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oneonta history

HOMETOWN History Nov. 22, 2019

HOMETOWN History

Nov. 22, 2019

150 Years Ago

Country Merchants Beware – The Twenty-sixth Street gambling house has organized a campaign for the winter on an original and comprehensive system after the Baden-Baden School. The house is but a few doors west of Broadway, and not far from the aristocratic St. James Hotel. It is a five-story brownstone front and is occupied by a score of the card fraternity. Women, elegantly dressed, flutter in and out of its doors. During the early evening the flutter of silks and laces and the shimmer of jewels grow most brilliant. These women are what are termed by gamblers “elegant cappers.” They inveigle many wealthy victims into the gambling den. Some of them “frequent” the Manhattan Club. They lounge in the parlors of their respective boarding houses after dinner and mingle with the boarders. They are asked out with rich men and ask rich men gentlemen out with them.

November 1869

125 Years Ago

What is called the national cycling costume for women is in danger of going out of existence in Paris for the Prefect has caused letters to be written to some well-known women cyclists, cautioning them that they are infringing the law in wearing men’s clothes.
The Oneonta people think they have the greatest conundrum out. It is “Why is the Democratic Party like the Earth?” Because it is flattened at the polls.
Governor-Elect Morton says his election expenses were $19,790, of which $16,000 went to the State Committee; $2,500 to the State Committeeman of the Dutchess District; $500 to the Town Committee of Rhinebeck; $390 for contributions to fire and hose companies, charitable and other associations; and $400 for Pastors. It shows that rich men only are available as candidates for high positions, and that the great bulk of these contributions was used illegally.

November 1894

80 Years Ago

Acclaimed as the first man to descend in a parachute and the first to drive a motor-powered dirigible, A. Leo Stevens of Fly Creek, a pioneer in the field of aeronautics, spoke at a meeting of the Lions Club last evening at the First Presbyterian Church in Oneonta. Mr. Stevens said that while he had made 3,456 dirigible flights and carried thousands of passengers, he had never lost a passenger. In 1916, Mr. Stevens was made Chief Instructor of Aeronautics in America by President Wilson. He remained with the War Department until 1927. Mr. Stevens once took James A. Hare, known as the president’s photographer, on a dirigible flight over New York City during which Mr. Hare took 51 pictures of the city, the first ever views from the air. Mr. Stevens holds pilot’s license number two in America and number seventeen in France.
Oneonta basketball fans will see three new faces in the lineup of the Renaissance basketball team when the crack colored club plays Schenectady in the gym at the Junior High
School Friday night. Manager Bob Douglas’ new pupils include Billy Gates, Zack Clayton and Puggy Bell, all tops in New York City scholastic circles in recent years.

November 1939

60 Years Ago

It is customary to address youth in terms of challenge and opportunity, to assure them that a better world will be their oyster if only they have the persistence to open it. Too much of this talk may badly misguide the young. They may conclude, dazzled by visions of shorter work weeks and electronic gadgets that life in their adulthood is going to be easier as well as better. This is not necessarily so. Technology will lift more and more of the burden of labor from mankind, but life may be far more trying in other ways than it is now. In the opinion of Dr. James R. Killian, Jr., of M.I.T., today’s children “will live in an increasingly intricate, turbulent and demanding world, requiring a new order of resourcefulness, adaptability, and trained intelligence on the part of both men and nations.” In addition to the challenges of communism, Dr. Killian sees these factors in the more complex life ahead – rapid change, explosive population growth, rising expectations of hitherto “backward people” and a surge of irresponsible, new nationalisms.
The picture is a sobering one.

November 1959

40 Years Ago

Just as they dominated play during the regular season, the Oneonta High School girls’ soccer team dominated the Southern Tier Athletic Conference’s All-Star Team. The STAC-championship Yellowjackets, have eight players on the All-Star team as selected by the league’s coaches. They are Kim Kurkowski, Dana Stam, Karen Bettiol, Sue McCarthy, and Laurie Jaques were all first team selections while Patty Butler, Sand Perry, and Judy Gergel were named to the second team. Stam, only a sophomore, was the team’s leading goal-scorer with 12. Kurkowski team with Stam to give Oneonta a strong left side. Kurkowski had ten goals this season. “She was an excellent pressure player,” said Coach Helen Sandford. In the STAC Championship game, Kurkowski had two goals including the game-winner in overtime.

