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News of Otsego County

peter oberacker

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Discuss a sustainable workforce 07-27-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for TUESDAY, JULY 27

Discuss a sustainable workforce

14-19eventspage

WORKFORCE FORUM – 9 – 11 a.m. Business owners are invited to discuss their employment needs, problems, and how to address them. Each will be given 2 – 3 minutes to discuss with elected officials including Congressman Antonio Delgado, State Senator Peter Oberacker, Assemblymen John Salka, Chris Tague, & Brian Miller. Free, registration for Zoom meeting required. Presented by Otsego County Chamber of Commerce. 607-432-4500 or visit members.otsegocc.com/events/details/2021-workforce-needs-forum-delgado-oberacker-and-assemblymen-salka-miller-and-tague-to-hear-your-thoughts-460

Sen. Oberacker: Flood costs could exceed town budgets

Flood damage in Gilbertsville on Sunday, July 18, shows the extent of the problems left behind by Saturday’s storm. (Janice Costello).

Sen. Oberacker:
Flood costs could
exceed town budgets

By KEVIN LIMITI • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

The flooding that occurred in Gilbertsville, Morris and Pittsfield on Saturday, July 17, is expected to cost millions and elected officials are calling for federal and state funding to pay for some of the damages.

State Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Maryland, estimated that the amount of money needed for the flood damage in Butternuts and Morris would far exceed their total respective town budgets.

“After what I’ve seen, it would be conservative (that damages) would cost at least their budgets and then some,” Oberacker said.

Susquehanna SPCA celebrates opening of new facility with ribbon cutting, open house
Executive Director Stacie Haynes, left, and Board President Henry Gaylord Dillingham cut the ribbon at the new SPCA building. (Kevin Limiti/AllOtsego.com).

Susquehanna SPCA
celebrates opening of new facility
with ribbon cutting, open house

By KEVIN LIMITI• Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

OTSEGO Hundreds gathered outside the Susquehanna SPCA’s new facility in Cooperstown for a ribbon cutting ceremony Saturday, July 17, which they say would help better service the needs of animals who are homeless and in need of caring adoptees.

In spite of the humidity one young woman apparently fainted during remarks from State Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Maryland the crowd was lively and enthusiastic, some bringing their own dogs to the ceremony.

Stacie Haynes, who as executive director has been at the forefront of this whole project, told the crowd this has been her “dream job” and joked she “hasn’t been home since.”

“I’m a dreamer and optimistic by nature,” Haynes said, but never imagined she’d be “standing on a multi-million dollar campus.”

Haynes thanked the “Shelter Us” capital campaign, which was largely responsible for raising the money necessary to build and open the facility, calling them an “all-star group.”

The Shelter Us Capital Campaign was able to secure a grant from the New York State Animal Capital Fund from the Department of Agriculture and Markets in order to move the facility to state Route 28 near Cooperstown.

Cooperstown Distillery celebrates expansion with ribbon cutting while touting local businesses
Mayor Ellen Tillapaugh, left, and Eugene Marra cut the ceremonial ribbon in front of Cooperstown Distillery. (Kevin Limiti/Allotsego)

Cooperstown Distillery celebrates expansion
with ribbon cutting,
while touting local businesses

By KEVIN LIMITI • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – The mood was jovial Saturday, June 12, as about 60 people, including elected officials state Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, Cooperstown Mayor Ellen Tillapaugh and State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, gathered outside the Cooperstown Distillery on Railroad Avenue for a ribbon cutting ceremony for the opening of the expansion to celebrate what is considered a big success for local businesses in particular and a revitalization of Railroad Avenue specifically.

Eugene Marra, the founder of Cooperstown Distillery, began with an emotional moment on losing his dad to the coronavirus. He said his dad was his “biggest fan and number one investor in this opportunity.”

However, the atmosphere was celebratory.

“It’s an auspicious occasion for sure,” Marra said. “As much as I want to claim it as my own, I want to share it all with you because you have made it possible,” Marra said.

Eugene Marra, founder of Cooperstown Distillery, speaks in front of the Distillery ahead of the ribbon cutting ceremony.

