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News of Otsego County

nutrition

DUNCAN: Quality Of Food Goes Back To Soil’s Quality
LETTER from R. SCOTT DUNCAN

Quality Of Food Goes

Back To Soil’s Quality

To the Editor:

Vitamins, minerals, and other supplements – there are numbers of people who say you should take vitamins.

Vitamin C for tissue repair, A for healthy skin, B for stress, E for women over 40, and a very popular one today – Vitamin D for overall health.

But the cost of the vitamins keeps getting higher and higher. A men’s multivitamin today will cost well over $50!

I was looking at the label on the jar and it said that a number of the ingredients are foods, from foods? Why not just eat the right foods? Well, they say foods are
not as nutritional us as they used to be.

I remember reading about one genetically modified grain that was created so it would grow faster. One of the reasons that it grows faster was that the roots are shorter. Well , the shorter roots do not go deep enough to absorb enough minerals, which in turn affects the brain function because of the lack of the minerals.

You can see why a lot of people think that you should eat organic, non-GMO foods. So I wonder why isn’t the food as good as it used to be?

A lot has to do with the soil. It’s been depleted and in many places contaminated.

There’s a graveyard for cars around here. Tons of cars lined up near a river. Every time I drive by I think how stupid to be so close to the river. The acid rain comes down on all the cars and carries all the pollutants into the river and into the farmland.

Man just ignores the cycles of nature, giving little respect to the natural process. They think science can do a better job. There is no balance between nature and science. You really don’t want to wait for nature to build the soil back up.

The way she takes care of things! Think about this: the COVID virus. It is keeping people inside, thereby reducing their impact on nature. Example: air pollution. The virus is killing lots of people, which reduces the population and also the stress on the environment.

Nature has her way of balance if we don’t play fair. Building up the quality of soil in Otsego County should be a pretty high priority on the list. Quality of soil equals quality of food equals quality of people.

I wonder what is being done to protect and enrich our local soil for, as they say, future generations?

R. SCOTT DUNCAN
Hartwick Forrest

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2020
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, JANUARY 21

Farmer’s Learn Animal Nutrition

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FARM CLASS – 5 – 7 p.m. Learn about sheep, goat nutrition for this season when the farmer is solely responsible for the feed with Dr. Tatiana Stanton, Small Ruminant Specialist from Cornell University. Cost, $5/person. Cornell Cooperative Extension, 123 Lake St., Cooperstown. 315-866-7920 or visit cceschoharie-otsego.org/events/2020/01/21/sheep-goat-nutrition-101

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, MAR. 2
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, MAR. 2

Sneak Peek At Exhibit

On Women’s Rights

14-19eventspage

VOTING RIGHTS PRESENTATION – 7 p.m. Public is invited to history program, “Votes for Women” by Ashley Hopkins-Benton and Jennifer LeMak from the NYS Museum. Offers a sneak peak at the upcoming exhibit marking the centennial of womens suffrage. Christ Church Parish Hall, 69 Fair St., Cooperstown. Info, Cindy Falk cynthia.g.falk@gmail.com

WOMEN’S GATHERING – 5 p.m. Follow up gathering and potluck dinner to discuss issues and further action. Open to ALL supporters of the Women’s March Movement. Unitarian Universalist Society of Oneonta, 12 Ford Ave., Oneonta. Info, ms.elayneous@yahoo.com

YPN NETWORKING – 6-8 p.m. Come meet young professionals from the Otsego area. The topic for this evening is community involvement. Roundhouse Indoor Golf, 174 Roundhouse Rd., Oneonta. Info, www.facebook.com/YoungProfessionalsNetworkYPN/

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