November 1979

20 Years Ago

Hartwick College field hockey player Kim Carter is an All-American for the second time. Teammate Nicole Fish joined Kim as a first time pick. Both were named third team Astro-Turf/National Field Hockey Coaches Association honorees. The two seniors led Hartwick College to a 65-18 overall record and three NCAA Division III Tournament appearances. Carter, a first-team selection last year, is the third Hartwick field hockey player to be named an All-American twice. Erin Ross (first team 1997 and third team 1996) and Jen Motyka (second team 1996 and 1997) were the others. Carter, a sweeper on defense finished as Hartwick’s all-time leading scorer (35 goals, 12 assists and 82 career points). Many of Carter’s points came off penalty corners.

November 1999

10 Years Ago

The A.O. Fox Memorial Hospital Board of Directors has approved the appointments of three members and thanked those they replaced who had stayed on during talks of affiliation with Bassett Healthcare. Outgoing members William “Bud” Pirone, Ricky O’Donnell and David Brenner were honored at a board dinner in the Levine Conference Center at Fox Hospital, Oneonta. Pirone and O’Donnell each served nine years, and Brenner, a former Oneonta Mayor, served 11 years. “They were great board members,” Fox board Chairman Michael Getman said.

November 2009

HOMETOWN History Nov. 15, 2019

HOMETOWN History

Nov. 15, 2019

150 Years Ago

The Democratic Victory and What Will We Do with It: A new and grave responsibility now devolves upon the Democratic Party, which for the first time in 17 years will soon hold all the departments of the state government, Legislative, Executive and Judicial. As we shall well or ill use this opportunity, will be our political future. Our opponents, smarting under defeat, and consequent loss of power and patronage, affect to believe that we will be made drunk with power, indulge in excesses, and speedily lose the confidence of the people. Power brings with it not only the opportunity of doing better than our opponents, but it brings also responsibility for the way in which this power is used. As a party we have condemned the corrupt and unconstitutional acts of our opponents. Let the legislators, let our leaders, let our Governor council prudence, and insist on just and constitutional legislation.

November 1869

100 Years Ago

The amount of building going on at this time in Oneonta, and along with numerous changes in ownership of city
realty apparently signify two things – one, that everybody has pretty much given up hope of there being any immediate
reduction in the cost of building; and the other, which in a sense is very like the first – that since all cannot build, they will buy, if buying at any fair price is possible. The number of residences going up gives a fair idea of the confidence which is felt in the future of the city. Along with residences, important business structures are also going up or being enlarged. There is a future ahead of Oneonta which is bright with not merely promise, but assurance of prosperity and continued growth.

November 1919

80 Years Ago

Oneonta Sports – Only a small group of sportsmen interested in securing a franchise in the Canadian-American League season attended a recent meeting, but hopes have not been abandoned for the city’s representation in Minor League ball. It is now planned to gather statistical data from the three clubs willing to park their franchises. An effort will be made to have a representative of one of the teams attend the next meeting. Lights may be installed at the park next year for night baseball and football.
Over 100 high school girls will compete in the intra-mural basketball league this winter according to Mrs. Frances Bates, physical education instructor.
Mayor Frank Zuber of Norwich and Captain Dan Fox, Commanding Officer of Troop C, State Police, will act as judges of the boxing card to be presented at the Elks Club Friday night under the auspices of the American Legion. Benny Leonard of New York, retired, undefeated lightweight champion, will referee one or two of the bouts.

November 1939

60 Years Ago

In Oneonta’s art colony are persons who regard themselves as amateurs and explain that they paint only for enjoyment. Mrs. Virginia Repa, a charter member of the Oneonta Community Art Center, is one of them. She says, “I paint for fun.” Be that as it may she handles water colors with such skill and imagination that her paintings have been regarded as professional. Mrs. Repa is among those artists who, in doing pastoral scenes, likes to work directly from nature, striving to translate beauty as accurately as possible, with an occasional resort to composition for the “sake of art.” A painting titled “The Old Sycamore” that was done in early spring by Mrs. Repa is enhanced with Mrs. Repa’s memories. “It was done in early spring. My husband, Dr. Joseph Repa was fishing and I saw this beautiful old tree in a meadow. I had a very interesting audience – a herd of Guernsey cows who breathed down my neck most of the afternoon.”

