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Seward

The Center Will Hold – If You Vote Nov. 6

AllOTSEGO.com, HOMETOWN ONEONTA,

FREEMAN’S JOURNAL ENDORSEMENTS

The Center Will Hold

– If You Vote Nov. 6

As voters – in Otsego County, the 19th Congressional District and nationally – struggle to make the right decision in the Tuesday, Nov. 6, midterm elections, a study, “The Hidden Tribes of America,” surfaces with a conclusion that has been widely commented on nationally:
“A majority of Americans (61 percent), whom we’ve called the ‘Exhausted Majority,’ are fed up by Americans’ polarization. They know we have more in common than that which divides us: our belief in freedom, equality and the pursuit of the American Dream. They share a deep sense of gratitude that they are citizens of the United States. They want us to move past our differences.”
It the past two years, those of us with that sensibility have been screamed at by two sides that, it turns out, are fringes. On the left, “Progressive Activists,” according to the study, are a mere 8 percent of the citizenry; on the right, “Devoted Conservatives” are only 6 percent.
If you consider yourself a centrist, you may believe your views will be overwhelmed at the ballot box. Not so, “Hidden Tribes” tells us; in effect, it’s the wish of a sizeable majority of Americans to find common ground.
This is by way of preamble to this newspaper’s endorsements, below, which are an effort to make recommendations based on the merits, not through any particular political prism.
Be sure to vote Nov. 6 – polls will be open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. – and vote your conscience. You may be surprised how much you are in sync with the majority of your
fellow Americans. So vote.
As usual, these endorsement editorials appear 10 days before Election Day, to allow you to agree or disagree in next week’s Letter to the Editor columns.
Send letters by noon Monday,
Oct. 29, to jimk@allotsego.com
Whether you agree or not, be of good cheer.

ZAGATA: Science Can Be Political Tool, And Even Worse, Up For Sale

Column by Mike Zagata for October 26, 2018.

Science Can Be Political Tool,
And Even Worse, Up For Sale

Mike Zagata

I read with interest and admiration the article in last week’s paper about the different kinds of “truth.”
Objective truth is the “truth” that
is supported by fact. Subjective “truth” is what circumstances point toward or what we want, based on the information we have at our disposal,
to believe.
The Senate confirmation hearings for judge, now justice, Kavanaugh were used in the article to illustrate the differences.
I found myself agreeing with the points being made until the author alleged that
it was the Republicans
who failed in the search for
THE truth by not having the FBI conduct a thorough investigation.
The truth is that we have no idea whether or not their investigation was “thorough.” What we do know is that the Democrats
sat on the information alleging
sexual abuse until AFTER the
Senate hearings.
Had they wanted the FBI to do a thorough investigation in search of the “truth”, the information about alleged sexual abuse would have been provided to the FBI
BEFORE, not AFTER, the
hearings. Had that been done, the FBI’s findings would have been a part of those hearings and thus fully vetted.
Based on that information, one can conclude the real agenda was not a search for the “truth”, but an attempt to delay the judge’s confirmation until after the mid-term elections.

Does that conclusion represent the objective or subjective “truth”? Each of us enters the search for the real “truth”

with built-in bias. That makes it very difficult to accept
information that differs from the results we want, i.e.
don’t confuse me with the facts.
It becomes tempting to omit certain information when offering our version of the truth to others. For example, the author omitted the fact that the ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee sat on the allegation of sexual abuse for six weeks prior to the hearings. Without that information, it is much easier to “sell” the truth that the FBI didn’t do a thorough investigation.

Finding the truth is not easy. I was invited to lunch recently by a person who wanted to talk about climate change. The person was very sincere and had done considerable research on the topic. In fact, it was that research that led to confusion, because one source stated that the recent deviations in our climate were outside the norm and another source said they weren’t.
How does the average lay person or non-scientist determine which one is the “truth”?
Unfortunately, science has become a political tool and, worse yet, can be for sale. If a scientist gets a government funded grant to do research on climate change, should that scientist’s findings have to agree with the government’s position? The answer is “no”, but grants have been withdrawn when
they didn’t.
That’s not true “science” where we test the null hypothesis and let the chips fall where they might. If we deliberately omit data points because they aren’t consistent with what
we want them to be, that isn’t
good science.
The downsides of doing so are a loss of public confidence and the expenditure of scarce capital to cure a problem that may not exist. If we cry “wolf” when there is no wolf, will the public be willing to support what needs to be done when a real “wolf” exists?

It’s election season, and we’re all being bombarded by various versions of the truth by candidates for office. I do not personally know all of the candidates, so I can only reach the subjective truth about how I feel they will perform if elected.
I do, however, personally know two of the candidates – state Sen. Jim Seward and Congressman John Faso. I worked with them while serving as your DEC commissioner and knew John as a neighbor.
I have watched them make the tough decisions based upon the objective truth when they could have ducked them. Those decisions were intended to provide real, measurable benefit to their constituents. That’s the objective truth based on fact.

Mike Zagata, DEC commissioner in the Pataki Administration and an environmental executive for Fortune 500 companies, lives in West Davenport.

Seward Delivers $1M For Hartwick Upgrade

Seward Delivers $1M

For Hartwick Upgrade

Senator Seward discusses water-system improvements wiith Town Supervisor Robert O’Brien, and Town Board member Chris Briggs. (Jeff Bishop photo)

HARTWICK – State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, today joined Town of Hartwick officials to announce a $1 million state grant to fund major upgrades to the town’s water system.  The full cost of improvements will be $1.35 million.

