that he had received fatal abdominal injuries. He was taken to the Fox Memorial Hospital, where he died about ten o’clock. The deceased was 30 years of age and a son of Mr. and Mrs. David Tripp of this city. He is survived by his wife, a daughter of five years, one brother, and his parents. He was a member of the United Presbyterian Church. Interment will be at the Plains.

June 1910

90 Years Ago

With interest gaining momentum each week and with its factory already three weeks behind on its orders, officials of the Linn Trailer Company are adding a few experienced machinists, blacksmiths, and toolmakers to the list of employees. It is now expected that within a week the production of the plant will have been more than doubled. As one of Oneonta’s youngest industries, and as an organization producing an article of established merit in a field which has seen little development in more than a score of years of use, the Linn Company’s patented design stands out.
Eugene Lee Ward, who may be appointed sales manager for the company, recently made a road trip with a demonstrator trailer towed by a Chevrolet Coupe and met with unusual success in interesting dealers and securing orders well exceeding the production capacity of the factory.

June 1930

70 Years Ago

Two new library alcoves dedicated Sunday afternoon at Hartwick College, will serve as a source for Otsego and Central New York State historians. The Traver Alcove contains the library of the father of Hartwick institutions, Johann Christopher Hartwick. Even though a good portion of the texts are written in German and Latin, they contain an accurate picture of life in the early 1800s. Many of Hartwick’s own original texts are included in the library. Several are written in the form of a diary thus accurately outlining his contacts with the settlers and prominent people of the area. The Traver Alcove is given in loving memory of Dr. John G. and Mrs. Ettie Traver, faithful servants of Hartwick Seminary from 1886 to 1941, by former students and friends. For many years Dr. Traver served as a teacher at the Seminary and as headmaster. An alcove dedicated to Richard H. Franchot and his brother Charles, given by descendants, will house a collection of writings and volumes of this area. The alcove is to be known as the Franchot Alcove of Otsego History. Charles P. Franchot presented a small round trunk once owned and used by his grandfather Charles when he enrolled at Hartwick Seminary in 1830. Both Richard and Charles Franchot attended Hartwick Seminary between 1830 and 1832.

June 1950

50 Years Ago

A five-member County Narcotic Guidance Council was appointed by the Board of Representatives at its June meeting on Wednesday of last week in response to a request made by Representative Stuart P. Taugher of Cooperstown. Appointed to the Council were Lewis Sturgess, a Unadilla druggist, the Rev. Robert Heffner, a member of the campus ministry at Hartwick College in Oneonta, Oneonta post-master Samuel J. Bertuzzi, who was named Chair of the Council, Dr. Joseph Lunn, an associate physician at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown, and George S. Kepner, Jr., a Cooperstown attorney. Each
member will serve three years.

June 1970

40 Years Ago

The asphalt, gravel and curbs taken from Oneonta’s Main Street are to be melted down and recycled for use as fill and patching material for potholes around the city. Asphalt removed by the Cerasaro Construction Co. in the Main Street reconstruction project is being hauled away to Neawha Park. A machine purchased by the city for $12,000 to $15,000 is used to melt and remix the old paving asphalt. Asphalt recovered from River Street earlier added to the Main Street asphalt will provide sufficient recycled fill and patch material to last 25 years, city engineer Richard Olton says. New asphalt costs about $35 a ton whereas the recycled asphalt about $2 a ton as remix for patch work.

June 1980

20 Years Ago

Classified advertisement: Program Coordinator (full-time) – Seeking motivated self-starter to implement the Leatherstocking Promise ACT for Youth Program. Work with various audiences including youth, parents, volunteers and media to enhance and build youth programs. B.S. in Social Work, Human Ecology, Social Sciences, Health Services, Education, or related field and two years of experience. Transportation required. Deadline June 23, 2000.

Bassett Healthcare’s Mobile Mammography Program will host three mammography and osteoporosis screening sessions in June. On Monday, June 19 and Tuesday, June 20, the van will stop at Bassett Healthcare Oneonta. Women who would like to have a mammogram or an osteoporosis screening test at this time may call 1-888-416-3409 to schedule an appointment. Free or reduced cost mammograms are available through the New York State Breast Health Partnership to income eligible, underserved, or uninsured women.

June 2000

10 Years Ago

Damaschke Field is alive again.  The Oneonta Outlaws hosted the Mohawk Valley Diamond Dawgs at Damaschke Field on Tuesday, June 8, for their inaugural Opening Night at Damaschke Field.

June 11, 2010

HOMETOWN History May 29, 2020

HOMETOWN History

May 29, 2020

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A few nights ago a fair damsel who was coming out of one of our churches was approached by a young man who requested the pleasure of seeing “her home.” The young lady replied,” “No, sir; if you want to go home with me you must go with me to church, sit with me during the exercises and thus show yourself worthy of my company!”
Sensible girl, that! If others would follow her example, the young men who loaf around the streets until service is nearly over and then station themselves near the church door, and when the ladies appear ask to go home with them, would soon become more familiar with the inside of the churches than at present.