November 1959

40 Years Ago

A new attitude toward illegal aliens is emerging in the American labor movement. Instead of summoning
immigration agents to get the illegal workers deported, a small but growing number of unions are trying to sign up the workers as members. For years, angry that illegal workers were taking Americans’ jobs, unions have argued that “we should close off the border and send them all back home,” says Allan Zack, a spokesman for the AFL-CIO. “But that’s a political impossibility now,” he says. “It’s also wrong. Many illegals have established residency here.” It isn’t known exactly how many illegal aliens live in the United States, or how many of them belong to unions.
The immigration service estimates the U.S. has four million to six million illegal immigrants, and other counts range
as high as ten million. Much of the labor movement, however, continues to urge a crackdown on illegal immigrants, arguing that foreign workers take jobs from members.

November 1979

20 Years Ago

Ten years after Congress ordered protections for whistleblowers throughout government, the Justice Department has set up a system to shield FBI agents – but they will have less shelter than other federal employees who report waste abuse and crime by co-workers. Under the rules, FBI whistleblowers are not protected for reporting misdeeds to Congress, in court during a trial, or to immediate superiors. FBI employees are protected only if they report to a short list of top officials and FBI internal investigators. The FBI Director will determine whether FBI employees will get a hearing. Also, FBI whistleblowers alleging retaliation will not have the right to a federal court review. Republican Senator Charles Grassley, Chair of a Senate sub-committee that oversees the FBI, said the rules “represent crafty
lawyering rather than good public policy.” Grassley said the Justice Department “interpreted the law to protect its own interests rather than the public interest in exposing fraud and mismanagement.’

November 1999

10 Years Ago

On Friday November 13, a player wearing number 13 on his jersey ended Oneonta boys’ soccer season. Marcellus senior forward Jon Schoonmaker made a baseball slide
into a bouncing ball on the right side of the penalty box and sent a low shot from 12 yards sailing past Yellowjackets’ keeper Alex Maschutt with eighteen minutes, 44 seconds left in the Mustang’s 2-1 Class B state quarter final victory at West Genesee High. “Friday the thirteenth? Maybe,” OHS coach Alex Brannan said.

November 2009

HOMETOWN HISTORY Nov. 8, 2019

HOMETOWN HISTORY

Nov. 8, 2019

150 Years Ago

Not Slaves After All – At a meeting of the Women’s Franchise Association which was held in New York a few days since, the strong-minded women of the “divine sex” were addressed by some gentleman whose opinions were more truthful than palatable. One of these gentlemen, Mr. Freeman, the orator of the evening, took conservative ground upon the woman suffrage question and advised his fair listeners to move prudently. He said he was opposed to such expressions as calling husbands taskmasters and wives slaves. He didn’t think that women looked much like slaves, as they passed along Pennsylvania Avenue, decked in fine dress and jewelry. From the very fact of women wearing such finery and jewelry he would judge that men were the slaves, from the amount they had to furnish to
purchase such things.

November 1869

125 Years Ago

Fire Loss – On Saturday night, October 27, at about 10 o’clock, the large four-story barn belonging to Adam Shaver, a prosperous farmer living one and one-half miles from Pepacton, was completely destroyed by fire. Eight cows, 90 tons of hay, 350 bushels of grain and all the valuable farming implements were destroyed with the building. The cattle were fed by Mr. Shaver’s son, at about six o’clock, after which none of the family went to the barn. By 10 o’clock, the family had all retired, and at about this time James W. Shaver was awakened by the crackling sound of the burning building. He hastily roused the family who rushed from their beds to work as best they could to save their property. There were in the barn 25 cows, a span of horses, and a yoke of oxen. With the exception of eight cows, all the cattle were driven or led from the building. It was only by the most heroic efforts that the house was saved. The most valuable farm implement was a new McCormick mower. The insurance on the barn and contents approximates $2,000 while the value of the destroyed property is estimated at $4,000. The origin of the fire is shrouded in deepest mystery.

November 1894

100 Years Ago

Editorial Notes: “Is there any rebate if bottles are returned?” a woman in New York City is said to have asked her milkman the other day. It is the opinion of many milkmen in Oneonta, and in fact in all places where bottled milk is sold, that if a deposit were required the consumers would be more careful.
Mrs. William T. Hyde of Cooperstown, superintendent for Otsego of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, will give an address at 8 o’clock this evening at Municipal Hall. All Boy Scouts should be present, as it is one of the laws of scouting that scouts shall be kind to dumb animals. This year an active campaign is to be waged on behalf of animals and Mrs. Hyde believes that the boys can be of material assistance in this work.