Marra spoke at length about the trials and tribulations of opening the expanded brewery on Railroad Avenue. He talked about how COVID had delayed the opening a year and how the distillery was tasked with producing hand sanitizer during that time.

He also mentioned how he was initially told by real estate agents that opening a distillery in Cooperstown was not possible.

“I like to believe we are responsible for what has become a revitalization of Railroad Avenue,” Marra said, saying that industry on that street in years past, “appeared to be dead.”

Marra said that Cooperstown Distillery, which has been around for eight years, is the “story about how it takes a village … the village of Cooperstown.”

Marra said he was loaned about $100,000 and received state fund grants of about $80,000, citing that his success was thanks to “local money.”

“We all hear these phrases, buy local, shop local, stay local. We are all of that,” Marra said, calling the Cooperstown Distillery the “fabric of this community on a very local, grassroots level.”

“We wouldn’t want to be anywhere else than the village of Cooperstown,” Marra said.

Tillapaugh said the Cooperstown Distillery is a business “in which the village takes a great deal of pride.”

She noted how the village implemented zoning law changes in order to help grow businesses.

“I certainly know what this Railroad Avenue looked like for decades,” Tillapaugh said.

She noted it was once not considered industrially viable, but that developments on the street, including the distillery and the Railroad Inn, created “positive synergy.”

DiNapoli joked he didn’t accept the invitation “because of the complimentary drinks,” but was happy to come because of how difficult a year it had been.

State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli speaks in front of Cooperstown Distillery. (Kevin Limiti/Allotsego.com).

DiNapoli said that while Cooperstown is known for its Baseball Hall of Fame and Fenimore art museum that “the distillery becomes yet another reason to visit.”

“This really was an incredible effort with all stakeholders playing their role. That’s usually not how it happens,” DiNapoli said. “This is the model that should be replicated.”

DiNapoli said he was going to go back to Albany and tell other lawmakers to “look to what happened in Cooperstown as an example of how it should work” in terms of state funding for local businesses.

After the ceremony, people took a tour of the distillery.

 

 

City of the Hills: May 27, 2021

City of the Hills

City to hold Memorial Day parade Monday

The Memorial Day Parade and celebration is set to kick off on Monday, May 31, with a parade starting at the Foothills Performing Arts Center at 10 a.m., going into Main Street and ending at Neahwa Park. Masks and social distancing are required.


Oberacker to give historic presentation

State Sen. Peter Oberacker will be giving a presentation to the Town of Maryland Historical Society at 6:30 p.m., Thursday, May 27.
The society will also be selling donuts, 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, May 30.

Oberacker To Urge Probe In Nursing-Home Deaths

‘WE CARE’ REMEMBRANCE SOUGHT

Oberacker To Urge Probe

In Nursing-Home Deaths

Senator Oberacker speaks with Anne Brancati, from Voices for Seniors advocacy group, after the “We Care” Remembrance Day memorial event in Albany today. Anne’s mother, Eleanor Ablett Brancati, 86, passed away Jan. 25 at the Fort Hudson Nursing Home in Fort Edward. (Jeff Bishop photo)

ALBANY – State Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, today attended a memorial gathering marking the one-year anniversary of the Cuomo Administration’s order that sent COVID-positive patients directly into New York’s nursing homes.

Oberacker told the gathering he is co-sponsoring a Senate Resolution (J554) which would designate March 25 as “We Care” Remembrance Day.

Baseball Camps Wait For Albany Guidance

Baseball Camps Wait

For Albany Guidance

Quarantine Rules Also Turn Off Some Families

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – Health and wealth.

Those are the two concepts people in government and the tourist industry are using in discussing the news that the two youth-baseball camps, Dreams Park in Hartwick Seminary and All Star Village in West Oneonta, are seeking permission to open someway, somehow, in the 2021 season.

“If they can conform to the state’s requirements and do it safely, they should be allowed to open,” said Cooperstown Mayor Ellen Tillapaugh Kuch. Others interviewed echoed her sentiment.

Dreams Park is planning to extend its season from May to September, with fewer players, who would stay on-campus, as in the past.  (Early, it was incorrectly reported that the players would stay off-campus.)

All must present negative COVID tests on arrival. Dreams Park’s local lawyer, Gar Gozigian, is looking for state Health Department guidance and permission to proceed.

