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News of Otsego County

oneonta history

HOMETOWN HISTORY: August 12, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

August 5, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – Frank A. Robbin’s Circus & Menagerie drew a big crowd to Oneonta on Tuesday. The company met with delays in getting here from Delhi, where it showed the day preceding, and it was not until between twelve and one o’clock that the street parade occurred. The best feature of the tent performance was the trained elephant exhibition.
Last September, a bay mare valued at $200 was stolen from the barn of Andrew J. Burdick of Clifford, Pennsylvania. Nick Crandall, a notorious character, was arrested and convicted of the theft and sent to prison for two years and six months. He had disposed of the horse but would not disclose to whom. Recently Mr. Burdick was informed that the horse was in Oneonta, and on coming here he found it in the possession of Lafayette Stanton, who bought it of Charles Knapp of Mt. Vision, who procured it from Crandall. The horse has been identified by Burdick, but legal steps will be necessary before he obtains possession of it.

August 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: August 5, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

August 5, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A horse driven by Mrs. Eugene Parish ran away last evening on Elm Street, a bolt working loose and allowing the thills to drop against its heels. The buggy collided with a tree near the front of G.H. Shearer’s residence, and Mrs. Parish was thrown several feet, striking the ground heavily. One rib was fractured and serious bruises were sustained. Besides, her system received a severe shock. She was taken into Mr. Shearer’s house and Dr. Manchester summoned. This morning she is reported to be in as comfortable a condition as possible under the circumstances. The wagon was quite badly demolished.

August 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 29, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 29, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

It would be difficult for the lover of wild and picturesque scenery to imagine a more delightful trip than that afforded by a ride at this season over the New York, Ontario, and Western railroad between Sidney Plains and Middletown. The road winds its way through the wildest regions of Delaware and Sullivan counties, traveling up mountain sides, crossing gorges, and now and then darting through tunnels; then, after reaching Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, runs for many miles along the shore of the Hudson River at a point where the view is the most desirable. Altogether it is a ride worth taking, if for no other motive than to view the matchless scenery to the eye along the way.

July 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 22, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 22, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Mr. N.C. Hart of Oneonta, who is
presently on his annual pilgrimage in the North Woods, writes poetically of his time there: “I have built me a cot close by a great rock at the base of a high mountain crest where the hawks sail around and game doth abound, and the eagle has chosen her nest. At the foot of the hill are both springlet and rill, and the shores of a bright sylvan lake in whose waters the trout leap spryly about and the deer comes his thirst to slake. Amid scenes like this our outing is bliss – no cares have we on our mind. We enjoy perfect rest in a haven that’s blest mid nature’s own bright summer clime.”

July 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 15, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 15, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – Mrs. Scanling of Oneonta, who has for years been addicted to the use of morphine, takes now on average ten grains daily. Her average used to be twelve grains a day, and once, through oversight, she took eighteen grains at a dose without ill effects. When it is considered that from one-third to one-half grains of morphine is the usual dose for an adult and that fatal effects usually follow where from one to three grains are given, the magnitude of the amount of morphine which slavish habit requires this poor woman to indulge in becomes woefully apparent.
It is reported that a child of Mrs. Davis Brumaghim, who lives back of the board fence near the railroad shops, died today of diphtheria. The ball game last Saturday between the Oneonta and Franklin clubs resulted in a score of 31 to 5 in favor of the home nine. The Oneonta nine has been materially strengthened by the addition of the Cox brothers of Williams College, who are passing the summer at Gilbertsville.

July 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 8, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 8, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Kate Farrell, aged 22, whose home is at Starucca, Pennsylvania, has for a few weeks been visiting her sister, Mrs. Frazee, at Gaylord’s store, West Harpersfield. Kate was addicted to the morphine habit.
She obtained as a substitute some hydrate of chloral. Sunday afternoon she visited Agnes Ward of Oneonta, who is caring for her mother, not far from the Gaylord store. Not long after Kate left Agnes she was found down the bank by the roadside, nearly unconscious. She was taken to her sister’s, where she died in a few hours.
The coroner’s jury found that she came to her death from an overdose of chloral, taken in mistake.
The body was buried at Starucca on Tuesday.

July 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: July 1, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

July 1, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

A letter to the editor: Allow me to
add a little emphasis to what you say concerning the loafers who are frequenting the Susquehanna House corner. So disagreeable has their presence become that the ladies generally dread to pass the corner, and not infrequently go out of their way to avoid doing so. Aside from being made a target for the eyes of every loafer and for the tobacco juice from the mouths of a dozen rowdies it is not unusual, particularly if a lady is passing alone, for remarks to reach her ears which set every drop of blood in her veins tingling with indignation. In behalf of the ladies of the village I would respectfully ask our trustees if something cannot be done to put a stop to the nuisance.
Sig. A Lady Reader

July 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 24, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 24, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

100 Years Ago

The death of Harlow Lithbridge, son of Mrs. W.N. Millard, reported last week, from diphtheria, has been followed by the deaths from the same disease of Earnest M. Blend, nine-year-old child of Dr. G.W. Blend, which occurred on Saturday on Dietz Street, and of the wife of Dr. Blend, who died Wednesday evening and was, by order of the Board of Health, buried a few hours afterward. Another child of Dr. Blend is ill from diphtheria, with a prospect of recovery. These cases are the only ones reported to the Board of Health, despite rumors to the contrary. They are thought to be purely sporadic, and due solely to bad sanitary surroundings. The Board of Health has taken every possible precaution against a spread of the disease, and there appears to be no cause for further alarm, particularly if the rules and regulations of the board are properly observed.