November 1919

80 Years Ago

H. Raymond “Red” Griffin, 27, of 30 Hudson Street, Oneonta, was fatally injured Wednesday morning when his car left the highway between Glens Falls and Saratoga Springs. Mr. Griffin, while away on a deer-hunting trip, is believed to have fallen asleep at the wheel. His Ford Coupe left the highway, knocked over two guard posts and somersaulted twice, landing right-side up off the road. The victim was seen emerging from his car and heading back to the highway when he dropped lifeless to the ground. An autopsy revealed death was caused by a punctured lung.

November 1939

60 Years Ago

Oneonta School Lunch Menu: Monday – Baked pork slices with grazed apricot, sliced tomato, mashed potato, half pint of milk, bread and butter, apple sauce. Tuesday – Frankfurter on roll, green salad, milk, raisin and rice pudding. Wednesday – Meat loaf, Harvard beets, creamed potato, bread and butter, milk, fruited Jello. Thursday – Beef stew, cabbage and apricot salad; bread and butter, milk, ice cream. Friday – Baked tuna, macaroni and cheese, buttered Mexican corn, bread and butter, milk, and banana.
Chosen for their “morals, scholastic ability, personality and skill in sports,” seventeen Oneonta High School girls have been elected to the “Girls’ Leaders Club.” They are Joan Wood, Rose Zummo, Betty Oliver, Denella Chamberlain, Connie Cooper, Betsy Jester, Joyce Catella, Linda Hamm, Nancy Hall, Linda Vieweg, Martha Latcher, Jean Stevens, Dorothy Roe, Donna Loucks, Cheryl Bordinger, Kathleen Rogers and Lynn Nelson.

November 1959

40 Years Ago

Senator Edward M. Kennedy declared Wednesday he will seek the presidency in 1980 because President Carter has failed to provide leadership to a country that is “willing, even anxious to be on the march again.” The last of the Kennedy brothers and heir to a modern political dynasty made his announcement in Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall, listing what he called stark failures of the Carter administration’s domestic policies. Kennedy said that before the last Presidential election, “we were told that Americans were honest, loving, good, decent, and compassionate. Now the people are blamed for every national ill and scolded as greedy, wasteful and mired in malaise.

November 1979

10 Years Ago

On a breezy but comfortable Saturday afternoon at the National Soccer Hall of Fame fields, the second-seeded Yellowjackets dominated top-seeded Owego in a 3-0 victory, clinching their first sectional crown since 2003. “We definitely thought it was possible,” said sophomore Dan Joseph, who scored Oneonta’s first two goals, the first coming with 24 minutes, 11 seconds left in the first half. The Yellowjackets (16-2-1) await the winner of the Section III championship game with Marcellus and Skaneateles.

November 2009

HOMETOWN History Nov. 1, 2019

HOMETOWN History

Nov. 1, 2019

150 Years Ago

(The following is quoted from an address by Dr. Orson M. Allaben to the members of the Delhi Agricultural and Mechanics Society at its Annual Fair, September 30, 1869) “It is but a few years since the first telegraph line was put in operation between Baltimore and Washington City. If the steamboat had been a wonder, and the steam-car had astonished and amazed the world, the Electric Telegraph was considered the miracle of the age.
That people could freely converse with each other and hold communications at long distances through the agency of electricity, and a simple iron wire had been considered impossible. But, the capabilities of a free intellect, as developed in the perceptions and productions of free thought, aided by the manipulations of a free hand, solved the problem, and the impossible became possible before the light of scientific investigation.”

October 1869

125 Years Ago

Normal Schools – The Hartwick Seminary Monthly tells a great deal of truth in a single paragraph – “The state spends $300,000 a year on Normal Schools for the avowed purpose of preparing young persons for the positions of teachers. Only about one-fifth of the pupils become teachers. Not one-tenth of the teachers in public schools are graduates of Normal Schools. The State pays largely for the whistle.
It has invested $2,000,000 in Normal School property. The academies of the State are preparing more teachers for their work than all the Normal Schools combined, and doing it as well. For this the State pays nothing except the pittance that comes from the distribution of the Literature Fund.”