All Star Village issued a more general statement, saying it would implement all health and safety measures, and concluding, “As things change we are confident restrictions will expire and we will update.”

County Board’s Partisan Divide Comes To Fore

County Board’s

Partisan Divide

Comes To Fore

Resolutions On Hot Current Issues

Blunted, Or Sent Back To Committee

County Reps. Dan Wilber, a Republican, top row, center, and Clark Oliver, the county Democratic chairman, in box below him, jousted this morning in discussion of partisan issues.   Others in top row are Vice Chair Meg Kennedy, from county office building, and Ed Frazier, top right.  Second row, from left, Reps. Keith McCarty, Michele Farwell, Jenifer Mickle and Adrienne Martini.  Third row, from left, are board Chairman David Bliss, County Attorney Ellen Coccoma, Andrew Stammel and Jill Basile.  Bottom row, Danny Lapin. (From Zoom)

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – Partisan perspectives led to lively debates this morning at the February meeting of the county Board of Representatives, but the three related resolutions were blunted or failed to reach the floor.

  • First, a resolution – to chide Assemblyman John Salka and state Sen. Peter Oberacker for a bill specifying New Yorkers can refuse the COVID vaccine – was watered down into a neutral statement asking the state Legislature to do what it could to expedite inoculations. It passed unanimously.
  • Second came two warring resolutions on violence – the Republican one decrying the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol AND violence at Black Lives Matter protests over the summer; the Democratic one decrying just the Jan. 6 assault. Both failed to garner sufficient support.

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO: Annual Ice Harvest Goes Online 02-04-21
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4

Annual Ice Harvest Goes Online

14-19eventspageICE HARVEST – 7 p.m. Hanford Ice Harvest goes online. Presenting ‘Winter’s Coolest Crop: Ice Harvesting History and Culture’ with staff Liz Callahan, Andrew Robichaud, assistant professor of History whose in-progress book is a history of the ice trade in North America. They will also discuss the annual festival celebrates this community tradition. Free, registration required. Presented by Hanford Mills Museum, East Meredith. 607-278-5744 or visit www.hanfordmills.org

Schenevus Alumni Honor Sen. Oberacker, 3 Others

Schenevus Alumni Honor

Sen. Oberacker, 3 Others

Oberacker

SCHENEVUS – The Schenevus Central School Alumni Association and its Alumni of Distinction Committee today announced state Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, will be one of four honorees at the second annual Alumni of Distinction Awards at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 4, via Zoom.

The three other honorees will be:

  • Robert Barnes, county fire coordinator/emergency manager for nine years and Oneonta fire chief and emergency manager for 19 years.
  • William Fredette, attending physician/medical director, Fox Pediatrics, Oneonta.
  • Timothy French, Bassett Hospital chief resident and, for the last 13 years, hospitalist at Catholic Medical Center, Manchester, N.H.

New Senator Joining Salka To Stem COVID Overreach

New Senator Joining Salka

To Stem COVID Overreach

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Senator Oberacker and his wife Shannon smile at the end of his swearing-in New Year’s Day in Schenevus. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

This could be the begining of a beautiful friendship.

Fresh from his swearing-in as state Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, in his hometown fire hall at 1:08 p.m. New Year’s Day, the freshman signaled he is planning to collaborate with Assemblyman John Salka, R-Brookfield, on two key pieces of legislation:

One, as he promised during the campaign, Oberacker plans to introduce legislation mirroring Salka’s to overturn the Democrats’ bail reform, which has allowed suspects in petty and some less-petty crimes to be immediately released.

Two, the new senator is planning to carry the flag in the upper house for Salka’s counter-legislation to two Democratic bills requiring New Yorkers to be vaccinated for COVID-19 or, in one of the bills, face possible detention. “That should be a personal choice,” said Oberacker.

“Peter and I have become good friends,” the second-term assemblyman said Tuesday, Jan. 5, the first day of the 2021 session. “I’m excited about having a member of the Senate to consider and possibly carry our legislation through this session.”

Both men appeared Tuesday morning via Zoom on the Otsego County Chamber of Commerce’s State of the State meeting.