May 1885

130 Years Ago

The street railway company has made arrangements to handle two thousand passengers on Decoration Day between West End and Wilber Park. The observation car will run only from the Windsor Hotel to the park; all other cars will run through as usual. Cars will leave the West End every half hour and the Windsor Hotel and Wilber Park every fifteen minutes.
The graduates of the Oneonta Normal School are from the first able to command very comfortable salaries.
Two members of the class of 1890 have already secured excellent positions. F.H. Lane, whose thesis is titled “The Jesuits,” goes to Babylon, Long Island at a salary of $1,000 per year, while one of the lady graduates has been secured by the Normal College of the City of New York where she will be teacher in the model department.

May 1890

125 Years Ago

Patrons who attended the sell-out performance of McIntyre & Heath’s “The Ham Tree,” a musical comedy, on Monday evening at the Oneonta Theatre, were unanimous in their verdict that it was the best of Manager George Roberts’ excellent shows. It was no place for a philosopher who wanted to do any serious work. But, for any human being who likes to laugh, it was the inner shrine. If there are any funnier comedians in the world than McIntyre & Heath they had better be locked up, or they might face a charge of manslaughter for tickling people to death.
The songs were good, the dancing clever, the show girls pretty, the costumes clean and bright and not a line in the show that would make a Quaker blush. The situations in which the busted down minstrels found themselves were the product of a mastermind and the dialogue of the two minstrels were put over in a way that would make imitators look awfully sick. Theatre lovers are grateful to Mr. Roberts for his nerve in securing an attraction like this for a city of this size.

May 1895

90 Years Ago

Professor Robert D. McKenzie of the University of Washington maintains that Nordic supremacy is not caused by racial differences, but rather by differences in culture and training. A good many people might disagree with him. However, the dissenters from McKenzie’s view might be persuaded differently by reading newspaper accounts of the marathon race at Amsterdam in the Netherlands. The marathon race is generally regarded as calling for distinctly Nordic strength and endurance. However, the race was won by a brown-skinned Algerian, with a dark-skinned Chilean second and two yellow-skinned Japanese fourth and sixth, while the white race had to be content with third and fifth places. The winner was trained as a dispatch runner for French troops – a fact that supports the professor’s theory that almost any race, with the same training as whites, can do what whites can.

May 1930

30 Years Ago

Pepsi is trading soda for vodka, McDonald’s is bringing
the golden arches across the iron curtain, and Thomas Scholet, an Oneonta businessman believes any size company can make a Soviet business connection. “Soviet Business Connections” is the name of the umbrella organization Scholet set up to facilitate commercial, cultural and recreational exchange between the super powers. Scholet himself is doing business with the Soviets, having recently entered into a joint venture with a Moscow-based organization called Soviet International Tourist Services. Scholet and his partners put together here in the U.S. to travel to the Soviet Union and the Moscow office organizes groups in the Soviet Union to tour in America. Scholet plans to lead 150 business travelers to the Soviet Union this year.

May 1990

20 Years Ago

Health insurance companies will have to settle claims faster and face higher penalties for failure to pay claims on time under the terms of legislation sponsored by State Senator James L. Seward. The measure passed unanimously on May 16. “We need to toughen the 1997 prompt payment laws because compliance isn’t what it should be,” Seward said. The legislation requires insurers to pay claims filed electronically within 30 days instead of 45. The bill also declares that failure to settle claims in a timely manner constitutes an unfair claims settlement practice,,, subjecting HMOs and insurers to additional penalties.
The bill requires that all health insurance contracts include a dispute resolution mechanism. “When a company agrees to cover medical procedures, it must pay policyholders and providers on time,” Seward said. The bill also prohibits HMOs and insurers from denying care that had been previously authorized. “I certainly hope the Assembly will support our effort to improve the claims settlement and payment process in New York on behalf of patients and providers,” Seward added.

May 2000

15 Years Ago

Jason West, the New Paltz Village Mayor who challenged New York law by attempting to marry gay couples will face trial, New York State’s highest court has ruled. Mayor West will face 24 misdemeanor counts of violating the state’s domestic relations law by marrying couples without marriage licenses last year. West’s defiance of a law that state officials say forbids gay marriage has made New Paltz a flashpoint in the national gay marriage debate. The New York State Court of Appeals refused West’s request to hear the case first, avoiding the usual process of hearing cases in town, county and state appellate courts before they are considered by the state’s highest court. West had sought a “leave application” because he argued the case was unique, novel and critical to the state. The Appellate Court issued its ruling following a teleconference.

May 2005

10 Years Ago

Oneonta native Jerry Jeff “Mr. Bojangles” Walker will be back in town in early August to visit his mother. And while here, he plans to play his first local concert in a half-dozen years Saturday, Aug. 14, at the by-then newly refurbished Oneonta Theatre.

