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News of Otsego County

Oneonta

Legion Riders Help Benefit Relay For Life

Legion Riders Run

Benefits Relay For Life

Jennifer Mickle, Chair of the Relay For Life of Otsego County Committee, pins a purple ribbon button on the vest of Chris Chase, Assistant Director of the American Legion Riders, before the start of the third annual Foliage Run to benefit the Relay for Life at the American Legion Post 259 this afternoon. “Cancer didn’t stop just because COVID happened,” said Mickle. “We can’t hold the walks right now because of social distancing, but donations are appreciated and needed now more than ever.” Another rider who drew some attention was Chase’s dog Pixel, pictured at right, who was ready to ride inside her safety harness and goggles. To donate, please call (607) 287-3588, or visit the Relay for Life of Otsego County facebook page. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Race Day Goes Virtual, But Skies Remain Clear

27th Annual Pit Run On Through Oct. 31

Race Day Goes Virtual,

As Skies Remain Clear

Since the first race in 1994, it has never once rained on the day of the annual Pit Run, and that track record continued today as Mike Rubino, Bob Scanlon, Eric Michelitsch, and Nancy Scanlon joined Deb and Sid Parisian this morning in Neahwa Park to honor fallen Trooper Ricky J. Parisian at the traditional finish line for the annual PIT Run, which is being held virtually throughout October. A few racers did come down to the park to run the 5 and 10K courses, including family friend Don Guinta, who was “first” to cross the finish line with a time of 36:29. New this year is the 100K challenge, where runners and walkers can add up their daily totals to try and reach a 62 mile goal. Registrations are open through Oct. 15.  (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

27th PIT Run, Underway – Virtually!

27th Annual PIT Run,

Underway – Virtually!

Deb and Sid Parisian stand next to the banner for the 27th annual PIT Run, which has gone virtual for the entire month of October. The race officially kicked off yesterday, but racers can still sign up individually or with a team to pool their totals and hit the 100K challenge. While Race Day – locally known as “The Best Day in Oneonta” – will not be taking place this year, the Parisians have already heard that there will people in Neahwa Park on Sunday, walking and running the course. “Runners can see their cumulative results daily online.” said Sid. “While there are no prizes, awards will still be given and mailed out at the end of the month to the participants.” (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Scoop! Ice Cream Returns To Oneonta’s East End

Scoop! Ice Cream Returns

To Oneonta’s East End

Tyler, Jayden and Nathan Zakala prepare scoops for customer’s at the newly opened Adaline Ice Cream in Oneonta’s east end. The parlor, which is housed in the former location of Ed Hughs’ gas station, held a soft opening on Saturday, while crowds on Sunday were steady, with many people seen enjoying their desserts on the outdoor seating. Make sure to stop in and try some of their many flavors, all churned on site! (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Legion Legacy Run Adapts To Social Distancing

Legion Legacy Run Adapts

To Social Distancing Rules

Rob Martinez, American Legion Riders director, and Assistant Director Chris Chase have made it their mission to make the ride substance-free in recent years.  But  they wanted to make sure today’s ride was COVID-free as well. Before the start of this year’s 18th Legacy Run, Chase created a blog post on the Legion Riders website promoting safe practices for all riders.  Riders, like Nathan Epps, Gloversville, top photos wore masks and had their temperatures checked by Devin Chase, Oneonta. “The Legacy Run is a scholarship to benefit children of soldiers and veterans who have passed away or have become disabled since 9/11,” explained Martinez, seen in image on right. “This year we’re doing it a little different,” added Chase. “Instead of giving all the proceeds to the national Legacy fund, we will be splitting it with our own fund. Last year no children from New York received any support, so with the money we keep we will make sure half of it goes to our local kids.”  some will also go to businesses who contributed to the Legion Riders over the years.  “We know some of them are struggling and this is a way for us to give back and thank them for their support,” Chase said. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Recovery Run Virtual This Year, But Family Still Gathers To Reflect

Recovery Run Virtual This Year,

But Family Gathers To Reflect

Cathy Rothenberger, left, runs with granddaughters Addison, front, and Piper, left, in Neahwa Park marking the start of the 2020 Rothenberger Road to Recovery Run, in memory of her son Lucas. The race, organized by Friends of Recovery of Delaware-Otsego has gone virtual this year, allowing people from across the country to compete for the highest cumulative distance now through September 30. Friends and family gathered for a small ceremony this morning in solidarity to share memories and show support for community members struggling with addiction. “If people have the opportunity to open up, it helps relieve some of the pain.” said Cathy Rothenberger, as she stood with husband Dale. “There are resources and committed members of this community who can help you. We are a society of helping people and I hop that people can take advantage of that.”(Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Lobsters Return  To Downtown Dining

