Ethiopian guards massacred scores of Tigrayan prisoners, witnesses say     Ukraine live briefing: Ground conditions improving for battle, official says; grain ship arrives in Ethiopia     A more pragmatic Xi Jinping launches a global charm offensive for China     Ethiopian guards massacred scores of Tigrayan prisoners, witnesses say     Ukraine live briefing: Ground conditions improving for battle, official says; grain ship arrives in Ethiopia     A more pragmatic Xi Jinping launches a global charm offensive for China     Ukraine live briefing: Russian defense minister meets with Belarusian president; Kremlin decries price cap on oil     Kandinsky sale halted after Poland claims artwork was stolen in 1984      After Kherson, Ukraine’s military ponders new push south and east     Ethiopian guards massacred scores of Tigrayan prisoners, witnesses say     Ukraine live briefing: Ground conditions improving for battle, official says; grain ship arrives in Ethiopia     A more pragmatic Xi Jinping launches a global charm offensive for China     Ethiopian guards massacred scores of Tigrayan prisoners, witnesses say     Ukraine live briefing: Ground conditions improving for battle, official says; grain ship arrives in Ethiopia     A more pragmatic Xi Jinping launches a global charm offensive for China     Ukraine live briefing: Russian defense minister meets with Belarusian president; Kremlin decries price cap on oil     Kandinsky sale halted after Poland claims artwork was stolen in 1984      After Kherson, Ukraine’s military ponders new push south and east     
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News of Otsego County

holidays

Salvation Army, Price Chopper Launch Kettle Donation Program

Salvation Army, Price Chopper
Launch Kettle Donation Program

SCHENECTADY—Price Chopper/Market 32 is once again playing host to the Salvation Army’s “Red Kettle” holiday campaign at all 130 of its stores in New York, Vermont, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The Salvation Army and Price Chopper/Market 32 have been collaborative partners in the communities they serve for more than 35 years.

Readers give Christmas to families in need for the 100th year

Readers give Christmas
to families in need
for the 100th year

L to Right, Larissa Ryan, The Freeman’s Journal and Salvation Army representatives Captain Selah Bender, Kyanne Clark and Kenny Clark.

For 100 years now, The Freeman’s Journal has worked with the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree initiative to provide gifts for families less fortunate. This year the newspaper sponsored 13 families, and because of the generosity of our readers, we were able to fill the back of the van with gifts. Many thanks to our readers and our communities, and many thanks to the Salvation Army for doing this event year after year.

 

News from the Noteworthy: Prepare against holiday disappointment

News from the Noteworthy:
Prepare against holiday disappointment

Deck the halls! Light the candles! Hang the lights! Prepare the feast! And then wait with excited anticipation of family and friends coming over to share the celebrations of the season.

Whether you observe Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, or a blend of traditions, the hopes for joy and peace are high in the hearts of most.

Then, for some of us, there are the thoughts of “that” guest or “that” situation everyone knows can turn delight into disappointment. We hope it will be different this year, and sometimes it is. For the most part, though, the disruption is fairly predictable. This is a real circumstance that many families deal with year after year.

How do you break that cycle? Can anything be done to increase the chances of a peaceful, happy gathering?

Gratefully, there are ways to disrupt a disruptive pattern. Because it is so common, a lot has been written on it. You can find lots of suggestions beyond the ones listed here. Generally, within families, a few themes can set off uncomfortable interactions. You probably know what they are: discussions of controversial topics, intoxication, and old family disputes.

Knowing that, here are a few strategies that you can try. They take a little planning, you will need to be vigilant for signs of trouble, and you will likely need some allies.

But remember, the goal is a joyful, fulfilling gathering.

1) In an upbeat way, create a family agreement about non-festive topics and turn it into a game. Before the gathering, make a “swear jar” (or a Krampus jar?) and list the non-festive topics like politics, religion, vaccines, social issues, etc. You may want to pre-arrange to have a few allies who will quickly agree to the game. And when someone brings up a topic on the list, they get to put a dollar (or a quarter) into the jar and come up with a new topic. It can be fun if everyone buys in and quickly catches someone veering off into controversial territory. At the end of the gathering, draw a name for who gets the contents of the swear jar.