May 28, 2010

HOMETOWN History May 15, 2020

HOMETOWN History

May 15, 2020

35 Years Ago

Mr. Arthur Platt writes us from Colliers: On the bottom lands ten rods south of what is known as Quick Sand bank, and thirty rods due west of Wm. Burnside’s premises (about half way between Colliers and the Junction), I discovered Saturday a thick deposit of charred wood, mingled with small fragments of bone which had evidently been burned. Whether they were human remains or not could not be determined. I set to work, and at a depth of fourteen inches beneath the bed of burned wood was found a collection of arrow heads, tightly pressed together, lying point upward. There were 118 perfect specimens though of very rude and ancient pattern; 112 of the number were uniform in appearance, and belong to a class that was generally used in battle. From the fact that so many were of this class, I am led to believe that they were deposited at the close of some treaty of peace. Two rude stone axes were also found.

May 1885

125 Years Ago

The Local News – About 200 dogs have been registered in the Town Clerk’s office in compliance with the provisions of the new state law.
Shooting at the rifle range on the Odell Brown farm began Wednesday.
Preparations are making for the fine new residence of George B. Baird at the corner of Chestnut and Church Streets. The dwelling will cost about $20,000.
The dynamo placed in Auburn prison for the first electrical execution is the machine formerly in use in the Oneonta electric light company’s plant. It is a Westinghouse machine, designed to supply 650 lights. The execution of the murderer Kemmler, who was to have died by electricity in Auburn prison this week, was stayed yesterday by virtue of a writ of habeas corpus issued by Judge Wallace of the United States Circuit Court on the application of Roger M. Sherman. The application on which the writ was granted and Kemmler’s life was spared, for a time, was made in order to determine whether the proposed killing by electricity is in violation of the Eighth and Fourteenth amendments of the Constitution of the United States.

May 1890

70 Years Ago

State Comptroller Frank C. Moore says that New York State is “determined to provide the new teachers required for its schools.” Moore spoke at ceremonies last Friday during which the cornerstone was laid for an $800,000 dormitory
and student union building at Oneonta State Teachers College.
Sheldon H. Close, president of the local Board of Visitors,
laid the cornerstone of the new building accepting the trowel
from Orlando B. Rowe, former president. Approximately 1,000 persons attended the ceremony. Construction began on August 9, 1949 and it is expected the building will be ready for occupancy by September 1, this year. Moore predicted that the enrollment at Oneonta would increase to about 1,000 in the next five years. Enrollment has increased from less than 400 in 1942 to more than 600 this year.

May 1950

65 Years Ago

Local government officials continually complain about the lack of tax revenues at their disposal and use this as an excuse for thrusting new responsibilities and financial burdens upon the state and federal governments. Yet they may be overlooking a traditional source of tax revenue. According to a spokesman for the National Association of Assessing Officers, “assessments have failed to keep pace with the rise of national wealth,” and “non-uniformity in assessments has increased as property values rise.”
If property assessments were made according to present market value, municipalities would have more tax revenues to use for building schools and roads instead of depending on the federal and state governments to do this.

May 1955

40 Years Ago

The Delaware & Hudson Railway Co. is considering expanding its freight service through northeastern Pennsylvania because of significant growth since the service began a year ago. Richard E. Long, D. & H. secretary, said that the carrier showed a profit in March and April, the first time in four years the line has operated in the black. Long credits the north-south corridor service that connect major southern points through the Potomac yards near Washington, D.C. with markets in New England and Canada. The D. & H. began service to Potomac Yard last year and since then volume has grown from 1,250 cars to 2,750 cars a month. “The line shows very significant growth, but we cannot go further unless we put on a second train,” Long noted. Only one train a day currently moves out from Potomac Yard. The D. & H. is awaiting a response from Conrail, the federally chartered rail system, on a proposed agreement to acquire the line, Long added.

May 1980

25 Years Ago

The death toll from the Ebola virus topped 100 Sunday and health workers said the epidemic may have started as long ago as December – three months earlier than previously thought. Medical workers scouring Kikwit, Zaire, a city of 600,000 where the outbreak was previously believed to have started in mid-March, found hospital records linking the virus to a household of 12 people, where seven people died in December last year. Tests confirmed that at least one of the victims had Ebola.

May 1995

10 Years Ago

Eleanor Kilmer, 83, a Hamden woman will celebrate 50 years as a 4-H leader next week. Over that time, more than 200 children have been members of the Country Cousins 4-H Club since it began in 1955, and many of those 4-H’s are related to one another. Kilmer credits Bill Ives, a neighbor, with the suggestion to start the Country Cousins 4-H Club. The original members included Kilmer’s five children and two of the Ives’ children. “We named it Country Cousins because most of them were cousins, no matter which way we went,” Kilmer said. Kilmer’s own family grew and three more of her own children became Country Cousins members along with 29 foster children whom Kilmer and her family took in over the years. Now there are three generations of Kilmer-kin with Country Cousins experience.

May 2010

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