Lobsters Return

To Downtown Dining

Wiley Laidlaw, the cook at the Autumn Cafe, pics out lobsters for at Friday’s Lobster and Oysters on Main Street dinner event at the weekly Survive Then Thrive event. “We had lobsters last week.” explained owner Wayne Carrington, “It was so popular we brought it back and added oysters!” Today’s event also featured live music by the Little Delaware Youth Ensemble, a pig roast, Chinese Auction and a shot of Oneonta’s Architecture at GOHS. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
The Hill City Rollers Skate Against Hate

The Hill City Rollers

Skate Against Hate

Baby Lace, Mrs. Boutfire and Bizzy Cheap Skate lead a a group around Neahwa Park this morning at the Hill City Roller Derby team took a stand against hate. The demonstration was part of the Worldwide Roll Out Day: Roll To Erase Hate movement started by skating coach Skate Fan Tazee out of Atlanta. “We wanted to get people from the rolling community to promote positivity and safe spaces in our community.” explained Mrs. Boutfire (aka Robin Williams, Oneonta) “We want to be open to all people. Derby is about anyone being able to do it regardless of color, body type, gender, or how much you have skated. This is an all-inclusive sport!” The group met at the skatepark and rolled their way around the park with their signs. “Anything we can do to make a statement.” said Jim Ruffo, Oneonta, “We will not stand for hate.”(Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Sunny Shines, Cooperstown, Oneonta Main Streets Open

‘PHASE 2’ ALLOWS SHOPPING

Sun Shines, Cooperstown,

Oneonta Main Streets Open

Kim Weekes, Oneonta, above, settles into the hairdresser’s chair Saturday at The Hair Studio, 179 South Main St., Oneonta for a much anticipated wash and cut from owner Kelly Woessner as “Phase Two” of NY Forward arrived Friday, enabling stores and “personal services” to restart, and offices to do so on Monday.  Inset right, Sue Fink, Cooperstown, shows the hand sanitizer station, including sanitizer provided by Cooperstown Distillery, at Tin Bin Alley, 114 Main St., Cooperstown. Though stores required customers wear masks and limit capacity to 50 percent, many reported greeting plenty of happy customers anxious to support local commerce. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Hundreds In Muller Plaza Join National Call For Justice

ONEONTA RALLY PEACEFUL

Hundreds In Muller Plaza

Join National Call For Justice

Perhaps as many as 500 people rallied peacefully in Oneonta’s Muller Plaza this afternoon to hear Rev. LaDana Clark, a former police officer, above, say, “Most of our police are trying to do the right thing, but it’s the bad apples have to be checked and removed! There can be no peace as long as an officer can place his knee on the neck of a black man and take his life in front of our eyes!”  As is happening nationwide, SUNY Oneonta student Sadie Starr Lincoln, Oneonta, inset left, organized this afternoon’s protest calling for justice and an end to racism following the May 25 death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Other speakers included SUNY students Johnson Brown and Kimberly Miller; Rev. Craig Schwalenberg, pastor, Unitarian Universalist Society and  Shannon McHugh, a member of the city’s Community Relations & Human Rights Commission. Attendees were urged to vote, to speak out when they see incidents of racism and to join the NAACP, Oneonta chapter;  Rev. Cynthia Walton-Leavitt of the Red Door Church was on site with NAACP membership applications. The crowd filled Muller Plaza and spread across the street.  Since social distancing was difficult, organizers urged attendees to be tested for COVID-19 following the gathering. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Legion Honors Fallen… From a Distance

ONEONTA FOLLOWS NYS LIMITS

Legion Honors Fallen

– From Safe Distance

There was no parade, and the crowds that usually cluster around the Memorial Walkway in Oneonta’s Neahwa Park were noticeably absent during the annual Memorial Day Celebration this morning. Above, Master of Ceremonies Les Grummons salutes as “Taps” is played for attendees, who brought wreathes and listened to a short speech from Mayor Gary Herzig. Following the ceremony, some members of the legion stopped by the home of John Forman, left, to salute him alongside fellow WWII veteran Fred Hicken. Returning to Legion Post 259, the veterans were surprised with complementary lunches from Brooks’ BBQ, courtesy of The Porch Fairies, anonymous donors who wanted to make sure veterans were honored. In addition to lunch, the Porch Fairies also dropped off gift cards for groceries for any veteran in need. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

Kennedy, Martin, Wooden Make State All-State Team

Kennedy, Martin, Wooden

Make State All-State Team

Cooperstown’s John Kennedy pulls down a rebound in a sectional game against Waterville. (Cheryl Clough/AllOTSEGO.com)

COOPERSTOWN – CCS junior John Kennedy landed on the Class C 2nd team  NYSSWA all-state boys basketball team. Kennedy averaged 17.3 points a game and led the Hawkeyes to the Section 3 Class C championship game this season.

Edmeston’s Josh Martin was also a 2nd team selection for Class D. Martin, a junior. averaged 22 points a game and helped the Panthers win their second consecutive Tri-Valley League title this season.