2) If you plan to serve alcohol, do so in limited quantities. For some people, alcohol consumption results in a relaxed, jovial response. For others, it can result in a more emotional, agitated, or aggressive
response. So, put away the alcohol in the house to limit access and make delicious low-alcohol punches or festive drinks. Be sure to include alcohol-free options as well. Actually, serving no alcohol at a gathering is perfectly okay. No need to explain yourself — it’s your party. You’re allowed to serve what you wish.

3) Have a strategy in place for heading off a conversation that might be drifting into the red zone. Announce that you are honoring the spirit of giving and that you have some surprises for the gathering that will be handed out at unexpected times. Have small grab-bag gifts for guests and at random times (or when the mood starts to shift), have one of the kids pull a name from a basket for who gets to pick the next gift. Be creative. Sometimes even small redirection strategies can help stop an uncomfortable situation before it starts. They’re also fun.

These are not the last word in ways to keep spirits bright. They are just a few suggestions to start new traditions and slightly change the dynamics of potentially explosive situations. Taking a bit of our control back in what has felt like an out-of-control situation is a major step forward.

May your holidays be merry and filled with peace.

Julie Dostal is executive director of The LEAF Council on Alcoholism & Addictions, Oneonta.

Otsego County: No COVID Deaths Since Dec. 29

No COVID Deaths

New Year’s Weekend

But Active Cases, Hospitalizations Up

By CHRYSTAL SAVAGE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – December was the deadliest month, but Otsego County has reported no additional deaths related to COVID-19 in almost a week.

Nonetheless, cases and hospitalizations have increased over the same six days.

Since Dec. 29, the number of active cases have grown to 157 – a 65 person increase – and hospitalizations have increased by four from 17 to 21 during that time.

“Shop With A Cop” Sees Successful “Trial Run”

‘Shop With A Cop’ Program

Sees Successful Trial Run

By CHRYSTAL SAVAGE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

COOPERSTOWN – “Shop with a Cop” came to Cooperstown this holiday season after a tip from Principal Tracy Durkee at Cooperstown Elementary.

Pictured – from left to right – with his father, Patrolman Katie Mulcare and Corporal James Kelman, this year’s shop with the cop recipient smiles beneath his mask with a few treats from Wal-Mart and Dunkin Donuts on Southside in Oneonta.

According to Durkee, Village Chief of Police Frank Cavalieri reached out to her explaining that they had the means to give back to a student with a shopping trip to Walmart and would appreciate her input on identifying the recipient.

The concept was new to the department this year. One second grade child was served and the trial run” went well.

Durkee, who was new to the district in July, called on her grade level chairs and other resources for their input and experience with a number of deserving students. After a list was put together, Durkee reviewed items such as report cards and landed on this year’s recipient.

“He was perfect,” she said.

As We Count Our Blessings, Let’s Stay The Course
This Christmas, Hope Should Be Foremost

As We Count Our Blessings,

Let’s Stay The Course

December 14, 2020 – Queens, NY – Sandra Lindsay, left, a registered nurse and Director of Critical Care at Northwell Health, receives the COVID-19 vaccine during a live conference with Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. (Scott heins/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo)

Last Sunday, www.AllOTSEGO was able to trumpet the news: “VACCINE HERE! 350 Bassett Tier 1 Workers Getting Shots Over Weekend.” Within hours, thousands had clicked throughto read the good news.

It – the COVID-19 pandemic – is not over, but it’s on the way to being over.

This happy news comes at a time when, as the Gospel of Luke had it, humanity wishes for “peace on Earth, good will toward men.”

It’s the time of year when we pause and reflect on how close we’ve come to the ideal.

The reality, this year as always, is that we missed it, given we live in an imperfect world, populated by imperfect people looking to find the way through a glass more or less darkly.

To what? To a modicum of happiness, prosperity, good will, not just for ourselves, but to our fellow humans. Not just here, in our relatively safe and secure Otsego County,
but throughout our state, country and even world.

Perfection, whether you’re religious or not, is not of this world – but the journey is life’s meaning.

Statistically, we can reflect with some satisfaction on meeting the COVID-19 challenge, (although it’s not over yet, and continued vigilance is essential.)

The crudest measurement – mere numbers – affirms this. As of this writing, 11 local people have succumbed to COVID. According to the state Health Department, 700 people die in our county annually, so this worldwide health challenge, the worst in a century, raised the local death rate by 1.4 percentile points.

Even with the post-Thanksgiving spike, only 1,300 people were infected.