Afterwards, Oberacker, his Chief of Staff (and former campaign manager) Ron Wheeler, and his Communications Director Jeff Bishop headed to Albany, where the senator has been assigned Office 506 in the Legislative Office Building in Empire State Plaza.

Salka was clearing his desk in his Oneida office, planning to head up to Albany Wednesday.

To help continuity between his predecessor, state Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, who represented Otsego County in Albany for 34 years, the new senator will occupy Seward’s Oneonta office on South Main Street.

He has also kept most of Seward’s staff, except his chief of staff, Duncan Davie, the former Oneonta town supervisor, who retired.

Already, Oberacker said in an interview Monday, Jan. 4, constituents are calling, seeking his assistance.

On New Year’s Day, Maryland Town Justice Joseph Staruck swears-in newly elected state Sen. Peter Oberacker, whose wife Shannon
holds the Bible. Oberacker’s mother, Carol, also a town justice, served with Staruck. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

The foremost issue is COVID-fueled unemployment. “I’ve had many inquiries. A lot of folks are wanting to know what should they do, how they should go about it.” He convened a staff meeting that afternoon “to put together an action plan.”

The second issue came out of the Mohawk Valley, where RemArms, controlled by Roundhill Group LLC, described in news reports as “a group of experienced firearms manufacturing and hunting industry professionals,” is seeking to work around the United Mine Workers in reopening the Ilion plant.

The plant, which has traditionally employed many people from Northern Otsego County, was sold to RemArms when Remington was broken up under the supervision of U.S. Bankruptcy Court, according to www.syracuse.com.

Oberacker said he has been seeking to ensure to clear red tape and allow the plant to reopen as soon as possible.

The new senator attended two days of orientation at the state Capitol in mid-December, “to get to know my fellow senators,” and to get guidance from “the vast knowledge that incumbents have. It harkens back to being a freshman on campus.”

Asked about the chances of overturning bail reform, Salka pointed out that Upstate Democrats like Assemblywoman Marianne Buttenschon, D-Marcy, support him, suggesting he may win votes from across the aisle on his measure.

“We’re hoping to present these bills” – bail reform and blocking mandatory vaccinations – “and get bi-partisan support,” he said.

Meanwhile, he pointed out, Job One will be “the 800-pound gorilla in the room – the $16 billion deficit,” which has risen from $10 billion in a year due to COVID challenges.

Oberacker, Salka Confer As 2021 Session Begins

Oberacker, Salka Confer

As 2021 Session Begins

State Sen. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, and Assemblyman John Salka, R-Brookfield, confer today in the senator’s Office 506 in the Legislative Office Building in Albany as the 2021 session gets underway. Oberacker, elected Nov. 3, and Salka, now in his second term, have said they plan to collaborate on two pieces of legislation in particular: One, to overturn bail reform and, two, to allow New Yorkers to accept or reject, without penalty, taking a COVID-19 vaccine. For details, see this week’s Freeman’s Journal and Hometown Oneonta. (Jeff Bishop photo)
Despite Democrat Objections, Bliss Relected As Chair

10 AYES Vs. 3 NAYS, ABSTENTION

Despite Democrat

Objections, Bliss

Relected As Chair

Turmoil Over Oberacker’s

Vacancy Continues To Sting

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

David Bliss

COOPERSTOWN – Democratic unhappiness over how state Sen. Peter Oberacker was replaced on the county board spilled over at today’s reorganizational meeting.

County Board Chair David Bliss, R-Cooperstown/Town of Middlefield, was reelected, but the vote was 10-3, plus  one abstention.  And not before Bliss was criticized for partisanship, poor communication and a lack of vision.

“The people of the county deserve a county chair who puts the good of the county above party and does not work the rules for partisan advantage,” said Michelle Farwell, D-Morris, one of two reps speaking out against Bliss’ reelection.

The other was Jill Basile, D-Oneonta, who said, “We saw our lack of transparency, partisanship and poor communications in the appointment of the District 6 representative,” Jennifer Mickle, R-Town of Maryland, who succeeded Oberacker.