October 1894

100 Years Ago

Wednesday afternoon, a team of horses belonging to Charles McCumber of Sidney Center ran away and crashed into the curb in Oneonta, demolishing the wagon and dumping the furniture, with which the wagon was loaded, on the sidewalk. The runaway was caused by the whiffletree coming loose and striking the horses on the legs, frightening them and causing them to get beyond control of Mr. McCumber.
The horses were not injured. It is fortunate that neither Mr. McCumber nor his wife, who was on the wagon with him at the time, were not injured. The furniture was damaged quite badly. Mr. McCumber had been to Milford for the furniture and was taking it to his home at Sidney Center.

October 1919

80 Years Ago

“A well-educated Christian leadership will provide the best possible means of restoring a spiritual balance to our distraught world,” declared Dr. Henry J. Arnold, following his induction as the third President of Hartwick College. The ceremonies were followed by an inaugural luncheon in the church parlors after which delegates witnessed the football game between Hartwick and Connecticut State Teachers College. “The College President as a Leader” was the topic chosen by Dr. William H. Cowley, President of Hamilton College of Clinton, New York, in his welcoming address to Dr. Arnold at the inaugural ceremonies. Dr. Cowley pointed out that a college president must above all else be a leader, defining a leader as “a person who is going somewhere and is able to persuade others to come along with him.”

October 1939

40 Years Ago

SUCO got over the first hurdle in its fight for a fieldhouse Wednesday when the SUNY Board of Trustees approved the college’s $629,000 request to plan the building. Now, Oneonta State’s request must be included in the overall university budget submitted to the Governor. Then, it must be included in the Governor’s executive budget and approved by the legislature prior to March 31, 1980. The fieldhouse request is part of a $1.3 million request for money to be used for construction and planning on the Oneonta campus. SUCO’s request is part of a $122.2 million SUNY capital construction budget for the 1980-81 school year. SUCO requested $539,000 for construction and $763,000 for planning. The entire $1.3 million package was approved by the trustees.

October 1979

20 Years Ago

Measures aimed at cracking down on phony school bomb threats and teenage drinking and smoking were signed into law recently by New York State Governor George Pataki. The first law makes it a felony to falsely report bombs, fires, explosions or the release of hazardous substances at a school. “It’s not a simple prank. It’s a crime,” Pataki said. “Our schools should be sanctuaries of peace and learning, not zones of mayhem and fear.” Schools throughout the state were disrupted repeatedly by bomb threats after the April 20 massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado. Penalties for the crimes include driver’s license suspension. Teenagers may also receive a youthful offender or juvenile delinquency adjudication. A second bill encourages merchants to install scanners that verify a customer’s age in stores, bars and nightclubs. The scanners can determine whether a person can legally buy alcohol and tobacco by reading a bar code or magnetic strip on the back of driver’s licenses or non-driver identification cards.

October 1999

10 Years Ago

Last Saturday in Muller Plaza about 35 community members joined people from places as far away as Kazakhstan, India and Spain to make a lot of noise. Armed with kazoos, party horns, and slide whistles, the group raised a ruckus
at 3:50 p.m. as part of a global event to call attention to
environmental issues. Students in Todd Ellis’ Global
Climate Change class at Oneonta took part in the “Global Day for Environmental Action” called “Make a Noise
about Climate Change.” The event was sponsored by 350 Org., a grassroots organization. Groups from 50 countries also made noise at 3:50 p.m. in their time zones. Pictures from these events streamed live on a billboard in Times Square. The SUNY campus “Protect Your Environment Club” approached Ellis who said he realized this event could be another teaching moment for his class which looks at the science of climate change as well as the social, political and economic issues surrounding it. “The 350 org. movement is anchored by those like environmentalist Bill McKibben who care about all facets of climate change,” Ellis said.

October 2009

HOMETOWN History Oct. 11, 2019

HOMETOWN History

Oct. 11, 2019

150 Years Ago

The great storm which occurred here on the second and third of the month extended over several States – south beyond Washington and north and west into the British territory. Property to the amount of millions was destroyed and quite a number of lives lost, while shipping along the coast suffered very much. Hundreds of cattle, sheep and swine were carried into the streams and drowned, In the Hudson and other navigable rivers the boats were obliged to lay by on account of the great quantities of logs, timber, &c., floating down. Last Sunday, the third successive Sunday, it again rained all day. The streams and river here were high Monday morning, but not a flood. We see by the Albany papers that the rise in the river before twelve o’clock Sunday night was five feet, and the merchants began to move their goods to the upper stories.