“This state grant will help ensure that the upgrades will take place without a major rate hike or tax increase for those who rely on the system,” Seward said.

Ommegang, Springbrook, YMCA Among Winners Of Otsego CFAs

CUOMO GRANTS TOTAL $4M LOCALLY

Ommegang, YMCA Among

Otsego Winners Of CFAs

Otsego County attendees today as Governor Cuomo announced $750 million in economic-development grants statewide included state Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, second from right; County Board Chair Kathy Clark, R-Otego, sixth from right, and Cooperstown Mayor Jeff Katz, fifth from left. In all, Otsego County received funding for 15 projects, ranging from $525,000 to Ommegang for the expansion of its hospitality center, to Springbrook for training, and to the Oneonta Family Y for renovations to the first and third floors.  The big winner was the Village of Cooperstown, which received $1 million, the largest grant, for its sewage-plant reconstruction.  In all, the county received $4 million, down from last year’s $7 million, which was a record.
CLICK HERE FOR LIST OF OTSEGO COUNTY CFAS

 

Seward Appointed To Panel Leading Lyme-Disease Fight

Seward Appointed To Panel

Leading Lyme-Disease Fight

Senator Seward

ALBANY – State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, has been appointed to the Senate Task Force on Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases, charged with improving prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these diseases.

“As chair of the Insurance Committee and representative of an area where tick-borne illnesses continue to spread, Senator Seward brings a valuable perspective that will help increase public awareness and prevent Lyme disease,” said Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan, who made the appointment.

SEWARD SUPPORTS PRO GAS COALITION

SEWARD SUPPORTS

PRO GAS COALITION

Senator Seward

ONEONTA – State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, today joined community, labor and business leaders from across the state to announce the launch of New Yorkers for Affordable Energy, a coalition supporting access to natural gas for manufacturing, power production, transportation and home heating.

“As I talk with business owners and prospective employers, the high cost of energy is always a top concern.  Job creators weigh this issue greatly when deciding whether or not to come here, stay here, or grow here” said the senator.  “We need reliable, affordable, clean energy to meet the needs of our current businesses and prepare for expansion.  Natural gas needs to be an option.”

Seward Named To Panel To Seek Technology Jobs

Seward Named To Panel

To Seek Technology Jobs

Seward

ALBANY – State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, has been named to the state Senate Select Committee on Technology and Innovation, aimed at creating jobs in the technology field.

“A recent U.S. Census report showed more than 190,000 people left New York State last year.  We must create new opportunities here at home to stop that exodus and reverse that trend,” said Seward.

Seward Distributing Checks To Springbrook, Non-Profits

Seward Distributing Checks

To Springbrook, Non-Profits

State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, toured Springbrook today, where he announced the residential community for people with disabilities will received a $576,000 state grant through the state Nonprofit Infrastructure Capital Investment Program.  Seward will be awarding $2.8 million to nonprofits throughout his district, include $714,000 to Pathfinder Village and $873,000 to Arc Otsego.  Here, he confers during a stop at Springbrook with CEO Patricia Kennedy and COO Seth Haight.
State Sen. Jim Seward, R-Milford, toured Springbrook today, where he announced the residential community for people with disabilities will received a $576,000 state grant through the state Nonprofit Infrastructure Capital Investment Program. Seward will be awarding $2.8 million to nonprofits throughout his district, include $714,000 to Pathfinder Village and $873,000 to Arc Otsego. Here, he confers during a stop at Springbrook with CEO Patricia Kennedy and COO Seth Haight.
10,000 ‘Pouches’ Donated To Deactivate Unused Pills
SEWARD, BASSETT, LEAF INVOLVED

10,000 ‘Pouches’ Donated

To Deactivate Unused Pills

Putting a human face on the problem, Rebekah Smith of Otego tells how, as a teenager, she became dependent on old pills left in people's medicine cabinets; she has been drug-free for six years. She was speaking today at a noontime press conference at The Otesaga, where state Sen. Jim Seward, Bassett CEO Vance Armstong, LEAF's Julie Dostal and drug company Mallinckrodt spokesperson Rhonda Sciarra announced the company's donation of 10,000 "medication deactivation pouches" to LEAF for distribution. Bottom left, Seward and Vance confer prior to the press conference; at left is Karen Dolan, from Bassett's marketing department. At bottom right, Sciarra shows how putting up to 45 pills in the pouch and addiing warm water, pills' potency can be elimiinated. The pouch can then be thrown away in household trash. (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Putting a human face on the problem, Rebekah Smith of Otego (top photo) tells how, as a teenager, she became dependent on pills by removing old prescriptions from people’s medicine cabinets; she has been drug-free for six years. She was speaking today at a noontime press conference at The Otesaga, where state Sen. Jim Seward, Bassett CEO Vance Armstong, LEAF’s Julie Dostal and drug company Mallinckrodt spokesperson Rhonda Sciarra announced the company’s donation of 10,000 “medication deactivation pouches” to LEAF for distribution locally. Bottom left, Seward and Brown confer prior to the press conference; at left is Karen Dolan, from Bassett’s marketing department. At bottom right, Sciarra shows how putting up to 45 pills in the pouch and addiing warm water, pills’ potency can be elimiinated. The pouch can then be thrown away in household trash.  Malllinckrodt operates the Covidien methadone production plant in Hobert.  (Jim Kevlin/AllOTSEGO.com)
CLICK FOR DETAILS ON MEDICAL DEACTIVATION POUCHES
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