Oneonta’s Graham Wooden was selected third team in Class B. Wooden, a senior, was the ‘Jackets team leader averaging 21.2 points a game. He will play basketball next season for D2 Mansfield University.

As Need Grows, Local Food Banks Welcoming Needy

IN TIME OF CORONAVIRUS

As Need Grows,

Local Food Banks

Welcoming Needy

Henry Korte- kaas and Lord’s Table Director Joyce Miller serve takeout pizza. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)

By LIBBY CUDMORE • Special to www.AllOTSEGO.com

MILFORD – In an average shopping trip, Laura Eggleston, Milford Food Pantry director, might buy 1,100 pounds of food to serve their 39 households.

On Monday, April 13, she placed an order for 4,300 pounds. “In these last two weeks, we’ve served 56 families,” she said. “That’s 193 individuals.”

CDC image of the coronavirus

As the COVID-19 crisis deepens, food banks across the county are seeing “a dramatic uptick,” said Maj. Cheryl Compton, Salvation Army. “Everyone just paid rent and many of them haven’t gotten their unemployment this month.”

Many of them are new customers, noted Julia Perdue, Cooperstown Food Pantry director. “We served 29 new households last month,” she said. “In all, we served 219 families. That’s our highest since 2007.”

“We’ve already seen 15 new people this month,” said Joyce Mason, director, St. James Food Pantry. “And it’s going to get worse the longer this goes on.”

However, she noted, the evening feeding ministry, The Lord’s Table, has seen a decline in people coming for the take-out hot meals. “It’s a social thing for them,” she said. “People want to sit down, and not being able to do so is difficult for them, so they don’t come.”

In Richfield Springs, Polly Renckens has seen the same influx of new clients herself, but worries the poor weather – or fears about COVID-19 exposure or that food may have run out – is keeping some former clients away.

“We have plenty of food!” she assured. “If we don’t see some people soon, we’re going to start calling individually to check on them.”

At many of the pantries, visitors are given a “shopping list” where they can check off what they need and want. “Client choice maintains dignity and alleviates food waste,” said Purdue. “If we give someone something they don’t want, it’s just going to go to waste on a shelf.”

The groceries are packed and bagged by volunteers – in masks and gloves – and then taken curbside  for the client to pick up, contact-free. “We make every effort to protect the safety of our volunteers and clients,” said Renckens.

And so that no one goes hungry, Stacie Haynes, executive director, Susquehanna SPCA, started
a pet food pantry to help families stretch their budgets in tight times. The pantry has
been placed outside of the shelter so that people can maintain social distancing.

But, she noted, if someone can’t get to the pantry, a volunteer will take the food to them.

And although the pantries are seeing a rise in need for the pantries, they’re also seeing a rise in donations.

“We’ve raised $1,000 in the last month,” said Eggleston. “A dollar buys $10 of food from the regional food bank.”

“People are donating anything they can,” said Mason. “And we’re getting a lot of help from organizations.”

Even between pantries, there’s sharing. “If I have an excess of anything, I call around to see who needs it,” said Mason. “That’s just how I do it. We have to help each other out.”

But however long this lasts, Eggleston assures people that the pantry will always be there to help their neighbors.

“As long as we have food, we’ll hand it out,” she said.

Chestnut Park Places Mailbox For Senior Correspondence

Chestnut Park Places Mailbox

For Senior Correspondence

Just because Chestnut Park Rehabilitation and Nursing Center is currently closed to all visitors due to COVID-19 safety measures, doesn’t mean your warm thoughts have to be left out in the cold. Hospital liaison Natalie Hooper, above, holds a special mail box that was placed outside the facility earlier today, where anyone wanting to brighten a senior’s day with letters, artwork or anything else can now drop them off there and it will be delivered by staff. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com)
Birthday Party Cancelled? Have A Parade Instead!

Birthday Party Cancelled?

Have A Parade Instead!

There was lots of hooting, hollering and horn-blowing on Elm Street in Oneonta this afternoon as 13 cars filled with friends, family, teachers and classmates, all dressed in costumes with signs and decorations, were escorted by Oneonta police in a birthday parade for Zoey Tonner, who turned 7 today. “The invitations were ready, the treat bags were all made, then everything shut down,” explained her mother Danielle. “We had to cancel her party because of social distancing, so this is her coronavirus substitute!” The party was held at the home of Zoey’s babysitter Sarah Baden, where Zoey, seen at right with brother Rob and Dad “Fish”, waved to passersby from the lawn and porch, which were covered in decorations. As the parade passed by, Zoey took pictures with her camera as people hopped out to wish her “Happy Birthday” and leave presents and cards in a basket by the curb. (Ian Austin/AllOTSEGO.com

 

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21 Railroad Ave. Cooperstown, New York 13326 • (607) 547-6103