Senator Oberacker Takes Oath Of Office

Senator Oberacker

Takes Oath Of Office

County Rep Succeeds Senator Seward

Peter Oberacker is sworn in at 1 p.m. today in the Schenevus Fire Hall as state senator for the 51st District, which includes Otsego and nine other Central New York Counties.  His wife Shannon holds the Bible.  About 20 friends and well-wishers attended, the number limited by COVID precautions.  A reception followed at FormTech Solutions, Oberacker’s business on Route 7 east of the hamlet.  Inset, Oberacker’s FormTech partner and campaign manager, Ron Wheeler, is sworn in as Maryland town supervisor.   His wife Christine  holds the Bible.  Town Justice Joseph Staruck, a fellow local judge for 28 years with Oberacker’s late mother, Carol, administered both oaths.  Oberacker, who was a three-term county representatives for the Schenevus area (Maryland, Worcester, Westford and Decatur), succeeds state Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, who represented the county in Albany for 34 years. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Scrappy, Innovative GOP Chair Resigns, Focuses on Consulting

Scrappy, Innovative GOP Chair

Resigns, Focuses on Consulting

By JIM KEVLIN • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

Vince Casale and wife (and fellow consultant) Lynn Krogh with a wall of memorabilia. (Jim Kevline/AllOTSEGO.com)

It was 2013. The issue was fracking. And four prominent local Republicans knocked on Vince Casale’s door.

“It was conveyed to me that the party was in some trouble,” said Casale, who last week advised the Republican County Committee he is resigning as chairman.

“My work is done,” he said. “It’s time for a change.”

He recommended Lori Lehenbauer of Worcester, Republican county elections commissioner, as his successor.

His seven years spanned the tenures of four of his Democratic counterparts.

In 2013, the first Democrat elected to countywide office in memory, Dan Crowell, was running for reelection unopposed, Casale recalled.

There was a shortage of candidates and, “when people were asked to run, they were just left to themselves.”

The committee had been using raffles to raise money – that was illegal, it turned out, leading to a sizable fine.

“At the time, I was consulting,” Vince recounted the other day – he still operates the Cooperstown-based Casale Group with his wife, Lynn Krogh, most recently helping guide state Sen.-elect Peter Oberacker’s campaign. “I was very happy.”

But the GOP contingent told him, “We need to win races. You know how to win races.”

Remembers Casale, “With the blessing of Senator Seward, I was good to go. I took over in September,” two months before the fall elections.

“The first thing we do is run polling,” a first in local races. It discovered not only newcomers, but longtime incumbents were in tight races, he said. “It’s going to be a drubbing like we’d never seen.”

Fracking had damaged the Republicans, but by then it had been discovered there was too little natural gas here to frack. The issue “was just at or past the peak,” Casale said.

“I told the candidates: Don’t mention it. It wasn’t that we wanted it or didn’t want it. It was political survival,”

The new message: Republicans will protect your tax dollars.

“Rick Hulse was down by over 20 points when we first did that poll,” said Casale. “I remember him cutting it to 14 points. I had him down to 7 points. ‘If we only had one more week,’ I told myself.

“I went into Election Day thinking we would lose the Town of Otsego,” including most of Cooperstown, he said. “We ended up winning by 10 points.”

Republicans Janet Quackenbush and Craig Gelbsman also won in Democratic Oneonta, and Len Carson, the retired fire captain.

Casale, then 40, was no stranger to politics. At age 5, he was handing out pencils at county fairs on behalf of his father, Assemblyman Tony Casale of Herkimer.

During school breaks, young Vince would ask to accompany his dad to Albany.

A music major, he taught for a few years before joining Herkimer Arc, then the community college, as development director.

He started the Casale Group in 2007. His first campaign: Cooperstown’s Mike Coccoma, for state Supreme Court. The next year, John Lambert for county judge. “The company just kind of grew,” he said. “I had a decision to make: Continue as is, or make the jump.” And jump he did.

This year, he managed the elevation of county Judge Brian Burns of Oneonta to replace the retiring Coccoma, and the campaign of county Rep. Peter Oberacker, R-Schenevus, to succeed Seward, keeping both influential positions in Otsego County.

Now, he and Lynn are busy, but looking forward to 2022, the next gubernatorial and U.S. Senate races.

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