June 1861

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 17, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 17, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

100 Years Ago

The Sullivan bill making it a felony to carry concealed weapons has been signed by Governor Dix. Among the provisions is one putting restrictions upon dealers. Every person selling a pistol or revolver must keep a register in which shall be entered at the time of sale, the date of sale, name, age occupation and residence of every purchaser of a revolver, together with the caliber, make and manufacturer’s number of the weapon. The dealer shall also, before delivering a firearm, require each purchaser to produce a permit for carrying or possessing the same as required by law, and shall also enter in such register the number thereon, if any, and the name of the magistrate or other officer by whom the permit was issued.

June 1911

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 10, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 10, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The union temperance meeting at the Metropolitan theatre last Sunday evening was a decided success. Over 1,000 persons were present and from beginning to end manifested a deep interest in all the proceedings. Enthusiastic addresses were made by the pastors, Professor Bull and Dr. Morris. The object and aid of the Law and Order League was clearly set forth and the citizens urged to rally to its support. At the close of the addresses signers were called for and over 100 names secured. Since the meeting the pastors have conducted an active canvass and at the present time over 250 names have been secured to the continuation of the league. Scarcely a business or professional man has refused to become a member and several have voluntarily offered liberal financial support for the prosecution of the work of the league.

June 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: June 3, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

June 3, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The board of trustees has effected a settlement with Harvey Baker whereby Mr. Baker releases the village from the contract made by the board of trustees of two years ago to grade Main Street from Grove Street to the railroad crossing, to give Mechanic Street a true grade from Main Street to the easterly limits of Mr. Baker’s property and to put a culvert in Mechanic Street, all in consideration of a vacant lot from Mr. Baker on which to erect a building for Wilber Hose Co. The board, as a compromise, agrees to drain the Baker ditch from Victor Street to Mechanic Street, to lay a culvert across Mechanic Street and to grade the Mechanic Street hill as soon as practicable. Mr. Baker withdraws all claims against the village, including that for $600 damages accruing from the time of the commencement of his action against the village to the rendering of judgment in his favor. Under this arrangement, the lot reverts to Mr. Baker, the hose building having been constructed elsewhere.

June 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 27, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 27, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

“What Are Boys Worth?” was the title of a lecture delivered by Rev. George W. Perry of Rutland, Vermont at the Universalist Church Tuesday evening. There was a good attendance and a goodly sprinkling of girls who were interested in the answer to the question. The average cost of a boy at 15 was figured by the lecturer to be about $1,500, aside from the toil, the care and the anxiety of bringing him up. The boys were given to understand that they are a far greater factor in society than they are generally given credit for being, and left the church at the close of the lecture invested with new ideas of their importance.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 20, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 20, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

Home & Vicinity – A few days since a hard-looking character came to Oneonta, claiming to be a bricklayer. He told an acquaintance that he had fled from Chicago during the recent trouble after hitting a policeman on the head with a club. His description tallied with that of one of the escaped anarchists, and as he professed to be a socialist, Officer Seeger telegraphed the fact of his presence here to the Chicago chief of police. Reply came that a photograph of the man wanted had been forwarded. A search for him revealed that he had suddenly left town. No one knows where to.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 13, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 13, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The first locomotive explosion that ever occurred on the Albany & Susquehanna railroad occurred on Tuesday afternoon about one-half mile east of Schenevus, a few rods east of what is known as DeLong’s swamp. The result was disastrous, the engine being blown to pieces and completely wrecked, killing the engineer and badly injuring the fireman, beside tearing up the track and doing other damage. The train was a wildcat of some 12 or 15 gondolas, Shepard Edick, conductor, James Gleason, engineer, and Abisha E. Loucks, fireman. The engine was No. 159 – one of the huge moguls, the cab of which rests over the boiler. The train was moving at a speed not to exceed 12 miles an hour. Those nearest the scene describe the report as terrific. Houses in Schenevus village, half a mile away, were shaken as if by an earthquake.

May 1886

HOMETOWN HISTORY: May 6, 2021

HOMETOWN HISTORY

May 6, 2021

Compiled by Tom Heitz/SHARON STUART, with resources
courtesy of The Fenimore Art Museum Research Library

135 Years Ago

The wretches who flaunted the red flag and hurled dynamite with fatal effect in Chicago Tuesday evening are not to be confounded with the honest workingmen there, or anywhere else, who seek to better their condition by agitation within the law. They were anarchists – cranks whose proper place is the lunatic asylum. Your anarchist is against all order, all existing institutions – the law, the schools, religion and the Ten Commandments. If this does not qualify him for the insane asylum then his proper place is the state prison. The country has tried ridicule long enough. It is time the anarchist was summarily wiped out. It will not be a difficult matter. Anarchism is a foreign plant with very little hold in American soil. Were it not for dynamite it might be left to die of itself. But unfortunately, that invention makes even one anarchist formidable.

May 1886

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