Take out the 750 on SUNY Oneonta’s campus – only one person in the community was determined to have been infected by that outbreak – only 550 people in the county at large have been stricken with the virus.

That’s less than one percent of our county’s population of 59,493 people.

To focus on the numbers shouldn’t harden us to the grief suffered by those 10 families, or to the lost wages, damaged and closed businesses, stunted educations, or the other very real negative impacts of the disease.

But Otsego County achieved something special and we can be proud: We can take comfort in how our neighbors, professionals and political leaders reacted to what could have been a devastating onslaught.

First, we can thank ourselves.

The widespread – in some cases, almost universal – wearing of masks, is an expression of caring for our fellow citizens. Masks, it’s been widely reported, may protect the wearer – but, mostly, they protect us from infecting people with whom we come into contact.

In that sense, wearing a mask is an act of love, the central Christmas sentiment. We should be proud of ourselves and others.

Second, we can thank our professionals.

Our Bassett Healthcare Network was up to the challenge. Brinton Muller, the local hospital’s emergency preparedness manager, formed a committee to prepare for a possible coronavirus infestation as early as January, well ahead of our state and national leaders.

In March, when the worst began to happen, then-President/CEO Bill Streck was able to roll out a “hotline” and testing tents almost immediately. He was assisted in those early days by Drs. Bill LeCates, Steve Heneghan (since departed) and Charles Hyman.

Fingers crossed, but an expanded ICU has yet to reach its capacity, a fear in those early days.

(Astonishingly, Bassett accomplished all this during a transition to the new president/CEO, Tommy Ibrahim, who devised and began implementing a futuristic, system-wide reorganization parallel to the COVID fight. That reflects a first-rate operation – and brings the famous Scott Fitzgerald quote to mind.)

Outside Bassett, county Public Health Director Heidi Bond became the face of the COVID-19 fight.

Third, of our political leaders.

Oneonta Mayor Gary Herzig reported the other day that, in limiting the campus outbreak’s impact, the City of Oneonta’s infection rate is among the lowest in the state.

Cooperstown Mayor Ellen Tillapaugh achieved similar results, with Governor Cuomo singling out “America’s Most Perfect Village” last month for its particular success. This, despite hosting baseball fans from around the country over the summer – fewer, for sure, but enough to pose a threat.

At the county level, the Big Three – Treasurer Allen Ruffles, with the support and encouragement of the county board’s top leadership, Chairman Dave Bliss and Vice Chair Meg Kennedy – put together a package of borrowings and revenue streams designed to get county government through a historic challenge with minimal impact.

Of course, as we wish for “peace on Earth, good will toward men” at Christmastime, let’s not forget pride is considered a sin. We’ve done well, but we’re not out of this yet.

It could take weeks, maybe months – let’s hope otherwise – before the anti-COVID vaccines are available locally. Let’s stay the course, wearing masks, social distancing, washing our hands and avoiding crowds – as we have.

We’ve proven we can do it. As we count our blessings this Christmas, let’s stay the course.

There’s Still Time To Reach Shoeboxes For Seniors Goal

There’s Still Time To Reach

Shoeboxes For Seniors Goal

The back room at The Green Earth is once again filling up with Christmas Cheer as organizer Lisa Nunez, left, and Don Reese counted donations to the 4th annual Shoeboxes For Seniors drive. “I didn’t know how it was going to work out this yer with COVID.” said Nunez, “But I think we are doing pretty great so far!” 188 care packages have already been collected from donors and drop-off sites, with more needed to meet the record set the previous year of 247. People wishing to donate can drop-off at The Southside Mall, The Green Earth and The New York Skin & Vein Center in Oneonta before the final pick up on Monday, Dec. 21st. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Christmas Comes Early At Community Dinner

Christmas Comes Early

At Community Dinner

By the end of the first hour, over 120 people had attended the Community Dinner at Oneonta’s First United Methodist Church this afternoon, with more continuing to come in.  Visitors like Andrew Winters-Bell, left, could enjoy plates of ham, turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, coleslaw, sweet potatoes, Chobani yogurt and a wide selection of pies served by Carol Heller, Scott Lewis, Terri Fisher, Ambrose Santiago and other volunteers from St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Saturday’s Bread and First UM. The event, usually held on Christmas Day, was early the last couple years so it would not conflict with the church’s Sunday and Christmas services. “Next year, Christmas will be on a Wednesday,” said event coordinator Ann Steen.  “So we are excited that next year it will be back on the usual day.” (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Santa Rides Into Town