October 1869

125 Years Ago

Local & Regional: H.G. Bishop, formerly of Oneonta, has bought off the Oneonta Press, and took possession last week.
Stamford now has a local telephone line with 21 subscribers. The subscribers not only have the advantages about the village, but they all connect with the Delhi, Grand Gorge, Harpersfield and Jefferson lines.
Ex-Governor Cornell is out with the
usual anti-election statements about the fearful increase of taxation under Democratic rule. He alleges that the state taxes have been increased nearly 100 percent. This is the annual chronic nonsense of Republican leaders. However, Delaware County is not weighted down with Democratic misrule. In 1882, the tax budget for Delaware County was $17,600. Under Republican rule it steadily increased, until in 1893 it was $63,800, an increase of nearly 400 percent. Meanwhile the increase in population has risen only about 5 percent.

October 1894

80 Years Ago

Speaking to members of Oneonta’s Rotary Club at the Hotel Oneonta yesterday afternoon, Bishop G. Ashton Oldham of the Episcopal Diocese of Albany said “With the determination to stay out of Europe’s conflict, I am in complete agreement – but for a different motive than that advanced by some of our leaders who seek the protection of our skins and our possessions, but rather because I want to see America ready to serve after the war in the leadership toward a lasting peace.” The Bishop commented further on the war and its effect on churches saying “the effect of war on our churches is feared by many who point out that they suffered during the last war because each side claimed that the church was on its side. However, that there is any war simply demonstrates that the church does not have the influence it should have upon governments, for every church and every denomination is most active in the cause of peace. Perhaps the fault lies in large part with the church which is too material and not sacrificial enough.”

October 1939

60 Years Ago

Bradenton, Florida – The home an elderly Negro woman was building in a new white neighborhood has been damaged by fire and authorities say the blaze was set deliberately. The woman, 67-year-old Elizabeth Jenkins has owned a 2.5 acre tract west of Bradenton since 1916. She has lived in one house there for 43 years and was building a new frame house nearby. She planned to move into the new house in a few weeks. Miss Jenkins’ property is surrounded by a fashionable white neighborhood which has been developed during the past two or three years. Sheriff Roy Baden said the woman had asked $20,000 for her land. But, when developers offered to meet her price, she hiked the figure to $40,000 and later to $50,000

October 1959

40 Years Ago

Hartwick College has received a $100,000 federal grant to establish a continuing education program for registered nurses. The grant, provided by the Health, Education and Welfare agency will fund classes, seminars and workshops for three years for nurses in Otsego, Delaware and Chenango counties. Hartwick College nursing department chair Mary Sees said the project is intended to provide additional training to as many as possible of the 1,300 nurses employed in the area. The exact line-up of programs will be determined in a survey of nurses. A coordinator will be hired.

October 1979

20 Years Ago

A wallet stolen during a recent robbery was recovered according to Oneonta police sources. In the past three weeks, three incidents of armed robbery were reported to police, compared to two robberies in all of 1998. “To have this number reported in this short a time is alarming,” said Oneonta Detective Sgt. Joseph Redmond. “People should exercise caution as in everything they do in life.” No one was hurt in the armed robbery incidents, during which wallets, cash, and keys were stolen, police said. At about 3:20 a.m. October 2, three people walking near 218 Chestnut Street told police they were robbed by two ski-masked men with handguns. Minutes later on West Street, another man was accosted by two men, one with a handgun. And, a man near Potter and Maple streets reported being robbed about an hour later, police said. Previously, a man told police someone had held a knife to his throat at about 3:15 a.m., September 23 while he was walking on Myrtle Avenue.

October 1999

10 Years Ago

When Chad Hall, a farmboy from Walton, was studying electrical mechanical design at SUNY Delhi, he figured he get a job as a draftsman, maybe in a some local firm. And he did, at Oneonta’s Custom Electronics. But instead of a job, Hall had found himself a launching pad.
Today, a mere 34, he’s COO of Custom Electronics’ spinoff Ioxus, jetting all over the country, to Korea, to Europe, pressing the cutting edge of ultracapacitors, a technology that, quite simply, could change the energy world as we know it.
The possibility is being recognized Thursday, Oct. 10, at the Otsego County Chamber’s 10th annual Small Business Banquet at The Otesaga, where Hall – and Chief Technical Officer Thor Eilertsen – will be accepting the chamber’s Breakthrough Award on their company’s behalf.