Santa Rides Into Milford

On Charlotte Valley RR

Santa Claus rode into Milford by train at 5 this evening. He was greeted by a large crowd of good boys and girls who wanted a chance to meet St. Nick. The children followed Santa down the street to the Upper Susquehanna Cultural Center for hot cocoa and cookies. The children also got the chance to tell Santa what they wanted for Christmas. (Parker Fish/AllOtsego.com)

Angel Tree Program

AllOTSEGO Logo: News of Oneonta, Cooperstown & Otsego County, New York.

Angel Tree Program

Accepts Contributions 

Celebrate The Spirit Of Christmas!Salvation Army And AllOTSEGO Angel Tree Christmas - Celebrate The Spirit Of Christmas

The AllOTSEGO newspapers, The Freeman’s Journal and Hometown Oneonta, are joining with The Salvation Army to make a joyful Christmas for area families through its Angel Tree Program.

This tradition dates back to 1921 with the creation of The Freeman’s Journal Christmas Fund by Editor & Publisher Rowan D. Spraker Sr. as a way for neighbors to help others enjoy a happy holiday. This week marks the 101st year of this community tradition, partnering with The Salvation Army. The Salvation Army has gathered Christmas wish lists grouped by family which can be seen below.

Embrace one individual or an entire family. Every gift is appreciated. Shop by yourself or with friends and colleagues. The more the merrier! Gifts should be both new and unwrapped (price tags removed please), and received no later than Dec. 9 (to allow the elves time for wrapping and loading). Gifts may be dropped off at the newspaper offices at 21 Railroad Ave., Cooperstown, or at the Salvation Army Chapel, 25 River St., Oneonta.

  • Here are the items that are needed (crossed out families and individuals have found a benefactor):
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, NOV. 18
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for FRIDAY, NOV. 18

Oneonta History Center

Opens Holiday Exhibit

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To Learn How You Can Help Area Families This Holiday Season CLICK HERE.

HOLIDAY DISPLAY OPENS – Noon-3 p.m. Bresee’s Santa, model train layouts, and other traditional holiday displays. Oneonta History Center, 183 Main St., Oneotna. Info, (607)432-0960 or www.oneontahistory.org

FUNDRAISER – 4:30-7 p.m. Brooks Barbeque Chicken Dinner & Homemade Pie Sale. Proceeds benefit the church’s Global Mission Outreach. Christ Episcopal Church, 69 Fair St., Cooperstown. Info, (607)547-9555.

GINGERBREAD CONTEST ENTRY – 3-6 p.m. Gingerbread house contest will be accepting contest and exhibit entries. Foothills Performing Arts Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta. signedevents.com/united-states/oneonta/gingerbread-contest/ , (607)432-2941

PRESENTATION – 7:30 p.m. Dr. Allison Oakes, American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project, presents on the Return of the American Chestnut. Elm Park United Methodist Church, 401 Chestnut St., Oneonta. Free and open to the public. Includes refreshments. Info, info@doas.us or visit doas.us/event/return-american-chestnut

HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for MONDAY, NOV. 14
HAPPENIN’ OTSEGO for MONDAY, NOV. 14

Give A Shoebox Of

Smiles For The Holidays

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OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD – 4-6 p.m. Pack a shoebox with items that will bring joy to children as they are delivered around the world. Collection point at Main St. Baptist Church, corner of Main and Maple Sts., Oneonta. Info, @ www.msbchurch.org/occ or email msbc@msbchurch.org or call (607)432-5712

READING CIRCLE – 6:30-8 p.m. Celebrate the 100th anniversary of Women’s Suffrage in New York State. Discussing “Sex Wars: A Novel of Gilded Age New York” by Marge Piercy. 5838 NY-80, Cooperstown. For info email hartj35@oneonta.edu or call (607)547-2586

GARDEN CLUB – 7 p.m. Ideas for Holiday arrangements will be presented by Gary Burman and Bob Opalecky, formerly of Gary’s Flowers. St. James Episcopal Church, 305 Main St, Oneonta. For Info email Angie Eichler at Angie.Eichler@oneonta.edu

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21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103