Oct. 9, 2009

Wilcox Staff Thanks Community At Museum’s Open House

Thank You, Swart Wilcox

Volunteers Tell Supporters

The staff of the Swart Wilcox House hosted an open house this afternoon in appreciation to all supporters who helped preserve Oneonta’s oldest surviving house and continue to prosper. Above, volunteers Norma Slawson, Debby Clough, Loraine Tyler, Pat Follett, Ann Schulz, Helen Rees, Richard Tyler, Ginny Pudelka and Len Pudelka pose for a photo on the lawn with a celebratory cake made by Barbara Clark, Otego. All but two items in the house were donated by local people from. Inset, Debby Clough holds up one of three nightgowns originally from the house donated by Ken Jones (on left) and wife Andrea. “We got them in an auction in 1974.” explained Jones. “They were in a box with other fabric and sugar bags. Even used fabric was valuable back then; they didn’t throw anything out.” Markers were also placed around the property in honor of Fred Morris, Mary Konstanty and Bill Slawson. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Hometown History Jan 31 2019

HOMETOWN History Jan. 30 – Feb. 1, 2019

150 Years Ago
There is no difficulty whatever in managing the finances of the government, provided Congress and the Secretary of the Treasury act as practical businessmen act in similar circumstances. Nothing should be attempted which cannot be done safely and surely. The government should be in a condition to defy all combinations of speculations, and all oppositions from any quarter. It won’t do to make experiments; neither will it do at all to follow any precedents furnished by other nations. Trouble would be the immediate result.
Those men who are very difficult in choosing wives seem as if they would take none of Nature’s ready-made works, but want a woman manufactured particularly to their order.
February 1869

125 Years Ago
The McCammon Piano Company apparently is not feeling the effects of the prevailing hard times. The factory is running on “full time” – ten hours per day – and the work force has been gradually increased as the orders have become more numerous. We learn that the output for January will exceed that of the previous month by twenty per cent. The company is now getting out a handsome new catalog which will be ready for distribution next week.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, MAY 25
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, MAY 25

History Exhibit: State Militia

& National Guard in Oneonta

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EXHIBIT RECEPTION – 2 p.m. “Oneonta’s Own: The State Militia & the National Guard in Oneonta, 1812 – 2003” features Oneonta-related items on loan from NYS Military Museum, & from the collections of GOHS, Hartwick College. Oneonta History Center, 183 Main St., Oneonta. Call 607-432-0960 or visit www.oneontahistory.org

JURIED ART SHOW – 5 – 7 p.m. Opening reception of the 27th annual regional show, the exhibit “A Singularity of Vision,” by E.A. Pilbeam, and The Leatherstocking Brush & Pallette Club Fine Arts Exhibit. Awards at 6 p.m. Cooperstown Art Association. Call 607-547-9777 or visit www.cooperstownart.com

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, JUNE 25
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for SUNDAY, JUNE 25

Share Musical History

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ORAL HISTORY – 2 p.m. Share your stories about Oneonta’s Music History, facilitated by Dr. Alan Donovan. All are invited. Oneonta History Center, 183 Main St., Oneonta. Call (607)432-0960 or visit www.OneontaHistory.org

ART BAZAAR – 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Browse the collection of gently used artwork and fine crafts for sale by artists at the Spring Cleaning Art Bazaar. Cooperstown Art Association. www.cooperstownart.com

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, NOV. 18
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, NOV. 18

Oneonta History Center

Opens Holiday Exhibit

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To Learn How You Can Help Area Families This Holiday Season CLICK HERE.

HOLIDAY DISPLAY OPENS – Noon-3 p.m. Bresee’s Santa, model train layouts, and other traditional holiday displays. Oneonta History Center, 183 Main St., Oneotna. Info, (607)432-0960 or www.oneontahistory.org

FUNDRAISER – 4:30-7 p.m. Brooks Barbeque Chicken Dinner & Homemade Pie Sale. Proceeds benefit the church’s Global Mission Outreach. Christ Episcopal Church, 69 Fair St., Cooperstown. Info, (607)547-9555.

GINGERBREAD CONTEST ENTRY – 3-6 p.m. Gingerbread house contest will be accepting contest and exhibit entries. Foothills Performing Arts Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta. signedevents.com/united-states/oneonta/gingerbread-contest/ , (607)432-2941

PRESENTATION – 7:30 p.m. Dr. Allison Oakes, American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project, presents on the Return of the American Chestnut. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. Free and open to the public. Includes refreshments. Info, info@doas.us or visit doas.us/event/return-american-chestnut

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21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103